The Twindows – Valkyrie 2.0

For most, musical bliss can come in various shapes and styles; creative adventures which just connect with personal instincts and tastes. It is fair to say that for us it recently came all rolled up in one hungrily tempting proposal going by the names of The Twindows and their debut album Valkyrie 2.0.

Hailing out of Philadelphia, The Twindows breed a rapacious sound which infuses essences of everything from noise and indie rock to metal and grunge to a punk across the decades borne heart. It is a bold and boisterous web of temptation as virulently infectious as it is ferociously imaginative and led by a voice truly we could listen to all day long. Vocalist/guitarist Aster Grimm has one of the most devilishly tempting voices and just as magnetically matched by the creative antics of guitarist Kyle Anderson, bassist Caleb Banas, and drummer Oskar Daoud across Valkyrie 2.0. Together they have nurtured a release which teases, seduces, and arouses across eleven lust inducing slices of musical diablerie.

It begins with Like My Music; raw and salacious pop infested punk rock roaring from aggravation with Damned like hooks and rhythmic rapacity to the fore. Grimm blossoms in the centre, her tones stirring song and attention further as for one minute and three quarters the track provides the album with one irresistible start.

The following Mosquito / Thick Skin swings in on a blend of grunge nurtured rock ‘n’ roll upon a ska seeded bounce. Fiercer textures with metallic toning soon sizzle and sear around the tenacious attack of Grimm, the track’s noise punk instincts just as vocal before it passed thick attention and an already keen appetite over to Forgiven. Instantly it entangles ears in rhythmic espionage; boisterously coaxing beats and a glorious bass grumble getting under the skin as guitars weave a sonic web around Grimm’s similarly magnetic lures. Something akin to Throwing Muses embroiled in the punk ‘n’ roll of Spinnerette and in turn fused with devilment of Die So Fluid, the track is sheer captivation; one as seductive as it is predacious and all feral temptation.

Dig Tree comes next, the track a bewitching slice of punk pop initially, nostalgically recalling bands such as The Chefs and 4 Non Blondes. It floats across the senses but has a sonic causticity which just adds to the song’s bait again headed by Grimm’s engagingly manipulative presence. Whilst adding a new hue to the album broadening adventure, the song has feet and hips involved just as easily as rock ‘n’ roll instincts.

That variety of flavouring across the release is encouraged again by next up Ska Death (Ska Death Lounge Death Ska), an unstoppable incursion of ska/noise punk which had the body eagerly bobbing along before expelling a hellacious sonic gas of aural volatility, a tempest returning with greater dexterity after the song relaxed again into its lively bounce, and with bolder imagination as sax flames sear the riveting bedlam. Imagine Animal Alpha infused by the spirit of The Jellycats and the punk revelry of The Mo-Dettes and you come close to the song’s infectious alchemy.

The Twindows let their punk instincts run riot in Reversals next, the track an insatiable rock ‘n’ roll charge with noise bred vapours crossing a kaleidoscope of twists and turns while Pulp within a similar but even more corrosive landscape leaps around with kinetic intensity and agility. All the while though as rhythms dance, sonic spices and melodic adventure simmers and rise up to temper and challenge the tempestuous nature of the track.

The inescapably catchy punk ‘n’ roll of Instigator unerringly worms into the psyche within seconds straight after, the song like a mix of The Kut and Daisy Chainsaw but as everywhere uniquely Twindows; a trait just as potently shown by the grunge rock of The Industry. Admittedly, the song did not quite hit the spot as those tracks around it within Valkyrie 2.0 but only added to the fun before The Pixies endowed Sleepycore had us licking our lips once more. With its almost somnolent swing and Grimm’s vocal bewitchment, the outstanding track simply transfixed, even more so when it’s deceitful gait unveiled a furious if still controlled intent.

Bringing things to a close Wire Mother surrounds its energetic croon with abrasive psych and indie punk imagination, the song another as unpredictable in sound and imagination as it is irresistible in persuasion. It provides a provocative and rousing conclusion to an album which just lit the fires of personal tastes while offering something completely fresh to ponder, taste, and devour.

We have nothing more to add except go and have a nibble yourselves.

