Dirt, spices, and rock ‘n’ roll: getting a taste of The Sourheads

If you ever have thoughts that real rock ‘n roll is on the wane a quick listen to the new album from British rockers The Sourheads will soon make you think again. Care Plan For The Soul is a nine-track debut full-length, a skilfully and passionately woven roar of classic and fresh rock diversity which snarls as it seduces, thrills as it trespasses ears and imagination. Through our friend Garry at SaN, we had the chance to dig deeper into The Sourheads with guitarist MIK CRONE, exploring the band’s origins, digging into the heart of Care Plan For The Soul, The Sourheads live and more….

Hi Mik and big thanks for taking time to chat with us.

Can you, for those yet to be invaded by your rock ‘n’ roll, first introduce the band?

We are The Sourheads and we come from Wakefield West Yorkshire. We are a rock band who take influence from the greats and add our own twist. We like to think of ourselves of somewhat multi-genre and we don’t want to be seen as just one specific style of music. A career band like The Stones or The Who dip into different things but still stay true to who they are…So yea we are a rock band who give it our all live.

The band is said to have emerged in 2016 but does its seeds go further back?

The version of The Sourheads now is the result of many years building. Like Oasis the original version was Jake [Coxon]our singer and his brother Sid who played guitar. They had a string of musicians throughout a short period of time. I first came into the picture as a producer for the band. I had been working with various bands and the early version of the band struck me as a very different but awesome set of musicians. I felt with direction the band could be massive.  Around this time I was asked to join as a second guitarist and a month later Sid left. So at this point we upped our game and decided to focus on a solid tight band and work on the debut album. The Sourheads you see now emerged in 2016.

Is The Sourheads your first ventures in a band or do you all bring various previous experiences and explored styles of music to the mix?

Everyone in The Sourheads has been in other bands before. I had a small amount of success with a metal band I was in. Lamb [Chris Lambert] our drummer was in a relatively successful Indi band. Ben [Taylor] has played bass forever and grew up jamming with his brother Simon (Inme) and Jake has always been a creative person singing and painting. The combination of these different influences creates the originality of our band. We are what we are.

You have just released your debut album, Care Plan For The Soul. From its first breath it shares a multi-flavoured, refreshingly dirty and just a little salacious roar of sound and intent; a mix which suggests a varied range of inspirations to the band and individual members. Who particularly stands out as having an impact on your approach to making music?

We take our inspiration from different places. Jake is a massive Doors fan, Lamb is into his classic British Indi music; Ben is also a fan of different styles of music. I look up to any band that has strong songs. Stone Temple Pilots are a massive influence for me. Deftones, Queens of the Stone Age, The Cult, Shed Seven, Oasis, Clutch. We use many colours to create our art.

How would you describe your sound to newcomers?

Iggy and the Stooges mixed with the Sex Pistols thrown into a blender with The Stereophonics and Nirvana.

Classic Rock with an edge.

It feels like it just follows its nose always prepared to embrace fresh and unpredictable flavours. Is this something you deliberately set out to purposefully develop or a sound and direction which just grew and evolved organically?

We are what we are. People either get it or don’t. One review says we are original and have rewritten the rule book of what a rock band should be. The other will say they don’t get us. Why do we look like we do and why does the artwork not match the music. Well the answer is we are totally focussed and we are 100% us. Everything is totally focused and this is what we do, our sound and direction develop naturally. Luckily our label saw this and our friends like Red Spektor saw this. So it’s better to have a loyal friendship and business partnership and have loyal listeners than to be fake and try to jump on a scene.

How long was Care Plan For The Soul in the making?

We had a lot of time rehearsing and making sure we could play the songs. We could play without vocals, with vocals, without bass or without guitar and obviously all of us together…Probably 3 months of pre-production and a week to record.

It has an instinctive snarl to its air and open rawness to its energy; at times feeling like it may have been recorded live. How did you approach its creation in the studio?

We decided early on that the band has a live energy that needed to be captured so we decided to record live and then delete the guide vocal and do a main vocal later. I also overdubbed a second guitar rhythm track to fatten the overall mix. We also added congas and cello in the overdub stage.

Can you give us an insight into the trials and pleasing surprises you found when recording the album?

We worked with a wonderful producer called Matt Knee and we used an old 70’s BBC mixing desk, this gave us a warmth that we were pleasantly surprised by. We wanted initially to record full analogue but as we wanted to play live we decided it’s may be better to do it digitally but through old analogue gear. This was due to the fact that digital is instant and we knew we had to keep in budget for our business plan to be effective. We needed to make sure everyone was comfortable and the atmosphere was good. We had incense burning and lava lamps. Pretty laid back.

