Skellums – Art Of Dying Young / Do Me Wrong

Skellums_RingMasterReview

August 2015, UK rock band Skellums strikingly lit ears with their EP, Clarion Call. It was a release awakening a new horde of fresh and eager ears to the band’s alternative rock sound as well as finding strong radio support from the likes of BBC 6 Music’s Steve Lamacq. Now the Liverpool band has raised the ante with their new double A-sided single Art Of Dying Young / Do Me Wrong; a pair of songs which alone reveal new maturity in the band’s sound and temptation.

art_RingMasterReviewConsisting of vocalist/guitarist Cal Roberts, bassist Crichton, guitarist/vocalist Seery, and drummer Courtney, Skellums takes barely the first half minute of Art Of Dying Young to reveal something bigger and bolder about their sound. From its first breath, bass and drums align in a thick wall of rousing enticement entangled in spicy tendrils of guitar. It grabs ears with ease, that persuasion only increasing in strength as a lull around the first syllables from Cal sparks a rich infection of melody within the rhythmic swagger subsequently driving the song. Casting an Arctic Monkeys meets The Jackals air to its own unique personality, the song has feet dancing and the spirit leaping along with its increasingly addictive swing. There is also more of a garage rock essence to its contagion compared to previous offerings, another appealing hue in the more expansive body and adventure of the track.

That new depth and imagination continues with Do Me Wrong where again it needs only the first nag of riffs and ear clipping beats to suggest new imagination at play in songwriting and music. It is only confirmed as the song shares its pop and punkier exploits, all offered with a creative mischief which is almost The Monkees like in its fun and pop catchiness. A rock snarl adds to the great unpredictability equally shaping the excellent encounter, it all colluding for another slice of new and distinct Skellums invention.

Being impressed by Skellums is becoming a highly agreeable habit but fair to say that both Art Of Dying Young and Do Me Wrong leave anything before firmly in the shade. Things are looking very rosy for Skellums and in turn our ears.

Art Of Dying Young / Do Me Wrong is released April 26th on the band’s own Rent & Debt Records @ http://skellums.bandcamp.com/

Upcoming Live Dates:

May 12 – Focus Wales Festival (Saith Seren)

May 13 – Focus Wales Festival (Rewind)

May 20 – Zanzibar, Liverpool

June 18 – Chester Live Festival

http://www.skellums.com/   https://www.facebook.com/skellums   https://twitter.com/skellumsmusic

Pete RingMaster 26/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Some Kind of Illness – Self Titled

SKOI_RingMasterReview

Recently British band Some Kind of Illness signed with Manchester record label Valentine Records. It seems they had been looking at the band for a while and eager to have them join their already potent roster which includes the likes of St Jucifer and Ten Mouth Electron. Listening to the band’s self-titled debut album, it is easy to hear why. The release is a collection of indie guitar sculpted songs aligned with reverberant tone and emotively resonating ambience with the quality of being a quick persuasion but also slow burners in revealing the fullness of their heart bred depths; a mix which simply endears itself to ears and attention.

Hailing from the Bolton/Manchester area of the UK, Some Kind of Illness is the creation of and centred round the Hinks brothers, Paul and Mark. Emerging almost two years ago exactly, the band took little time in luring potent attention with their quickly praised live presence. Last year saw the band play in excess of 100 shows taking in venues such as Manchester Club Academy, Manchester Academy 3, Night And Day Cafe, The Roadhouse, The Ritz, Band On The Wall, The Cavern, and The Zanzibar as well as playing support to the likes of ex-Inspiral Carpets frontman Tom Hingley, The Jackals, and Pink Mountain Tops. That time has also seen the band record demos with Durutti Column’s Vini Reilly who has become a friend and strong supporter of the band and the release of first EP Stratus Dream which featured Luna from Birmingham band PQLYR. The self-released Some Kind Of Illness album was released in the latter part of 2015 but with the band signing to Valentine and a new chapter opening up for them it never does any harm to remind of the kind of treats which has drawn such potent steps in their emergence.

From album opener, The Test of Time, ears are hugged and caressed and thoughts nudged. In the dawning of a warm atmospheric caress, a melody winds its tender way around the senses with keys subsequently entangling with similarly enticing acoustic guitar. It is a mesmeric affair only enhanced by the expressive and distinctive vocals as well as the ebbing and flowing of the charming yet unpredictable ambience soaking all. It is a great start revealing the template of things to come; of the warm melodic enterprise, vocal reflection, and emotive explorations from band and the listener’s own imagination.

