Hypochristmutreefuzz – Hypopotomonstrosesquipedaiophobia

There is music which is bred out of bedlam, sounds which are seemingly born out of creative psychosis and challenges which are feverishly psychotic; and there is that from Hypochristmutreefuzz. The Belgian noise-rock outfit create a psyche infesting collusion of all that and more; a theatre of fun coming to an insatiable head on their debut album Hypopotomonstrosesquipedaiophobia.

Meaning the phobia of long words, Hypopotomonstrosesquipedaiophobia immediately hints at the mischief and insanity at play with its off-kilter title spelling; traits swiftly infesting body and spirit from its first seconds. Instantly it has the body bouncing and imagination dancing, unpredictability and that creative madness fuelling every fascinating, entrapping second.

Hailing from Ghent and taking their name from an avant-garde jazz piece by Misha Mengelberg, Hypochristmutreefuzz has already teased and lured acclaim through a self-titled EP in 2015 and a host of surrounding singles. Hypopotomonstrosesquipedaiophobia though takes things to a whole new inventive and magnetic level. Drawing on inspirations ranging from The Residents, The Birthday Party, and Sonic Youth to Pere Ubu, Television, PJ Harvey, and The Germans, the quintet instantly traps attention with opener Finger. Teasing tendrils of guitar beckon first, their lures intermittently joined by an electronic throb. It is a lingering enticement with the sonic post punk causticity of Bauhaus and the instinctive though waiting dance antics of an Axis Mundi rising up alongside. The union continues to imposingly quiver as the vocals of guitarist Ramses Van den Eede add their uniqueness, his tones as distinct as the sounds brewing up around them and with all the ingredients in place, the track strolls along with a raw and infectious air; a touch of Asylums and Allusondrugs meets The Residents further colouring the irresistible adventure.

It is a compelling, thrilling start causing hips to swerve and appetite to lick its lips, a tempting just as potent in the following Gums Smile Blood. Getting down to even swifter business, the song offers a punk toned, electronically nurtured virility to its mouth-watering creative animation. Like a blend of De Staat, G.R.I.M, and Big Black, the track prowls and swings with the seduction of a rabid pole dancer before Hypochondria invades with the scuzzy antics of guitarists Jesse Maes and Van den Eede courting the jabbing beats of Elias Devoldere. Carrying a more primal edge compared to its predecessors, the song still flirts with a lightness of whimsy through the synth of Thijs Troch; dark and light, heavy and fuzz entangling across its eventful drama.

Chromakalim is a far calmer experience, its minimalistic entrance reeking of deceit and espionage as vocals stalk attention. That imagined tempest does erupt with unbridled rigour before swiftly settling down again waiting for its return in a volcanic chorus. The bass of Sander Verstraete struts with menace throughout, its intensity leaking into the discord of guitars and keys as the track spreads its mercurial heart. Nothing less than captivating it is still eclipsed by the sauntering haunting of Music Of Spheres. A noir lit, jazz cloaked venture to the atmospheric darkside, the track is a maze of sound and evocative incitement taking ears and imagination down shadow cloaked paths.

From there the album hits its pinnacle with a couple of quite manipulative encounters. First up is Elephantiasis, a slice of schizophrenic yet restrained noise rock which has the listener involved from its first trespassing breath and in eager participation by its vocal and musical meander a host of seconds later. A track which haunts the memory after just one listen it too is then overshadowed by a successor in Clammy Hands. The song is an asylum of imagination and enterprise; a fusion of flavours and styles which too needs barely a handful of breaths to seduce and enslave. A patchwork of vocals amidst an equally varied synth palette of enticing steals the passions even before its chorus has vocal chords hollering and limbs punching.

