Popes Of Chillitown – Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard

Releases which have us throwing feet, hips, and bodies around in an uninhibited frenzy are just as boisterously devoured here as those provoking thoughts and imagination into the same eager exploits. Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard, the new album from UK outfit Popes Of Chillitown is one such example, an encounter which stirs up every aspect of the human spirit across thirteen slices of what for the moment we will simply call ska punk but is so much more. The band and release swiftly had the body bouncing, energies uncaged, and mind feeding off its insightful social and personal lyrical intimation. It is one of those unforgettable, deviously manipulative propositions which will surely set Popes Of Chillitown on the way to being a household name far beyond the ska and punk scene.

From London, Popes Of Chillitown has already bred and nurtured a fine reputation across two albums and a live presence which has had venues and bodies bouncing, as the album now, with lustful participation. 2013 saw the release of their pledge-funded debut album A Word To The Wise, a keenly embraced encounter eclipsed by its even more eagerly received successor To The Moon two years later. Since that first offering, the sextet has further lit up the live scene, from the Capital bursting across the UK and into Europe sharing stages with the likes of Reel Big Fish, The Selecter, The Skints, Imperial Leisure, [Spunge], Mouthwash, The Snare and many more along the way.

As Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard swiftly reveals, the band’s sound has an irresistibility which borders on the viral. It is a fusion of upbeat ska, punk, 2-tone, dub, drum & bass, reggae, indie with plenty more flavoursome spices working away in the mix; a rousing incitement which never flirts with the predictable and across the new album, easily the band’s finest moment yet, persistently has body, imagination, and spirit bounding.

Straight away as intrigue coaxes ears there is a sense of drama and mischief at play which swiftly sparks opener Prang into life, the track springing along with wilful exuberance. The guitar of Tom Penn winds around ears from an already persuasive hook spraying stroll while the rhythmic prowess of bassist Arvin Bancil and drummer Jack Ashley gets under the skin in no time. Matt Conner’s rousing vocals are just as effective, listener participation we found inevitable and can keen testify to. The track is superb, its twist into discord and off kilter imagination icing on the stomp.

The flames of trombonist Ieuan Williams and saxophonist Jon Pryce open up the following Get Off/Get On, lighting the way to another persuasive saunter ridden by the increasingly captivating vocals of Conner. There is a touch of [Spunge] meets King Prawn to the track, a tasty flavouring quickly ignited by the band’s own raucously individual enterprise.

Fair to say Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard already had its temptation racing through our veins in two songs but raised the temperature of its persuasion even more with next up Vexed. Cored by a hook which had ears and appetite dangling like a fish on a rod as well as a glorious teasing yet taunting grumble of a bassline, the track instantly took the album’s seductive clamour to another level. Brewing an addictive roar something akin to The Mighty Mighty Bosstones meets Capdown with the rawer edge of The Hostiles, the track simply and quickly had us enslaved and adding our less able attributes.

The equally outstanding No Manners In Ireland is next, the song a web of twists and turns littered with creative hooks and melodic lures which seduce like sonic sirens. Guitars and vocals dance on the swagger of the rhythms, their dark lined joy seared with the soulful flames of brass as the song evolves in form and imagination across four minutes plus of pure magnetism. Its glory is matched by that of the far briefer but just as riveting Graveyard. A dub infested mix of Skindred and again King Prawn, the slither of a track just ignited the senses before Upside Down got the body rocking and rolling with its almost salacious bounce and antics.

Across the fiery ska fuelled punk ‘n’ roll of The Last Elephant and the swinging holler of Mr. Piotr, physical reaction is inescapable as thoughts invest in more of the band’s lyrical inference, both tracks cauldrons of drama and physical manipulation so easy to devour while the likes of What A Guy and Inner Peace add yet more variety and adventure to the album’s beauty. The first erupts from a haunting melancholic sigh into another inescapable to resist canter, voice and hips soon embroiled in its creative romp before its companion smoulders seductively on the senses with its less boisterous but just as tenacious reflection. From guitars to rhythms, brass to voice, the song serenades and seduces; volatility in its heart adding greater depth to its inventive cry and increasingly rising temperature and intensity.

Take Control is punk rock blessed with the ear clipping tenacity of ska; a rousing trespass of an incitement under a sweltering climate of suggestion cast by sax and trombone. Unsurprisingly again indulgence in its swing is unavoidable, a lack of discipline thankfully the whole of Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard exploits.

The album closes up with firstly the melodically shimmering Lego Prisoners, a track resembling what you might imagine emerging from the essences of Ruts DC, The Skints, and a calm Random Hand being locked in together, and lastly Culpa and its reggae brewed saunter where grooves and beats overwhelm restraints even before voice and hooks sink their temptation into ears.

It all makes for one deliciously riveting and rousing adventure going by the name of Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard. Popes Of Chillitown has been firing up the ska and punk scene pretty much from their first days but are now ready to be spoken in the same breath as those bands which immediately come to mind as inspirations to the across the array of styles the Londoners skilfully embrace and employ in their own adventure. After Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard they might just be the first name to lips.

Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard is out now on 12inch vinyl, CD and Digital Download @ https://popesofchillitown.bandcamp.com/album/work-hard-play-hard-see-you-in-the-graveyard

 

Upcoming Popes Of Chillitown tour dates:

MAY 27 – BOURNEMOUTH Cursus Festival

JUN 02 – NOTTINGHAM The Maze

JUN 09 – CHEPSTOW Balter Festival

AUG 04 – BLACKPOOL Rebellion Festival

AUG 09 – NEWCASTLE Trillians*

AUG 10 – GLASGOW Audio*

AUG 11 – LONDON Underworld*

AUG 12 – WINCHESTER Boomtown Fair

*w/ Fishbone

http://www.popesofchillitown.com/   https://www.facebook.com/PopesOfChillitown    https://twitter.com/popesofctown

Pete RingMaster 18/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Celeb Car Crash – ¡Mucha Lucha!

CCC_RingMaster Review

Fusing a great blend of nineties rock and pop punk into a modern alternative rock invention, Italian quartet Celeb Car Crash have a sound which feels simultaneously fresh and familiar. It is a mix which makes their latest EP, ¡Mucha Lucha! an adventurous but equally, an instinctively enticing proposition. Bringing three varied and fiercely magnetic slices of melodic rock ‘n’ roll to bear on ears and appetite, the release alone suggests that Celeb Car Crash are pushing towards major attention.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Nicola Briganti, drummer Michelangelo Naldini, guitarist Carlo Alberto Morini, and bassist Simone Benati, Celeb Car Crash emerged at the end of 2012 and quickly set about recording their first encounter. Ambush! was unveiled in the April of 2013, backed by the video /single Dead Poets Society. Gaining strong attention from fans and media alike, the album was supported by an extensive tour across Italy, Switzerland, France, and the UK and shows supporting bands such as Gotthard and Coheed and Cambria, all reinforcing the emergence of record and band. After another well-received single the previous year, 2014 saw the band again concentrate on tours and shows, ending with Celeb Car Crash winning the Red Bull Tourbus contest against 1700 other entrants, resulting in the band playing three shows as support to Lacuna Coil and the chance to record a new single. That was to be Because I’m Sad, the opening song and lead to the ¡Mucha Lucha! EP.

celeb-car-crash-300x300Celeb Car Crash - ¡Mucha Lucha!     Backed by two unreleased tracks on the EP, the Olly Riva and Mario Rice produced Because I’m Sad gets things off to a gripping start. From its opening coaxing of acoustic guitar and the swiftly magnetic voice of Briganti, the song has ears in the palm of its hands, especially as the gentle opening soon sparks a feistier burst of rhythms and riffs. Quickly blooming greater colour and richer tempting through spicy hooks and anthemic enterprise, it continues to evolve, breaking into a tenacious canter reminding of bands like Everclear and Jimmy Eat World. It is a recognisable essence though which only adds to the potency and arousing drama of the song, and indeed its virulent infectiousness.

The following Next Summer has a more hard rock endeavour to its character but also a rhythm and blues spicing which has thoughts of Graham Parker hinting as it continues to explore its wiry walls and throaty canvas. Sharing the same boisterous energy as its predecessor and ripe with melodic flames and catchy hooks, the song shows another hue to the songwriting and sound of Celeb Car Crash, a raw and dirtier toning bred from more fresh and varied sources of rock ‘n roll gripping the imagination.

The EP is completed by ¡Adiós Talossa! (tututu), a sultry seductive affair from the off with warm emotive coaxing cast from the trumpet of Damiele Ravaiolli. Growing and blossoming with every passing minute, the bewitching track grows into a grungy pop punk affair around a compelling rhythmic stomp. Whispers of Green Day, Nirvana, The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, and again Graham Parker all seem to collude as a thicker aural colour continues to enrich a captivating encounter spawned from the band’s own invigorating ideation.

The opener and closer definitely steal the show upon ¡Mucha Lucha! but the thoroughly enjoyable Next Summer also shows that Celeb Car Crash have real variety and depth to their music and writing. A little late to the party, the EP is actually our introduction to the band but one which has sparked a keen appetite to see where they go next. An intrigue we will surely not be alone in.

¡Mucha Lucha! is available now via Sliptrick Records through most digital stores.

http://www.celebcarcrash.com/ https://www.facebook.com/CelebCarCrash/

RingMaster 22/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

 

Strings Of Atlas – In A Better World EP

Atlas and his Nova_RingMaster Review

Strings Of Atlas is a “psychedelic urban punk band”, a labelling which presumably comes from either the band or someone pushing them and their new encounter, In A Better World EP. It is a tag which sort of fits and does not, but one label that does is simply that the El Paso bred Strings Of Atlas is one mighty fine rock ‘n’ roll incitement. The band’s sixth studio and latest offering is our introduction to the duo of singer/songwriter Atlas Cage (vocals, guitar, bass, drums) and former Archetyped bassist Ed C., and the first feeling, after being gripped by strong enjoyment, is that we have been missing out. Consisting of five tracks which whip up attention and appetite with increasing success, the EP is a thumping treat of an encounter. Not one to re-invent the boundaries of rock music but certainly one to give it a new tasty prod.

Since forming, Strings of Atlas has opened for such artists as Nick McGalis and Guitar Slim, whilst their music has graced a trio of short films and the soundtrack of the movie, The Edison Bomb. As mentioned and according to the press release for the EP, In A Better World is release number six from the band and for us potentially the one to awaken a new broad spotlight upon their stirring sound.

Strings Of Atlas - In A Better World Album Cover_RingMaster Review     The EP opens with Burning Days and a spicy web of grooves aligned to punchy beats. It is a strongly alluring start which hits another level once the striking tones of Cage join the affair. His voice reminds of Dicky Barrett from The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, and once it unites with the already potent sounds brewing up in the song, a nice whiff of Rocket From the Crypt emerges. It is an essence which only gets stronger within subsequent songs on the EP. His guitar play is just as magnetic too, riffs and hooks laying down nothing particularly spectacular yet everything comes with a craft and instinct to it which is virulently infectious. The song continues to get feet and imagination involved before making way for its equally potent successor.

The second song is the EP’s title track, and like the first it grabs instant focus, this time with a sultry blues toned coaxing complete with soulful melodies and vocal persuasion. The song’s steady and enticing stroll continues to smoulder and sizzle, and though it does not have the imposing snap of its predecessor, the track is one lingering slice of fiery enterprise.

As strong as its first two tracks are though, In A Better World kicks up another gear from The Way You Don’t Love on. The third proposal is an incendiary slab of garage and melodic rock, that RFTC whisper entwining with a great sixties spicing springing thoughts of bands like The Kinks and The Who to mind. Loaded with an additional snarl and a breed of punkish attitude which can only give an extra spark to any rock ‘n’ roll stomp, the song perfectly hits the spot, though as it outshines the previous song it is in turn eclipsed by the following Odyssey. The feisty stomp is glorious, a cauldron of rebellious riffs and rhythms wrapped in a gripping mesh of guitar and bass tenacity, each casting contagious hooks and a predacious air. Again vocally Cage has full attention, stirring things up as potently as the sounds around him with the result one outstanding rock roar.

The release is concluded by A Light In The Dark, a rousing and tantalising seduction of psych rock and melodic punk, again predominantly recalling The Mighty Mighty Bosstones and Rocket From the Crypt whilst sculpting its own distinct and irresistible romp of anthemic rock ‘n’ roll.

Co-Produced by Charles Godfrey, In A Better World sets the wheels in motion for a far keener and expansion spotlight on the band. Strings Of Atlas have certainly now caught and chained our attention and it is hard to imagine us being a lone new recruit to this potential drenched and thoroughly enjoyable band.

