The Dollyrots – Daydream Explosion

A party in the ears, romp with the body, and riot with the imagination; descriptions which can certainly be suggested upon the sound of the Dollyrots to date but definitely and strenuously applies to the band’s new release, Daydream Explosion. Across fourteen slices of the band’s inimitable fusion of punk, rock, and pop, the album incites and captivates but equally fascinates more than anything from the Los Angeles duo yet as diversity and adventure fuel an eclectic mix of contagious goodness.

With previous album, Whiplash Splash, one of the rousing treats of 2017, vocalist/bassist Kelly Ogden and vocalist/guitarist Luis Cabezas have pulled out all the creative stops to outshine that acclaimed release with Daydream Explosion. From the moment it gives its first eager breath we can declare aim accomplished and an irresistible slab of infectious enterprise bred.

Produced by the band with long-time producer John Fields, Daydream Explosion immediately had ears and attention in its hands, a teasing hook bringing in the pop ‘n’ roll of opener Animal. Ogden’s seductive tones swiftly join the broadening stomp of the track; Cabezas’ soon after and as magnetic as the rhythms and riffs which collude in a charge of flirtatious punk nurtured hooks. As catchy and inescapable as barbed wire, the song effortlessly gets the album off to a rousing start.

With beats swinging, riffs nagging, Everything steps up next and just as devilishly infests body and spirit. Again vocals simply incite participation as easily as the rhythms manipulate feet, the song’s chorus a heightened exploitation of an already fired up appetite for the record and eager subservience to its pop persuasion.

In Your Face comes with a steadier gait after but even in its shimmering sway there is a zeal and energy keen to break out which it does in another contagion of a chorus, the song’s seductive pop increasingly volatile and riveting before Naked uncages its alternative rock devilment like a pop infested Blood Red Shoes. With a rock ‘n’ roll shaped heart the track quickly builds its own character and grinning escapade to be unique Dollyrots.

As expected hooks escape the band like rocker instincts bound in one listening to the album, next up Last Ones on Earth relishes its own host of ear snaring conjuring. With a pop breath seemingly taking inspiration from an array of decades the song commands air and attention while exploring more eighties pop seeded breeding I Love You Instead follows to get the body popping all over again and sap the lungs just a little more of their willing breath. With all songs, but here especially, you can almost feel the fun and big broad grins the pair should have had creating one devilish encounter.

Through the ear smooching sixties girl group toned Watching the Storm Go By and the frenetically stomping I Know How to Party, band and album only pulled attention further away from reality, both tracks major moments among only highlights with the latter carrying a mischievous nod towards Andrew W.K. in certain moments while Kat’s Meow more than matched their glories with its virulently frisky stroll.

There is no decline in pure temptation as No Princess springs its own individual pop punk epidemic straight after nor as Flippy In My Red Dress infests hips and passion with its rampant rock ‘n’ roll seduction.  Like a mix of The Hillbilly Moon Explosion and Stray Cats but pure Dollyrots, the song is sublime, a major favourite track challenger though tested throughout the album for that honour as proven by the feisty Oblivious and Talk Too Much with its senses taunting hooks and melodic dance, a combination far too potent to resist.

The album closes up with Daisy’s Song, a final slice of punk ‘n’ rock temptation as instinctively sinful as it is masterfully manipulative and simply beguiling. And that pretty much describes Daydream Explosions as a whole, creatively wicked and unapologetically infectious and most likely the best piece of pop punk you will embrace and devour this year or possibly next.

Daydream Explosions is out now via Wicked Cool Records/ The Orchard; available @ https://thedollyrotswcr.bandcamp.com/album/daydream-explosion

http://www.dollyrots.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thedollyrots/    https://twitter.com/thedollyrots

Pete RingMaster 13/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Basement Critters – Hurt Me With The Truth

Currently working on their debut album, Belgian metallers Basement Critters recently signed a worldwide distribution deal with Wormholedeath for their first official EP, Hurt Me With The Truth. It has given their highly praised offering, originally released in 2016, a broader voice, an invitation to a host of new ears and a sure to be fresh wealth of anticipation for that first full-length.

Thrash metal bred but coming with a richer variety of flavours, the Basement Critters’ sound is a mix of crossover adventure and thrash ferocity emerging as a beast akin to a fusion of Stuck Mojo and Testament. It is familiar yet pleasingly individual and unafraid to embrace any spicing which takes the West-Vlaanderen hailing band’s imagination. It makes for a rousing roar as evidenced within Hurt Me With The Truth, an encounter deserving of a fuller landscape to tempt.

 The EP opens up with Brain Bleach and instantly prowls the listener with predacious riffs and rhythms. Guitarists Sven Caes and Glenn Labie wind their bait and emerging grooves around ears as drummer Frederik Vanwijmelbeke pounds with controlled but voracious intent. In the midst of the sizing up vocalist Thomas Marijsse brings a raw agitation which in turn is courted by the heavy grumble of Frederik Declercq’s bass. The song continues to stalk and tenderise the senses, going up a gear or two but never going for the jugular. Instead it springs a virulent groove which had the body bouncing as a swift appetite for the band’s sound erupted. That cycle repeats with greater tenacity and intensity, the track making for a tremendous start with a vocal self-diagnosis adding to its instinctive contagion.

The following Storm similarly circles its target, guitars driving its intentions before inciting a voracious assault. Again the band twists and turns in its attack, urgency varying with unpredictable adventure as the song’s ferociousness ever deviates. The vocals of Marijsse epitomise that adventure, fluidly moving through a variation of dexterity in tandem with the sounds before Nature Strikes Back raids the senses with a more expected thrash offense but one lined with irresistible hooks and anthemic tendencies. The track is superb, a galvanic incitement mixing up the old and new with fresh boisterousness and craft. Declercq’s bass unleashes a delicious rabid growl throughout the EP, though sometimes seems a touch hidden by the exploits around him, and is in full rumbling voice here as it prowls the blaze of the guitars.

Hurt Me With The Truth concludes with the pair of Book and 39:16. The first saunters through ears with an almost doom laden gait, vocals reflecting their emotional tone and defiance within the song’s own thick voracity and predatory nature while its successor is thrash savagery and heavy metal flirtation rolled up in a multi-flavoured nagging of ears and spirit. It also slips into tantalising calm as the progressive instincts of the guitars conjure, rhythms rumbling alongside before sparking a further anthemic arousal.

It is a fine end to a release which we are so glad has been given a new chance to introduce the thrash adventure of Basement Critters. Like those things in the dark corners of the lowest depths, the band’s sound lurks and prowls, often teasing before lashing out with a delicious feral bite.

The Hurt Me With The Truth EP is out on all digital stores via Wormholedeath / The Orchard.

https://www.basementcritters.be/    https://www.facebook.com/BasementCritters/

Pete RingMaster 04/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright