Cokegoat – Vessel

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If an easy journey with scenic gentleness is the purpose of your musical intent then steering well away from Vessel, the debut album from Chicago sextet Cokegoat is advice to be heeded. The eight track release is a tsunami of imposing yet empowering sounds and invention; a tempest of stoner, sludge, and progressive metal which merges into a dramatically brawling and rigorously rewarding incitement. Riffs spew animosity and rhythms provoke with an even greater antagonism whilst vocals roar with eclectic venom across the consumption. It is a brutal and seductive onslaught, but one with equally ferocious veins of creativity and imagination which ensures every track ignites far more than just ears. The album is demanding from start to finish, often a punishing encounter, but mostly a tremendous debut roaring aloud the might and potential of these new provocateurs.

Consisting of Jeff Wojtysiak (vocals/guitar), Ed Nudd (guitarist/vocals), Rebekah Brown (keys/vocals), Chase Bentley (guitar), Tim Baldwin (bass), and Jordan Schultz (drums), Cokegoat has built a formidable reputation with their live performances alone which has seen the band sharing stages with the likes of Church of Misery, The Skull, Early Graves, Electric Hawk, Order of the Owl, Jucifer, Indian, Mount Salem and many more. Vessel though is set to ignite the widest and probably wildest attention with eagerly accompanying acclaim you can only expect such its intensive proposition. Recorded with Andy Nelson of Weekend Nachos and mastered by Carl Saff (Unsane, Red Fang, Earthless), the impressive album may not end up heading best of lists come December but it is a release which is intensely impacting and unforgettable.

As mentioned earlier the album is primarily bred in a mesh of sludge and stoner metal but the eclectic textures and sound of the release CGvesselcover1600_1600are just as potent and instantly on show as opener Fear the Followers rages against the ears. Launching a sonic rabidity matched by vocal squalls and punching rhythms, the track is a furious brew seeded in punk and hardcore. It takes the senses and expectations immediately by surprise and once wrong footing their assumptions, unfurls infectious grooves and a melodic acidity seducing appetite and imagination. Twisting and swerving with almost vitriolic endeavour, the song evolves into a riveting landscape of warm climes and intimidating shadows as a doom kissed weight lies eagerly upon the forceful roars and senses entwining sonic hues. It is a compelling introduction explored to greater heights by the following pair of songs.

Buried in the City entangles the listener in a web of sonic design and predatory rhythms straight away, the guitars winding tight evocative sirens of sound round thoughts whilst coarse vocal abrasing works on emotions, their graze tempered superbly by the underlying clean vocals which coax just as potently. The ambience of the song is erosive from the start but brews and accelerates its intense malevolence and rapaciousness to trap and enslave before the outstanding destructive crescendo of a finale gets involved.

The following Dogs is a predatory treat, its dark throaty bass opening a wonderful distorted lure which seduces the senses ready for the annihilatory prowl and disorientating psychedelic manipulating brought by guitars and keys respectively. It is an alluring entrance which only increases in contagion as the track settles into a sinew driven stroll with a captivating mix of clean male and female vocals encased in carnivorous riffing and caustic hooks. It is a bewitching suasion, one which never loses its strength of bait even when a fiery energy and urgency washes through the heart of the song, vocals returning to grizzled scowls and riffs to their contentious enticement. A truly mesmeric encounter which is evolving its presence and narrative right to the closing seconds, the track takes top honours on the album though it’s persistently challenged by tracks like the two parts of End of Your Life. Part 1 is a venomous almost bestial challenge but a provocation which makes for riveting submission, its primal riffery and rhythmic angst perfectly aligned to mystical keys and subsequently roving, virtually rampaging melodic invention. Its slow to grip start is a raging infection by its climax, something Part 2, tries to replicate, it also beginning with a fully immersive and restrained opening. To be fair restraint to Cokegoat is still a raw abrasion which strips senses mercilessly and scores emotions permanently. The track does not match its partner in persuasion or the earlier tracks, but easily continues the invigorating ravaging provided by Vessel.

Fly by Night, Pt. 2 is pure aural pestilence, its opening second the cue for a corrosive swamp of guitar and bass to beleaguer the senses whilst rhythms lash the body with cyclonic intensity, a metallic punk voracity again coursing through sound and band. That hunger and animosity is held tight as sonic adventure with progressive insight spills across the distressed canvas of the song. It results in another thoroughly engrossing and intensive examination, one contrasted pleasingly by Fly by Daylight. Whereas the hostile climate of the previous track devoured, the mellower seducing of melodies and warm enterprise here soothes the wounds, though a mix of charming and abrasing vocals continue to stand and at times scream face to face as keys bring a celestial spattering to the strenuous soundscape.

The track swallows the imagination with ease, a success matched by the closing Glorious Dead. The song is spellbinding, a sirenesque envelopment aligning to another barbarous though more respectful intensity which unveils and expands a weave of sonic adventure and melody kissed enterprise. It is a towering end to the album, alone unleashing all the might and riches of the band in songwriting, passion, and experimentation.

Vessel is not without minor issues, primarily the lack of variety to the predominate abrasing vocals, though that is more to do with personal taste, and at times a lack of toxins to make some songs a lingering venom away from the release. They are small nags though and cannot stop album and Cokegoat providing an impressive and exciting debut.

Vessel is now available digitally from http://cokegoat.bandcamp.com/ and on red vinyl from The Path Less Traveled Records

http://www.facebook.com/cokegoat

8.5/10

RingMaster 30/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Imbroglio – The Struggle in Pursuit

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There is an overpowering beauty in something which is intensively tormented and destructively passionate, equally a compelling attraction in the most vicious inner struggles of man and their corrosive shadows, and that beauteous temptation does not come any more irresistible than the new album from US metallers Imbroglio. Returning from an obviously potent hiatus, the band has unleashed the ravenous The Struggle in Pursuit, a breath-taking slab of creative savagery which will leave newcomers to the band reeling and bring existing fans their most richly absorbing and imaginatively consuming presence yet.

It was a surprise when the Ohio band announced it was going on a hiatus on the eve of the release of their previous acclaimed full-length Declared Self Hatred. It was something which was desperately needed as band founder and  guitarist /vocalist D.J. Gilbert revealed in an interview with Exclaim!, where he stated “I no longer felt a fire burning inside because with Declared Self Hatred I felt like I finally wrote my final piece, my suicide note. I knew I was on my way to the easy way out. I literally expelled every ounce of hate for myself on that record. So it was either put it on an indefinite hiatus for a while or just allows myself to self-destruct.

Initially with the intent of starting a new band when ready to return to creating music, Gilbert was persuaded by new band member Bret Newland (drums/vocals) that the project had to stay as Imbroglio; that whatever Gilbert wrote and performed it would sound like the band anyway. Original band member Josh Deeter (bass/vocals) returned to complete the line-up with the trio setting about making returning EP which they recorded with Bobby Leonard. Featuring the contribution of keys and synths on a couple of tracks by Devon Robillard, who had played bass in the band at the time of the Sleep Deprivation album, The Struggle in Pursuit takes little time in smothering the senses and imagination in aural causticity and lyrical ravages incited by the struggle in the pursuit of happiness in today’s social climate. The songs rage and stand defiant against the wrongs and obstacles in life but with a triumphant and provocative stance promoting a broad and personal freedom.

The inventive tempest of grind, sludge, and doom metal from the band is veined by their most exhilarating and rigorous experimental TSIP_Album_Coverexploration to date; exhaustive and captivating invention immediately paraded on opener Full Speed. As its title implies, the song races through ears from its first breath, rhythms thundering down upon the senses and riffs immediately abrasing and flailing everything before them. Vocals need little coaxing to sear the air with vitriolic suasion as the bass darkens the imposing and strenuous maelstrom further. It is a disorientating treat, sonic spirals of invention and searing toxicity enflaming the imagination and an already drooling appetite for song and release. The track continues to lurch over and rip through the senses with sabre flung sonic twists of sound and a rhythmic predation which intimidates and commands full submission to its inciting call simultaneously.

The outstanding start is matched by the thick intensity and equally rapacious antagonism of Approaching, the track soaked in a passionate rabidity and driven by an anthemic enticement within a maelstrom of noise and intrigue. The track roars and rages as it engages and recruits the passions, every second a ferocious protagonist and every twist a mouthwatering intrusion of cutting sonic endeavour and enterprise. There is little time to concentrate on a single moment, the voracious attack and invention of songs a turbulence which needs numerous exploits to  explore fully which this and the following Gravity are perfect thrilling examples of. The third song of the release barracks and engages thoughts and emotions from its first touch, riffs and rhythms tenderising the senses as the guitar spurts potent sonic toxicity throughout the provocative landscape. It is a riveting furnace of emotion and sound which reaches a new height when solemn darkly toned clean vocals duet with the coarse squalls of voice and sound beneath them.  It is a tremendous sprawling and suffocating embrace of harsh and invigorating endeavour leaving the body a broadly smiling wasted mess.

