Canshaker Pi – Naughty Naughty Violence

The word is that Dutch outfit Canshaker Pi is one emerging proposition sparking excitement and keen attention at every turn.  Now having been introduced to them through their first album it is easy to hear why. Naughty Naughty Violence is a devilishly magnetic and creatively mischievous indie rock romp; one spawned from a fusion of ear grabbing flavours equipped with an arsenal of hooks to make a Cenobite jealous.

The Amsterdam band’s sound is bred through varied strains of rock, punk, indie, and noise woven into a web of rhythmic and sonic manipulation. Since forming, the quartet has earned increasing attention and praise through their music and a live presence which has seen them share stages with the likes of The Cribs, Car Seat Headrest, Parquet Courts, Pip Blom, and Scott Kannberg’s Spiral Stairs and this year alone gather plaudits from playing Eurosonic, SXSW, and The Great Escape. That Pavement link is maybe no surprise as the band’s sound has a certain spicing of them and no doubt helped the band grab support slot on Kannberg’s side project’s tour in 2017 and continues with Canshaker Pi’s debut album being produced by Stephen Malkmus.

Naughty Naughty Violence swiftly shows that there is a definite individuality to Canshaker Pi’s sound, one not necessarily unique but springing a fresh and distinct character of imagination and flavouring which quickly got under our skin. Album opener is Pressure From Above, a song instantly teasing with an electronic wag of its creative finger and soon bursting into a fuzz fired boisterous stroll. As calm vocals join in, the track relaxes but is soon romping again bringing greater clamour and tenacity to its contagious rock ‘n’ roll. Already it is easy to sense that Pavement inspiration and too of bands like The Mai Shi, a kaleidoscope of hooks and melodic unpredictability additionally lighting the great beginning to the release.

It is a start soon eclipsed though, the initial off-kilter sonic lure of next up Tonsil enough alone to ignite our discord loving instincts. It is a kind of false start but the trigger to the glorious swagger wearing exploits of the track, that continuing discord a delicious clamour of temptation and trespass often enticing like a raw pop fuelled mix of Shellac and The Melvins. The final sonic sigh of the track drifts into the opening vocal and sonic discordance of Sooner Later. Around a compelling bass throb, the brief but dramatic track ignites and disrupts the senses, noise and voice a volatile incitement driven by the irresistible manipulation of the drums.

Three tracks in and fair to say we were hooked and only dangling with further enjoyment as Smurf uncaged its infectious canter like a grunge inspired Fountains of Wayne next with the following If Kelly Doesn’t, Then Who Will calming things down with its melodic and rhythmic pop ‘n’ roll. Neither track quite sparked the more lustful responses caused by their predecessors but ears could not evade being caught up in their individual and increasingly persuasive captivations; the latter especially as it just blossomed play by play to have us bouncing around as forcibly as its own endeavour.

But Why provided one minute of rousing noise rock next, rhythms humping ears as guitars meddle with the senses and vocals tease. With not even a breath allowed between them, No Sack, No Way saunters in to match its success, an immediate ear enslaving hook steering its lure. It is matched in magnetism by bass and vocals, each a controlled but virulent tempting entangling for even greater seduction of the imagination. Pop rock has rarely been heard more addictively in our speakers though its successor Put A Record Out with its ballsier rock ‘n’ roll was more than a match as it unleashed its resourcefully fiery clamour around further rhythmic machination.

In contrast to its raucous blaze, Legless provided a calm almost solemn amble through sound and imagination. The outstanding track carries something of early Cure meets Dinosaur Jr to its tantalising slow post punk sway while The Indie Academy straight after is up on its heels swinging along with pop rock devilment to almost as imposingly please.

The final pair of Half Book and Beautiful World brings the album to a potent conclusion, the first of the two again inventively merging flavours and eras with its post punk/pop punk infested rock before the second leaves ears immersed in a shadow wrapped melancholic croon with its own infectious gait and enterprise boiling up to a rousing corrosive climax.

Naughty Naughty Violence is an album which was really hard to move on from which tells you all about its exploits and temptations. As we said at the start, Canshaker Pi is being very highly talked of right now, their new album gives all the reasons why.

Naughty Naughty Violence is out now through Excelsior Recordings.

http://www.canshakerpi.nl/   https://www.facebook.com/CanshakerPi/   https://twitter.com/CanshakerPi

Pete RingMaster 05/06/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Exoskeletons – We Are Here To Make Things Better

Two years ago, British outfit Exoskeletons caught the imagination with their first release, the Get Lost EP. It was a striking almost rabid slice of punk infused noise rock which excited as it whetted the appetite for the band’s emerging sound. Since then the band has been in a process of “writing, gigging, destroying and rewriting material in an effort to find something new and more challenging.” The upcoming release of debut album We Are Here To Make Things Better is undeniable evidence in their discovering and exploring that new and individual incitement which most importantly is rather irresistible.

From Kent, Exoskeletons consists of members of Punching Swans, Bear vs Manero, and Houdini; all three bands which has certainly lit our fires in their own rights. Embracing inspirations from the writings of Greg Egan and Philip K Dick, especially on themes of Artificial intelligence, We Are Here To Make Things Better was recorded over 9 months between the September of last year and this past June. Released through Skingasm Records, the album is an adventurous mix of alternative rock with the band’s punk/noise origins which develops a distinct but connecting character over its ten tracks but brings an unpredictable quality and imagination to each.

Face In The Rock starts things off, the track merging from subdued sonic disturbance with beckoning beats and soon after the throbbing lure of bass. As the guitar entangles both with its acidic melodic vines, Greg Webster’s vocals step in, his distinctive tones inevitably bringing a Houdini feel though his guitar and the rhythmic imagination of bassist Peter Bevan and drummer Tom Bonner swiftly sculpt Exoskeletons unique textures and invention. The song continues to pounce and romp on the listener’s imagination, its kinetic gait and lively energy firmly gripping attention.

Even so, it is soon outshone by the following track and new single House Of Disappearing Bricks. It is pure virulent infectiousness, its firmly rapping beats and gnarly bassline instinctive manna to these ears even before the punk soaked attack of chords and vocals add to the trespass. The track’s post punk antics swiftly hit the spot, its noise punk devilry inflaming the passions as swinging rhythms and spiky hooks wake up a lustful submission to their angular bait. It is sublime stuff, pop discordance at its best and surely alone an unstoppable lure into the world of Exoskeletons for a new flood of fans.

Kuiper swaggers in next, again beats and bass casting an enslaving web as vocals across the band infest the psyche within another guitar woven tapestry of enterprise as belligerent as it is psychotic. Kind of like a mix of Shellac and The Mai Shi, the song traps ears in a compelling maze of sound before the more even keeled stroll of In Real Life takes over. In saying that, it pleasingly too has a rhythmic skeleton which jerks around with dervish like agility around which melodies with a caustic hue blossom. Passages of even calmer energy has a great feel of UK band An Entire Legion to them but again what emerges is a track distinct to its creators.

Through the catchy clamour of Crash Symbols and the crunchy prowess of Holes pleasure only escalates; the first, maybe without the striking quirkiness of those before, a magnetic cauldron of sonic imagination and rhythmic dexterity which seals the deal even before the brilliance of the irritable bass and great dissension of the vocals enslave. Its successor is a wonderfully dirty and cantankerous proposal with an addictively contagious swing which continues to infest an evolving landscape of adventure. There is a definite Melvins like ingenuity to the track but similarly echoes of the great music scene in the Medway area of Britain which the band’s line-up has been a major part of in recent times.

Again ultimately, the track is individual to Exoskeletons, a trait all songs process as shown yet unsurprisingly by next up Cicadas which is a more subdued proposition in nature to its companions but one rich in enticing hooks and dramatic ideation. Attention is putty in its hands and a greed for more overwhelming and fully fed by successor Show. It’s almost tempestuous start quickly turns to a bold saunter with another highly flirtatious bassline and spirited beats aligned to Webster’s suggestive guitar weaving and vocal dynamics. It too is low on the aggression of previous tracks but high on imposing enterprise and a flavoursome mix of imaginative post and noise punk tenacity.

The penultimate track is Dust; an expected atmospheric indeed haunting piece of sci-fi bred AI suggestiveness. Minimalistic but very potent, it has the imagination at play before the album reveals its best track to bring things to an enthralling close. Wild Swimmers is simply immense and for personal tastes leaves everything before it, and a heady collection of songs they are too, in its wake. From a distance it flows in with bass and sonic intrigue to the fore; both essences soon uniting with the most delicious hook nurtured melody. Alongside, a nagging tide of riffs work away, always there enticing even as the track twists through its unpredictable landscape. Bevan’s bass is once more manna to ears, its grumbling exploits as eventful and persuasive as the lithe rhythmic craft of Bonner and Webster’s resourceful sonic painting. Add the ever captivating vocal strengths of the band and you have a feast for the ear and a song which suggests we, as the band, have so much more to discover ahead with the Exoskeletons imagination.

Because of the Get Lost EP and the previous exploits of its band members which we previously got hooked on, we expected to find plenty to enjoy within We Are Here To Make Things Better but not to the lustful extent we did. Quite simply the album and band back up the declaration of its title in one of the year’s major highlights.

We Are Here To Make Things Better is released November 10th on Skingasm Records.

UpcomingTour Dates

19/10 – Maidstone – Drakes

03/11 – Ramsgate Music Hall

17/11 – Manchester – Fallows Cafe

18/11 – Leeds – Tbc

23/11 – Camden, London – Our Black Heart (album launch show)

22/12 – Chatham – Poco Loco

http://weareexoskeletons.com/    https://www.facebook.com/weareexoskeletons/    https://twitter.com/weexoskeletons    https://weareexoskeletons.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 25/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Tvivler – Negativ Psykologi #1

photo by Mads Ogstrup Nielsen

photo by Mads Ogstrup Nielsen

A rousing of the passions like no other; that is probably the best description of the effect the debut EP from Danish noise punks Tvivler had on our tender ears. Bristling with four tracks of something between post hardcore, noise rock, and sonic ferocity, Negativ Psykologi #1 is a blistering trespass of rabid virulence, an addiction in the making for fans of anyone from At The Drive-In and KEN mode to Kabul Golf Club and Coilguns. Band and release has a sound and presence though which is equally unique from those suggestions, a personality and freshness of its own which translates as one of the most exciting debuts in recent times.

Formed last year, Tvivler (Danish for doubter) hails from Copenhagen and comprises the united talent from numerous other Scandinavian bands. Vocalist Thomas Burø is a member of Lack whilst bassist Morten Ogstrup Nielsen is part of instrumental progressive metallers Town Portal. Completing the line is guitarist Thomas Feltheim from Obstacles and drummer Morten Clausen, the pair also part of hardcore band Children Of Fall. The quartet bring an eclectic mix of styles from their other projects into Tvivler but yet again the band emerges with something wholly distinct from those spices and other propositions breeding a similar assault of sound.

front coverReputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The first instalment in a 7″ trilogy, Negativ Psykologi #1 simply explodes in ears with the first breath of opener Almanak, guitars spreading a sonic rub quickly joined by raw and catchy riffs amidst scything rhythms as well as the scorching tones of Burø. There is an immediate contagion to the encounter, hooks and grooves uniting in a web of irresistible sonic flirtation whilst vocals squall with a just as gripping persuasion. UK band The Gaa Gaas spring to mind at times as the tones of Burø climb over the wiry strands of guitar, his magnetic pull the perfect temper to the carnivorous enticing from the throat of the bass and the emerging dance of surf and post punk imagination.

At two minutes it is far too short but in its brief presence an inescapable slavery of ears and emotions making it easy for the following Tænder to turn up the heat and passions. It too has no interest in offering a gentle entrance, bundling itself through ears in a ball of antagonistic bass and jangly guitar temptation courted by Clausen’s concussive beats. It is a thick assault of busy sound but with a clear centre from which Burø unveils the narrative with acidic prowess. Living up to its title, the song switches around with striking invention and rhythmic agitation, guitars and drum sticks a maelstrom of unpredictability to which the bass provides its own twisted grudge. With a whiff of bands like The Mai Shi to it, the tempest is an anthem to the primal and disorientated amongst us and quite scintillating.

Træfælder opens on a portentous ambience wrapping church bells, but an atmosphere taking less than a second to become a cauldron of unsettling suggestiveness leading to a furnace of guitar causticity and raw vocal bewitchment. As imposing and abrasive as the delivery of Burø and in turn the backing of the band are, they expel a ringing harmonious lure which is as seductive and disturbing as the kaleidoscope of psyche sucking adventure around them. The song’s title means traps and there is indeed no escaping the addictive hold of the song, another living up to its name and keeping ears with a greedy appetite chained.

The EP finishes with Tyndhudet, the harshest, most disorientating fury on the release. Each track within Negativ Psykologi #1 gets progressively rawer and violent, the closer bringing the release to a hellacious and abrasing finale. It is not all raw confrontation though, Tvivler again spinning a weave of infectious hooks and addictive grooves which just light body and imagination. Drums and bass are bestial it is fair to say against that alluring tempting but even they have moments where lust gets the best of them and they ease off a whisper to add fresh flirtation.

The track is a glorious end to a stunning encounter. Tvivler and their sound is not going to be for everyone of course but if those hints earlier get the juices bubbling and indeed post and neat hardcore as well as noise and punk rock too, then Negativ Psykologi #1 is going to bring some ecstasy to your lives.

Negativ Psykologi #1 is out now @ http://tvivler.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/tvivler

RingMaster 23/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Death Kindly Waits For Me – Wire Iron Blood

death kindly

Let us cut to the chase right away and suggest that Wire Iron Blood might just be the best and certainly one of the most exciting post hardcore debut in recent times. An introduction to UK quartet Death Kindly Waits For Me, the three track release is a striking and dramatically captivating protagonist for ears and imagination, and the fact that it suggests there is plenty more in the creative tank of the band yet to be explored and developed only increases its impact. Expressively provocative with a sound coming from the At The Drive In/Fall Of Troy end of an ever broadening genre, Death Kindly Waits For Me is a dramatic fresh breath in the British post hardcore scene.

Northamptonshire bred, Death Kindly Waits For Me began towards the beginning of 2014, taking inspirations from the likes of Thursday, Being As An Ocean, Finch, and Taking Back Sunday into their emerging invention. Their melody rich and aggressive sound was soon drawing potent attention locally and even further afield as their increasing live presence saw the foursome sharing stages with bands such as Decade, Light You Up, Devil Sold His Soul, Terraform, Emp!re, Our Hollow Our Home, Hey Vanity, Attention Thieves and Flood Of Red. Now a national attention is on the radar as Wire Iron Blood is uncaged, and it is fair to say that expectations are already confident in the band’s success in luring a wider spotlight.

The EP opens with the outstanding Cutting Room Floor, a sonic lure swiftly thrusting ears into the impassioned vocals of Adam Fitch, his clean and earnest tones instantly magnetic. Alongside him the guitar of Max Freeston slowly spreads a coarsely melodic lure whilst the heavy bass tones of Adam Cator, just as quickly adds dark haunting shadows. Pierced by the controlled and reserved but rapier like strikes of drummer Josh Miller, it is not a dramatic start yet thoroughly intriguing and awakening an appetite to hear more. Soon into a steady stride and still employing the creative weave which set things off, the song increasingly impresses as it expands its presence musically and vocally, Fitch superb with his distinctive angst fuelled tones whilst the DEath KIndly...more punkish offering of Freeston is a potent backing and the raw roars of Cator nicely caustic. An additional anthemic strength emerges in the song and though musically maybe it does not blaze with startling originality there is nothing but freshness and adventure to the opener.

The same strengths flows though the following Best Friends. It character is shadowed and emotionally dark yet it flames with a contagious energy and a rigorously exciting imagination. Vocally once more the track shines whilst riffs and melodies create an infectious proposal which, as the EP, becomes more addictively enjoyable over time. That Fall Of Troy feel is a bright whisper across the song, whilst other elements hint at the more experimental adventure of The Mai Shi at times, but as the song evolves from a raging stomp into a melancholic croon in its finale, the track is thrillingly individual to Death Kindly Waits For Me.

