Healthy Junkies – Delirious Dream

Two years on from the album Box Of Chaos outshining its impressive predecessor The Lost Refuge, which had started the trend by eclipsing the band’s debut Sick Note, UK punksters Healthy Junkies have again repeated the feat with their fourth album. Delirious Dream is a collection of tracks embracing the band’s broadest kaleidoscope of flavours yet over a punk ‘n’ roll landscape; a 15 song strong release which is for sure their finest moment to date keeping expectations clueless and the imagination enthralled.

Recorded with Brian O’Shaughnessy and mastered by Pete Maher, Delirious Dream is the songwriting and sound of the band at its boldest yet most intricately woven. With the founding duo of vocalist Nina Courson and guitarist/vocalist Phil Honey-Jones tapping into their most imaginative depths yet alongside the rhythmic prowess of bassist Dave Whitmore and drummers Pumpy and Adam Lewis, Healthy Junkies have created a new magnet of sound which needs mere seconds to demand attention through album opener When All Is Said And Done.

Instantly the track is strolling eagerly through ears with a rich melodic hook amidst eager rhythmic bait, all the while keys adding their intimation. Courson’s ever alluring vocals quickly join the mix, adding elegance and harmonic radiance to the earthier breath of the song. With drama soaking every note and syllable, theatre intensifying across the host of twists and turns making up the simply outstanding punk ‘n’ roll incitement, the track immediately sets the high creative bar and striking character of the release.

This Is Not A Suicide brings its own exceptional roar of sound and enterprise straight after. Dirtier and grumpier than its predecessor and driven by attitude fuelled riffs and senses biting rhythms, the track sets its own particular pinnacle within Delirious Dream. Nagging grooves and garage punk spicing also add their incitement to the bracing trespass before the even tempered rock ‘n’ roll of Juliet’s Call saunters in. Like a gothic rock nurtured punk inspired collusion between Siouxsie and The Banshees and In Evil Hour, the track is pure virulence.

The band embraces more hard rock like hues for next up Johnny Demented, its raw sonic haze magnetically tempered by Coulson’s angelic tones. The song did not quite raise the roof as its predecessors in appetite and the passions here yet from start to finish it is a full captivation raising the ante as its holler and breath erupt across its eventful body.

Through the infectiously tenacious croon of Some Kind Of Girl and Ghost Without A Soul with its shadow draped atmosphere, riveting sound and adventure abounds with unpredictability and rapacious enterprise while All Talk brews an emotive entanglement of old school punk and classic rock in its own individual recipe of temptation. All three tracks easily grip ears and appetite though the delicious punk instincts and pop flirtations of The Sound Of My Guitar outshine all. The track is Class-A addiction spurning late seventies kissed new wave/punk rock slavery as ripe with hooks and celebration as a festive holly bush.

The following Boy Or Girl is something akin to a meeting of early Blondie and The Photos and quite irresistible with its successor, Meet & Greet preyed on an already aroused hunger for what is on offer with its predacious escapade resembling a kind of X-Ray Spex/Spinnerette collusion as the band take a swipe at musical greed. It is simply another major highlight of the album echoed in success by the frisky indie/pop punk animation of This Condition with Honey-Jones leading and dueting on vocals.

The album’s worst track is next and These Boots Are Made For Walking is nothing less than full pleasure as Healthy Junkies make the classic their own by giving it a predatory breath as classic rock guitars blaze before James Dean rumbles with old school punk ‘n’ roll lust and uncontainable ebullience.

The album concludes with the pair of Theft and Part 2. The first is a rebel rousing protagonist vivaciously prowling the senses before breaking into a similarly ravening rock ‘n’ roll canter with erupting psych rock bred flames while the second is its dark but incandescent underworld where physical and emotion elements of the tracks shimmer, smoulder, and burn.

Together they make for a fascinating conclusion to Delirious Dream, echoing its title despite their brooding volatility and showing there is so much more to the creative palette of Healthy Junkies, one they have still yet to fully explore.

We always feel a sense of excitement when a new encounter with Healthy Junkies comes along as they have always manage to outdo themselves so far; Delirious Dream is no exception; in fact it pretty much outshines most other punk/rock nurtured offerings around this year too.

Delirious Dream is out now via Banana Castle Records/Cargo Records UK across most online stores.

http://www.healthyjunkies.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/healthyjunkiesband   https://twitter.com/HealthyJunkies

Pete RingMaster 17/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Healthy Junkies – Box of Chaos

HJ_RingMaster Review

It was September 2013 when we last had Healthy Junkies igniting ears with a release; that being their impressive second album The Lost Refuge. One of our parting lines then was that the UK had “come of age and you only sense they will get better.” It was partly right as the London quartet has only gone from strength to strength on the live scene and now with third album Box of Chaos. Their coming of age back then though might have been a touch premature for the riveting and dynamic fourteen track punk ‘n’ roll stomp from the band firmly outshines its acclaimed predecessor.

Emerging from a meeting between founders, guitarist Phil Honey-Jones and Paris hailing vocalist Nina Courson at the venue Punk in Soho in 2009 and their creative bonding over mutual loves and influences, melodic punks Healthy Junkies took little time to start leaving their stamp on the UK punk and rock scene. Making their live debut at an all-day punk festival in Brighton in 2010, the band has become a rousing roar around the UK moving into Europe and one of London’s most exciting and prominent live attractions with their self-hosted monthly night at The Unicorn in Camden a regular treat. Debut album Sick Note awoke a broader attention on the band when released, a success forcibly backed up by The Lost Refuge. Throughout the time line-up changes have only seemed to refuel the band at various times too, the latest coming since the recording of Box of Chaos with bassist Ivan Baragone replacing the departed Dave Renegade alongside Courson, Honey Jones, and drummer Tony Alda.

HJ(1)_RingMaster ReviewWhilst The Lost Refuge was a rousing tempest in ears from the first roar, Box of Chaos takes its time to build and entice even greater greedier reactions. Certainly its first play and touch is a potent lure but each listen reveals greater depths and imagination at the heart of the release which only adds to its strength and drama. There is also seemingly richer old school punk and rock ‘n’ roll hues this time around, essences no doubt bred from inspirations to Honey-Jones and Courson such as Sonic Youth, Hole, Sex Pistols, Bauhaus, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Iggy and the Stooges, and David Bowie. One band which our thoughts most leaned to as a reference across the new album though is Penetration; a similarly evocative nature and tone to the great County Durham band spicing the band’s adventurous sound from the off with both Nice n Sleazy and its successor Never Want It Again. The opener emerges on a sonic shimmer with waiting riffs quickly stirring into predatory life as ears continue to be enveloped in that initial mist. Rhythms are soon just as pressing as Coulson’s magnetic voice seduces, her tones a smouldering caress within the rising fiery heat of the song. It is an increasingly virulent protagonist grabbing swift involvement of the listener, setting them up for more riotous stroll of Never Want It Again. It is a tenacious canter though superbly twisted with ska/like asides as rhythms and vocals flirtatiously swing with mischievous intent within the otherwise busy attitude loaded rock ‘n’ roll of the song.

Danny Trash keeps the potent start to the album in top gear, its catchy canter and haunted atmosphere soon enslaving hips and imagination respectively. As expected and already shown, Health Junkies produce choruses and anthemic moments which are inescapable; voice and body soon on board with a track which is a maze of evocative sounds, pungent emotion, and creatively boisterous exploits.

The following Hypocrite is the opposite but just as glorious, its punk rock fury offering one minute fifteen seconds of cantankerous rock ‘n’ roll with raw riffs and repetitious brawling spawned from delicious old school incitement before I Don’t Give a Damn springs with a similar aggressive heart into ears. It is soon casting another prowling proposal with addictive hooks and gripping rhythms; both swift slavery as the guitars weave a melodically provocative narrative for thoughts to get wound up in as successfully as the body is lost to the anthemic prowess of the encounter.

The more hard rock meets punk ‘n’ roll tempting of Je Suis Free is an inviting and again contagious defiance next whilst Watch Out has a blues rock lining to its infection loaded, roister fuelled smoulder. Both tracks lead the listener into energetic and galvanic ways before Rebellion, with presumably Honey-Jones standing toe to toe with Courson in duet, stirring up another urge to take a stand and lose inhibitions in voice and deed. The track is Healthy Junkies at their rock ‘n’ roll best, direct, lyrically potent, yet igniting the want to fling the body around.

The confrontational rock pop enticement of Just a Fool steps up next, it too quickly sparking total involvement before the outstanding creative theatre of Runaway Devil infests ears and psyche. There is no escaping a Siouxsie and the Banshees air to the song, keys running their melodic fingers over the senses as Courson’s ethereal tones enchant seductively around the darker touch of rhythms. In short time the track is soon a fiercely bubbling and intimidating tempting, reminding of fellow Londoners The Duel, but still with that early coaxing a rich lure.

There are numerous peaks in the landscape of the album, that one pinnacle almost matched by the dirtier rock ‘n’ roll of Hustle Street straight after and indeed the twin tempting of the melodically mesmeric Captive with its dub shimmer and the robust swagger of Don’t Give Up where scything beats, bass rumbling, and scuzzy riffery crowd around the ever alluring tones of Courson. Reggae seeded turns and again dub spiced inventiveness only increases its grip on ears and appetite, Ruts DC like imagination leaving satisfaction bulging.

Closing with D7, another spellbinding mix of evocative calms, atmospheric haunting, and vocal seducing in a case of antagonistically anthemic rebel-rousing, Box of Chaos is a thrilling blaze for the ears and manna for the spirit from a band looking at their most successful and surely acclaimed loaded year yet.

Box of Chaos is released February via STP Records.

http://www.healthyjunkies.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/healthyjunkiesband/   https://twitter.com/HealthyJunkies

9/10

Pete RingMaster 01/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Healthy Junkies -The Lost Refuge

hj

Our attention was first given a tasty prod by UK melodic punksters Healthy Junkies back in 2011 by their track Manifesto taken from debut album Sick Note, its impressive enticement soon backed up once discovering the singles Copycat and Trash My Love. There was a certain promise and persuasion about the songs which made you suspect that the band had even greater moments and triumphs up their sleeve. The release of new album The Lost Refuge proves that that hope and assumption was more than valid, in fact such the exciting invention and presence of the release it shows maybe a depth of underestimation was at play too.

The seeds of the London based band came with the meeting of Parisian vocalist Nina Courson and guitarist Phil Honey-Jones at the venue Punk in Soho in 2009. Each in different bands, they found a mutual love and sharing of inspirations which fired up their individual creativity, influences that included the likes of Iggy Pop, Nirvana, The Doors, Blondie, Killing Joke and Sonic Youth. Linking up they were soon joined by drummer Adam Lewis and bassist Tjay Tarantino. Lewis recorded the two previously mentioned singles, and also plays on one of the tracks on The Lost Refuge, before leaving with Steve Nightmare taking over the sticks. From their first gig at an all-day punk festival in Brighton in 2010 the band has gone on to play with great success numerous shows across the UK including headlining the new band stage at the 2012 Rebellion punk festival and this year having their new album’s launch party again at the Rebellion Festivals in August, a show which saw Danny Fury (Lords of the New Church, Sham69) on drums and Dave Renegade on bass in a changed line-up since the recording of the album.

Signing with STP Records for the release of The Lost Refuge earlier this year has given Healthy Junkies a stronger platform to launch the stp1album from, though you can only feel it would make its mark such the quality and devilish temptation. The release opens with Resistance, riffs and harmonies teasing around the firm rhythms to fully engage the ear before the song hits its stride. With sonic lures riding the senses alongside the strong vocals of Courson, the track makes a satisfying introduction if a slightly underwhelming one, especially when compared to previous songs and the suggested heights they offered ahead. Nevertheless there is little wrong with the song just a lack of a gripping bait or spark to ignite thoughts and emotions.

There is no such problem from the second song on though, the album unleashing a mischief and contagious invention which now confirms and extends those earlier hopes and sets fire to the passions. Spoilt Brat offers a restrained chug of a persuasion initially as the dual vocals work their temptation. The thumping beats and moody bassline flicks more switches as the song erupts into a thrilling blaze of aural and lyrical attitude which takes hold of the emotion’s shoulders and leads them on a pop punk lilted stroll of undoubted quality. The band reminds of eighties pop punk band The Photos as the track dances on the ear which only adds to the pleasure. It is instantly followed by the excellent Play Me and its coaxing of grazing riffs and jabbing rhythms. Once in full flow with hooks and melodies laying deep barbs in the passions, the track is a fiery stomp with a blues flame to the solo and seductive licks to the vocals, especially in the restrained moments before the song bursts into sonic crescendos.

From one major pinnacle the album steps into another and the magnificent Scam Update. Coated in a definite Penetration like confrontation and old school punk urgency yet with a melodic indie breath, the track is an enthralling and magnetic glory, the little twists of ska punk strokes and grungy intensity imaginative manna. It probably takes the best song award though it does change with each listen as the likes of the next up pair of If You Talk To Her and Swansong as examples, challenge each and every time. The first of the pair casts a sinister cosmic wash over the listener before a pulsating bass tango avails the song of its charms amidst the cracking rhythmic cage set by Nightmare. In full flight the song is a sonic thrill with a whiff of wantonness and surf rock to its invention and scent of sultry melodic sex to its dance. A scintillating and irresistible provocateur it is soon matched by its successor and its cantankerous vaunt, its rhythmic slavery as inescapable as the vocal enticement and the near on psychobilly guitar mystique which strokes the imagination before launching into a raw and rewarding riot. It is another major highlight in so many.

The fun and decent enough cover of La Vie En Rose is followed by the pleasing prowling sleek Cat Story, with Lewis on drums, and Mad Parade with its hungry riffs and throaty bass call seizing the ear tightly for the playful keys brought by Honey-Jones to whip up another rise of appetite especially with the musicians equally impressive guitar ingenuity. Old school pop punk with a muscular heart and steely frame, the song is another deviously potent suasion and yet one more exciting treat.

The quality and triumphs just keep coming, the likes of the bewitching and elegantly forceful Shine A Line and the charismatically riveting and rapacious Witches Of Lust unleashing in their own unique ways more punk alchemy to enslave the passions. The album as a whole is diverse and inventively distinct from song to song, the final pair of the pop rock shaped Coz It Sucks and the magnificent Sex War with its dub scythes of invention stoking the fires as melodic pop flames to fly whilst the vocals of Courson and Honey-Jones create a sizzling duelling attack. Ruts meets Dangerous Girls with Pauline Murray at the helm, the track is a mighty end to a robustly thrilling album. Healthy Junkies have come of age and you only sense they will get better. A must investigate release!

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Healthy-Junkies/128020360589230

9/10

RingMaster 12/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com