The In A Better World EP is available now on Amazon and iTunes or @ http://www.stringsofatlas.com/music

https://www.facebook.com/stringsofatlas

RingMaster 17/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

The Talks – Radio

the talks pic

It is never hard to get feet and passions up for a healthy infectious dose of ska punk and it does not come in any finer form of potency than Radio the new single from UK quartet The Talks. An irresistible toe tapping escapade with the vitality of The Selector, the addictive prowess of The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, and the irrepressible invention of The Specials, the single ignites the imagination and passions with sublime efficiency whilst breeding a boisterous hunger for not only itself but the band’s highly anticipated forthcoming album Commoners, Piers, Drunks and Thieves. One song does not make an album but if the rest of the exploits are half as enslaving and potent as Radio than a heady ride is coming our way.

Since forming Hull’s The Talks has built and earned a strong reputation for sound and presence across not only the UK but Europe. Their sharing of stages with the likes of The Specials, Rancid, Madness, The Beat, King Blues, and The Toasters has only put the quartet of Jody Moore, Pat Pretorius, Iain Allen, and Richard “Titch” Lovelock into increasingly intensive spotlights. It has been a recognition reinforced and enhanced by their releases; the 2012 single Can Stand The Rain which featured the legendary Neville Staple easily marking the cards of a great many whilst last year’s West Sinister EP took things to greater levels of attention and support. The band’s last single Don’t look behind you pushed it all on again, its success leading to slots at festivals such as Boomtown and Camden Rocks at home and the Sapi Festival in France and the Fusion Festival in Germany.

The new album is the source of the next great hunger sure to be inspired by the band, greed set to be intensified with the rampant appearance of Radio. The single instantly casts a rhythmic coaxing and melodic bait to be pounced upon with feverish energy, an entrance swiftly exploding into a magnetic canter of irrepressible enticement through keys and guitar stabs under the great anthemic singular and group lure of vocals. As all good ska fuelled emprises, the track holds a riveting swagger which is as anthemic to feet and passions as the punchy rhythms framing the whole dance. Complete with flames of brass and constantly seducing keys, the track is an epidemic stride of sound and melodic magnetism with just that edge of punk belligerence.

Radio is a song for steamy climates and floor quaking dancehalls, a celebration to indulge in time and time again alone or in a crowd as we wait the next rigorously intriguing and sure to be majestic exploit from The Talks.

Radio is available on All Our Own Records now digitally and on LTD Edition 7″ Vinyl.

http://www.thetalks.co.uk/

9/10

RingMaster 30/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Cherry Poppin’ Daddies – White Teeth, Black Thoughts

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You will excuse any misplaced words and deviation of thought as you read this review as it is all down to the fact that these hips are still swerving as feet are stomping with a dervish passion whilst emotions flying high from listening to the delicious romp of White Teeth, Black Thoughts. You can blame its creators Cherry Poppin’ Daddies for this over enthusiastic and lingering unprofessional relish as they spread the irresistible swing and jazz passion of their new and sixth full-length release via People Like You Records. Bringing eleven richly flavoured and distinctly shaped temptresses to flirt, seduce, and enslave the imagination, the album sees the US band diving back into their swing and jazz inspired natures, leaving the more eclectic worldly sounds of previous offerings to the side, for one terrific and unforgettable party.

From the release of their 1990 debut album Ferociously Stoned a year after forming, Cherry Poppin’ Daddies has ignited bodies and passions with their constantly tempting sounds; the band fusing weaves of potent spices and styles along the way. They brewed or certainly accelerated a loyal and swiftly growing fanbase around the world with their compilation Zoot Suit Riot: The Swingin’ Hits of the Cherry Poppin’ Daddies in 1997, it the catalyst to a new concentrated attention and hunger for their sound. Since its invitation albums like Soul Caddy and Susquehanna in 2000 and 2008 respectively, with their wider striking mixes of flavours such as ska, rock, and at times pop, have only increased the band’s acclaim and presence whilst shows and tours with bands such as Reel Big Fish, The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Rancid and Bad Religion have unreservedly enhanced their reputation and stature.

The early more concentrated swing and jazz fuelled time of their first releases though for many is the core and instinctive sound of the Press_CoverOregon band and returning to it White Teeth, Black Thoughts proves the octet has lost none of their flare and fervour not to mention skill for the styles. The album is not a throwback to those times though but a fresh and contemporary slice of revelry immersed in the world of today and its issues. Vocalist/guitarist Steve Perry, who founded the band alongside bassist Dan Schmid, described the album and the intent of the band with it as “We’re a modern band talking about modern problems,” going on to say “This is not a nostalgic record. If anything, it’s a record about nostalgia. I’m not interested in old things; I’m interested in how old things function now.