The mellow though no less cracked balladry of Don’t Drown only mesmerises if without the major impact of the previous duo while One Trick Pony simmers then boldly romps in with a rhythmic tenacity as vocals and add their lively smoulder to that of the sounds. The skittishness of the beats and throb of the bass has the body in eager motion whilst ears are drawn to the melodic beauty sharing their moment. Within it all causticity lies in wait, igniting its fuse further down the line for a scuzzy, electrifying and almost terrifying finale.

The album closes with the funky, noise jaunt of Spitter; a breeding of movement which starts in the big toe and has the whole body popping by its first vocal line and feverish by the time brazzy flames course through the tango of sound. Of course there is an acidity and rough play within its dance; textures only adding to the fun and energy of the encounter when spreading their addictive toxicity. Throw The Magic Numbers, Billy Momo, Pere Ubu, and Primus into a pot, stir with psychotic vigour and you have this, one gripping conclusion to one mighty album.

Its title might be impossible to say, still not possible after twenty tries or and indeed spell with ease, but the contents of Hypopotomonstrosesquipedaiophobia are manna to the ears and the loco in us all.

Hypopotomonstrosesquipedaiophobia is out now across most stores an @ https://hypochristmutreefuzz.bandcamp.com/album/hypopotomonstrosesquipedaliophobia

 http://www.hypochristmutreefuzz.be/    https://www.facebook.com/Hypochristmutreefuzz/    https://twitter.com/HypoFuzzMusic

Pete RingMaster 15/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Jingo – Make Some Money, Buy Some Love

jingo_RingMasterReview

March 11th sees the eagerly anticipated second album from British rock band Jingo and it is very easy to say that it does not let expectations, bred from the band’s previous impressive releases, down. The ten tracks making up Make Some Money, Buy Some Love are the band’s most eclectic bunch yet, at times in an understated way with closer attention revealing the new myriad of flavours and broad imagination bringing them to life. Just as importantly, it is another mesmerising collection of songs feeding in us and their growing wealth of fans an already eager appetite for the band’s invention and carrying the potential to excite another hungry wave of newcomers to the world of Jingo.

Formed by husband and wife, guitarist/vocalist Jack and vocalist/keyboardist/guitarist Katie Buckett, Jingo seem to have made a strong impact with every move since Jingo played its debut live show was supporting Blur’s Graham Coxon. Through a clutch of captivating singles, creatively provocative EPs, and striking debut album The Art Of Loving of 2014, as well as a live presence seeing the London based band take their imagination and craft across the UK and over to the US, France, Germany, and Belgium, Jingo has enticed rich interest and fan support which has through a highly successful pre-order campaign enabled the band to release Make Some Money, Buy Some Love on CD and vinyl as well as digitally.

With its line-up completed by the invention of Nima Safai, Michael Hussain, and Kelly Lenahan, Jingo has from day one never been easy to pigeonhole. They are generally tagged as alternative rock and have found themselves compared to the varied likes of Portishead, The Magic Numbers, Not Blood Paint, Fleetwood Mac, Interpol, and Jess & the Ancient Ones along the way. As Make Some Money, Buy Some Love again proves Jingo spins broad tapestries which explore diversity with zeal to match their eagerly creative imagination.

art_RingMasterReviewRecorded in New York with producer Kahan James, and mastered by Kevin Blackler (Raconteurs, RHCP etc.), Make Some Money, Buy Some Love opens up with Lifer, the alluring tones of Katie cradled by melodic coaxing as the bass strolls with a controlled but carefree grace. Crisp beats add to the enticement instantly flirting with ears, the song’s underlying funkiness infesting its gait and the listener as pop catchiness and lyrical romancing tempt. Drama is never far from a Jingo twist and turn, its boldest attraction lining Katie’s vocal prowess especially here in a gem of an introduction.

All of the track’s qualities and more emerge in the following Sirens and Vices, Its rhythmic bait quickly infecting feet as melody woven grooves seize hips. Both elements add to the flirtatious nature of the song, impassioned vocals and raw, fiery textures growing in the blend of smouldering and raucous seduction. Grabbing ears and imagination from the first second, it only tightens its grip second by second squeezing lustful responses out before making way for the pop revelry of Money. It is instinctive catchiness with a steely backbone and bold attitude though, dancing persistently and mischievously as the song teases with playful coquetry.