Day Break gives no time for a breather or respite as it leaps straight at the listener, drums puncturing every inch of the psyche into which the guitars and vocal lay their vicious irresistible bait whilst the bass looks on with a dark hearted yet seductive lure. There is a hardcore violence to the track also which only accentuates its almost visceral predation leaving emotions smouldering and senses bruised. Its primal insistence makes way for Desolation, another track where the title reveals all before any sniff of the suffocating ambience and emotional suffering can soak the ears. It is a glorious cloud of despair and intent; one speared and split apart by unpredictable sonic imagination and skilled melody inspired shafts of scorched light. A towering conclusion to a quite brilliant encounter, the return of Imbroglio has given metal a new proposition to wax lyrical over, The Struggle in Pursuit deserving all the acclaim destined to come its way.

The Struggle in Pursuit is out via The Path Less Traveled Records now!

10/10

RingMaster Review 16/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Cave of Swimmers – Self Titled

 

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Originally self-released last year, the self-titled debut EP from Cave of Swimmers now has its deserved wider release with The Path Less Traveled Records, and an insatiably magnetic treat it is. Consisting of four irresistibly flavoured tracks which are unpredictable and compelling, the release ignites ears and imagination with a contagiously adventurous and dramatically enthralling encounter. Fusing the rich essences of varied metal and rock ventures into mouthwatering landscapes, band and EP provide one surprising and wholly captivating encounter.

Cave of Swimmers consists of Guillermo Gonzalez (vocals, guitar, synth) and Arturo Garcia (drums/backing vocals), two musicians hailing originally from Venezuela who relocated to Miami a few years back. The pair met in school but it was only nine years after their first meeting when Garcia git his first drum kit that the pair started making music together. They played in a few projects including a Rage Against The Machine cover band before Garcia moved to Miami followed four years later by Gonzalez. More years passed before the pair linked up musically properly, forming The Tunnel before renaming it Cave of Swimmers.

Their debut release instantly tells you all you need to know about the pair, their influences, intentions, and undoubted musical skills. From  CoS coverthe opening track Hangman, the band unveils a superbly textured and provocatively spices weave of styles and flavours ranging from seventies heavy metal and psychedelic rock to stoner and doom as well as a stirring progressive encrusted spicery. As the first song proves it is a riveting and refreshing concoction which hits the sweet spot time and time again. Song one instantly has attention at its will with eagerly coaxing rhythms framing expressive and inventive guitar suggestiveness. It is a heavy and melodically infused invitation which losing a little of its grip when relaxing into a less surprising stride, though it soon regains its potency with the outstanding vocals of Gonzalez. His voice soars and roars simultaneously, complementing and driving the sounds around him whilst his guitar, as the rhythms of Garcia, tie up any lingering doubts with anthemic arms.  As confirmed by all songs, there is never a moment to assume you know the destination of a track, a thrilling jazz/funk like salsa of Latin rhythmic temptation and melodic seduction tripping up expectations towards the middle of the first song before excellent guitar craft entwines ears and thoughts.

The outstanding start is soon matched by the initially bewildering Materia. A sinister atmospheric embrace coats the senses first, the breath of the moog synthesizer lying provocatively upon the ears as a rhythmic hurrying pushes the listener into the thick doomy arms of the song. It is a slowly tempered prowl which courts the imagination before being torn apart by the vocal flames of Gonzalez, his delivery verging on operatic and a shock to assumptions, a very welcome and absorbing jolt to expectations. The track continues to stalk with a noir clouded ambience and heavy footed muscular persuasion. It is an irresistible bewitchment, a beautifully thought out and presented drama which explores a brighter but still doom bred scenery. Keys and guitars cast further twists in the haunting narrative as they drop into a frightening textures and sonic mystery before reaching skywards with emotive invention to close the song.

The song Cave of Swimmers steps up next instantly employing open homages to the likes of Sabbath and Pentagram in riffs and melodic grooving whilst vocally they are again sparked by a heavy metal seeding. It is only part of the song’s colour though; it’s contagious hooks and winding sonic bait offering thoughts of Kyuss and Metallic in varying degrees. Inventive and persistently shifting in its gait, intensity, and pure imagination, the song escorts the listener on a breath-taking ride across scorching melody draped scenery and sultry sonic climates, closing out in a blistering vocal crescendo.

The strikingly impressive and immense infection of the release never abates across its length, the closing Catch ensuring the EP ends on the same lofty heights as it started on. The track arguably is the least adventurous of the four but still treats with stoner visited psychedelic temptations and the ever impressing vocal suasion, whilst samples and progressive tinkering only enhance the recipe. It is a fine end to a masterful and rapturous debut by a band with all the potential to make major strides and deposits in the world of metal. Make a note of the name Cave of Swimmers you will be hearing a great deal more of these guys we suspect.

Cave of Swimmers is out on The Path Less Traveled Records now!

https://www.facebook.com/caveofswimmers

http://thepathlesstraveledrecords.bandcamp.com/album/cave-of-swimmers

10/10

RingMaster 16/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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