It was subsequently mastered by Pete Maher (The Rolling Stones, Depeche Mode, U2) and released through German Label Kozmik Artifactz. How did those link ups come about?

Pete Maher has worked with everyone and we liked the fact that he worked within multiple genres. Katy Perry, Pink Floyd, Linkin Park are a few of his varied clientele and he had just finished mastering the LA LA Land soundtrack. We knew that attracting a big name would gain us attention and Pete does great deals for up and coming bands. It seemed like a great idea and he did an amazing job. Around this time we became close friends with Red Spektor and their manager Simon. They were saying good things about us in interviews and we were starting to get noticed. I sent a private link of the album to a number of labels and pretty much instantly Kai at Kozmik Artifactz messaged back saying ‘We don’t usually release this style but we think you would fit our sister label Oak Island perfectly so we did the deal and we are honoured to be part of the Kozmik Artifactz Oak Island family. The label is having great success with bands like Church of the Cozmic Skull and of course our brothers Red Spektor.

Can you give us the inspiration for the album title and some of the themes within its body?

We felt that the title had to reflect the song content. Our drummer Lamb came up with it. The songs are pretty intense in parts and cover lots of topics such as Demonic Possession, Marriage Breakdowns, War veterans, soul stealing creatures. When you take this into consideration and then see the album cover is a lone figure stood in the middle of the beach with his dog it’s kind of like that is the care plan for his soul. He is escaping the turmoil.

Is there a particular songwriting process within the band?

Pretty much straight forward…Ben or me write a riff or two. Lamb plays a beat. We arrange the song, record it on a phone then Jake writes the lyrics.

Apart from obvious pride and satisfaction in Care Plan For The Soul is there a particular moment within it which gives you a specific personal flush of inner pleasure?

The whole thing is a major flush of inner pleasure. We set out with a goal and we achieved it on budget and we didn’t move away from our art and vision one bit. This is amazing to us. To have a vinyl copy of the album in my hands and look at the finished product gives me goosebumps. The fact that the digital streaming numbers are good too also feels good. We want to get out to as many people as possible. From the actual recording there are a few moments I like. I think some of the vocal delivery is the best Jake has ever been.  The rush created when he shouts I am the Lotus! That’s a fan favourite moment.

Give us an insight into the live side of the band?

We are told we are extremely good live. Jake is a bare chested beast of a frontman, live truly something that has to be seen and heard. We are very tight and play as close to the album as we can get. I like the idea that we are four individual characters and that as a member of the audience you can get what you are looking for from us. We put a lot into it. I’m swinging my arm in the air and running around; Jake is in the crowd or rolling around on the floor. Ben is grooving away and lam is bashing the living daylights out of the kit.  We are an old fashioned rock band. We put on a show.

Obviously the album is in its early days inviting attention but what is next on the horizon of The Sourheads?

We are hoping to tour throughout 2018 and play some festivals. Do a couple of music videos and keep writing. We have 3 songs written for the next album already. We have also experimented with slightly different sounds. Some old school style Stones vibe.

Again many thanks for sharing your time; any last words you would like to add?

Thank you for showing interest in the band. We truly appreciate every website, magazine radio station that helps us spread our message and music. We are fans of music and do this because we love playing and creating our art. People like you keep the musical torch burning bright. There is a buzz and new found enthusiasm for rock music and we want to embrace this whole heartedly.

Check out The Sourheads further @ https://www.thesourheads.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thesourheads    https://thesourheads2.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 13/12/2017

The RingMaster Review

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Sourheads – Care Plan For The Soul

Since forming in the Spring of 2016, UK rockers The Sourheads has drawn increasing attention and support through their live presence, singles, and most of all their dirty, multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll. Now the band has added another accelerant to their emergence with the release of debut album Care Plan For The Soul. Offering nine slices of rowdy but skilfully woven incitement embracing classic and fresh rock diversity, the release thrusts the listener into a grubby cellar of salacious intent and irreverent sound; a temptation the body gets the urge to dance to and appetite the need to increasingly devour.

Hailing from Wakefield, West Yorkshire, The Sourheads embrace an array of inspirations in their sound ranging from Deep Purple, Kasabian and The Doors to Kyuss and Clutch. It is a web of punk and garage to psych and classic rock which is just as grungy as it is melodically enticing and within Care Plan For The Soul an incitement which makes a potent first impression but really grows in persuasion listen by listen. Mastered by Pete Maher (The Rolling Stones, Depeche Mode, U2), the album swiftly grabs ears and appetite with opener Demon. Straight away it is enticingly grumbling in ears, bass and riffs an irritable lure soon bound in sonic tendrils as familiar and new endeavours collude in the blossoming growl capped by the slightly gnarly tones of Jake Coxon. The bass of Ben Taylor continues to be a belligerent presence in the caustic captivation, guitarist Mik Crone and drummer Chris Lambert adding their bold touches to the ever evolving roar maybe best described as Turbonegro meets The Senton Bombs meets Guns n’ Roses.

It is a great start to proceedings which Morally High continues with its spicily grooved stroll. Carrying similar essences and flavours to its predecessor in its own individual way, the track is equally as infectious and magnetic with again classic and modern textures rubbing excitedly again each other within its controlled yet salacious swing. As the music, Coxon has a snarl to his croon, attitude dripping from every syllable and note before My Rock And Roll steps up to coax bad behaviour with its blues skinned devilry entangled in more of the great guitar enterprise which veins the whole of Care Plan For The Soul.

Power Of Addiction shares some of that psychedelic influence next; keys and melodies a sultry tempting while Rag And Bone Man has a great scruffy feel and character to its predacious gait and rhythmically rousing proposal. The song alone sums up the variety of flavours within The Sourheads sound, a host of rock bred essences embroiled in its inescapable command of body and imagination. It all adds up to one of the biggest highlights of the release, one quickly matched by the voracious punk ‘n’ roll of Don’t Get Caught (I Am The Lotus). Like The Stooges and Eddie and The Hot Rods caught in the act by The Vibrators as AC/DC hold the camera, the track is superb, taking best song honours with its manipulative temptations and craft.

Both Secret Cigarette and Warbird take a firm grip of release and listener next, the first an invasive but seductive fire of blues and classic grooves with punk bred kindling while its successor merges sullied rock ‘n’ roll with some of the most addictive melodic hooks and enterprise within the album for another pinnacle. As with many songs, it openly draws on some classic punk hooks and teases but equally shares psych rock imagination for the album’s most imaginative moment to stand alongside its best.

Care Plan For The Soul concludes with Mad Dog, a song rising from an initial Queen/Skid Row like invitation into an invasive and volatile ballad which becomes more captivating by the minute and listen, much as the album itself.  Indeed just as many will take to the release within seconds many others will need time to explore and discover its qualities; the big rewards for the attention we can vouch for as too the finding of a potential of even greater fun and adventure ahead with the Sourheads.

Care Plan For The Soul is available now through Oak Island Records on CD, Vinyl and Digitally.

https://www.thesourheads.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thesourheads    https://thesourheads2.bandcamp.com/

 Pete RingMaster 23/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Beth Blade & The Beautiful Disasters – Bad Habit

Gaining an increasing reputation and support for their hard rock nurtured sound, South Wales hailing Beth Blade & The Beautiful Disasters raise the ante with the release of debut album Bad Habit. It offers a lively and tenacious roar, already drawing comparisons to artists such as Halestorm, Joan Jett, and Heart, which swiftly has the body and appetite eagerly involved in its instinctive rock ‘n’ roll.

From Cardiff, Beth Blade And The Beautiful Disasters have quickly recruited and built upon an eager and loyal local following since emerging. The time since has seen them stomping across the UK with their own tours and with the likes of Marco Mendoza (Thin Lizzy, Whitesnake, The Dead Daisies) as well as sharing stages with others such as Ricky Warwick and Damon Johnson of Black Star Riders. Recorded with Nick Brine (Thunder, The Darkness, Bruce Springsteen) at the legendary Rockfield studios and Leeders Vale, and mastered by Pete Maher (The Rolling Stones), the crowd funded Bad Habit is a hefty poke at bigger national attention with success an easy to assume expectation.

Opener Hell Yeah swiftly has ears grabbed, its opening lure of riffs accompanied by the moody tone of the bass; instinctive attention inviting by them well before the fiery flames springing from Chris Gould’s guitar ignite with classic rock spicing. As rhythm guitarist Beth Blade brings just as tasty riffs into play, her vocals command even greater focus while giving richer strength to the song. Like a mix of Suzi Quatro and Cherie Currie, she stands bold with a tenacity matched in the infectious sound hollering around her.

It is a great start quickly matched by the album’s title track; a slice of foot stomping, chest beating heavy rock led by the swinging beats of drummer Sam Brain. Its forceful attitude is epitomised by the brooding tone of Nicko Goodwin’s bass, its menace tempered skilfully by the wiry melodic tendrils of guitar similarly coming at ears with a touch of discontent. Its rousing qualities are swift incitement to physical and vocal participation before Beautiful Disease offers its own potent blend of catchiness and predacious threat. Muscle and melody unite across the menacing prowl of a song which shows the band as adept at creating more composed and moody proposals as they are at flying at the jugular in spirit rousing charges.

Down And Dirty lives up to its name next, its bluesy grooves tonic for hips as rhythms and riffs surround the increasingly impressing tones of Blade with their grungy antagonism while Poster Girl For Pain reveals another aspect to the Blade’s songwriting and the band’s sound with its power driven balladry and emotive intensity. It is a slowly burning encounter compared to the hungry exploits of its predecessors but a temptation becoming more potent and irresistible with every passing minute and listen.

The heart bred snarl of This Bitch Bites fuels both vocals and music, Blade a spiky treat within the track’s quarrelsome nature. Again attitude soaks every strain of sound and intent escaping the excellent song, its defiance and combative contagion equally lining successor Hell In High Heels though its blues rock inflamed body has a ‘lighter’ and more keenly catchy nature which might not impress as addictively as the antics of the previous track but leaves pleasure in another lofty place soon reinforced by the classic rock ‘n’ roll nurtured romp of If You’re Ready To Rock. Carrying no real surprises, the song lacks the spark of its companions for personal tastes yet easily keeps enjoyment and feet firmly involved.

The album is brought to an end by firstly the heated beauty of Angel With A Dirty Face, Blade sharing a croon as magnetic and captivating as her rebel rousing deliveries elsewhere, melodies simmering and boiling up with equal elegance, and lastly through the ballsy, swagger loaded rock ‘n’ roll of Legends Never Die. It encapsulates all the galvanic and creatively vociferous qualities of the Beth Blade and The Beautiful Disasters sound and indeed Bad Habit itself in its bones, leaving instincts aroused and a hunger for more leading fingers keenly back to the start button.

Beth Blade and The Beautiful Disasters might not be the most unique proposition around right now in sound but for a fiercely enjoyable and raucous holler easy to get off on, they set a mighty example.

Bad Habit is out now @ https://bethbladeandthebeautifuldisasters.com/store

https://bethbladeandthebeautifuldisasters.com    https://www.facebook.com/BBATBDofficial    https://twitter.com/BBATBDofficial

Pete RingMaster 23/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

MountainJam – Waiting

image1_RingMasterReview

Following the success of recent single Lemon and Lime, which itself cemented the prowess and potency of MountainJam as first discovered within the band’s debut EP and its singles of last year, the UK band now have its successor Waiting in line to please ears. The new single reveals another shade to the band’s persistently enticing sound, an emotively sculpted landscape of melodic rock with just a tinge of Americana to its alternative bred rock ‘n’ roll.

There also seems a broader depth to the flavouring building the sultry climate of sound and atmospheric enterprise and climate embracing ears. It is nothing overwhelming but as suggested a new shade of melodic and sonic colour to intrigue, fascinate, and as it proves again, excite. Influences to the Midlands hailing quartet of vocalist/rhythm guitarist Dean Dovey, lead guitarist Andy Varden, bassist Nick Roberts, and drummer Pez include the likes of The Rolling Stones, The Doors, Neil Young, Small Faces, Cream, The Verve, The Stone Roses, and The Who. Many are influences which arguably make a stronger showing within Waiting than some of the band’s previous songs to date, aiding the new hue to the becoming renowned MountainJam sound.

Emerging on the warm ambience of keys, the song soon strolls through ears with a melodic smoulder to its trails of sultry guitar and a feisty edge to its rhythmic tempting. Dovey as so often in songs becomes a potent focal point upon his entrance, but as usual too, his expressive voice is soon hugged by the strength of the sounds which here reveal a touch of psyche rock lacing and an almost sweltering atmosphere through guitar and keys.

With it all, also comes an infectiousness which, especially in the rousing roar of the chorus, has body and imagination as involved as the sonic swathes of sound which seduce in the track’s mellowest moments.

It is fair to say that Waiting does not infest the psyche as immediately as other MountainJam songs, though ears are thoroughly contented in moments, but with its magnetic layers and almost epic structure of emotion and sonic enterprise, the single is another richly and increasingly enticing lure to a band which just seems to grow with each and every track written.

Waiting is out now through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/MountainJam2015   https://twitter.com/mountainjam2015

Pete RingMaster 29/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Winachi Tribe VS Sense Of Danger

Print_RingMaster Review

With feet and hips, not forgetting imagination, still sweaty from the rousing temptation of last year’s impressive single Time For Love, the increasingly addictive charm and invention of The Winachi Tribe has set out to work them up all over again with its successor Sense Of Danger. The band’s new single is a magnetic and almost imposingly infectious shuffle of pulsating electronics and skittish rhythms woven into a tapestry of evocative vocals and flirtatious melodies; a proposal which simply confirms The Winachi Tribe as one of Britain’s most mesmeric contagions.

Emerging last year out of Northern D.Funk collective China White, the Warrington/Leeds based band create a funk fuelled, soul bred, dance party which has quickly drawn references to the likes of George Clinton, Massive Attack, and The Happy Mondays, they amongst inspirations to the band which equally include Sly & The Family Stone, Primal Scream, Ian Brown, and The Rolling Stones. As Time For Love and its companion Plant The Seed eagerly showed as the band’s first single, even with those spices The Winachi Tribe only uncages unique proposals and infections of sound which gets right under the skin and into every corner of the body; a quality vocalist Liam Croker, guitarist Jamie McGregor, bassist Richie Rich, keyboardist Antony Egerton, drummer Sam Tushingham, and percussionist Inder Goldfinger have escalated for Sense Of Danger.

The song opens with the raspy but inviting tones of Croker, their echo warming the way for the pulsating rhythms and electronic radiance which swiftly link their hypnotic motion with the obeying reactions of the listener. Within a few breaths the track is in control of body and thoughts, its flirtatious movement and rhythmic dexterity colluding with the atmospheric and provocative textures of keys, guitar, and voice. At certain moments it is a Tom Tom Club meets Thompson Twins incitement and in other times leaning towards a darker The Happy Mondays/Talking Heads hue but all the time an irresistible lure impossible to resist.

Accompanying the track is I Sense Danger (Everybody’s Got Their Price – Remix); a more energetic and flirtatious take on the lead song replacing the it’s shadows with livelier shards of electronic tempting and energetic tenacity. Its predecessor was a magnetic saunter, a seductive crawl through ears whereas the second song blossoms into a boisterous canter with matching elegance and compelling revelry for similar responses.

Both tracks feed body and soul, and each suggest they are just the next step in the inevitable ascent of The Winachi Tribe into one of the UK’s most greedily devoured bands.

Sense Of Danger is out now digitally on iTunes with a Ltd Edition Hard Copy also available.

http://thewinachitribe.com/   https://www.facebook.com/thewinachitribe   https://twitter.com/winachitribe

Pete RingMaster 04/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

MountainJam – Lemon and Lime

MJ_RingMaster Review

Having lured attention with their first pair of singles last year and even more when those tracks came together with further new offerings to form a debut EP, UK rock band MountainJam has more than suggested they are an emerging talent to keep a close eye and ear upon. The release of the Tamworth/Hinckley quartet’s new single Lemon & Lime only adds weight to that intimation and the sizeable potential already showing its potency within the band’s captivating sound.

A boisterous rock ‘n’ roll stroll bred with the spicy strains of alternative and indie rock aligned to fiery blues flames, Lemon & Lime shows another shade to the colourful tenacious weave of melody, harmony, and rousing energy which predominantly shapes a MountainJam song. Inspirations to the band comes through the likes of The Rolling Stones, The Who, Small Faces, The Doors, Cream, The Verve, The Stone Roses, and Neil Young, and as in previous songs here they are spices which, if not openly fuelling the encounter, reveal some of the sources to its imagination and invention. Formed early 2015, the foursome of Dean Dovey (vocals, rhythm guitar), Andy Varden (lead guitar), Nick Roberts (bass), and Pez (drums) soon caught ears and appetite with their double A-sided single debut Jealous Of Me/Lust last July and its quickly following successor Lord of My Hours. They subsequently became part of the release simply called EP which ignited even stronger awareness of MountainJam, an awareness which Lemon & Lime can only successfully reinforce.

The song cups ears in a sonic mist initially, intriguingly holding the senses as a pungent union of sonic tendrils from the guitars and resonance fitted bass tempting gets involved. With firm beats in the mix too, the track soon blossoms a heated mesh of enterprise against which the potent vocals of Dovey begin sharing the lyrical persuasion. In turn catchy hooks and a swinging groove join in the sweltering fun, bringing greater blues essences into the flowing and evolving landscape of a track. Such the resourcefulness of the songwriting and imagination, every roaming riff and twist of that evocative bait loaded groove seems to find another dimension within the song’s design, a shimmering psyche rock breath and pop rock tenacity further aspects breaking out within the festivity to prove the point.

For personal tastes Lemon & Lime does not quite match up to previous tracks The Lord of My Hours or Lust yet as all offerings from MountainJam to date, it leaves pleasure full and anticipation of more rife. If you are yet to explore the rock escapades of MountainJam then Lemon & Lime is the perfect tonic to get enticed by.

Lemon & Lime is available now

https://www.facebook.com/MountainJam2015/    https://twitter.com/mountainjam2015

Pete RingMaster 13/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Winachi Tribe – Time For Love

Picture 7_RingMaster Review

Fancy giving feet and hips a healthy work out? Then take Time For Love, the new single from The Winachi Tribe, out for a ride. Consisting of two electro funk bred shuffles as soulful as they are blessed with a varied weave of additional flavours, the band’s debut release is the perfect incitement for those with the need to dance in their heart.

The Warrington / Leeds based funk driven collective emerged earlier this year out of Northern D.Funk collective China White, entangling inspirations from the likes of Sly & The Family Stone, Happy Mondays, Black Grape, Primal Scream, Massive Attack, The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, and Ian Brown into their own diverse and fresh sounds. As young a band as it is, experiences across its members are deep, collaborations and tours with a range of artists from Alabama 3 and Keith Allen to The Furious Five included on the overall CV whilst percussionist Inder Goldfinger alone has been a member of Ian Brown’s band for thirteen years. With a line-up completed by vocalist Liam Croker, guitarist Jamie Mcgregor, bassist Richie Rich, keyboardist Antony Egerton, and drummer Sam Tushingham, The Winachi Tribe have hit the ground running with their first release, unleashing a soulfully infectious party at the same time.

Time For Love opens with inviting beats and a guitar jangle reminiscent of Talking Heads; The Tom Tom Club further coming to mind as percussion and vocals breathe their lively enticing into the expanding swing and flirtation of the song. A dark and pulsating bassline only adds to the draw whilst developing guitar enterprise and the ever captivating rhythms make a puppeteer to feet and body movement. The song saunters along with eighties/nineties funk revelry, the flames of horn provided by Tim Hutton alongside warm harmonies and the enticing lead vocals of Croker, further lighting up the song’s bustling scenery. With everything combined, Time For Love is a magnetism of nostalgia and originality. Manna for those with a passion of funk ‘n’ soul and pleasing temptation for those maybe less inclined to swing a hip or two.

Second song Plant The Seed, instantly offers a darker atmosphere and tone, but again with a virulence which only spreads the catchiness oozing from its second breath. Vocally Croker is soon mixing up his delivery too, enticing raps and mellow smouldering escaping his throat to match the similarly lively and varied sounds hugging his every word. As with its predecessor, a hint of Heaven 17 and additionally here Rip Rig & Panic plays with thoughts, especially around the great and thick temptation of female vocals. Emerging for personal tastes our favourite of the equally fine pair, the track reveals more of the depth and imagination within The Winachi Tribe songwriting and sound.

Completed by the Love Maze 4DD remix of Time For Love, the single is a masterful persuasion for ears and body, and an introduction to take even those of us generally lacking the keenest appetite for its style of music on a highly satisfying and eager adventure.

Time For Love is available via A1M Records from July 20th

https://www.facebook.com/thewinachitribe https://twitter.com/winachitribe

Upcoming Live Dates:

18th July – Single launch at Water Rats, London with Alabama 3 DJ set and support from Italian Band La Strange http://www.wegottickets.com/event/319583

27th August – Vinyl launch, The Ruby Lounge

29th August – Victorious Festival, Portsmouth, opening for Primal Scream & The Flaming Lips

5th September – Manchester Met Uni, ‘The Second Coming’ with Aziz Ibrahim, The Clone Roses, Cressa (DJ Set)

7th November – Shiiine On Weekender, Minehead Arena, Somerset with Happy Mondays, Stereo MCs, 808 State

RingMaster 20/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net