The closing Decade Of War continues the excellent temptation, its emotionally sober but energetically impassioned heart a canvas for great rhythmic enterprise and colourful guitar endeavour to wrap with craft and tenacity. Vocally of course the song continues a weighty persuasion amidst impressive sonic imagination and by its end it is hard not to sigh in disappointment that there is no more and to swiftly go back to the beginning again and ensure there is.

As mentioned at the beginning, Wire Iron Blood is a starting point for the band which shows that they have plenty to discover and push within themselves. There is little nothing to shade the potency of the release though, with no reflection on Cator, personal tastes would like to see a diminishing or loss of the aggressive vocal squalls as they often feel at odds with the rest of the vocal delivery and at times songs. It is a very minor thing of course in a potential drenched start by Death Kindly Waits For Me, a band hard not to get rather excited over.

Wire Iron Blood will be available from 2nd March through all digital stores.

https://www.facebook.com/deathkindlywaitsformeuk

RingMaster 02/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

 

Auxes – Boys In My Head

Auxes_2014_Big

Storming the psyche like a deranged bluster forged from the sonic invention of The Pixies and Melvins bound in the raw devilment of The Fat Dukes Of Fuck and the acidic charm of The Mai Shi, Boys In My Head is contagion gone wild. The new album from Germany based noise punks Auxes is a masterfully devious roar combining addiction with primal seduction for without any doubt one of the year’s most essential propositions.

The successor to their previously acclaimed More! More! More! of 2012, Boys In My Head sees the band take some of its raw punk persuasion and fuse it to a broader noise and psyche rock exploration. The result is their most compelling and spicily intrusive incitement yet, which as well as those earlier comparisons also sows essences found in band such as At The Drive In, The Birthday Party, and The Locust. Consisting of the combined experiences and adventure of Dave Laney (the co-founder of Milemarker and Challenger), Florian Brandel (Eniac, Kommando Sonne-nmilch, Airpeople) and Manuel Wirtz (Eniac, Honigbomber, Die Charts), Auxes fire up ears and emotions with swift drama and success as Boys In My Head entangles ears with opener To All The Fires. Song and release provide an infestation which is as fascinating as it is unpredictable, as anthemically warped as it is sonically scorching, and from their first notes inescapable slavery.

To All The Fires immediately encases ears in a web of weighty beats and sonic intrigue, a coaxing soon flourishing with feistily flavoursome melodic enterprise fuelling enslaving grooves and hooks. Vocals too have an alluring expression which subsequent harmonies only enhance as the song continues to flirt and dance with the imagination. The impressive start is straight away surpassed by I Can’t Stand You Any Longer, the song from its initial feisty rub of riffery and jabbing rhythms, a voracious stomp of virulently gripping hooks and tangy melodic intrigue. There is a grunge spice to certain aspects of the track but primarily it is a merger of garage and noise rock devilry sparking thoughts of Fake Shark-Real Zombie!

The following I Wanna See Results riles up the passions with its brief but ravenous temptation, a gnarly bassline relentlessly courting acidic guitar endeavour whilst increasingly impressing vocal causticity and just as hungrily agitated rhythms unleash their narratives. Far too brief but irrepressibly thrilling, the encounter makes way for the album’s title track, itself an epidemic of rhythmic bait and resourceful hooks within a sonic haze. Seemingly strongly inspired by The Pixies, the song is a delicious weave of sonic slavery, every groove and tangy chord easy thraldom of thoughts and passions.

The pair of Dog & Master and Life In Their Television increases the album’s grip, the first opening with a predatory rub of riffs and similarly commanding rhythms before striding purposefully with creative rabidity and bewitching enterprise. The track is a scintillating hex on body and emotions whilst its successor is an instant tease with its percussive coaxing and boys in their headmischievous beats. It is revelry though which cannot resist bursting into a punk fired tempest of abrasing guitar invention and vocal confrontation, all around a throaty bass spine. The track is a fiery charge soaked in punk belligerence, it again igniting fresh hunger in the appetite for the outstanding release; a greed right away fed wholesomely by the Frank Black spiced Boom Boom Town. Harmonies and melodies thrive in the sonic tapestry around them, drawing on an acidic wine of sound to brew their equally captivating toxicity.

Every song brings a fresh peak to Boys In My Head, though maybe none as insatiably as Under Fire. Its primal seduction of bass and drums is the foreplay to an orgasmic devilment of barbed hooks and intoxicating grooves, a dramatic infection where there is no second where feet are relaxed and emotions silent, though that to be fair applies to most tracks, especially the relatively calmer but no less transfixing Hand In Hand With The Man and the sultry rock ‘n’ roller Dead Dead Eyes. The first of the two sways and flames with siren-esque sonic candy which brings hints of eighties bands like The Fire Engines and Scars. The second of the pair again has that breeze of nostalgia, offering whispers of the Scottish bands as just mentioned and the likes of Josef K but infusing it into a punk bred slice of ferocious rock with infectious vocals and chorus eventually aligned to anthemic chants.

The album closes with the darkly shadowed I’ve Had Enough, a post punk coloured antagonism engaging ears with a noise and punk rock provocation, and another which is as much an epidemic of tempting as it is a blast of creative turbulence. The song is a brilliant end to quite simply one of the year’s biggest triumphs. There have been a few essential encounters in 2014 and Boys In My Head easily joins the list; in fact it might just be the one heading the queue.

Boys In My Head is available now via Gunner Records, digitally and as CD, vinyl, and cassette versions @ http://auxes.bandcamp.com/album/boys-in-my-head

http://auxes.com/

RingMaster 26/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

Heavy Hand – Northwoods Knives

pic Mike Olen

Remember that first instinctive tingle and thrill when discovering The Pixies? Well stand by as you just might be getting a healthy hint of that with Heavy Hand, certainly our gut instincts and emotions felt a similar fingering upon hearing the band for the first time through their new album Northwoods Knives. Now we are not claiming they are going to rise to such influential and dynamic heights as the Boston quartet but they certainly have the potential and unique invention to make a very hefty impact.

The Milwaukee trio of vocalist/guitarist Anthony Weber, bassist Isa Carini, and drummer Chris Roberts, bring essences of their experiences past and presence from playing in bands such as Like Like The The The Death, The Scarring Party, and The Silence into the distinctly unique sonic character of Heavy Hand. Formed in 2011, the band first drew attention with their EP Confusion is Body Parts of the following year. Their songs leap at the senses and imagination even if at times some barely hang around long enough for a snack let alone a full meal. Such their ingenious flavouring though they all draw you straight back into their mischievous web of creative revelry, and we suspect as for us it will be impossible for most to listen to Northwoods Knives only once in each sitting of their insatiable and deliciously twisted, post punk spiced, noise rock ‘n’ pop.

Opening track is David Bowie Wants to Steal Your Baby, its title alone enough to get excited over and spark a lick of the lips for the devilry to come. Less than a minute long, the track is an instant blaze of acidic guitar swiftly joined 10296960_586252141494327_5213763507857338502_nby thumping beats and the pungent tones of bass. That is enough to incite the senses but once the yelping tones of Weber tease and spill their tangy expression in ears the track is a full seductive trap. The track continues to bounce and squeal along like a mix of The Mai Shi and Hot Hot Heat with the eccentric invention of The Victorian English Gentlemens Club, that last essence making stronger whispers throughout the rest of the EP.

It is a glorious start swiftly backed up by the outstanding Winner Winner (Beer for Dinner). A gnarly bass riff sets up the immediately eagerly devoured proposition, its predatory bait irresistible and only enhanced by the crispy percussion and beats of the drums and the punk seeded vocals. The track is soon in full swagger as searing scythes of guitar temptation flash across the compelling stroll of the incitement. Also reminding of UK band Frau Pouch, Heavy Hand and song proceed to enslave an ardour soaked reaction before stepping aside for the more pop soiled Milwaukee Cum Dumpster. Hooks lay siege to ears right away within a cage of forceful beats aligned to another twist of the voice and enterprise of the bass. There are whispers of The Pixies to the song but soon lost as it twists and flirts with imagination through burrowing grooves and sonic toxicity within a virulently contagious enticement.

Hot With Dads Tiger Beat Nation, even if it is hard to make sense of the title, makes an openly obvious yet unpredictable persuasion with a tasty jangle of riffs and infectious hooks. We have no idea of inspirations to the threesome but you have to suggest maybe Melvins makes a nudge to their creativity going by the song’s unrelenting teasing and sonic magnetism. It is a glorious provocation but soon put in its place by the exceptional Secret of These Wedges. Imagine The Minutemen meeting eighties UK band The Fire Engines and you get a whiff of the heated alchemy at play within the brief and epidemically potent track. As at this point more expected, sharp hooks and barb littered riffs tangle for a merciless tempting which only leaves you wanting so much more.

Not quite as dramatic but no less addictive, the next up I Freed All Four Wizards croons and yelps musically and vocally to twist ears and imagination around its little finger, or should that be short body, whilst the following Motherfucking Bobcat turns a brawl of sonic assault into a climate of stoner kissed grooves and adventurous rhythms courted by a heavy throated bass prowl. It is a snarl of a song but with a raw melodic colour and feisty attitude combining to again light up ears and thoughts, it also lays a seduction impossible to ignore.

The closing pair of tracks ensures the release ends on a high, Urban Coyote first up bringing a more expansive and less striking impact than others with its noise smoked sonic narrative but it smoulders with raw charm and smart invention to match the heights and appeal of the punchier, more direct tracks on Northwoods Knives. Its successor Bend at the Waist is another bout of pure virulence, playing like UK’s Houdini in a salacious intercourse with Dope Body but distinctly and imaginatively all Heavy Hand. Binding ears in a passion fuelled rampage of riff irritancy and rhythmic agitation bounded over by the irresistible squawking vocals, the track is an exhilarating sonic fire to lose bodily fluids over.

Northwoods Knives is exceptional, one of the most exciting releases this year and as suggested maybe the doorway to bigger things for the band; if not certainly its incorrigible arms will drag hordes more into the peculiar riveting world of Heavy Hand.

Northwoods Knives is available via Latest Flame now @ http://www.latestflame.com

and @ http://heavyhand.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Heavy-Hand/122042274581985

10/10

RingMaster 27/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

 

Tweak Bird – Any Ol’ Way

pic BryanRichardMartin

pic BryanRichardMartin

Having been seduced and exhilarated by the band’s previous EP Undercover Crops, it is fair to say anticipation of getting the senses into Any Ol’ Way the new album from Tweak Bird, was acute and swiftly more than satisfied as the eleven track exotic haze of psychedelically enhanced rock unveiled its acidic and generous charms. Whereas the previous release could be said to be more stoner bred at its core, the duo of brothers Caleb Benjamin and Ashton Leech seed their new full-length more in the seventies psychedelic rock side of their creativity which in turn breeds their finest, most potent hour yet. It is a glorious evocative aural summer of fresh melodic weaves and sonic winds all caught in the inventively unpredictable psych pop kissed adventure that is Tweak Bird.

Formed in 2006, the Los Angeles based brother’s musical cv together goes back years before, as kids writing and recording music after growing up on a diet of Black Sabbath, King Crimson, and Pink Floyd. Jumping forward to 2005 with Ashton putting together his own drum kit and Caleb experimenting on the way to purchasing his first baritone guitar, the pair made their live debut as Tweak Bird within a year which led them to the attention of Melvins whose drummer Dale Crover subsequently passed a drum kit down to the duo. The bigbonesnakebite 7” came next followed by the Reservations EP in 2007 and 2008 respectively. Their acclaimed Crover produced self-titled debut album two years later was the spark to greater attention and spotlight upon the band, which Undercover Crops pushed on yet again in sound and responses, a success matched by their live shows which has seen the band stand alongside the likes of Tool, Melvins, Big Business, Black Mountain, Best Coast, and Ted Leo and the Pharmacists whilst driving their own headline tours in the US and across Europe. As stated though Any Ol’ Way is another kettle of fish thrusting Tweak Bird to the highest captivating perch within imagination reeking sonic rock ‘n’ roll.

As soon as the throaty voice of the guitar embraces and resonates through the ears as opener Weird Oasis sets joy in motion there is a AOW5x5sense of something seduction lurking, a feeling soon realised as the guitar expands its slow coaxing alongside similarly urgent and gripping rhythms. It is an immediately captivating enticement which the vocals soon climb all over with strained melodic hues and irresistible expression as small hooks and hinted grooves entwine their welcome fingers around thoughts and a rapidly emerging appetite. It is hard not to think of Melvins with the song but to that slithers of Hot Hot Heat and The Mai Shi offers their suggestions also but as mere spices in something primarily belonging to Tweak Bird.

The enthralling start is soon lifted up a level by Greens, the warm soak of seventies psychedelic sun of its predecessor seamlessly given an injection of gnarly riffs and heavy stoner-esque virulence speared by Sabbath-esque rhythmic stabs and sonic groans. The gait of the song is a prowl and its air an oppressive breath but with harmonious vocals and sonic flames carving out searing grooves, the track is an invigorating fascination whose bruising is only welcomed wholeheartedly.

The first major pinnacle on the album comes next in the aural temptress that is She Preach, a song which from a seducing mist of sound launches into a ravenous almost wanton persuasion of melodically teased grooves and crisply jabbing beats reined by the again impressive individual vocals. The song SOON adds catchy claws to its salacious dance of sound and lyrical enticing, hooks and infectious bait almost deviously infesting the senses and passions as the song spreads its erotic charms, wiles enhanced by the excellent discordant blessed sax croons which brings thoughts of eighties UK band Essential Logic to the fore. It is a magnificent provocation which leaves the following A Sign of Badness a little pale in comparison, but with its wispy vocals and muscular beats the track glides resourcefully across senses and imagination to add another twinge of hunger for the release.

The great alignment of raw aggression and melodic elegance makes Peace Walker a riveting encounter next, its sixties pop lure within a slightly cantankerous punk spawned sonic voracity insatiably magnetic. If you wondered what a mix of The Doors, The Beach Boys, and Corrosion of Conformity might sound like then this song is a good hint. It is another potent entrapment for thoughts and emotions but soon passed over for the ridiculously addictive Builder with is post punk repetition and gentle but imposing sonic nagging. The instrumental seeks out and consumes every pore and synapse with delicious chilled toxicity before flowing into the vibrantly smouldering arms of A Sign of Positivity. With almost griping deep toned grooves and a rhythmic shuffle which defies feet not to join its dance, the song as the vocals soars majestically and almost melancholically evolving into a thoroughly riveting and thrilling sway of aural hypnosis.

Both the niggling contagion of the brilliant Mild Manor and the summer soirée of Inspiration Point keep album and listener entwined, the first providing five minutes plus of the kind of rhythmic and sonic transfixing bands such as Gang Of Four and Joy Division conjured so decisively. Complete with short but deeply penetrating hooks and spatial toxins, the track works its way towards a rich and fully packed stoner rock fuelled fire as a finale. Its successor is a narrative locking intrigue and surf party suasion into a psychedelic rock sculpted sway of melodies and shadows, a song not as potent as the last but full of drama and invention to enslave attention and satisfaction.

The album is completed by the outstanding Burn On, a feisty and raw surfaced rock pop proposition which simply chains and romances with the passions like a high school teenager, even if one clad in stalker like intent, and a humid reprise on the bewitching opener called Sunshine (slight return). The pair makes a mesmeric conclusion to a spellbinding adventure and pleasure.

The David Allen produced Any Ol’ Way according to the Bird brothers “…voice our opinions and feel comfortable. We hired our dear old friend, to engineer and co-produce, which helped us explore new sounds and develop unfinished ideas. We believe in peace, marijuana, individual freedoms and not taking ourselves too seriously. This just happened to be what came out.” It is all there to be heard within the album where freedom seeps from every note and syllable.

Any Ol’ Way is available now from http://tweakbird.bandcamp.com/releases and on vinyl via Let’s Pretend Records now!

http://www.tweakbird.com

9/10

RingMaster 22/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com