As soon as the brass flames soar over the ears escorted by crisp beats and a riveting dark bass tone, opener The Babooch has attention in the palm of its hands; trumpet, sax, and trombone similarly igniting the imagination with their fiery temptation. Settling into a steady stroll, keys and rhythms entangle an already awoken appetite further whilst the smooth tones of Perry croon with an eager smile as group vocal additives and cheeky twists within the song skirt and accentuate the lure of the track. Well into its stride the track subsequently lifts its urgently driven feet to run with the melodic devilry grinning within all members and their instrumentations; the encounter a glorious and irresistible start to the album swiftly backed and increased by I Love American Music. Like its predecessor, the song needs no time to warm up its intent and desire to have the listener instantly engaged and dancing with its swinging gait and boldly stomping hips. So with more contagion to its narrative and melodic toxicity than at a sultry burlesque show and just as much aural sex, the song magnetically storms and seductively smoulders across its piece of defiant devilry, alternating the bait whilst providing an unrelenting temptation of insatiable imagination.

The following Whiskey Jack ensures that there is not lifting of the persuasion and energy, its blustery brass caresses potent incitements to thoughts and feet. Their masterful seizing of the senses is persistently coaxed and driven by the as now expected excellent vocals of Perry and the colourful dance of keys, though once again it is a song which skilfully throws strands of unexpected textures and unpredictable sounds with equally intriguing ideation into the mix. Hunger for the album at this point is intense; greed just as wholesomely fed by Doug the Jitterbug, a glorious cover of the Louis Jordan track, and the sultrily fired title track. The first of the two is a jazz bred quickstep of mischievous urgency and vivacious enterprise whilst the second whilst also being seeded in a rich soak of jazz tempting, finds just as riveting strains of blues and R&B within its simmering and evocative melodic blaze.

The dark boisterous and pulsating entrance of next up Brown Flight Jacket immediately has lips licked, the resonance of hollow yet vocal drums, similarly intensive bass, and the ever descriptive keys merging for a mouthwatering welcome. In many ways the emergence of the undeniably mesmeric and enthralling keys and vocal harmonies thereafter is an anti-climax such the impressive build-up, but the song soon has mind and heart locked and loaded within its mellow enticement. The song whips up yet another lustful response towards the album, taking longer than most may be to get there but over time seducing with the guile and poise of a siren.

The variety within the release continues with another masterful cover, this time of the Hank Penny track Bloodshot Eyes, which riles up another surge of eagerness in the appetite, and then the inventive and unexpected proposition of Jakes Frilly Panties. The song sees the band dig right back in time with its blues piano swagger but it is the static in the production recalling forties and fifties recordings which steals the imagination most. The success of the pair is matched by the darker toned almost salacious Huffin Muggles, a weave of heavily throated and resourceful temptation walked through by equally mysterious and darkly alluring vocals. Its outstanding sound and invention reminds of the sounds bands like Molotov Jukebox and The BeauBowBelles have been spreading around the passions.

As good as the trio of songs are they have to play second fiddle in a way to the final cover on the album. Recorded back in the day by Bull Moose Jackson, Cherry Poppin’ Daddies give Bowlegged Woman an accomplished devilry musically and vocally which cannot fail to raise constant chuckles and pleasure. Its boisterous revelry is followed by the closing masterful call of Concrete Man Blues, arguably the biggest swing number on the album with its orchestrated fire. The song completes a captivating and dramatically thrilling release, White Teeth, Black Thoughts an addiction casting treat which shows that Cherry Poppin’ Daddies are still the masters of swing induced jazz sculpted revelry. If the likes of King Salami and the Cumberland 3, The Stargazers, and Brian Setzer tinkle your fancy then Cherry Poppin’ Daddies and their new album is a must.

White Teeth, Black Thoughts is available now via People Like You Records.

http://www.daddies.com/

https://www.facebook.com/CherryPoppinDaddies

9/10

RingMaster 05/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Boy – Darkest Visions

boy 2

Imagine a mix of The Angelic Upstarts and UK Subs with an equally potent blend of Rocket From The Crypt and Turbonegro, and you have a sense of Czech punks Boy and the body of their outstanding debut album Darkest Visions. Fusing old school British punk with a touch of glam and raw rock ‘n’ roll, band and release make a dramatic entrance to a worldwide market with their Rebel Sound/Voltage Records released rampage. It is an encounter which has a welcome familiarity to its brawl but just as strongly a unique breath and substance which marks out Boy as a band with a potentially mighty future within the world of punk rock. The band name suggests wishy-washy media friendly teen pleasing blandness, what you get is raw antagonistic punk rock of the finest order.

There is little we can reveal about the background of the band with any available bio offered in Czechoslovakian, but they are a quintet from Brno who have previously released a three track 7” EP via Voltage Records last year and before that had a track on the 2012 compilation Brno stále v plamenech (Brno Still In Flames). Their new full-length is produced by Turbonegro’s Tommy Akerholdt and features numerous guests including Ronnie King (who has worked with NOFX, Rancid, Offspring, Snoop Dog) on piano, Shawn Smash (Total Chaos) on guitar, Daniel Marusack (Chancers) on flute, Theresa Kovalová (Calm Season) on cello, and Martin Maleček (ex – Centaury ,SRK) on conga. That piece of info alone tells you the flavoursome design and sounds bursting from within the punk bred tempest, though the album starts off with a more straight forward belligerent sound.

The title track opens things up with a fiery welcome, hooks blazing vociferously within the ears whilst vocal samples bred from 9/11 place front coverthe drama of the release. It is a heavy weight welcome with sinews building up their intent and intensity ready for the following I Need Your Hate. The second track is immediately snarling and gnawing at the senses, riffs bordering on carnivorous and rhythms an imposing barracking. The excellent rough vocals roar and confront with a voracity which matches the passion of the sounds around them, the song further flaming with seductive melodies from within its rapacious onslaught. There is nothing dramatically ground breaking about the song but with impressive individual skills, a scorching solo, and anthemic band vocals it is an irresistible proposition.

Never Break Us Down binds the imagination next with an instant addictive groove, a lure aligned to numerous sharp hooks and that again virulent anthem seeded suasion which already the band proves they are expert at sculpting. The resourceful romp offers that earlier mentioned RFTC comparison as well as holding a touch of The Mighty Mighty Bosstones to its catchy temptation, both elements re-occurring across the album and adding extra spice to the outstanding raucous charge of punk ’n’ roll. It is a mix which lights up Back For More to a different degree, the band grazing the senses with greater causticity and ravenous breath. Again there is a compelling contagion to the track which has attention and appetite impatient for more which Stay Free more than happily provides. Abrasing ears with acidic sonic swipes from the first second along with an evocatively brewing wash of keys, the track broadens its riveting narrative with a wonderful dark cello croon and atmospheric shadows. It is like a mix of UK band The Duel and Russian punks Biting Elbows, an invasive seduction which subsequently stretches further into a NOFX like imposing. The track is quite glorious, pushing the invention and songwriting of the band whilst still entrenched in their epidemically appealing seventies seeded punk.

Stop Talking To Me stalks and riles up the imagination next, riffs on a chunky prowl speared by predatory rhythms. The vocals are vitriolic in delivery and malevolent in intent, a seemingly different voice leading the intrusive belligerence as the track squares up to the senses and emotions. It is a great strike but one which ends far too soon, only one minute forty seconds in length, and closes on a frustrating and actually very annoying fade-out. These grievances are soon forgotten though as Drop The Bomb scores ears with an acrid flame of guitar punctuated by keys and wisps of melodic guitar invention. The song strides purposefully with a slow predation, absorbing imagination and the by now constantly submissive passions. It is another total captivation revealing yet more of the depths of sound and invention within Boy, the unveiling continued with the heavy rock exploits of It was the Alcohol. The track is prime punk and hard rock with glam devilry and metal toned hunger, and impossibly addictive especially its infectious chorus which is bait only the deaf or the six feet under could resist joining in with.

The album comes to a close with firstly the thrilling quarrelsome bluster and catchiness of Fashion Police then the incendiary glory of Just A Number. The last track is an aggressive scrap of spellbinding hooks, fierce riffs, and punchy rhythms all merged into a rabid contagious punk spat, a last lingering triumph to sear the sound and name of Boy in to the memory and passions.

Darkest Visions is one of the punk glories of recent years and a potent suggestion that Boy has all the armoury and invention to be a real force in punk and rock rioting across numerous horizons to come.

Darkest Visions is available through Rebel Sound and Voltage Records now as a black vinyl release with a 12 -page booklet and in a deluxe version clad in silver foiled artwork.

https://www.facebook.com/PUNKROCKHOOLIGANS

http://www.boy-punk.com/

9/10

RingMaster 19/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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