From a busy bedlam Gaia emerges with its own melodic grace and emotive eloquence next, Katie joined by the equally potent tones of Jack as keys and guitars paint their own poetic picture over a more forceful rhythmic spine. It is pure magnetism with a just unveiled eye catching video to match.

Never Love Again also has little trouble winning attention and pleasure as its evocative melodies and warmly invasive essences hug captivating vocals. The song never quite reaches the heights of its predecessors but never lacks a second of enjoyable adventure before the outstanding Death Counts takes over. The track is nothing less than melancholic beauty becoming more exotic, almost sinister, and relentlessly beguiling with each passing seduction of passion fuelled notes and vocal fascination.

The body is back jumping around with Let’s Be Friends next; its noir lit drama and tenacious rhythmic dexterity enough alone to enslave the imagination. Katie is like a devious puppeteer in the midst of the brew of fire bred grooves, agitated beats, and frequently concussive energy; her lures as inescapable as the gloriously tempestuous textures making up another mighty highlight within Make Some Money, Buy Some Love.

Last year’s sensational single Sweet Anne follows, Katie and Jack united in crooning temptation as initially the song gently grows in ears. Soon it is in full swing with boisterous rhythms skirting the tangy funk infused hooks and lecherous grooves uniting and barging against each other. It too has an irresistible tempest like texture to its body but equally melodic calm makes a compelling persuasion in between the song’s moments of vociferous and explosive carnival like devilry.

The album is completed by firstly the melodic romance and harmonic charm of Supersymmetry, one simply bewitching encounter with fire in its heart and finally by the pop rock seducing of The Shell. Both tracks solicit emotions and body to get involved in quick time and each leave only a want for more, the perpetual hunger which seems to come with every Jingo encounter.

For Make Some Money, Buy Some Love, Jingo has honed their sound into something as diverse and bold as ever but exploring both with a more seamlessly and easily flowing touch; the result being another Jingo moment which makes the world a better place.

Make Some Money, Buy Some Love is released March 11th

http://jingomusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/jingomusic/   https://twitter.com/JingoMusic

Pete RingMaster 22/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Morganway – Ain’t It Just

morganway-car-shot_RingMasterReview

A lingering caress of melodic and harmonic captivation is probably the best way to describe the alt-country of UK band Morganway, certainly on the evidence of their current EP and the single it is about to bear.

Hailing from “North Norfolk’s rural outback”, the Norwich quintet create a proposition which feels familiar, like an returning friend, yet still stands boldly apart from most other proposals. New single Ain’t It Just is the perfect example, a warm and engaging seduction which almost deceptively is also one rousing incitement for body and spirit.

Formed by twins Callum (acoustic guitar, lead vocals) and Kieran Morgan (lead guitar), Morganway is completed by Yve Mary B (lead vocals), Matt Brocklehurst (keyboard), and Simon Tinmouth (drums). With its raw smouldering Americana air and kaleidoscope of harmonic suggestiveness, debut EP No Tomorrows made an instant attention grabbing impact, drawing comparisons to the likes of Fleetwood Mac, The Strokes, ELO, and The Magic Numbers since its unveiling last year. Its success is poised to be backed and pushed by the release of opening track Ain’t It Just as the band’s new single, a song which stirs ears and heart with inevitable success.

morganway-artwork_RingMasterReviewAin’t It Just opens with an immediately emotive air and strum of guitar; a warm enticing swiftly bolstered by the transfixing tones of Yve Mary B and the poetic nature of the accompanying melody. With gentle rhythms alongside, the song wraps its tender thoughts and enterprise around the ears, still hiding the anthemic prowess in the depths of its already catchy character. Once freed, the rousing infectiousness bewitches hips and imagination alike, the song blossoming into a melodic roar which still embraces its opening elegance and reflective charm.

