The Castor Troys – Legends Never Die

We all come across propositions sparking a passion which is just meant to be whether in life, love, or regard to Legends Never Die, music. The new release from Canadian rockers The Castor Troys, everything about the EP caught our instincts and wants in a slab of rock ‘n’ roll whilst providing one of the most fiercely enjoyable encounters this year.

Hailing from Hamilton, The Castor Troys was formed in 2013, taking their name from the Nick Cage character in Jon Woo’s movie, Face/Off. Embracing inspirations from the likes of Headstones, Social Distortion, Motörhead, The Offspring, and Iron Maiden, the quartet forge their rousing sound from a tenacious mix of hard rock and punk with plenty of other strong hues involved around stories of “war heroes, bank robbers and clandestine lovers”. It is a recipe which drew potent praise upon the band’s debut album, Come Hell or High Water in 2015 and will surely lead to even greater attention and acclaim for Legends Never Die.

With shows with the likes of The Planet Smashers, Scarlett, and Silverstein under their belts and having just shared stages with Headstones and Black Collar Union in the lead up to the EP’s release, The Castor Troys get straight down to business from the first breath of the Andre Kaden Black produced EP.

Blackout Love makes the break from speakers first, hungry riffs and swinging rhythms instantly descending on the senses in an inviting trespass. Vocalist Aaron Walsh soon leaps into the mix, his powerful and magnetic tones as compelling as the sounds roaring around him. Straightaway our appetites were hooked, the steely groove of Matthew Bowker’s bass alone irresistible but with the wiry tendrils springing from the guitar of Chris Ledroit and Bryson Emmons’ swinging beats everything about the punk ‘n’ roll holler hit the spot.

The backing vocals across the band alongside Walsh also consistently make for a thick galvanic incitement and are in full force within the following We Are One, the band’s new single. From the first note they are careering through ears pulling the tracks’ devious hooks and eager exploits along with zeal and in no time, its call to arms character and chant fuelled persuasion, with a whiff of Grumpynators adding to its compelling cry and creative thunder, takes command leading body and emotions to get boisterously involved; that always a sign of prime rib rock ‘n’ roll.

The country rock lined Watch the City Burn is next, its sultry grooves and infectious chorus enough to hook the appetite. There is certainly something familiar to the song though nothing which can be exactly defined but, without hitting the heights of its companions, it leaves ears and satisfaction full to the brim with goodness before the EP’s title track uncages its punk rock rapacity. Though it reminds of UK punk metallers Fuckshovel a touch, the track epitomises the individuality of The Castor Troys sound and its insatiable anthemic howl.

Wreck of The Bastard boasts its claim for best track honours next, its melodic vines carrying something of Skids to them whilst riffs and rhythms nag and harass with a punk infused hunger. Even so their organic irritability is perfectly tempered by the hard rock breeding of the track, the song emerging as another slice of unpredictable but easily accessible rock ‘n’ roll scorched in The Castor Troys individuality.

The release concludes with a great cover of the Tom Petty track, Runnin’ Down A Dream. Certainly the song does not quite live up to the heights of those before it, but with a bouncing body and well-worn vocal chords in its wake gets the job done with a firm enterprising hand.

It is a great and again inescapably rousing moment in a release which The Castor Troys deserve all the attention and praise they get for and with Legends Never Die that should be plenty.

Legends Never Die is out now; available @ https://thecastortroys.bandcamp.com/

fuick

K-Man & The 45s – Self Titled

Pic DannyDonnovan @bucketlistmr

This month sees the new romping stomping album from Canadian outfit K-Man & The 45s uncaged, a release which had the body bouncing and spirit roaring like a teenage boy after his first sexual adventure. The band creates a contagious proposition from a fusion of ska and rockabilly spiced classic rock ‘n’ roll with plenty more involved, a recipe providing their finest feast of sound yet within their self-titled full-length.

