Resonating intimation; exploring the sounds of Jeff II

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce yourself and give us some background to how you began making music?

Hey! I’m Jeff II an electro rock music producer and guitar player. I’ve been doing music for more than 10 years. I’ve been playing in bands since forever as a guitar player. I’m doing some session gigs and some live shows. This is really cool but at some point, I wanted to have my own project to play my own music. It all came up naturally, I had a lot of pre-written material, but I needed some time to bring everything to life and to find my sound as a solo artist.

How have the experiences of being in other bands previously impacted and guided what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Yeah I’ve been in bands since I started playing the guitar. Mostly rock and pop bands. I had a lot of fun but I started to gain an interest for music production and especially electronic music. I like working with bands but I enjoy being alone in my studio writing and producing new music. My style hasn’t changed that much, it’s still hard rock music but with an electronic production.

What inspired the band name?

My friends in France are into rap music a lot. I’m the only ‘rock dude’ around, so they started calling me ‘JE2F’ to make my name sounds more ‘Hip Hop’ *laughs* I just adjusted it to ‘Jeff II’ eventually. It all started with a private joke.

Was there any specific idea behind your solo venture, in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

I wanted to do my own solo project for a long time. My idea was to make some music that sounds good live on stage, in a club or at home with the headphones on. It’s not always easy to find the right balance but eventually I worked hard on my sound and ideas to figure it all out.

Do the same thoughts still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they and your sound evolved over time?

I’m still driven by the same passion and desire to produce quality music. My mind-set hasn’t changed. The sound changed a little bit but it’s still in the same electro/rock vein. I’ve been in many bands before and it’s sometimes difficult to deal with 3, 4 or more different individuals. As it is a solo project, it’s much easier to manage and to know where I’m heading.

My sound has become more and more ‘produced’. I don’t see it as a bad thing; it’s a natural evolution for me. The more I’m practicing my skills in the studio, the more I want to apply my knowledge to my tracks. When I started I was just a guitar player I didn’t know anything about production, so it was mainly riffs, bass and drums. Now there’s more effects and synths.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more you deliberately wanting to try new things?

Totally an organic movement, I didn’t even think about it. I didn’t go like ‘ I have to change my sound’. It just evolved naturally until now.

Presumably you have a wide range of inspirations and artists you admire; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on your music but your personal approach and ideas to creating it?

As a guitar player I’ve always been a fan of Hendrix, SRV, Satriani, Jimmy Page….I like classic rock in general. But when I started producing I was more into electronic bands such as The Prodigy or The Glitch Mob. At the end of the day my music sounds like both worlds. There’s a few punk and pop elements here and there but it’s not dominant.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

I usually start with a guitar riff or a melody. I’m recording a loop of it and eventually I build my track around it. Then I set the structure so I have a whole track. Then comes the production part, I add all the effects, the layers, the samples…. I’m trying to mix while I’m producing so my song sounds good right from the start.

…And any lyrical side to your songs?

My music is mostly instrumental, there’s no real lyrics. I use voice samples here and there but I’m not too concerned about the words, I’m all about the sound and the vibe. If I have a voice sample that fits right for a certain track, I’ll use it no matter what’s the lyrics in it.

Give us some background to your latest release.

My latest single ‘Laying low’ is a bit different than what I’m use to do. It has less guitar but more synths and drums. I was focused on the beat and the atmosphere of the song rather than the riff. The mood is a bit darker and less euphoric than songs like ‘Sleepless’. It’s an ‘introvert’ song kind of.

Could you give us an insight to the themes and premise behind the single and other songs?

Recently my songs are getting a bit more ‘serious’. My first tracks were really straight forward EDM/Rock. It’s the kind of music that entertains and makes you move. It’s all about that really, hedonism and escapism. But I wanted to add a little more subtlety in the new release. It’s cliché but I’ve through tough moments recently and I wasn’t feeling like doing ‘hard rocking party music’ kind of songs. So the latest tracks are more ‘laid back’.

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

I change my tracks all the time. When I’m in the studio I have no idea where the song is gonna go. That’s the cool part about recording everything at home, you don’t have a deadline or you don’t have to worry about time, you can change any parameter at any moment.

Tell us about the live side to Jeff II?

Being on stage is the main reason why I’m doing music. Even though I spend more and more time in the studio, the final goal is to play all that in front of people. My stage set up is a bit special; I’m DJ-ing and playing guitar at the same time. There’s a drummer and a bass player backing me up. It’s like a hybrid of a DJ set and a hard rock band. I wanted to keep the ‘rock n’ roll’ vibe by having a real band with me but it’s impossible to play all the different layers of sounds that my music contains without some electronic gear.

It is not easy for any new artist or band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it so far?

Well these days with the internet it’s much easier. You can reach so many people from different places with platforms like YouTube. Also my music being instrumental I’m not too concerned about the languages and the identity of the listeners. My sound isn’t ‘American’ or ‘European’ it can appeal to everybody. I’m based out of Los Angeles but my goal is to ultimately play worldwide.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success?

It’s a game changer. I won’t go into the debate whether or not it has ‘killed’ the sales income for musicians. But what I do know is that internet is the number one space for promotion. Maybe people won’t buy your albums but if they like your music they’ll still go to your shows. As a music producer who does everything by myself, social medias are a fantastic tool to use. These days you see 17 year old kids making hit songs on a laptop in their bedroom. And they’re able to eventually book big tours all around the globe. Thanks to the internet. On a negative note I will say that artists should get much more income from the streaming platforms.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you for your time and attention. Check me out on YouTube and Instagram (jeff2music). You can also learn a bit more about me and my background on my website (jeff2music.com).

https://www.jeff2music.com/   https://www.instagram.com/jeff2music/

Pete RingMaster 11/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Open Eyed Dreamer – Free Your Own Mind

free your own mind_RingMasterReview

The Open Eyed Dreamer is the solo project of Bracknell hailing Steve Fearon, the former frontman of the strongly missed British industrial rockers Ghost In the Static. The Free Your Own Mind is the debut EP from that project which was in many ways an idea and presence predating Fearon’s previous band. In the words of the man himself though, “For a long time, The Open Eyed Dreamer was nothing more than a persona, a mask worn on stage, someone sung about in Ghost In the Static Songs.” With the striking Free Your Own Mind the first ‘words’, The Open Eyed Dreamer is now Fearon’s voice against a world where “power is misused and misappropriated by those who hold all the card.”, and a release for his inner anger.

Fusing electronic incitements with raw rock and melodic pop textures, Fearon’s sound and EP is an attention grabbing blend of extremes and differing textures. It roars in defiance, snarls with antagonism, both lyrically and musically, but equally seduces while inflaming body and imagination with vibrant melodies and tenaciously infectious hooks. The heart and thoughts of Fearon and songs are unmistakable, their bite and contempt at the injustices running and ruining the world forceful but bound in music and imagination which forcibly but contagiously suggests and highlights without ever breaking into the realms of preaching.

Free Your Own Mind opens up with Press Enter To Continue and the line, “This is a bed time story but not for the innocent; you know what you’ve done and what it meant.” As big portentous beats accentuate the moment and the gentle but open inescapable challenge of that simple line, synths begin to rise and bring their intimidating sizzle to the brewing provocative drama of the brief opener.

The attention and imagination seizing start leads to the magnetic lures of Simple People where instantly it too is wrapped in dark shadows and an oppressively evocative ambience. Simultaneously Fearon’s vocals unveil the track’s narrative and emotion with rich expression and the enjoyably familiar style that helped make his previous band a potent proposition. Warm flowing melodies align to catchy beats as hooks just as magnetically blossom within the darker climate of the song, all seducing and igniting body and spirit as firmly as its tone and words spark the imagination and emotions.

Inspirations drawn upon by Fearon include, among many, the likes of The Prodigy, Gary Numan, NIN, Cease2exist, KMFDM, Infected Mushroom, and Combichrist. They are essences which in varying degrees you can sense across Free Your Own Mind. Third track Waiting though, has a hint of fellow UK band MiXE1 to it, something after investigation unsurprising when learning the song, the only one not solely written by Fearon, was created with Michael Evans of MiXE1 and Defeat’s Gary Walker. The pair also physically feature in the song; Evans’ vocals easy to spot within moments as they provide an excellent companion and foil to the equally impressing and darker tones of Fearon. The song is superb, a swiftly captivating persuasion with also a touch of the Walker Brothers to its melodic and emotional atmosphere. Synths paint a just as potent and dramatic picture as the vocals and lyrics, a combination which infests and lingers in appetite and memory.

It surely has to be the lead track to draw newcomers into the project, though The Last Revolution provides a just as commanding and gripping proposal next. Its shadows are far darker than its predecessor and in some way, especially rhythmically, its drama even bigger and bolder as the song envelopes ears and thoughts. There is also a great predacious nature to a track which at times feels like it is stalking the senses; nudging and imposing on them as an instinctive volatility inspires scything strikes of beats and keys for another resonating incitement.