Its touch is a memorable temptation which for those new to the band is echoed across the No Tomorrows EP with the compelling Hearts Of Fire a matching energetic crescendo of invention. Backed by tracks like it’s title track and the Fleetwood Mac spiced Baby, Let’s Run, both similarly infectious affairs, all help reveal a broader character of the Morganway sound which can only blossom further ahead.

Ain’t It Just is released January 6th with the No Tomorrows EP out now and available @ https://morganway.bandcamp.com/releases

Upcoming Live Shows

Friday 13th January – The Troubadour, London

Saturday 14th January – Open, Norwich

25th February – The Islington, London

http://www.morganway.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/morganwayuk/   https://twitter.com/MorganwayUK

Pete RingMaster 04/01/2017
Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Jingo – A.D.D.

Jingo_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Photo – Patrick Auffret

 

With each unveiling of songs since forming and a simply majestic adventure of a debut album last year, we wondered whether the days of saying Jingo just get better and better was coming to an end as surely they could not surpass the riveting might of The Art of Loving. Thankfully that is a massive no as the band release brand new single A.D.D., a simply scintillating teaser of their forthcoming EP due later this year. The theatre of their sound, the intensive creativity of their music is all fuelled by a new voracious energy and imagination whilst emotionally and lyrically, the song is as rich a blaze as ever. So yes this is the UK based alternative rockers Jingo being better than ever again whilst breaching yet another lofty pinnacle in their invention.

The foursome of guitarist/vocalist Jack Buckett, his American wife and vocalist/keyboardist/guitarist Katie, drummer Joseph Reeves, and bassist Chris Smith, Jingo has potently flourished since their first ever show supporting Graham Coxon of Blur, releasing some attention grabbing songs and honing an increasingly acclaimed live presence which alone has shown them to be one of the most impressive bands on the UK rock/pop music scene. Comparisons to the likes of Fleetwood Mac and The Magic Numbers were early declarations but swiftly from the constant evolution and diversity persistently showing in their songwriting and music, Jingo was establishing their own unique identity which came to a head with the album The Art of Loving. In hindsight and using A.D.D. as a new marker, the release was a closing of a chapter in some ways but equally the sensational bridge to new dramatic climes now revealed in the new single.

Cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review    A.D.D. opens with a bulging temptation of firmly bound rhythms wrapped in a tangy melodic enticing of guitar, and already drama colours the air as brewing emotional intensity begins soaking every early note and rhythmic swing. The track relaxes a little as the bewitching tones of Katie incite ears and closer attention, as ever her distinctive voice bringing an air of jazz like resourcefulness against the funkier spicing of the music. Keys add an emotive hue to the song whilst rhythms offer the shadows, everything building slowly but surely towards the irresistible flame of the chorus. It is a point where the song opens up and explores an even more energetic and provocative landscape, within which the song’s powerful lyrical and vocal narrative further blossoms. The song just grows bigger and bolder with every passing second, angst and passion increasingly and intensively dripping from every note and syllable as it heads into a blaze of a finale though the song’s parting moment is a just as pungent kiss of vocals and a reflective melody.

From its brilliant artwork provided by another side to Katie’s impressive talent, A.D.D. is pure aural beauty. It is a beast of a song too, generating a passion and emotion translated as physical intensity which most out and out heavy rock bands would kill for. The blood of Jingo’s music is melody though and that is as feverish and explosive as ever. Can the band top this we ask, well we are not betting against it.