Hailing from Montreal, K-Man & The 45s has been a constant and acclaimed presence on the Canadian music scene; their records luring keen praise and support and live presence just as rich plaudits and a matching reputation. The band has shared stages with the likes of The Slackers, Big D and The Kids Table, The Satellites, The Original Wailers , The Planet Smashers, The Brains and so many more as well as graced and ignite a host of festivals across their homeland over the years. It is easy to suggest that their new album is their greatest moment yet and even easier to eagerly push it towards the attention of ska, punk and rock ‘n’ roll fans alike with the band embracing the inspirations of bands such as The Specials, The Beat, The Ramones, and The Cramps among their influences though it is fair to say K-Man and co have successfully nurtured their own individual character of sound as in thick evidence across the new record now getting its deserved push via Stomp Records.

Opener They Gotta Know had us hooked with its first breath, a classic rock ‘n roll guitar lure entangling ears and appetite before the song leaps into its punk rock swing. The jangle of Kman’s guitar flirts as the beats of Brian Smith arouse against the melodic dance of an organ; a potent enticement only enhanced by the dancing flames of Josh Michaud’s trombone and the trumpet of Seb Fournier. Bouncing along to the track’s body and stroll is inevitable, we can testify to that, as the song gets the album off to a rousing start.

The following Poppy’s Back In Town is just as manipulative, its rowdier rock colluding with the animated canter of keys and guitar with, as in its predecessor and every song, Kman’s vocal mischief leading the fun. Lively melodies and lustful hooks line its boisterous stroll before I Don’t Mind wheels in with an instantly appealing breeze easily reminding of The Beat. The band soon adds its own distinct colour to the song, adding a vocal backing in which participation is simply unavoidable. Smith’s clipping beats just get under the skin too, the brass n turn into the passions as the track lustily manipulates body and spirit.

Rudy Don’t Smoke equally had the body dangling from its virulent strands of sound and enterprise; its ska and punk collusion a devilish puppeteer with a glint in the eye of its imagination before Piece Of The Action bursts in with drama and intrigue which would not be out of place in the theme to a sixties TV spy/private detective show. With a Department S-esque hue to its theatre, the song is more than a match for the lofty heights of its predecessors as too the cosmic adventure of Space Thriller. Bringing the atmospheric prowess of The Specials into a surf rock spiced ska saunter the track has the same level of drama and intimation as the last song, its story a sultry seduction of lust and danger descriptively shaped by brass led enterprise.

Through the punk ‘n’ roll/ska bred stomp of Road Rage Randy and the fifties rock ‘n’ roll seeded ska spin of This Moment, pleasure only escalates with the album, each adding a new shade of sound and mischief to its party before a great cover of The Kingpins’ Party in Ja joins the fun. Giving its reggae nurtured catchiness a Ruts like dub makeover the track pulsates on the senses as again the body is lost to an instinctive bounce.

Next up is Johnny Thumbs a track which maybe did not inflame the passions as others around it but still made for the most enjoyable playmate before the outstanding Far Away Eyes Come Home simply became a love affair with ears. From its revolving hooks and melodic enticement to vocal and rhythmic invitation, the song devoured inhibitions.

The album finishes with another gem in What’s Inside A Girl, a glorious garage punk and rockabilly spun tease with a healthy psychobilly and surf rock glaze led by yet another delicious bassline among so many across the album from Frankie amidst the perpetual rhythmic incitement of Smith. The song epitomises the craft, sound, and contagious exploits of K-Man & The 45s perfectly whilst at the same time sealing its best track moment though that is debated with each and every listen.

K-Man & The 45s is a band which deserves the biggest attention within the ska, punk, and simply great rock ‘n’ roll world; all the reasons are in their new album so no hanging around go have fun.

Recently the sad news that drummer Brian Smith has terminal pancreatic cancer was announced and a Go Fund Me page set up to support him and his family. To help out this great musician and friend to so many go to https://gofundme.com/support-brian-our-brother

The K-Man & The 45s album is out digitally and on vinyl now @ https://k-manthe45s.bandcamp.com/album/k-man-the-45s

 https://www.facebook.com/kman45/   https://twitter.com/kmanandthe45s

Pete RingMaster 14/08/2018

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