The EP is brought to a close by The Final Photograph, a smouldering electronic caress with sonically blistered skin veined by melodic and vocal coaxing. The gentler wash of synths and sonic suggestiveness also has an inbred irritability which subsequently erupts and fuels the track’s volcanic and galvanic climax.

It is a fine end to a great, I guess, introduction to The Open Eyed Dreamer. Fearon calls Free Your Own Mind his “call to arms” and indeed it is an arousing of the listener in many irresistible ways.

The Free Your Own Mind is out now @ https://theopeneyeddreamer.bandcamp.com/album/free-your-own-mind

https://www.facebook.com/TheOpenEyedDreamer/

Pete RingMaster 12/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Electro waltzes and deviancy: the Mr. Strange Interview.

 

Mr. Strange 2015 _RingMaster Review

Some know Mr. Strange as the former frontman of the brilliant circus rock steampunks The Shanklin Freak Show, others more some from their solo exploits and especially outstanding 2014 album Wonderful World Of Weird. What is beginning to be recognised is that the sound conjuror of musical deviancy from the Isle of Wight is one of the UK’s most imaginative and unique songwriters. Proof to that has come with their fiercely tremendous new album The Bible of Electric Pornography, the first offering since the rebirth of the persona and sound of Mr. Strange over past months. The just released album is a “sacrilegious assault of electro-influenced filth”; a thrilling incitement of electronic and rock ‘n’ roll alchemy with the unique Mr. Strange imagination. A certain album of the year contender for a great many, we grab time with its creator and took a look onto the defiant invention of The Bible of Electric Pornography.

Hello Mr. Strange, thanks for letting us peer into the heart of your new album.

Before we do though, you are already known for your tapestry of sound and flavours. What are the major inspirations which have most coloured your ideas, songwriting, and approach to making music?

Historically, the culprits in the inspiration department are; Marilyn Manson, Insane Clown Posse, Dr. Steel, Alice Cooper, Gary Numan, etc., anything theatrical, weird, and dark that I can “escape” into. Musical ability has never been that important to me, the atmosphere and/or uniqueness in music has always been more appealing, personally.

I’ve always wanted to create “worlds” for listeners to get lost in; you can see this in each Mr. Strange album, no matter what changes musically the escapism is always there.

Inspirations for this new album are a little different though; Krizz Kaliko, Prince, Peaches, Nine Inch Nails, Lady Gaga, Perturbator, Die Antwoord, The Prodigy, Marilyn Manson’s Mechanical Animals, Dead Or Alive, Dirty Sanchez (the electroclash band), Electric Six and Gary Numan have all played a part. Anton LaVey’s ‘Satanic Bible’ has been an influence, also.

Being primarily an electronic composer I’ve always worked using software, so no Mr. Strange song (or earlier Shanklin Freak Show) song have ever come from a traditional “jam” – all songs are created in a methodical, multi-layered, jigsaw-like way. I imagine this approach, while not in any way unique, has had an effect creating the Mr. Strange “sound” over the years.

As with any artist, everything influences me in some way or another, a lot of it subconsciously. The quirkiness of video game music has always been a large influence, especially pre-2001, before games started trying to ape films so much.

Mr. Strange 2015 pic 5_RingMaster Review

You have just released your new album The Bible of Electric Pornography. Can you give us some idea to the evolution of your craft and music shown in previous propositions and has culminated in the new incitement of ears and emotions?

This album’s been on the cards since about 2005. Originally it was just an idea to make a sleazy electro-rock album called ‘Sleaze Pit’; a few demo songs were written, only one of which survived and made the album. The ‘Sleaze Pit’ idea has always been there, all this time, but there has always been something else I wanted to try when it came to the “next record”. That was until Wonderful World Of Weird came out, then it was a toss-up between doing a metal album or this Sleaze Pit album. My guitar amp broke so I went with Sleaze Pit’!

It was only supposed to take 6 months but took 2 years… It evolved in to a monster.

Ideas kept coming, both musically and thematically. It tied in with a pivotal moment in my life, so I could pour a lot more of myself into it without it feeling at odds with the albums themes; I am the albums themes. There’s a sincerity and “realness” behind the theatricality now which may not have been there before. I hope it comes across to people listening to the record.

