The Cavemen – Born To Hate

TC_RingMasterReview

It did not take the release of recent single Too High To Die/I’d Kill to stir up eager anticipation for the new album from The Cavemen, that instinct bred by the band’s debut album last year, but it certainly added to the energy of the lustful welcome offered to Born To Hate. Native New Zealanders now UK based within the “grimy streets of London”, The Cavemen is one of those proposals you naturally take to or not, but for raw and uncompromising spirit stirring rock ‘n’ roll, the quartet’s punk driven garage rock takes some beating.

That previously mentioned single suggested a new primal ferocity and trashy tenacity had been bred in the band’s sound, a lascivious urgency which again fuels Born To Hate. In many ways the release is a continuation of The Cavemen’s self-titled debut album; more of the same lo-fi devilry but with this fresh impetus of sonic corruption, the band breaches a new plateau in their salaciously dirty rock ‘n’ roll.

Savage is the first assault on ears, its blues scented impurity a swift involvement of ears and appetite as sixties garage rock puts on its punk pants for a stomping trespass driven by the rhythmic slaps of drummer Jake and the moody bassline of Nick. As with most songs from the band to date, involvement with feet and vocal chords is swift and full, its ease of persuasion just a warm up for the joys to come as I’m A Mess swoops in straight after. A teasing spicy hook starts things rolling, its inescapable lure soon backed by tenacious rhythms and the scuzzy enterprise of guitarist Jack, in turn his great unpolished vocal backing to the punk attitude bred delivery of front man Paul creating a rousing union hard to resist.

swamp-cover_RingMasterReviewI Hate Art romps in next, its raucous hook littered confrontation assaulting and exciting like a fusion of The Sonics and Eddie and The Hot Rods and quickly in control of hips and feet whilst stirring up a litter of trouble before Satan Is Her Name stalks ears and imagination with the same trashy deviancy and demonic wantonness as bound in its centre of attention. Fair to say floorboards bounce when the song is around, its infectiousness enslaving and instantly matched by that uncaged by the corrosive sixties pop bawdiness of In Love With You complete with eagerly chopping riffs and fab four inspired howls.

There is a taste of Motorhead to next up Speed Of Death, its harsh ferocity and virulent antagonism as catchy as anything taunting from within Born To Hate while showing a broader diversity within the familiar Cavemen sound. That variety continues across the album as songs like I Hope They Drop The Bomb On Me bullies and flirts with its sonically befouling seventies punk/power pop inspired antagonism and straight after the crazed punk ‘n’ roll of Ain’t My Baby ignites an even greedier reaction and union between listener and release.

The band drops down a gear for the excellent Dead To Me, its meaty croon though still loaded with muscular energy as it strolls rabidly through ears with its psychobilly laced garage rock before Nasty Girl Nasty Boy whips up the passions all over again with its The Pirates meets The Flys romp. Pure rock ‘n’ roll in its most primordial punk breeding, the track is irresistible; a certain pinnacle though closely chased throughout the album by songs like the psychotic UK Subs coloured C.H.A.R.L.I.E. and the ever glorious I’d Kill (To See You Dead). One of the tracks on the last single, it is a belligerent nagging of the senses carrying a great groan of The Saints and The Lurkers to its grouchy contagion.

Born To Hate is completed by the persistent fingering of Why Won’t You; a song as seventies pop glam as it is punk in its sonically ravaged way, and an inescapable infection to bring a thrilling release to a boisterously rousing close. The band’s songs might and will draw comparisons to others at certain times but every flavour is devoured, twisted, than corrupted again until emerging as part of a riot unique to The Cavemen and right here helping create an album which simply leads you into dirty habits.

Born To Hate is available via Dirty Water Records at https://thecavemennz.bandcamp.com/album/born-to-hate  and http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/The-Cavemen/c/18119001/offset=0&sort=normal

 

https://www.facebook.com/thecavemennz

Pete RingMaster 29/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Kingcrows – Funland

 

Kingcrows_RingMaster Review

For all the exceptional punk releases and bands igniting the rock scene over recent years, there is no still no substitute yet for the special tingle which only lifts its head with a ‘77 found roar. As we all know, it is a never diminishing inspirational period for punk rock and the never ending torrent of bands spawning their own identity with its antagonistic hues. Some breed a sound which is as close a cousin as you could wish for, amongst them The Kingcrows who are simply a rousing bridge between the late seventies and modern punk ‘n’ roll. Their previous releases have already made that declaration but new album Funland sets it in stone, the UK quartet involving the listener in something energetically aggressive, attitude driven, and most of all undiluted sleaze wrapped fun.

Hailing from Leeds, the quartet of vocalist Phil E Stine, guitarist Lee J., bassist Rocco, and drummer Ratbag have been a bruising and thrilling live presence across the north of England moving outwards. Emerging in 2005, The Kingcrows has torn up stages with their filthy rock ‘n’ roll ever since, playing alongside the likes of Spear Of Destiny, UK Subs, The Rezillos, TV Smith, Anti Nowhere League, Tokyo Dragons, Vice Squad, The Lurkers, 999, The Vibrators, Red Alert, The Outcasts, Peter & The Test Tube Babies and many more legendary and emerging bands over the years. They have also released a clutch of attention grabbing EPs, which made an even bigger impression when collected together and released in the shape of Corvus Maximus through STP Records in 2013. The album awoke a broader focus and awareness of the band’s unfussy and virulent sound, which Funland should now push into new spotlights and recognition.

The album erupts with Here We Go, the first riot initially blooming from a fairground organ and its warm invitation. Soon rhythms rumble with attitude and riffs stir up the air as the opener’s eager rock ‘n’ roll seizes ears and attention. The song is quickly into its virulent and persistent stride, cruising with jabbing beats spearing grouchy guitar and bass tenacity. The track is like a mix of Spunk Volcano and The Eruptions and The Adicts, similarity and nostalgia colluding with fresh attitude and revelry.

cover_RingMaster Review     A potent start to the album is further ignited by the following She’s My Rock ‘N’ Roll and its thrilling tempting. An alluring rhythmic enticing sparks a rockabilly bred grooving flirted with by spicy harmonica, they in turn kick-starting a heavy anthemic canter of contagious rhythms and incendiary sonic enterprise led by the ever magnetic tones of Stine. The track is glorious, punk rock at its tenacious and riotous best, and again as old school as it is imposingly new. The album’s first major pinnacle is backed, if not quite matched, by On The Road Again, a swiftly engaging and infectious stomp which has ears, feet, and appetite locked in within a handful of chords and resourceful seconds. There are no big surprises within song and arguably Funland in general, yet they only provide a nonstop and fully satisfying stomp to get eagerly involved in.

A southern whisper lines the lure and rampage of Rock ‘N’ Roll Rebel Songs, the track aflame with sultry guitar endeavour, inviting group vocals, and the breath and atmosphere of ’77. Lyrically it also sparks memories of times past, it all colluding in one easy going and gripping persuasion, though outshone by Forgotten Son straight after. Its opening riff comes with dark intent and imagination igniting attitude, its bait continuing to enthral as the song grows and breeds new sonic colour and lyrical drama around it. There is a touch of Angelic Upstarts to the encounter though that is but one flavour within the emotive shadows and provocative narrative on offer.

The album’s title track kicks up a storm of attitude and insatiable rock ‘n’ roll next, the track forcibly prowling with essences of bands like Suburban Studs and Crisis in its armoury before making way for the irresistible presence of Kick ‘Em Down. The album is truly at its loftiest height at this point, the tasty provocateur, and its predecessor, unleashing welcomingly bullying and virulently infectious rock ‘n’ roll with the second also unveiling another tonic of harmonica belligerence, before the brilliant Apocalypso steals the whole show. Opening on a delicious throaty bass riff with tendrils of guitar adding their spice before the drums create a brooding and catchy confrontation, the track evolves into one seriously magnetic shuffle. The beats of Ratbag continue to incite song and ears with their anthemic swings, whilst around them voice, riffs, and contagion ebb and flow like virulent waves soaked in inescapable temptation.

Never Gonna Fall continues the album’s elevated and invigorating energy and enjoyment with ease, its thumping presence and gait luring many strains of rock into one bulging incitement whilst Sick Of Love Songs creates its own individual fusion of old school punk and new rock ‘n’ roll. The bass of Rocco breeds a bestial snarl to its tone whilst Lee J. once again leaves sonic vapours from his searing and ever to the point exploits. Led by the beckoning delivery of Stine, the track is another hitting the sweet spot whilst proving to be another proposition you only wish its two or so minutes was stretches longer.

Funland ends with Beer and Whiskey, arguably the weakest song on the album. In context though, with it holding ears and pleasure firmly in its rip-roaring escapade, it simply reinforces the might of the tracks which over shadow it. It is indeed a fine end to an excellent slab of rock ‘n’ roll, Funland rigorously feeding appetites for seventies punk and today’s punk ‘n’ roll from start to finish.

2015 has already been blessed with some mighty punk offerings which The Kingcrows now rival if not surpass with their new proposal, but few of those others will become as big a favourite as Funland is destined to be we suggest.

Funland will be released through STP Records at Rebellion on August 6th and then available @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page4.htm

http://www.kingcrows.com/     https://www.facebook.com/kingcrows

RingMaster 31/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Loaded 44 – Come On!

photo by Dave Brown

photo by Dave Brown

If there is a fiercer more contagious slab of rock ‘n’ roll around right now than Come On! it is sure to be a major triumph as the second album from UK punks Loaded 44 is one mighty stomp. From a strong but arguably unremarkable start it turns into a ridiculously addictive and riotous brawl. It does not take long for the transition to happen either, just a couple of songs, but when the release kicks up a gear bliss and exhaustion is its legacy.

Hailing from the North East, Loaded 44 began in 1996 stirring up the local scene before working on a broader attention and wave of eager appetites for their “ass-shakin’ punk rock”. The band’s live reputation is second to none whilst first album Wasted On You, released in 2011 on STP Records like its successor, established the band as one of the UK’s finest musically voracious punk bands. Now the quartet of vocalist Beki (Steve Ignorant, Chaos 8), guitarist Dave, bassist Steve and drummer Nelly (both Hi-Fi Spitfires and The Lurkers), have upped the ante and created a new tempest of attitude and aggressive infectiousness in Come On!, an album to rage at the world with and lose your inhibitions to.

As mentioned the album did not bowl as over initially though it had attention and appetite gripped and eager through the first pair of songs. Breakdown hits first and from a single riff erupts in a blaze of jabbing beats and aggressive chords. Once Beki unveils her distinctive tones, the track is a richly satisfying slice of rock ‘n’ roll for thoughts to swiftly align to. What it does not have is the spark to ignite anything more than calm but thorough enjoyment. Nevertheless it is a potent start straight away matched by the rhythmically agitated Something For Nothing. A throaty bassline instantly grips whilst the vocals of Beki have a great Poly Styrene edge to them as the rumbling beats of Nelly add richer anthemic bait. Again though, it strongly pleases without sparking big excitement, though that all changes from hereon in.

STP033     Paper Heart steps up next with a heavy tempest of beats and riffs on its first breath, a stormy presence soon veined by group harmonies and the combative tones of Beki. They in turn seem to inspire greater attitude and menace in the other parts of the song, the result a forceful romp with a volatile air veined by incendiary flames of rock guitar. Finishing on an inescapable anthemic roar the song makes way for Generation Idiot and yet another gear and plateau is found. Vocals lure from the first second, swiftly backed by addictive hooks and dirty riffs. The song is soon ablaze with pop punk devilry and energy, but this is no lightweight Green Day like tempting, but a fiery and predatory incitement of power punk.

The class ‘A’ addiction of Give It Up strides in next, a track with a chorus taking barely seconds to be seduced by, roared along with, and deeply wormed in the psyche. The repetitive spine of the song through bass and riffs, has all the hallmarks of an understandable influence of The Lurkers and works like a magnet as melodies and hooks flare up with virulent catchiness around it. The track screams single but then again most of the songs from the album have that declaration as proved by Over And Out next. A bigger bruising encounter than its predecessor, the track equally has that infectious temptation and enterprise to it. Vocally Beki reveals a touch of the Fay Fifes whilst the guitars and bass collude to create a straight forward yet perpetually spicy confrontation punctuated by the scything swings of Nelly’s sticks.

Aggression and intensity only gets harder and more imposing in Step Back In Time but so does the band’s ability to create catchy provocations. Hooks simply seduce as rhythms and riffs badger rigorously, whilst vocally the band and Beki singularly, whip up an anthemic storm from which escape is impossible, a success emulated in Only Ones within seconds. Like a dirtier punk version of The Rezillos, the track is a rampant persuasion of rock temptation. Both tracks have you thinking rock ‘n’ roll does not get much better than this but oh it does as shown by the outstanding Shake It Up. Opening with a classic rock spicing within its punk coaxing, and with a great whiff of The Duel to its early melodic and harmonic resonance, the song twists around to unleash a chorus which simply sends a tingle down the spine as body and emotions succumb to its epidemic lures. It is one of those moments you know music is primarily there to breed, an all-consuming treat which only grows stronger and hungrier as the band get even more adventurous within the brilliant encounter.

The album is brought to a thrilling close by It`s Not About You first of all, a raucous punk ‘n’ roll exploit with drama to its riffs and delicious bassline. Voices and beats cast a riveting and bracing proposal as ears and the passions are set ablaze once again, then left on a high at the song’s departure, subsequently and fed further intensive pleasure by the closing Love Myself To Death. A more standard rock punk bellow but giving the album one final exciting moment, the track just puts the final layer of icing on a modern punk classic.

You may come up against many albums which might rival Come On! as a bulging package of rock ‘n’ roll anthems but there will be few to surpass it, if any. Loaded 44 produce punk rock at its best and an example of why the genre and state of mind will never die.

Come On! is available now on CD via S.T.P. Records @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page4.htm and digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/come-on!/id982345664

http://loaded44.weebly.com/   https://www.facebook.com/loaded44

RingMaster 16/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

The Bricks – Here We Come

CD Cover for Print

     Here We Come is an album which might not be stretching existing boundaries or ideas of invention, indeed you would suggest it is not even trying to, but it is an encounter which introduces us to a potential soaked band with a sound which simply leaves satisfaction and enjoyment full. The release comes from Nebraska punks The Bricks and is receiving its broader unveiling courtesy of Raven Faith Records this month. Consisting of ten memorable if a little formulaic punk anthems, it is a proposition which leaves ears and attention wanting more of its old school punk rock.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Jimmy Hobbs, lead guitarist Chris Smith, bassist Kelly Turney, and drummer Mathew Lewis, The Bricks as mentioned has an old school feel to their raw rock ‘n’ roll but equally and in varying degrees infuse essences of oi, hardcore, and Street Punk amongst many spices, into its rebellious nature and sound. It is a faith based proposition which is not backwards in coming forward with the band’s personal emotions and praising but equally does not make it a focal point. This results in an offering from the Omaha quartet which will easily appeal to all punk fans and leave them with an appetite for more.

Recorded at Two Bird Dog Studio in Sioux City, Iowa, Here We Come opens up with an immediately delicious hook within the first few seconds of Just Like You. It has a ring of The Ramones to it which only adds to the instantly attentive hunger of ears and emotions. It is a familiarity which captivates with ease, continuing its potent lure as rhythms thump on the senses and the raw tones of Hobbs, backed by group shouts of the band, bellow engagingly. Like all good punk songs it is an easily accessible stomp for the listener’s body and voice, no demands or surprises being launched just magnetic punk revelry.

The strong start continues with the excellent Punk’s Not Dead, a song which stands toe to toe with ears like a mix of The Lurkers and Dead Kennedys given a healthy dose of US oi. Again the listener is enlisted within seconds to its boisterous persuasion, something all songs achieve with little defiance coming their way to be honest, and shown again straight after by Same Old Story. Not quite having the same spark as the first two, its character a little more dour, the track still provides an infectious and captivating proposal. Its midway slip into a more restrained and melodically aflame passage also reveals a stronger twist of invention adding to the enjoyable incitement.

Yahweh has a pop punk contagion to its otherwise simple and addictively persuasive offering, again a familiar tone soaking hook and riffs but once more leaving only highly satisfied ears and a greedier appetite. Whether in their next release or further down the line we will have the same feeling of satisfaction at being offered recognisable influences and flavours we will see, but right now it works a treat with its nostalgic charm. Proof again coming in the punchy Revolt and the masterfully anthemic Omaha Punks which follows. The first of the pair brings a more metallic essence to its riffs whilst vocals and rhythms lay down a great confrontation of punk persuasion, whilst its successor dips into the essences of The Clash and Angelic Upstarts for a predatory and gripping call to arms.

We Live flirts with whispers of ska and street punk next for an inescapably catchy coaxing of Rancid meets Social Distortion like tempting. As the last track, it easily has ears and feet engaged, and emotions basking in its old school and anthemically alluring intimacy. The same can be said about the Ramones bred Red White and True which strides resourcefully in next. Early touches have a more Clash feel but as the song hits its stride and chorus, it all courted by a great rhythmic antagonism and scything riffs, the NYC legends come to mind

The final pair of tracks ensures the listener is left energised and wanting more. Small Few is a middle finger defiance, driven by crisply jabbing beats aligned to a moody baseline and belligerent backing vocal calls, and inescapable addictive whilst the closing Some Day with less rigour lights ears with abrasing energy and inviting enterprise. More of a slow burner in persuasion compared to earlier songs, it still triggers pleasure fuelled reactions and brings a thoroughly enjoyable album to a strong close.

The Bricks openly wear their influences and passions in their music and it only rubs off on the listener. There are few new things to devour but plenty to provide one highly enjoyable encounter.

Here We Come is available now via http://www.ravenfaithrecords.com/#!product/prd1/3580537951/the-bricks-here-we-come

https://www.facebook.com/TheBricksOmaha

RingMaster 17/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

The Permanent Smilers – One Real Big Identity Crisis

identity-web

One Real Big Identity Crisis, the new album from UK band The Permanent Smilers, is a release with no apparent direction or framework to its intent and enterprise; a release which basically lives up to its title but boy is it a slab of irresistible fun. Through thirteen songs, band and album take on a torrent of different styles and nostalgic flavours which really should not work alongside each other as coherently as they do, and all come with a humour and mischief which adds to rather than overrides the adventure of the individual characters. It is slightly deranged but not chaotic and thoroughly unpredictable yet not messy considering the vast sounds employed from song to song. Most of all though it is simply a compelling proposition which comes from left-field, keeps its heart there, and leaves the most enjoyable experience in its wake.

There is little we can tell you about the band itself, though The Permanent Smilers is fronted by Richard Lemongrower who was the songwriter behind Norwich band The Lemongrowers, a band releasing two albums on Noisebox at some point in time. Produced with Jonny Cole and mixed by David Pye, One Real Big Identity Crisis takes little time in lighting ears and imagination, though it opens with maybe its weakest song. That is a little misleading as it takes a song to get a handle, or try to, on the release anyway but certainly Identity Crisis did not really grip attention as much as elsewhere and left thoughts with a slight wondering of what have we got ourselves into. Strongly swung rhythms and similarly intensive riffs clasp ears within the first breath of the song, their bait a jabbing lure against the unpolished yet engaging tones of Richard. It is an easily flowing and energetic slice of rock ‘n’ roll with the bass of Jonny Cole pungent bait at the centre of the stomp. Truthfully there is little wrong with the song but it lacks a spark in its presence which evades the reaction it probably deserves and is easy to imagine being found with others.

The good if unsure start is soon a thing of the past as Uh-Oh takes over with its festive folk swagger and emerging carnival like devilment. Sporting a splash of Tankus The Henge to its relaxed but vibrant stroll, the song is a constant swing of melodic hips as it moves towards an unexpected and mouth-watering slip into a Dukes of Stratosphear like ethereal psychedelic charm and climate, returning back into festive mood soon after as if it had just emerged from a dip in the sea. The song is fascinating and bewitching, and just the first of numerous adventures into different landscapes, as shown next by the punk pop devilry of You Know Where To Go. Bred from seventies power pop and carrying a mix of The Flys and The Lurkers to its hookery, the song just hits the sweet spot with its insatiable energy and mischief, before making way for the more relaxed melodic embrace of Elastic. The keys and guitars of Richard weave another enthralling web of sound here, this time with a sniff of sixties pop to it which is punctuated by the crisp beats of drummer Pete Fraser and dark bass lures of Cole. By its close, the song somehow becomes a thumping anthem without losing any of its melodic and gentle elegance, a potent feat for any song to offer.

Both Just No Good and It Doesn’t Work Anymore keep album and ears bouncing with energy and pleasure, the first using a garage rock spicing again teased by a sixties almost Doors like toxicity, whilst the second again spawning from the same kind of seeding brings a rawer punk grouchiness with its presence. Each has feet and emotions joining their rigorous coaxing before Ghosts allows a breather for the body if not the imagination with its Simon and Garfunkel meets Burt Bacharach like embrace. The brass persuasion of Dave Land seductively flames over similarly captivating keys and vocal caresses through the song but as always there is a scent of devilment to the song with thoughts wondering at times if they should be enjoying this as much as they are. There is no escaping its thick charm though.

The next pair of songs brings a rich sense of XTC to their enterprise and persuasion, Rebel broadening that over time with a seventies kissed soar of progressive fuelled psyche rock whilst its successor, Voodoo has the stamp of Andy Partridge to its flirtatious pop and virulent enterprise. The pair leaves nostalgia glazed lips licked and, through the latter especially, ears basking in psyche pop of the most delicious kind complete with jazzy brass and funk spirited unpredictability.

You Know When To Go dives straight back into punk infused rock ‘n’ roll for its brief but sparkling instrumental before Unforseen manages to conjure an encounter which recalls the quirky indie pop of The Monochrome Set and the plainer but no less tasty essence of Tom Robinson. The song alternatively stomps and swirls around ears, every passing hook and melody it conjures an intriguing and quaint yet voracious tease before it moves off into the distance allowing the outstanding See Through You to make its lingering mark. Acoustically shaped with an avalanche of panzer gun delivered rhythms, the song initially is a smouldering and majestic sway of sound. It subsequently explodes though into a tempest of energy and revelry which only lifts a great song to a heady plateau. Imagine the volatile energy of De Staat at their most devilish with the epidemic hunger of eighties punk/power pop and you get a sense of the glorious treat.

One Real Big Identity Crisis closes with the acoustic lullaby of Sleepyhead, the album ending as it started with a track which does not catch the ardour triggered elsewhere but certainly graces ears with tantalising propositions. This album is one unexpected and seriously enjoyable adventure; not breaking down boundaries or venturing into the unknown but never providing a moment when you are not surprised or wrapped up in its refreshing simplicity woven by skill and invention. There is only time left to lick lips all over again as we close off and dive straight back into The Permanent Smilers’ irresistible arms, something we suggest you do too upon release.

One Real Big Identity Crisis is released in April via IRL Records with new single Identity Crisis out in March.

http://www.thepermanentsmilers.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Permanent-Smilers/1539697962929725

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

Cross Wires – Your History Defaced EP

cover

If you were caught in the ridiculously captivating web that UK band Cross Wires spun with their Assembly EP earlier this year, or indeed the releases before it, be prepared for a new rapture with the band’s recently released Your History Defaced EP. For all those new to the invigorating brew of post punk, new wave, and garage rock which the quartet potently brew, the release is quite simply a devilish treat just waiting to infest your senses. Consisting of five eclectically and creatively warped slices of sound which is simultaneously nostalgic and refreshingly new, the EP reinforces and pushes on the riveting emergence of this severely tantalising band.

Hailing from the creative depths of Bethnal Green and Romford, Cross Wires who take their name from a track on the XTC debut album White Noise, took little time from forming in breeding an impressive reputation locally through their live performances and sound. It was a presence soon spreading with their first pair of releases in the tasty shape of the Forward/Repeat and Animal Heat EPs in 2011 helping spark that growing awareness which the Dark Water EP a year later, soon drove to even wider recognition and attention. Assembly saw the band take another step in sound, songwriting, and success which Your History Defaced looks like not only emulating but surpassing as it seduces fans old and new, as well as the underground media alike.

Opener Modern Art is an instant irresistible offering, slithers of acidic guitar crossing a bulging bassline and feisty beats for an irrepressible coaxing of ears and imagination. Instantly thoughts of bands like Fire Engines and Wire come to mind but just as swiftly the song shows a more rounded and fuller sound from the band than ever before but one still draped in open originality. Right away the vocals of Jonathan Chapman romp with the same mischievous potency as that spicing the sonic intrigue of Peter Muller’s guitar and the rhythmic bait cast by drummer Ian Clarke and bassist Pete Letch. It is arguably the most pop friendly song from Cross Wires to date but one swinging with a rhythmic swagger and melodic flirtation which is virulently infectious and unpredictable. Think Franz Ferdinand meets The Freshies and you get a good hint of the impressive romp.

   Shades Of Light And Dark comes next and soon has a jangle of angular guitar temptation teasing ears as vocals dance with resourceful frivolity over the feverish agitation of beats. There is also a chunkiness to the riffs which ignites the passions as easily as the sonic persistence and repetitious ingenuity flourishing within the thrilling weave of enterprise. The song continues the EPs strong start but is soon surpassed by the thumping and imposing devilry of Tab Clear, everything about the song heavier and more intensive yet equipped with the same contagious weight of hooks and spicy grooves as those before it. The bass of Letch is especially a throaty treat whilst the vocals straddle the whole encounter with a lustful energy and expressive magnetism which seemingly inflames the scintillating tempest of sonic and discord washed endeavour around them.

The thumping rhythmic entrance of Last Stand is all that is needed to ignite the passions, an immediate ardour which is enhanced by the layers of scything riffs and pulsating bass persuasion which underpins the again impressive vocal adventure of Chapman and band. There is a Buzzcocks like flavour to the imagination binding grooves and hooks whilst the song’s overall unconventional catchiness reminds of fellow emerging UK band Houdini. The result is another addiction sparking encounter which in turn is surpassed by the closing punk spawned storm of Vultures, a deliciously raw and rapacious stomp of Swell Maps like causticity and dour infectiousness courtesy of bands like The Lurkers. It is a pungent and thrilling end to an outstanding release from a band hard not to take a lustful shine to.

If new wave and postpunk with a modern mischief excites the ears than Cross Wires and the Your History Defaced EP is a must.

Your History Defaced is available now @ http://crosswires.bandcamp.com/album/your-history-defaced

https://www.facebook.com/CrossWires

RingMaster 02/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

 

The Cottonettes – DEMO 1

The Cottonettes

With the same instinctive infectiousness of early Undertones and the hook ability of Buzzcocks, DEMO 1 the debut EP from UK punks The Cottonettes is one of the most refreshing and invigorating genre releases this year. Grasped by a potent breath of nostalgia too, the four track stomp feeds all the needs and wants of any punk hunger whilst teasing with a pop contagion which is virulent and unashamedly anthemic. Sound wise the band transports you back to the likes of Television Personalities, The Shapes, and Swell Maps with a dose of the pop punkness of The Buzzards and The Lurkers to its charm, whilst equally carving out a presence set firmly in the audacious invention of the now. The result is a release and sound which is raw and honest, mischievous, and a wholly irresistible mayhem.

Formed in February 2012 by Guildford guitarist Ben Madle who soon recruited bassist Josh Young from Fleet into his master plan with Basingstoke based drummer Marty Dixon being brought in by the four string slapper, The Cottonettes has built a potent reputation and following around their immediate locale through their energetic live devilry and a series of cheek slapping singles. It is a presence which is stretching further afield and with the EP, and luck, will soon be igniting nationwide awareness and hunger for their unpolished gem of a sound.

Won’t Ya opens up the release and is instantly barracking the ears with thumping rhythms and antagonistic riffs. It is a magnetic a3850943094_2introduction soon driven by the unpolished vocals and a prime punk probing of the senses; simplicity and a genuine intent to unleash pure fun fuelling the track whilst translating it all to a riveting and addictive persuasion which soon has feet and voice joining its brawl. With an oi whisper loudly showing its sinews, an essence of bands like Serious Drinking adding to the mix, the track is a delicious incitement of old school glories and memories alongside a modern day bruising.

It is followed by the exceptional For The Boys, a sure fire anthem which will have venues, terraces, and passions reaping its seeds. Senses bashing beats rile up the air first before the guitar starts slashing any remaining peace with discord clad riffs and ridiculously addictive hooks. Like a riot instigated by Peter and the Test Tube Babies and Suburban Studs, the track is an infestation of epidemic punk antagonism and raucous seduction which recruits the fullest enjoyment and wholehearted participation.

Entering on a confident swagger, Happy For You takes up the reins left by the previous song to stomp through the ear straight to the passions, big swinging rhythms and jangle coated guitars skirting vocal chants and a boisterous energy. It is a full-on punk persuasion which leads thoughts and emotions into nefarious anarchic ways before the closing Oh No! Yoko finishes the release off in a blaze of melodically rubbed pop punk. Catchy grooves and hooks make welcome bait amongst the caustic riffs and commanding rhythms, the mix especially with the more melody soaked voice of the song reminiscent of The Freshies.

     DEMO 1 is an excellent slice of essential punk rock and The Cottonettes a band who carve out a thrilling stance through distilling old school British punk with a more devious modern version which teases with varied flavours. This is a band and release which deserves the fullest attention and recognition within the genre and you suspect they will soon be getting it.

http://www.thecottonettes.com/

9/10

RingMaster 24/10/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com