A.D.D. is available to stream now @ https://soundcloud.com/jingomusic/add-2 whilst its Launch Show is on June 11th at Old St Pancras Church in London. See links below for more details.

https://www.facebook.com/jingomusic   https://twitter.com/JingoMusic

RingMaster 01/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Jingo – The Art Of Loving

jingo

One of the artists which has truly excited and impressed without reservation over the past couple of years has been UK band Jingo. The London based quartet has inspired critical acclaim and a hungry fan base through a series of diversely inventive and explosively creative singles. It has led to an impatient anticipation for the band’s debut album and now that it is here, it feels like we all short changed them with our hopes and expectations. The Art Of Loving is an exceptional encounter, a delicious collection of melodically fiery and emotionally intensive songs which have a revelry which seduces feet right through to the passions. Individually unique but uniting for a fluidly captivating adventure, the album brings some of their previously released singles together with striking new songs. Those older tracks though which fans already know well and love, have been revitalised in their mix as well as in their actual bodies to create nothing but fresh and scintillating exploits within the exhilarating album.

Jingo consists of guitarist/vocalist Jack Buckett, his American wife and vocalist/keyboardist/guitarist Katie, drummer Joseph Reeves, and bassist Chris Smith. Since its early days and shows across Brooklyn, New York and London, Jingo has gone from their first gig which saw them supporting Graham Coxon of Blur, to being compared to the likes of Fleetwood Mac and The Magic Numbers, and to gaining fevered attention and support from independent press and radio whilst becoming one of the most talked about bands with fans and again the underground media. Their nine singles marked the band firmly out as having the potency to break into the strongest spotlight of attention and recognition, now the year in a half making The Art Of Loving could and should be the doorway into that expansive scenery for Jingo.

With former member Sahil Batra adding his talent to some of the tracks too, the band instantly ignites ears and imagination with album opener Black Flowers. A heavy air and throaty bass coaxing engrosses ears straight away but it is tempered by the vocal seduction of Katie. It is a magnetically intriguing union of hungry shadows and vocal temptation which only gains further potency as post punk scythes of guitar add their voice to the compellingly brewing emprise of the song. Once hitting its sultry stride, the track is awash with evocative keys and a metallic resonance to riffs which adds mystique and intimidation to the encounter respectively. The song is a dramatically contagious and ingeniously crafted fusion of light and dark, merging the  heavier seventies rock essences of Jess & the Ancient Ones in majestic flirtation with the melodic beauty of The Magic Numbers and the atmospheric beauty of Solar Halos, but ultimately something unique to Jingo.

   The following Skypunch opens with an elegant caress of keys but also another imagination grabbing breath of dramatic breeding. It is fair to say there is a powerful drama to all of Jingo’s songs, all different but all building an intensity and climatic narrative musically and emotionally. The second track soon parades a cinematic landscape of sound and emotion, its thick yet warmly charming enterprise suitable for a narrative of global espionage or intimate emotional dilemma. Keys and drums entangle with strenuous ideation across the song whilst Katie roars with mesmeric beauty matched by the similarly vocal endeavour of Jack’s expressive guitar invention.

Both When You Want Me and Belong To You take the listener into imaginative journeys of tenacious and creative revelry. The first comes through a sonic almost sinister ambience to cup ears in an engaging vocal tempting amidst a

bordering on tempestuous climate which like the rhythmic enticement seems to grow and bulge with intent the deeper into the song the listener finds themselves. Looking like it is heading into a storm, the song instead twists back on itself to parade a glorious stomp of funk seeded melodies and boisterous rhythms courted by a psychedelic enticing of guitar and keys. It is an engrossing and impossibly infectious song almost matched by its successor. Belong To You opens with a bass lure which offers hints of The Pixies before joining a warm flame of chords and the even hotter vocals of Katie. With a masterful rhythmic dance from the sticks of Reeves creating a gripping spine, the song smoulders energetically with a sixties pop and psychedelic infectiousness but also a provocative aural melodrama to voice and the multi-flavoured textures erupting throughout the outstanding track.

That sixties feel with a just as strong fifties pop additive, brings the following title track to enthralling life too. Barely a minute long and simply the voice and harmonies of Katie accompanied by finger clicks, it is simply mesmeric and irresistible. Like Wanda Jackson meets Sarah Vaughan, the track is a small treat and soon making way for Home. Right away there is angst and drama, a word impossible not to use with every song, to the thick bass hues and short stabs of guitar which skirt the visually provocative vocals. The track is sensational, a seductive and mentally intrusive aural movie which sets body and emotions ablaze whilst coaxing thoughts to create their own personal adventures.

A gentler flight is brought by the brilliant Blue Wail. Exotic vocal expression and jagged guitar teasing wraps engrossingly around thoughts whilst bulging rhythms and bass sultriness adds to the Caribbean coloured canvas spawning the

Artwork by Katie Buckett

Artwork by Katie Buckett

creative devilry emerging above it. It is a transfixing fascination of sound for ears and imagination soon emulated in its own distinctive manner by Before You Were Born. The song is an emotively enchanting ballad but one still fuelled by vivacity through its rhythms and invention which keenly engages the striking heart felt vocal presence of Katie. It is a delightful embrace, if not as potent on the passions as other songs on the album, which shares its intimacy and passionate depths with the magnificent Jaclyn. Written about a friend of Katie who killed herself, the song is simply creative vaudeville set in the walls of one of the most creatively inspired and melodically pungent songs you are likely to hear this year. Every second, note, and syllable is soaked in passion, anger and love entwined in a fire of invention and yes aurally poetic drama. There is also a sultry seduction to the song which weaves and swerves curvaceously before ears to entice and pull the senses into the heated grandeur and personal fever of the track. Brilliance hardly covers it.

The jazzy elegance of Same Without You is next and cored by a piano grace, proceeds to cast a melodic temptress of itself melodically and theatrically to stand hand in hand with the similarly seductive vocals. With broody basslines and individual fires of invention lining the sensational enticement, the song is a climate of invasively emotive hues, melancholic ambience, and lustful invention, much like next up IQ84. The track from its first moment is parading an irresistible web of choppy riffs, jangling chords, and mountainously heavy bass and rhythmic sculpting. Complete with seventies seeded keys, a touch of The Stranglers not for the first time hinting away in keys, and virulently suggestive and flaming atmospheres, it is another stunning pinnacle in the release.

The Art Of Loving is brought to a close by the increasingly captivating beauty of Don’t Call It Love, a resourceful and melodically shimmering ballad once again allowing Katie to show the depths of her voice before utilising it in a crescendo of creative courtliness enclosed in a tempest of united passion and inventive energy. It is a slow burner of a song which given time matches the depths and heights of the other songs on what is easily one of the albums of the year. Fans of the band will probably expect to hear that but even they will have their breath taken away by its magnificence.

The Art Of Loving is released on September 1st @ http://jingomusic.bandcamp.com/album/the-art-of-loving

http://jingomusic.com/

10/10

RingMaster 31/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Jingo – Jaclyn

jingo pic oct

It must be at least two to three weeks since we last wrote about Jingo on The RR so that must mean we are overdue a single. Actually we are a little late with Jaclyn having been released at the beginning of the month, but better late than never and certainly when the song is as stunningly impressive as the band’s sixth unveiling.

The London based quartet of Jack Buckett (vocals/guitar), his U.S. born wife Katie (lead vocals/keys/guitar), Sahil Batra (keys/bass/guitar/vocals), and Joseph Reeves (drums), opened up their singles account with three tracks in the compelling shapes of IQ84, Same Without You, The Matador. Each was an eclectic mix of sounds and adventure which maybe only hinted as great as they were, at the potent things to emerge with their successors, Black Flowers and Wake Up, two songs which brewed up the darker heavier shadows of the band’s imagination and songwriting into a sultry blaze of intensive rock fuelled by scorching melodic flames. It has been an enthralling evolution which continues to engrain Jingo deeper into the passions, with Jaclyn is no exception.

Continuing the dramatic presence and grandeur of its predecessors, the new single again merges psychedelically flavoured heavy rock with virulently contagious passion, a brew which incitingly washes over senses and thoughts through music and vocals alike. Inspired by and dedicated to a Jaclyn Ann Perrelli, the song initially tempts ears and air with a guitar teasing alongside the powerful and mesmeric voice of Katie, her first touch gentle yet instantly magnetic.  With drama rising, a squalled name cry of the song’s inspiration sears the atmosphere before the track unveils its rigorous yet restrained stomp, a considered charge coated in vaudeville like charm within the emotively impacting weight of the musical narrative. It raises the hairs on the back of the neck, refusing to leave them be across the whole of its riveting expanse. Melodramatic keys equally lay down the strongest temptation but it is the stunning vocal potency and depths of Katie aided by equally impressive vocals from the band which steal and steer the passions into a feverish embrace. If there is a finer natural vocalist in British rock right now it is hard to bring them to mind right now.

Everything about the track is immense and majestic, as well as dynamically provocative with Jingo just getting better and better with each uncaging of their all-round talent through irresistible pyres of burning sounds and emotional flames. With references to the likes of Jess & the Ancient Ones, The Magic Numbers and now Saint Agnes and Helldorado creeping into view to give an idea of the original blazes being created, Jingo just might be the most important new entrant to the world of British music, certainly for our convinced hearts.

www.facebook.com/jingomusic

10/10

RingMaster 18/10/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Jingo – Black Flowers

jingo promo

Earlier this year, London based Jingo more than impressed with a trio of single released a couple of weeks or so apart from each other. Each was a distinct emotional soundscape with scenery of melodic and colour drenched narratives lyrically and musically capturing the imagination. It is fair to say each of the three left thoughts and emotions eager and happy to declare the promise and an assumed potent horizon of the band. Well it turns out that we were merely on the appetisers for greater things, the songs just hints and temptations of what was to come ahead and certainly with their fourth release. Black Flowers is simply magnificent, a flame of creative mastery which leaves as great as they were, its predecessors well back in the shade. Jingo have truly arrived and in a fire of adventure.

Consisting of husband and wife guitarist/vocalist Jack and vocalist/keyboardist/guitarist Katie Buckett, alongside drummer Joseph Reeves, and Sahil Batra on keys/bass/guitar/vocals, the quartet certainly took no time in drawing attention, their first gig as Jingo coming as support for Graham Coxon of Blur in March this year at a sold out charity night at Mother London. That same day saw the release of debut single IQ84 soon after followed by Same Without You and subsequently Matador. Each song left a stronger and increasing appetite and thirst for their descriptive musical narratives and rich lyrical expression, something Black Flowers more than quenches. Comparisons in many ways to bands such as Fleetwood Mac and The Magic Numbers have been mentioned but it is fair to say Jingo have already managed to stand alone, and even more so with the more intensive and formidable single.

As soon as the drone kissed riffs of guitar and bass opened up the air there is a feeling of darker more intensive things afoot. The addition of the glorious vocals of Katie offers an immediate seduction but they cannot dismiss the shadows draping eagerly over the ear. It is a magnetic welcome which only deepens in lure and intensity as the drums flex their forceful sinews and the guitars bring a greater gnarly caress to the encounter. With the keys expanding their richly hued imaginative presence within the veins of doom spawned  corruptive contagion, the blend of light and dark is pure ingenious whilst the exceptional enchanting vocals and harmonies act like a beacon to restrain the musical and lyrical darkness. Other songs maybe have sparked thoughts The Magic Numbers etc. but Black Flowers seem to find a kind of kinship with bands such as Blood Ceremony and Jess & the Ancient Ones.

Black Flowers is outstanding, a track to thrust the band into the heart of British rock music, though you get the inkling that Jingo will never settle in one camp, and that makes them and their new single even the more exhilarating.

Stream/download Black Flowers https://soundcloud.com/jingomusic/black-flowers

https://www.facebook.com/jingomusic

10/10

RingMaster 07/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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