In my opinion, this is easily the best album I’ve worked on. I’ve never been very confident or overly pleased with any albums up until now. There’s always been time constraints forcing me to rush to completion, or a loss of interest in the project that has hampered its potential. This is the most personal, well-realised and accessible album I’ve ever done. I’ll be happy if this is the last album I ever do.

Some may mourn the loss of the old Mr. Strange quirky goofiness, but I needed to try something else for this album. I’m sure it’ll be back, though.

Mr. Strange EP album cover _RingMaster Review

You mentioned the time it has taken The Bible of Electric Pornography to grow and emerge etc., can you give us more insight into its writing and recording; also were there any collaborations also involved thus time around?

It was a bit more of a solo effort than Wonderful World of Weird, which was a very collaborative effort between me and Mr. Stench (guitarist). This is mainly due to how electronic the music is, so there wasn’t as much for a guitarist or live drummer to do. It was only meant to take 6 months; I didn’t mean to leave my band mates twiddling their thumbs for so long! But we have written a lot of music together though, it’s just not on this record…

The collaboration with Global Citizen (on the track D/s) came about very naturally. I co-produce their music, so have access to their track “stems” and decided to play about with one of their songs one day. I did a remix/remake, of sorts. It sounded great and fitted with the new album perfectly, so I asked Global Citizen if I could use it on the record, they said yes! I thought it’d be cool to have them sing on it too, their brand of lyrical filth seemed a natural fit.

Mr. Strange 2015 pic 3_RingMaster Review

 

Tell us about the lyrical themes and sparks for some of the tracks within The Bible of Electric Pornography.

There are two main themes running throughout Electric Pornography; Satanism and sexuality. For hundreds of years, religions have led people to believe the two are as one. This has led to an extremely repressed society, ashamed by default, born sinners. Christianity has had such a huge impact on the mentality of the western world over its 2000-odd years; its grip is loosening, but very slowly. The ingrained shame still exists in the western subconscious; some can overcome it easily, for others it can emotionally cripple.

I wanted to make a liberating album; I’m tired of hearing and feeling that I should be ashamed. I want to be the antithesis of that kind of thinking, the adversary of it. Seeing as so much repression, shaming, and bigotry stems from religion, I thought I’d side with one of their classic adversaries, metaphorically. If I’m a deviant abomination in their eyes, so be it, I’ll just embrace it. It’s a middle finger, really. Calling the album a ‘Bible’ is a cheeky slap in the face to the Jesus freaks; it also holds just as much relevance as their Bible, which is none. That’s a positive statement I wanted to make for people who might find this album and who may have to deal with religious bigotry on a daily basis. If it helps just one person feel a little better about themselves, then I’ll call that mission accomplished.

The sexuality in this album is very over-the-top, dark and nasty. This isn’t so much how I view sex and sexuality, but more of a symbolic revelling in the so-called “sinful” debauchery of it all. If I feel a certain way about something, I always take that to the extreme in my music – I blow it up so it’s ten times bigger and more exaggerated than it really is. People who already know my music and “get” it see past the pomp of it all and appreciated the real sentiments behind the overblown way I present them, but I can imagine that to the uninitiated I may seem like a self-obsessed sociopath or something!

Mr. Strange 2015 pic 4_RingMaster Review

Is there one core message within all those aspects it looks at and explores, and specifically that within the album’s finale, The Last Song?

It’s unapologetic and unashamed, and hopefully it will make people feel that way when listening to it.

The finale has two meanings.

The first: the end of a beautiful relationship. A mutual parting of ways that is sometimes necessary and unavoidable.

The second: a farewell to people who may not wish to follow me anymore. I look different and I sound different, I AM different, and that doesn’t always go down well with music fans. The first line sums it up perfectly for me:

 

“I know this isn’t what you wanted,

You wanted more of the same,

But that’s a game I cannot play”

The future for Mr Strange

The future is electric!

Mr. Strange 2015 pic 6_RingMaster Review

Read our review of The Bible of Electric Pornography @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/05/mr-strange-the-bible-of-electric-pornography/

http://www.mrstrangemedia.com  https://www.facebook.com/Official.Mr.Strange   https://twitter.com/MrStrangeMedia

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Desert Ships – Skyliner

Desert Ships press image 2014

Four mesmeric flights flooded with celestial hauntings and shoegaze fascination, the Skyliner EP from UK band Desert Ships is as both band and release names suggest, an expansive and sultrily aired adventure. A release which is cinematic in its touch on the imagination and warmly sensuous in its lure on the senses, Skyliner shimmers and radiates like a mix of The Horrors, House Of Love, and Brian Jonestown Massacre with just a tinge of Inspiral Carpets for spicy measure. To be honest that is still a loose description of the psychedelic fuelled exploration found within the release but a good starting point for something distinct to Desert Ships.

Formed in 2012, the London trio of Mikey (vocals/guitar), Daniel (bass/vocals), and Claude (drums/vocals) swiftly sparked attention and acclaim with the release of their debut album that same year. The Mark Gardener (ex- Ride) produced Doll Skin Flag soon drew regular comparisons to the likes of Brian Jonestown Massacre, The Flaming Lips, Tame Impala, and occasionally the film scores of John Barry. Its success was backed by the band’s equally praised live presence which saw them tour with bands such as The Prodigy, Band of Skulls, The Rifles, and Babyshambles as well as play numerous festivals over the past couple of years. Reuniting with Gardener again in the studio, Desert Ships now unveil their new EP, a release taking its predecessor as a launch pad for broader and more expressive aurally visual experiences.

The release opens with its epic title track, a seven minute plus excursion into magnetic harmonies, sonic exploration, and fuzzy show gaze seducing. From its first breath there is a fresh and smouldering temptation at work, guitar coaxing Desert Ships-Skyliner-artwork -Final-HRthe lead into a weave of vocal harmonies and expression from across the band. That in turn is cradled by a tapestry of keys bred elegance and enterprise. The song emerges as a gentle maelstrom of gripping ideation and aural fascination, the vocals as varied and riveting as the spatial grooves and rhythmic shuffle courting their narrative whilst every immersive note is an exotic kiss upon the senses. Like soaring through a refreshingly muggy landscape, the track is enthralling leaving body and emotions submerged in blissful exploration.

The slightly slimmer length of Shell Shock is no less eventful next, embracing ears with a synth pop spiced temptation straight away. Laying down an eighties flavoured yet modern canvas of melodic hues, bands like China Crisis, Modern English, and The Flaming Lips coming to mind, the track croons with cosmic lustre and psychedelic colour. Again the imagination is sparked by and emotions immersed in an ethereal tapestry of sound and voice, the song the perfect pop proposition. It is a description which almost applies to the following Heart Beats and it’s more grounded but no less transfixing splendour too, though the magnetic offering does not quite have the infectious glow and compelling grandeur of its predecessor. All the same the feistier track is a masterfully and enticingly grooved invitation which is hard to resist as it reveals further shades and turns in the band’s creativity.

Skyliner is concluded by another epic holding of ears with its longest and relentlessly suggestive track, Ausgang. Somewhere between cheerfully funereal and livelily meditative, the persistent breeze of sonic and melodic enticing is a vibrantly repetitive affair which probably outstays its welcome but still provides an instrumental soundscape to create imaginative tales within. Though the EP is not one of two halves, like the previous track the closer lacks something of the first pair of songs but has plenty to entice and feed an already keen appetite for release and band.

Desert Ships has provided a treat of an encounter which is at its stunning best at the start and whilst slipping a level of persuasion or two in its latter part, perpetually leaves expectations and anticipation of big things from and for the band ahead rife. Ultimately Skyliner is a gorgeous flight which more than deserves a full investigation.

The Skyliner EP is available now @ http://desertships.bandcamp.com/

http://www.desertships.com

RingMaster 11/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Spookshow Inc. – Visions of the blinded world (pt.1)

 

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A furiously agitated entrapment of industrial, metal, and electro rock, Visions of the blinded world (pt.1) is a fiery embrace to colour the way to an impending apocalypse. Its contagion is bred from the darkest corners of arcane themes taking in elements such as ‘time travel, dreams, out of body experiences and death’, but also there is a rich expression of human failings and frailties, all sculpted with striking imagination and clad in virulently varied sounds cast by Norwegian band Spookshow Inc. Imagine the world cast in imposing ravenous shadows feeding on the psyche and emotional turmoil to a soundtrack bred from a merger of Nine Inch Nails, Apollo 440, The Prodigy, and Skinny Puppy, though this is still a slim-line representation of the adventure abounding the release, and you have the rigorously compelling Visions of the blinded world (pt.1).

Just as enthrallingly veined with middle-eastern sounds too, the album is the result of a journey taking around seven years. The origins of Spookshow Inc. though go back to 2003 when Lucky Spook (guitar, programming, songwriting, producer) and Soltex (vocals) united and began honing a sound described as a mixture of Pink Floyd, Prodigy and Paradise Lost and increasingly influenced by bands such as Rob Zombie, KMFDM, Die Krupps, Skinny Puppy, NIN, Chemical Brothers, and those middle east sounds. Initially a duo hiring in additional musicians for their live shows, the band garnered strong praise as they played numerous festivals and supported The Legendary Pink Dots in 2005 on a leg of their European tour. The pair began working on Visions Of The Blinded World (pt.1) in 2006, being joined by instrumentalist Sharaz on bass and synth for the last songs recorded. Released on the bands own label Thunder Of The Distant World, the album makes a riveting introduction with a gripping invention and originality which is simply an inescapable temptation. Having grown in size with the inclusion of Seba to the line-up, Spookshow Inc. is poised to make a striking mark on electro/industrial rock; that is if anyone is brave enough to share their aural dystopian visions.

A simple resonating clang of twanging guitar is the potent coaxing bringing the imagination and album together, opener Games Of Delusion (art and religion) setting the exploration in motion. Its tone is soon swallowed by portentous caresses of haunting synths and percussive stalking, everything under a heavy air and slowly invasive atmosphere. This in turn is permeated with vocal samples and a warm and patiently waiting blaze of techno revelry. Its fire is given further freedom though still with a rein on its energy as jazz sparks flirt with ears and raw dance rapacity entwines the sturdy spine and enticingly rumbling belly of the song. It is a potent and gripping start, not one which ever explodes as it constantly hints it might but a track setting up a hungry appetite for more, a greed soon fed by New World Crash.

The second song instantly has a darker and more aggressive countenance, sinews driving beats whilst Soltex’s vocals carry a menacing snarl to his melodic persuasion. The sounds conjured by Lucky equally growl and sizzle with hostile coverpredation and electro static, yet as the first track they never quite escape their binds to go for the jugular. It is a hold which works a treat, especially with the Trent Reznor like exploration which searches the darkest corners and elegance of the track. Provocative Middle Eastern spicery adds to the drama and invention of the outstanding proposition before it makes way for the even greater temptation of Scary Dream. Like a collision between KMFDM, Ghost In the Static, and The Prodigy, yet discovering its own identity ultimately, the track is an exhausting and ravenous tempest of energy and imagination, its electro rock tenacity and enslaving infectiousness the making of addictions.

Female hailing whispers and harmonious wails within another Eastern flavoured breeze opens up Falling Down pt.2, darker tones from Soltex swiftly adding encroaching shadows to the mesmeric tempting. It is not long before he turns them into passionate roars to compliment the increasingly evolving and portentous yet radiant landscape of the song. It is a fascinating track, one which has you fully involved and immersed in its spicy energy and adventure but then drifts away to make you feel there is unfinished business. Again it is a twist which actually elevates the song rather than defuses its potency, it seemingly revelling in the adage of ‘leave them wanting more’.

Things taking a chilling turn with Requiem For a Vision, where sinister air colludes with menacing vocal variety for another creative twist to the album. A progressively fuelled slice of intrigue and sonic unpredictability, the song is a slow burning prowl, a thick and sultry seduction which takes longer to get a grip on than other songs but emerges as a web of imagination and sonic trespass before the muscular stomp of Dead Shot Baby unveils its rugged charm and intensive rock ‘n’ roll. As much industrial as it is funky, equally as electronically powered as it is ferociously antagonistic, the track is a swift grudge of a treat before the psychedelically seeded beauty of My Secret Plan. Featuring Matangi Shakti, the song is a feisty shuffle of melodic elegance, Middle Eastern magnetism, and shadowed noir kissed enterprise. It is an imagination firing adventure where drama and bracing emotional espionage flirts relentlessly from every second of the album’s best moment.

The similarly thought exploring Cyberage keeps the creative theatre and engrossing bait of the album at its most incendiary, the song a caustically abrasing and infectiously binding suasion, whilst the next up Map Of The World glides through dank caverns and stark climates in its provocative crawl across the senses. The track is a croon from the darkest nightmares, reminding strongly of Fad Gadget with the gothic predation of Paradise Lost.

The album closes with the evocatively and sonically picturesque Other Side Of Time (Vision Of The Blinded World), flavours and sounds from a global tapestry merging for a tantalising sinister waltz. It is a menacing and thrilling conclusion to an album which gets better and reveals more with every listen. Visions of the blinded world (pt.1) is a labour of love from the band and an increasingly rewarding adventure for the listener, whilst Spookshow Inc. is a potential clad protagonist ready to help see out the end of the world with the embrace of their inimitable invention, an apocalypse sure to get only more colourful with the band’s second instalment of their journey due next year.

Visions of the blinded world (pt.1) is available now digitally and as a Limited edition cd digipak via http://www.spookshowinc.com/music and http://spookshowinc.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.spookshowinc.com/

RingMaster 07/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

 

 

Tribazik -Tools Of Mass Creation

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Swiftly following the acclaimed success of their recent album Data Warfare, UK band Tribazik unleash their new gripping and contagion fuelled single, Tools Of Mass Creation. The closing track on their outstanding full-length, the song is an emotion and thought provoking tempest of sound and adventure, reinforcing the potential and creative emprise shining within the London based trio.

Formed by Jerry Kandiah (vocals/guitar) and Hedge Seel (drums/samples), Tribazik has grown into one of Britain’s most inventive and formidable prospects, Data Warfare their coming of age and the suspected spark to a world spotlight upon their ingenious mix of sounds. Sculpting an individual presence through the merger of genres such alternative rock, psychedelic metal, industrial, techno and much more, the band grabbed the attention of Killing Joke bassist Paul Raven from the release of the single Yang To Yin alone. The song led to the invitation and supporting of Killing Joke on two European tours as well as Jaz Coleman guesting on a track on Tribazik’s Andy Gill (Gang of Four) mixed debut album All Blood is Red in 2009. From there the pair became a trio with the recruitment of Syan and subsequently the creation and release of the self-produced and Youth (Killing Joke, The Orb, The Verve) mixed Date Warfare earlier this year. It is a fiercely flavoured tempest of imagination drenched sound and inventive force managing to cast a mix of early Killing Joke, Pendulum, Pitchshifter, The Prodigy, and Red Beat, whilst sculpting something new and invigoratingly distinct to Tribazik. Now Tools Of Mass Creation is ready to stir up another incitement for the album and itself, an aim as with its source release hard to imagine failing to achieve success.

The single harasses ears from its first breath, rhythms rapping with thick sinews on the senses whilst guitars blaze with a raw causticity to their riffs and hooks. The gothic harmonies of Syan glance across the turbulent air of the track soon after whilst beneath, the track roars with aggression and antagonistic intensity. It then relaxes into a more merciful embrace, the mellow tones of Syan snuggling closer to the ear as Kandiah unveils the narrative with his captivating voice. It is a smouldering passage prone to forceful eruptions of sonic energy and blazing passion musically and vocally. There is an unavoidable essence to Killing Joke to the track, as well as a tasty tinge of Fear Factory, but as it brawls and seduces body and emotions, the song sets down an individual character and beauty to the fury which belongs solely to its creators.

Tools Of Mass Creation is a riveting and mouth-watering furnace of sound and enterprise, the perfect doorway for those still not infected by the exciting presence of Tribazik, to dive into their glorious depths.

Tools Of Mass Creation is available on September 24th

Tribazik have confirmed a special single release party at London’s Islington Academy 2 on September 24th. To celebrate the single release of Tools Of Mass Creation, the band have promised ‘A storming show with full visual onslaught’

Tickets for the event can be purchased from http://www.o2academyislington.co.uk/event/69196/tribazik-tickets

http://www.tribazik.com

RingMaster 16/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Tribazik – Data Warfare

 

TRIBAZIK

    Describing the sound of UK band Tribazik is easy, early Killing Joke meets Pendulum with healthy doses of the raw power of Pitchshifter, the fiery electro snarl of The Prodigy, and the rhythmic swagger of seventies band Red Beat, except as is loudly evident on new album Data Warfare, it is only part of the scintillating recipe. Forging something unique and irrepressibly contagious through the merging and rigorous gene altering of alternative rock, psychedelic metal, industrial, techno and much more, the London based trio rampage through the imagination like a sonic tornado, organic electro and rhythmic teasing entwined with hungry rapacious grooves and psyche igniting invention. It is a glorious pulsating confrontation which has already brought the band eager and potent attention though you suspect that will be nothing in comparison to the acclaim once the album reaches out and out.

     The band is the brainchild of Jerry Kandiah (vocals/guitar) and Hedge Seel (drums/samples), two musicians with a rich experience in metal based bands and having their own sound system on the underground rave scene. Linking up the pair explored styles which lit their own passions with a new and boundary pushing invention, the first results including the track Yang To Yin which caught the attention of Killing Joke bassist Paul Raven. His invitation to support his band led to two European tours alongside Killing Joke and Jaz Coleman guesting on a track from Tribazik’s Andy Gill (Gang of Four) mixed debut album All Blood is Red in 2009. Following its acclaimed release the band was then permanently joined by Syan whose previous band Interlock had released the critically acclaimed album Crisis//reinvention in 2004. The recording of the new album was hit by the death of the band’s manager Gary DS but such the force and energy to the breath-taking tempest you can only feel they used the loss to drive their creativity and passion in tribute to the man. Self-produced and mixed by Youth (Killing Joke, The Orb, The Verve), Data Warfare is a sumptuous kaleidoscope of sound and imagination, an inventive fury which transports the listener into lyrical skirmishes looking at ‘the imminent hostilities facing the human race’, and broiling sonic soundscapes woven with aggressively stirring imagination and voracious creative energy.

     A cyber enticement starts things off as Too Dead To Care emerges from an electronic cocoon to incinerate the air with a a2136431759_2furnace of sound and riffs before settling into a deliciously agitated yet perfectly poised enveloping of the ears. Immediately that Killing Joke and Pitchshifter reference coaxes thoughts as electro driven rhythms and pulsating energy fuses with the ravenous guitars. It is a senses dominating introduction to the album, one bold in its invention and unafraid in its dramatic and persistently evolving provocation.

    The intense and breath-taking start has lips of anticipation being licked and soon satisfied as Atom soon followed by Life Force Energy parade their ingenious contagion. The first of the two flirts with and peels away the surface of the senses with a skittish almost acidic electro irritant whilst behind riffs and rhythms carve out a formidable and incendiary canvas for the vocals of Kandiah to paint the lyrical narrative. His tones are very Jaz Coleman like across the whole release which only accentuates that Killing Joke resemblance, but never to the detriment of the adventure and distinctive Tribazik presence. The second of the pair from another subdued but sinister intro erupts into a blood pumping and exhaustive consumption of the senses, riffs growling with every heavy note and the beats of Seel reinforcing the tantalising damage with sharp and incisive animosity. As now expected it is just one facet of the enterprise escorting the emotions into a near rapture, melodic swarms and thought provoking craft washing and twisting around the uncompromising pulse and heart of the track.

     Without allowing the listener a breath unless they use the pause button, Tribazik keep the riveting creative pressure on with 12th Disclosure and Sonar Sumeria, the first a sonic bred incident filled experiment wailing with aural warning signs, caustic sirens, and perilous intimidation all filtered through a dangerously magnetic swamp of techno radiance and industrial predation. It is a masterful seduction taken to even greater heights by Sonar Sumeria, a celestial journey through rave spawned, psychedelic coloured, sonic romance. Throughout a vociferous energy equally brews up resulting in a sultry and elegant evocation which Pendulum would have loved to have sculpted.

    The album continues to fire up the passions and greed in an already gluttonous hunger as firstly the restrained but predatory Hacktivism with its unrelenting electro bait and metallic rabidity seduces and abrases the senses. Just as keenly a virulently addictive groove brings slavery to the imagination before the rhythmically toxic Spacetime Collapse takes over laying a wonderfully wanton and irresistible hand on the emotions as spirals of unpredictable transfixing ingenuity expand the already dexterous invention. With an additional dub coating to its expanse reminding at times of Ruts DC, the song provides another pinnacle on the lofty range of the album before the dark and menacing presence of Bloodline Crossbreed infects and magnetises an admittedly ready to drool over anything appetite for the album. Arguably not as colourfully imposing as previous tracks but with an evocative melody enriched ambience merging with the intensive atmosphere it is on the frontline of intriguing, sophisticated alchemy.

   That deliberately sculpted and thoughtfully layered turn of the album continues through the final two songs, though no song lacks invigorating intelligence and artful ingenuity in its makeup. The melancholic yet vibrantly rousing Absence Of Proof comes first with female calls lighting the surface of the emotive exploration lyrically and musically whilst the closing Tools Of Mass Creation delivers a world of sonic emprise all of its own, it a resourcefully elegant and vivaciously daring flight of moving imagination. The pair makes a mentally and emotionally mesmeric end to an exceptional encounter; Data Warfare a sensational dawning of Tribazik and their time to take the rock world by storm you suspect and hope.

http://www.tribazik.com

10/10

RingMaster 21/02/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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