Valkyrie 2.0 is out now ad available @

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright


Various Artists – Our Voltage

Released via Chicago DIY label Girlsville Records, Our Voltage is a collection of tracks from an array of bands embracing a similarly broad landscape of sounds from garage and post punk to psych, noise, and Lo-Fi Trash Pop. It is one of those independent treats which come along now and then to introduce new bands to the ears and new tracks from those which may already be on the radar. Our Voltage is also here to help raise funds for great causes; its proceeds benefitting legal aid for anti-racist activists and a new community self-defence gym in Chicago called Haymaker.

As with all collections there are tracks which hit the spot and passions more central than others, understandable when 14 bands are coming together but it is honest to say that every encounter within Our Voltage had us off eagerly exploring their creators with further treats the reward.

The album opens with OFF DUTY NUNS from Olympia, Washington trio UK GOLD. The band consists of Matt Murillo (Ka-Nives, Jewws) Forrest Peaker (Wisdom Teeth), and Vadi Eredal (Pitted Youth) and released their debut single last April. Off Duty Nuns is a brand new slice of the band’s post punk shuffle which, with guitars spiralling with their flavoursome jangle around senses badgering metronomic beats and one instincts pleasing bass line, is pure magnetism capped by just as tenacious vocals. At barely one minute 45, the song is too short but oh so addictive.

THE BUZZARDS offer up TENNESSEE next, the Detroit outfit featuring Joe Burdick (The Dirtys), Maribel Restepo (Detroit Cobras) and twins Nancy and Leslie Paterra. It too is a brand new song grabbing quickly attentive ears with ease; the band’s garage rock ‘n’ roll a boisterously rapacious proposal with thumping beats and vocal zeal aligned to angular guitars and another bassline which danced with personal tastes. It is not necessarily a unique encounter yet everything about it rouses body and attitude like all potent rockers.

Raw noise/punk rock is offered up next by GERM HOUSE in the shape of 7 INTO 7, a gripping burst of dirty rock ‘n’ roll with the catchy instincts of pop rock. The band is the solo project of Justin Hubbard, formerly of Boston band Turpentine Brothers, which expands live with the addition of his wife Tara McManus-Hubbard (Mr. Airplane Man / Turpentine Brothers) and Joe Ayoub (Marked Men / Shangalang). The song has the kind of mouth-watering DIY glaze which nurtured so many treats in the late seventies and similarly coats the album’s fourteenth and final song which sees Hubbard inciting ears just as potently through a second song in SHOWING SYMPTOMS.

Before then the fun keeps coming as firstly THE MYRMIDONS unveils a gorgeous cover of the Siouxsie and The Banshees classic CHRISTINE. The band is the union of Ted Ottaviano and Lauren Johnson of first wave electronic pop group Book of Love and Lori Lindsay of The Prissteens and Purple Wizard. Together they have taken an already irresistible track and coated it in a darker gothic almost predacious sheen whilst invigorating its natural infectiousness. Its post punk bassline just hits the spot, a feature recurring between instrument and appetite over numerous songs it seems.

PILOT’S PIPE from DAMAGED BUG, the solo project of Oh Sees vocalist/guitarist John Dwyer, is a tantalising psych pop seduction; a woozy slice of temptation uniting synths and guitars under a psychedelic glaze and sounding like something you would expect in a Lewis Carroll penned Barbarella seduction. It is quite mesmeric before making way for WHAT DID YOU SAY? from UK post punks VIRVON VARVON. The London-based band comprises of members of The Jazz June, Black Time, and Candy Highway and creates a trespass, on the evidence of this track, which is inherently catchy but with great volatility in its heart which leads ears into rapacious noise and cacophonous punk ‘n’ roll. We would offer up comparisons to give you an idea of its raw beauty but we could not find any, a splendid sign.

FREAK GENES step forward with HE’S UNHAPPY, a British band which lists the likes of Swell Maps, Nick Lowe, and Devo among their likes, of which the first pair do come to mind almost weirdly within the slice of lo-fi punk pop and add a whisker of MC Lars to that thought and you get a real feel of the band’s excellent offering. Featuring Charlie Murphy of Red Cords and Andrew Anderson of Hipshakes, Freak Genes tease and taunt ears, and a lusty reaction, throughout their two minutes before handing over to BEASTII the moment to uncage their cover of The Violators track, SUMMER OF 81. The Chicago psych/pop trio initially coax ears with their own possessive treat of a bassline before wrapping it in siren-esque harmonies and brining in mischievously rousing beats. It then all unites in a rousing slice of punk ‘n’ roll which reminds of something akin to Fatal Microbes meets The Kut and more than does another classic song justice.

The devilish garage punk of DO THE OCTOPUS keeps the passions flying; the track from Kansas duo MR. AND THE MRS. Primarily an instrumental with vocal devilment, the track recalls the fuzz antics of The Cramps, the punk salaciousness of Dick Venom, and the gothic contagion of The Orson Family as it has hips swinging and dark deeds brewing before a never before released track from 90’s gracing NYC punks THE PRISSTEENS.  STUPID NOTHING serenades in tone and voice within a fuzz lined tunnel and is simply as captivating as you would expect from the excellent outfit.

One of our already favourite bands is next; London garage punk noiseniks ATOMIC SUPLEX stirring up trouble with a cover of Bo Diddley’s WHO DO YOU LOVE? It might be the dirtiest, scuzziest thing heard from the band yet as they if not making the song their own, give it a seriously stirring feral work over.

MARCUS from Cincinnati garage fuzz stirrers BUMMERS EVE strolls in next, the trio providing a beat textured ballad about 3-year-old autistic boy who was murdered by his foster parents while MR. AIRPLANE MAN dance with the senses and imagination through BELIEVE. Both tracks spark a need for more, the first with its insatiable scuzz hustle and the second through its psychedelic blues punk shuffle and vocal seduction.

With that second Germ House offering completing the line-up, we found the only thing to do after listening to Our Voltage just the first time around was press play again and go exploring. The rewards have been quite refreshing.

Our Voltage is available now through Girlsville Records @

Pete RingMaster 09/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Poly-Esters – First Cut

The Poly-Esters pic_RingMaster Review

And the excitement builds…alongside thick anticipation for The Poly-Esters and their proposed debut album for 2016. The reason all stems from the band’s freshly unleashed EP First Cut, three tracks of attitude drooling punk rock which just gets under the skin in a relentless incitement of rousingly fiery rock ‘n’ roll. It is a proposition which is potently nostalgic, furiously fresh, and one more defiant slab of loud proof that British punk ‘n’ roll outshines all on its day.

The Poly-Esters is a Blackpool bred force consisting of guitarists/vocalists Lola Fenix and Catlow, bassist/vocalist Syphi Lizz, and drummer Elliska Tron. Formed we believe in 2014, it is fair to say that the quartet has been stirring up an eager fuss for their riot grrrl/grunge punk fuelled rock ‘n’ roll as evidenced by their storming performance and subsequent reactions at the Nice N Sleazy Festival and Rebellion this year. Now it is their debut release attempting to do the brewing of hungry attention and already in its few weeks out, First Cut has done a stirring and sterling job.

The Poly-Esters_RingMaster Review     From their first track upon First Cut, The Poly-Esters fall on ears with the belligerent nature of Vice Squad, the ravenous and resourceful tenacity of The Kut, and the off kilter invention of The Raincoats. A strain of familiarity colludes with one of brand new imagination as opener Fooling Noone straight way gets to grips with body and emotions. Instantly riffs and wicked beats are raining down on the senses but tempered by the infectiousness which is just as swiftly fuelling the persuasion. In no time a healthily luring hook is working away in the swing of things too whilst the raw coated and seriously engaging vocals from all three string manipulators are as magnetic as the sounds around them. The track stomps along before suddenly slipping into something unpredictable and transfixing, a great discord kissed shimmer of calm which has a definite spice of The Slits to it. Things are soon feistily rocking again of course, bringing the song to a bruising and boisterous close whilst setting the EP off to a tremendous start.

Things only get better though, second track Cracked wrapping ears in a sonic mist from within which a flirtatious bassline winks and a searing flame of guitar erupts. The beats of Tron leave nothing in the locker as they join the affair but as in the first song, the instinctive catchiness of the band’s sound involves rather than intimidates. It does have an inherent snarl though which escapes through vocals and the rugged seduction on offer, it here aligned to riffs and short grooves which finger the imagination and a rhythmic inducement acting as a protagonist to well flung bodies.

Binge And Purge completes the line-up of thrills and again finds something to just outshine its predecessor. Opening with a rhythmic enticing which is almost duelling with ears as it crawls over their already eager appetite, the track’s predatory start is further enhanced by the acidic caress of the guitars but urged into a more even tempered stroll. That initial stalking of the senses is soon back igniting ears though, bringing an extra tingle of pleasure with it. That earlier reference to The Raincoats is most rowdy here but again The Poly-Esters use the hues to create their own landscape of imagination and thick temptation in on irresistible proposal within another in the shape of one thrilling introduction to the band.