Some Kind of Illness - Some Kind Of Illness - cover_RingMasterReviewSome Kind of Illness cast an experience which leaves you feeling chilled yet also coaxes thoughts into exploring more imposing emotional shadows in sound and tone as with the following Angel Breakdown. An instrumental with a sampled vocal piece, the song suggests and incites with its melancholic air and sultry melodies, stirring up imagination and appetite simultaneously before the just as blue and evocative Stars involves ears in its sorrowful yet hopeful croon. Both songs captivate, a quality fuelling the whole of the album and through the more exotic yet intimate landscape of Maple Leaf which features Daisy Davies, who presumably is the child charming ears within the track’s bewitching instrumental.

The Light transfixes next with its Verve like scent; And Live matching its success with its sombre beauty before You Have To Laugh casts the listener upon a floating raft of melodic cheer and harmonic smiles. Each are individual suggestive temptations, songs, especially the last, that border on meditative as they escort the listener towards the absorbing intimate contemplation of My Shadow In The Maze and in turn the woven wrap of light and shadows that is Rush To Wait.

It is hard not to be absorbed by each and the whole of the album which is completed by Fool Man Runaway with Manchester bred Caoilfhionn Rose guesting. It is a final sigh of emotion, a last kiss of melodic poetry which, as the Some Kind of Illness album, leaves a lingering and warm yet maudlin glow which lures ears back to the release time and again. That is a success easy to reward with attention, something we suspect that the band’s link up with Valentine Records and a second album later in 2016 will inspire much more of ahead.

The Some Kind Of Illness album is available now @ https://somekindofillness1.bandcamp.com/album/some-kind-of-illness

https://www.facebook.com/SomeKindofIllness   https://twitter.com/skoiband

Pete RingMaster 19/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Mellor – Damage/ Joy

Mellor_RingMasterReview

Formed in 2011, British quartet Mellor has earned some high praise and interest from fans and media alike, and there are plenty of reasons to expect things to continue and get busier around the band with the release of new EP Damage/ Joy. Four tracks which leap and bound into the imagination, the EP is a rousing slice of kinetic indie pop easy to get a healthy taste for.

The band itself calls their sound “Pop Smack”, but it can be best described as raucous Brit pop with an arsenal of twists. On the EP, it is like a galvanic stomp woven from the indie adventure of The Jackals, the punkishness of a Top Buzzer, the eighties fervour of a Purple Hearts or Secret Affair, and the transatlantic mischief of Weezer. It is a sound which has already lured potent attention through a trio of singles and a debut EP to date as well as a highly praised live presence which has seen the band share stages with bands such as The Milk, Carl Barat, and The Kooks. Now it is the turn of the Mo Hausler (Babyshambles, Everything Everything) produced Damage/ Joy to whip up fresh ears and appetites the way of Reading quartet Gary, Josh, Evert, and Sam.

The release gets straight down to it too with opener Win Me Over. Punchy rhythms and a fine clash of guitar swiftly springs a hook lined swagger which soon has hips and ears locked into it’s a seriously catchy and flirtatious stroll. Bursts of feisty energy and aggression add to the spicy drama on offer whilst its melodic infectiousness and rhythmic shuffle is not too far removed from sixties beat bands like Herman’s Hermits.

logo_RingMasterReviewIt is a gripping and eventful proposal entangling a host of flavours across the decades into its bouncing body; a treat of imagination emulated again in Dolly Daydream. A slower but no less enticing proposal which gets increasingly compelling with every minute, the song is a serenade of emotive keys and vocal prowess within rhythmic shadows and an underlying but restrained urgency. It is an energy which gets more of an escape in the riveting Going Nowhere, a track which from its delicious opening groan of bass has ears and appetite on board. Sultry caresses of guitar and melodic seducing need little time to captivate the listener either whilst fiery grooves and the ever potent vocals, as well as that persistent dark lure of rhythms, ensures enjoyment is full to the rim.

The EP closes with Schadenfreude; a rip-roaring romp of indie rock ‘n’ roll with again a breeding in each of the past five decades via various strains of galvanic sound. If reading all the references to times and flavours past triggers thoughts that the band may have missed their time in musical history, be rest assured that Mellor, certainly going by Damage/Joy, is very much a band of the now and one of those with the potential to eventually steer the adventure of the British indie rock ‘n’ pop scene.

Damage/Joy is available from 11th March 2016 via iTunes and other stores.

http://www.mellorsounds.com   https://www.facebook.com/melloruk   https://www.twitter.com/melloruk

Upcoming Live Dates:

Saturday 12th March – Oakford Social Club – Reading (READING EP RELEASE SHOW)

Friday 25th March – The Railway – Winchester

Friday 8th April – Sebright Arms – London

Pete RingMaster 10/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Jackals – People

band_RingMaster Review

Warm hearted and tenaciously welcoming, the sound of Scottish band The Jackals just leaves you with a smile on the face and across the emotions. Its potency is richly apparent in the band’s new album People, eleven tracks of melodic and soulful sunshine which may not ignite a riot in the passions but lingers with captivating tempting for the same kind of success. At times it serenades with smouldering radiance and in other moments has feet and hips in festive mood; in the words of the band, it is cosmic rock ‘n’ roll.

Edinburgh bred, The Jackals quickly earned a reputation for blistering live performances and songs combining “cryptic lyrics with expansive guitars, underpinned with the solid grooves of the bass and drums.” Their double A-sided single Holding All The Roses/L.E.A.R.N of last year was the spark which really began luring greater and broader attention the way of the band. Recorded with legendary producer Owen Morris (Oasis, The Verve), who returns for the new album too, the release was a highly appetising forerunner to People, which in turn provides a full meal of pleasure.

cover_RingMaster Review     From opening track Eyes Awaken, the album is awash with a fusion of psych and surf rock soaked in sixties pop essences. That is of course simplifying their sound as at times it is as much folk toned as it is indie rock as it is all the flavours mentioned combined. It is an engaging mix which can catch fire in a boisterous revelry or just caress the senses with warm temptation and as the first song shows is highly persuasive. Eyes Awaken gently strokes ears initially, crystalline melodies from keys aligning with a similarly glowing kiss of guitar as they await the mellow vocal tones of Scott Watson. His and Gary Quilietti’s guitars continue to entice as darker rhythms begin flirting with thoughts and strings cast slithers of melancholy. Eventually a livelier energy escapes as the catchy chorus looms from where, like waves lapping on ears, all the ingredients of sound and invention entwine to fascinate and seduce. As a few songs on the album, it was not a swift persuasion but grows with every listen into a rich tonic of feel good enterprise within a sweltering psych rock ambience.

The following Raspberry Moon similarly makes its entrance with a slow kiss on ears, those emotive strings returning to compelling effect as skittish beats from Paddy McMaster begin to find their and the listener’s feet. In no time the song is cantering along with a country twang and folkish air reminiscent of Irish band Raglans. We cannot say the inspirations sparking The Jackals’ musical endeavours but it is easy to suspect from the second track alone that possibly The Beatles are amongst them and maybe Scottish bands like Orange Juice and Aztec Camera too.

United band vocals open up Call Out Mellobird next as ears are entangled in melodic enticement from the guitars and flirted with by the darker tones cast by bassist David Panton. It is a magnetic affair equipped with a soulful smile and web of alluring melodies that along with boisterous beats set up ears for the outstanding Ghost Soul Traffic. Straight away the tangy sixties groove escaping the guitar has lips licked, its surf rock breeding and early sixties tone reminding of bands like The Ventures is bewitching and just as alluringly backed by a matching nostalgic climate of harmonies and acoustic riffs. Hips and feet are quickly under the song’s spell whilst an early contented appetite gets hungrier for more which it gets in the equally seducing Can’t Leave the City and its gentle sway within another instinctively melancholic but refreshing atmosphere. Once more a vintage melodic wine runs through the host o spicy grooves and hooks slipping easily from the guitar and again ears and imagination are engrossed.

Just To Pass The Pleasant Time strolls along with a mix of folk and sixties psych pop after whilst Dancin’ Round The Nails explores a thick emotionally textured landscape, its croon reflective and a touch sombre but with a liveliness which gives it an edge and potency. Both songs satisfy without matching those before them, each joining the list of tracks which just grow and become more tempting over time, something definitely not applying to Two Heads. The track instantly has ears alive with its opening bait of hooks and harmonic vocals, they leading to an alluring jangle and rhythmic shuffle which just lights the passions. Bass and guitars continue to weave their infectious and almost teasing enterprise as beats and voice dance with feet and imagination respectively as the emotions are taken on a feistily feel-good ride from start to finish by almost four minutes of joy.

The more humid air and emotive croon of Where the Face of Angels Lay takes over from the best track on the album next, its smooth balladry emulated but then taken into more intimate and cosmopolitan scenery by Gold Gift from Paris straight after, it’s Hammond seeded kisses additionally pleasing hues in its exotically toned flight of sound. Both songs join those taking time to reveal their full character and persuasion but only impressing with every listen and always setting up the rousing merger of country rock, folk, and indie pop that is Waiting On The Man With the Sun perfectly. The track brings those rich essences into a spicy and addictively boisterous dance with the masterful rhythms of McMaster stealing the show in a glorious anthemic tirade of incitement midway.

Closing song Dust is drenched in psychedelic mystique and low key but open funk grooving for a pulsating smog like rhapsody of sonic and melodic imagination laying on the senses as its title might suggests. It is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable release, an encounter which seems to get more absorbing and headier with every passing listen. It is easy to see why there is a fuss brewing around The Jackals, a band which will be surely only creating bigger and bolder things ahead.

People is available from September 14th digitally and on vinyl with an additional cassette release through Burger Records.

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/