Whenever the band’s first album is out it cannot come quick enough. We often label bands as ones to watch, and always with strong evidence but with The Poly-Esters watching is too late, climbing on board their ascent from the off and feeling their punk ingenuity manipulating body and soul, the only option.

The First Cut EP is out now via the band’s Bandcamp profile.

Pete RingMaster 03/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out

The Kut – Rock Paper Scissors

The Kut Promo

More captivating with every listen, Rock Paper Scissors is one of those encounters which make a bigger impact in four songs than many bands can in a handful of song loaded releases. The new EP from UK rockers The Kut; it is a ferocious yet alluring mix of grunge, alternative rock, and punk. Each of the tracks offers something different to those before it without departing from the core heart of the band’s sound. It is pop, punk, grunge all at once, but predominantly it is anthemic rock ‘n’ roll to rage and romp with.

Taking inspirations from bands such as Deftones, L7, Hole, Incubus, Placebo, Nirvana, and Faith No More, the London trio whipped up keen attention with their first EP Make Up last year whilst singles and songs like No Trace, Mario, Closure, and Doesn’t Matter Anyway have bred keen support and appetites for their emergence in fans and media alike. Now is the turn of the more dramatically imposing yet virulently contagious James LeRock Loughrey (Skindred,White Zombie, My Vitriol, Page & Plant, Bjork, Def Leppard) produced songs of Rock Paper Scissors to make their persuasions, and there seems little will stop them awakening an even hungrier spotlight upon the band.

Artwork- The Kut RPS   Immediately opener I Want You Maniac treats ears to a scuzzy riff matched by punchy rhythms and an inviting vocal confrontation from guitarist Maha. Just as swiftly there is a sense of a more aggressive, angry even, feel to the tone and music of the track which is supported and realised in broader visceral fashion across the rest of the EP. The infectious qualities which marked the previous release are just as prevalent too, hooks and anthemic vocals a virulent persuasion against the fuzz lined enterprise of Maha’s guitar and the thumping beats of Violet Cannibal aligned to the predatory lures of Alison Wood’s bass. As mentioned the track has a new aggressive and raw belligerence in sound which without doubt benefits band and release. The song hunts the senses like a mix of L7 and Distillers but with the punk toxicity of early Damned and the catchiness of The Ramones to its potency.

   Alekhine’s Gun steps up next and has a mellower more relaxed touch to its opening, though again there is menace in the rhythmic framing and atmosphere shadows surrounding the excellent vocals and infectious melodic tempting. The rage which seems to fuel the EP erupts in abrasing vocal bellows throughout the encounter but persistently it manages to return to a less volatile and equally compelling state, subsequently offering great unpredictability and adventure throughout.

The best tracks on the EP complete Rock Paper Scissors, the first coming with the rock/punk pop excellence of I Don’t Need Therapy. Brewing essences of bands like Spinnerette and Valentiine into its own distinct landscape of dirty rock ‘n’ roll, the song strolls boldly with simple but voracious riffs speared by gripping hooks whilst the bassline running through all is sheer grouchiness. The track has an inescapable familiarity to it but that only adds to the rich flavouring offered and enjoyed.

The closing Bad Man emerges as the favourite, everything about it preying on ears from scything rhythms to caustic riffery. Even its melodic passages have a sultry yet sinister occult/psyche rock colouring which would not be out of place in a Jess and the Ancient Ones or Blood Ceremony offering. The track is outstanding; the pinnacle of The Kut’s invention for personal tastes and a fine way to leave the listener with a long and lingering excited impression of the release.

Listening to Rock Paper Scissors it is still easy to feel there is plenty more to come from the threesome, in songwriting and sound as well as invention, to truly set the band aside from the rest and give the UK a band to rival the statures of bands like Hole and L7. Right now The Kut provide a thoroughly enjoyable and impressive proposal which goes just down a treat.

The Rock Paper Scissors EP is available now via Criminal Records digitally and on CD at

Upcoming live dates for The Kut…

2nd May: Hell Fire Club, Redhill, Surrey

Saturday 16th May: Elektrowerkz, Angel, London

Saturday 24th May: Mainstage, Glastonbudget, Leicester

Saturday 23rd – 24th May: Strummercamp Festival, Manchester

Saturday 30th May: The Harvest Home, Haughton Regis, Bedford

RingMaster 15/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @