Panic Island – Cabin Fever EP

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First track catches ears and imagination by excited surprise, the second has both locked in a blaze of pungent rock ‘n’ roll, and by its third, Cabin Fever the debut EP from Panic Island has made a clear statement that UK rock has another potential ridden and magnetic proposition emerging from its midst. The three track release is a magnetic roar of alternative and melodic rock, a weave of pungent riffs and sinew swung rhythms entwined with creative and anthemic dexterity. Maybe not yet the release to suggest that Panic Island will be amongst those to the fore driving the ever changing face of British rock ‘n’ roll, the EP is definitely an impressive introduction for the band to spring on from and tempt those kind of heights.

image003     Panic Island is centred round the North London songwriting duo Arron Sans and Vinnie Shimia, two musicians which first met at a gig by The Cult in Spain in 2012. Sans had already “dabbled in acting and film production” before exploring music and songwriting whilst Brazilian born Shimia had developed a romance with the guitar since the age of 13, and moved to the capital from his homeland to pursue his aspirations in music. Their individual abilities and strengths going by Cabin Fever have certainly gelled and openly flourished musically and lyrically since the pair creatively united, openly evidenced by their first release. Produced by Paul Tipler (Idlewild, The Horrors, Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster), the EP is a storming adventure of sound and dark emotional exploration, a release which has you sonically gripped within a few choice moments and persistently thought provoked across each infectious proposal.

The EP starts with the outstanding We Start Fires, a thick lure of bass the first enticing quickly joined by jabbing beats and in another breath, an electronic teasing. Coming cold into the band and letting the music be the first indication of their sound, the latter element immediately sends expectations down the wrong avenue, with punchy beats the almost techno like tempting sparking thoughts of a dance-floor escapade to come. The great vocals of the pair soon begins dispelling that, their attention grabbing presence the trigger to a more volatile lure of rhythms and a stroll of pungent riffs and striking heavy rock hooks. There is a slight punk edge to things too, whilst grooves and vocals increasingly cast a more aggressive and flavoursome web of hard rock and melodic tenacity. The early electro devilment also continues to flirt with the imagination, from time to time coming to the fore but never for long as the unpredictable and thrilling anthemic stomp of a track continues to bound through and ignite ears.

The excellent start is followed by new single Temples, a song providing a more settled landscape of melodic rock but one equally as fiery and alluring from the off. Because of its more uniform canvas of sound, the emotive potency of word and voice has a stronger and clearer sounding board to spring its passion and angst from. This aligns perfectly with the just as magnetically imposing drama of melodies and craft of guitars. It is a combination offering a feel of Bristol band Mind Museum to the provocative nature of the song which excels again within closing song City Screams.

As the previous encounter, it too is a swiftly catchy and enticing proposition with raw feeling in the vocals and raucous enterprise in the heart of the music. It also shows that any of the three songs upon Cabin Fever can be a potent single for the band, each in their individual ways intense and incendiary slices of drama with the emotional climate expected in the consuming premise of the EP title.

Panic Island do everything right with Cabin Fever, and though their sound is not yet holding a truly unique character it is not an issue, just part of the evolution of the band’s creativity to that expected success. Anyway the release is a gripping slice of exciting rock ‘n’ roll and that more than works for us.

The Cabin Fever EP is available from May 18th via Flat 4 Records at http://amzn.to/1QTpAQH and http://panicisland.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.panicisland.com     http://panicisland.bandcamp.com/releases

RingMaster 17/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

 

Broken Chords – Rock & Stone EP

 copyright Broken Chords/Niall Lea Photography

copyright Broken Chords/Niall Lea Photography

Bursting with fiery rock ‘n’ roll to throw your inhibitions out the window to, the eagerly anticipated Rock & Stone EP from UK rockers Broken Chords is finally here to set the rock scene roaring with raucous revelry and insatiable temptation. Bulging with four tracks which have been seeded in the instinctive bed of classic rock, bred with the ferocious devilry found in the likes of Rival Sons and Turbonegro, and honed in the ways of modern rock ‘n’ roll, the releases is a welcomingly familiar and invigoratingly fresh incitement under the banner of real and bawdy rock ‘n’ roll.

Formed in 2013, the Essex/Herts hailing Broken Chords swiftly became an attention grabbing encounter on the local live scene, soon spreading their lure nationally. Their hunger to play live and share their sounds saw them play over sixty shows a year initially expanding to a full UK tour whilst 2014 found the band sharing stages at major venues with artists such as Bernie Torme and Australian rockers Electric Mary, as well as sealing a headline slot on the second stage at Hard Rock Hell Helloween. Last year also saw debut single Get Some embraced by radio, media, and new fans alike. It has all led to the licking of lips of a great many for the release of the Rock & Stone EP. Recorded with producer Paul Tipler (Idlewild, The Horrors, Placebo) and coming after a successful tour of Poland and Ukraine by the band, the release provides one of those rock riots which lights up ears and days.

The title track opens things up and instantly has the senses bound in a spicy groove to devour greedily and a vocal persuasion from guitarist Joe Finnigan and bassist Aiden Eggenton impossible to escape joining in on. Riffs and rhythms only add to the immediate infectious and rowdy proposal offered, a blaze unafraid to twist itself into alternating slimmer and broader strains of ferocious temptation. Its title sums up the song perfectly, its body a swinging explosion of rock ‘n’ roll built on an immoveable rhythmic imposing and intensive energy.

04769447-15ed-4c44-990c-2d60d46e7797The following Your Moves springs next with a great blues rock flavouring from its first breath, one thickening in spice and enterprise as the track develops its magnetic character and adventure. The jabbing rhythms of drummer Jamie Wilsdon provide potent bait whilst vocals and basslines bring their own expressive lures to play with the imagination, but it is the spicy hooks and fiery grooves which seal the colourful deal and inflame further the impressive start to the release.

Tell Them Of Us, described as the band’s “tribute to the fallen of 1914-18”, entangles ears with a resourceful web of invention vocally and musically, one embraced by melodic flames soaked in creative drama. It is a skilfully controlled and restrained encounter compared to the more volatile air of its predecessors but equally has that element of incendiary energy and imagination which erupts at certain times and in expressive ideation.

The EP is closed by the outstanding Wild Child, a song you can easily see being a fan favourite, and swiftly one of ours truth be told. Once again ears and attention are gripped by an irresistible opening groove, its irrepressible temptation swiftly backed by thumping beats and voracious riffs bound in glam/classic rock devilry addictiveness. Teasing with moments of discord, throaty basslines, and anthemic instinct, the track is a thrilling stomp, taking best song honours along the way.

Everything about the Rock & Stone EP has familiarity and originality ingrained, a fine line skilfully walked with invention whilst casting rock ‘n’ roll so easy to create a real kinship with

The Rock & Stone EP is available from April 6th @ http://brokenchordsmerch.com/album/235634/rock-stone-ep

Upcoming live dates

Wed 15th April     Cardiff, The Globe, (Supporting Kyshera)

Thu 16th April     Brighton, The Albert, (Supporting Kyshera)

Fri 17th April     Harlow, The Square, (Supporting Kyshera)

Sat 18th April     London, Underworld, (Supporting Kyshera)

Tue 21st April     Wolverhampton, Robin 2, (Supporting Kyshera)

Thu 23rd April     Nottingham, Rock City, (Supporting Kyshera)

Fri 24th April     Selby, The Riverside, (Supporting Kyshera)

Sat 25th April     Sheerness, The Ivy, (Supporting Kyshera)

Wed 13th May London, Surya

Thu 14th May Brighton, The Great Escape Festival

Sat 16th May Sheffield, Mulberry Tavern (supporting Kyshera)

http://www.thebrokenchords.com   https://www.facebook.com/brokenchordsofficial

RingMaster 06/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Surf City – Jekyll Island

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There are times when it is easy to get lost in a realm of fantasy, moments in life and indeed music when physically and mentally you can escape the hum drum and explore new landscapes. One such escape is the sultry adventure of Jekyll Island, the new and third album from New Zealand psychgazers Surf City. Basking in a sultry surf rock seeded climate wrapped in the summery smile of shoegaze and the sonic beauty of psyche rock, the release is a mesmeric lure for ears and imagination.

The successor to their acclaimed album We Knew It Was Not Going To Be Like This of 2013, Jekyll Island is a fascinating flight of sound and emotion. Songs again come soaked in the warm magnetic fuzziness which the band is becoming renowned for but equally feel more precisely sculpted and resourcefully rounded propositions. It is open growth and evolution in the Surf City songwriting but an emerging potency which defuses none of the band’s already rich and tantalising qualities; basically a maturity of existing prowess exploring fresh and vivaciously new adventure. Simply songs and album offer pure pop presented in summery embraces of charm and beauty.

The album is also an imposing grower on ears and passions, its early touches engaging and magnetic but continual exposure leads to anything from lustful rapture to lingering seduction. The first track though is an immediate enslavement of ears and emotions on its first ever touch. From its opening exotic web of percussive and sonic enticement, Beat The Summer Heat has imagination and appetite hooked; especially as from that opening shuffle a rhythmic contagion unleashes irresistible bait. Jabbing with their own individual swing, beats forge an addictive lure at the heart of the track, taking ears and pleasure by the hand as guitars swarm over their enticement with vivid colours and a lively shimmer. Vocally too Davin Stoddard is a beacon of warmth and magnetism, riding the contagion with radiance. The track is glorious, almost alone worth the cost of your ticket for the album’s compelling ride.

Surf City - Jekyll Island   There is no major drift in quality and temptation as the following Spec City takes over, it a song with a bubbling electro underbelly and a radiating surface of melodic and harmonic splendour. The song is a courtship of the senses, a My Bloody Valentine like caress making an unrelenting seduction as a Yo La Tengo like vibrancy brings livelier action to the romance. It is a tempting swiftly backed and taken into new explorations by Jekyll Island and the Psycosphere and in turn Hollow Veins. The first of the two is a fascinating mix of eighties new wave bred pop and nineties inspired psychedelic enterprise, but also littered with post punk hooks and a Happy Monday’s like devilry. The song is pure mesmerism and perfectly contrasted and complimented in tone by the darker rockier revelry of its successor. It romps through ears like a meeting of The Horrors and House Of Love engaged in a vintage surf rock revival, its touch and breath raw yet overwhelmingly seductive.

The guitars of Stoddard and Jamie Kennedy weave an infectious web of fuzz induced rock pop next in One Too Many Things, its twang offering a country whisper whilst its catchy tenacity has a Brit pop lilt to its tempting, whilst its successor What They Need expands the already potent variety within the album again. It opens with a droning tang of a sound you might expect from the band’s part of the world, a scuzz lined whiny lure which persists invitingly around the additional minimalistic yet weighty hug of sound filling its persuasion.

That constant tweaking of flavours has Leave Your Worries unveiling an anthemic infectiousness which plays like a the offspring of a union between The Mighty Lemon Drop, The Lightning Seeds, and Kitchens of Distinction, but as in all songs it emerges as unique to Surf City.

The delicious heavy bass seducing and just as enticing beats offered by Mike Ellis and Andy Frost at its start makes Indian Summer straight after, irresistible all on their own but infused with the melodic lustre of the guitars and the resonating touch of Stoddard’s vocals, it only proceeds to steal attention and the passions further. It is a charmer from start to finish, one carrying the right amount of mischief and excitement but an incitement which ultimately places the listener in a fulfilling and richly satisfying calm. That is a description suiting the whole of Jekyll Island to be honest, and especially the gorgeous pop of Thumbs Up which romps with ears and emotions next. Whether it is possible to ever write the perfect song is debateable but it is possible to come close and this is certainly a serious contender. Melodies reek of innocence yet are inflammatory on the ear whilst harmonies and rhythms simply engage in lustful and infection breeding temptation.

The album is brought to a just as thrilling end by firstly the more sober, in comparison to its predecessor, but raucously energetic dance of The End and lastly through the meditative glamour and brilliance of Jesus Elvis Coca Cola. Sixties kissed and soaked in aural sunshine, the track is a majestic sea of expressive harmonies and poetic melodies soaked in a wash of psychedelic humidity.

It is a transfixing end to an increasingly mouth-watering encounter. There is a great familiarity to Jekyll Island but only as a rich spice in the unique ambience and masterful imagination of Surf City. Psyche/shoegaze pop has rarely sounded better.

Jekyll Island is available via Fire Records now and digitally, on CD, and on black vinyl @ https://surfcitymusic.bandcamp.com/track/hollow-veins

https://www.facebook.com/killsurfcity

RingMaster 25/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Finister – Suburbs of Mind

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The Italian rock and metal scene is ripe with striking emerging talent right now and proven by their new album, one of the most exciting of the impressive bunch of artists is Florence bred Finister. Debut full-length Suburbs of Mind is a ten track adventure of sound and imagination sculpted upon a progressive/psychedelic rock canvas and coloured with an array of diverse rock essences. It is an instantly captivating proposition with a collection of striking songs which just get more compelling and enjoyable with every listen. The band’s sound can be described as something like Muse meets The Horrors but there is plenty more to its body in flavour and originality which perpetually adds to the rich introduction of the band through their thoroughly impressive album.

Formed in 2009, Finister made a potent impression locally and within the Italian underground scene with a couple of EPs but it was their third release, the Nothing Is Real EP that they ignited stronger attention. It showed a new thrust and exploration in their sound, an evolving imagination and adventure with broader flavouring and imagination. It is a direction pushed into even greater psychedelic spiced landscapes through the progressively honed creative offering within Suburbs of Mind. Released via Red Cats Records, the album is a fascinating and immediate temptation for ears and thoughts from a band still young in years. Such its maturity in songwriting and sound though, and the impressive craft shaping it, it is impossible not to anticipate a big future for and from the band ahead.

The album opens with a wistful flame of sax against a sturdier stroking of guitar, both creating a melodic and sombre coaxing which easily enthrals ears before emerging jab of beats, a pungent dark bassline, and equally melancholic vocals. Within a few chords and seconds The Morning Star has the imagination lit, especially as it slowly expands and almost taunts the listener with its minimalistic but potent sonic tempting. The guitar and voice of Elia Rinaldi is soon holding reign over the evocative sounds which at times seem to be prowling his vocal delivery. It is a scene continually shifting and evolving though, the keys of Orlando Cialli, with his sax skills, as well as the rhythms of drummer Lorenzo Burgio providing an unpredictable and fluid stroll of adventure.

It is a strong start to the album, those Muse spices already adding enjoyable hues to the offering, but things are soon taken up a notch with the following Bite the Snake. Also the band’s new single, the track is a predatory bait of creatively agitated beats and sonic causticity aligned to a great grizzly bassline from Leonardo Brambilla. There is a primal essence to the encounter though one tempered by the mellower tones of Rinaldi and a melody rich caress of keys. Alternative rock, with an extra snarl of punk, the track lights ears and emotions instantly, but subsequently surpasses its early glories with an exotic dance of keys and sultry melodic enterprise which erupts from its contagious presence.

The Way (I Used to Know) breezes in on a melodic haze next; skittish rhythms providing a smiling additive to the opening and smouldering croon of the song. Guitars and sax soon add to 51QQyJUGhnL._SS280the sultriness of atmosphere and sound, embracing the senses whilst Rinaldi again shows endearing expression and potency in his voice and delivery. Addictive drama emerges to coat the track as it evolves; the sax of Cialli an especially inflammatory essence in the inventive theatre of the increasingly bewitching track.

Already three songs in and the diversity of sound and imagination in the album is striking and continued in the more volatile yet addictively mesmeric A Decadent Story. Feeling like it is going to explode in a muscular rage at any moment, the song instead seduces and sways with harmonic and melodic ingenuity as its progressive heart explores an almost chivalric psych fuelled canter. In brief glimpses a sense of Hawkwind makes a suggestive spice in the infectious proposition whilst its passage of pure peace midway is the appetiser to a rich Muse like ascent of voice and sound which leads to a gripping climatic finale.

Both the fiery and dramatic progressive croon of My Howl and the spellbinding Levity grip ears and attention next, the first from an understated but alluring start building to another tempestuous and enthralling confrontation with the cello of guest Lea Galasso a potent tinge to the exploration. Its successor is a glorious flight of intrigue and addictive drama. Opening with a scuzzy climate of guitar and keys it soon creates a web of sinister yet rigorously tempting hooks and melodies. They are noir lit, like moments of cinematic espionage within enticing sonic smog and accentuated by again expressive vocals and technical enterprise. The track is sheer temptation, creative intrigue for ears and imagination to immerse in and the latter to sculpt its own theatre for alongside the lyrical reflection of the song.

One of the major pinnacles of the release, it is contrasted in tone by the balladry of Oceans of Thrills but matched in appeal. The song is an engrossing melancholic yet warm embrace with shadows brought by the cello of Galasso and the bass of Brambilla entwined by the melodic poetry of Davide Dalpiaz’s violin courted by the keys and sax of Cialli. As all the tracks there is much more going on than first recognised, this song alone a maze of twists and imagination which increasingly enthrals and impresses over time.

Another exotic tempting is unveiled with The Key, the song a mix of psych pop and alternative endeavour kissed by a blues whisper and jazz bred ambience, though again that is only part of the colouring boldly seducing ears and emotions. The song is another hypnotic tantalising, maybe not as immediately persuasive as previous tracks but ultimately enslaving emotions and appetite for another big success.

Suburbs of Mind is brought to a close by firstly the classically charmed and melodically tempting Here the Sun, the keys of Cialli a play all on their own but a seamless fit in the accompanying drama of guitars and vocals. This again is a slower burner in thoughts but also with a seriously merciless persuasion before final song Everything Goes Back shimmers with psychedelic radiance and smoky atmospheres to bring the album to a turbulently enchanting close. With a flurry of dramatic and towards its end explosive textures, it is one final lingering ride into the full spectacle of the band’s sound and invention.

Suburbs of Mind is one of those unexpected treats and delights which startle from out of the blue, its creators announcing their presence on the largest stage in impressive style. As mentioned Finister is young in age but with a mature presence and craft which belies that. You can only feel there is more to come from and be discovered within themselves though, an excitement and anticipation for which is already ripening nicely here.

Suburbs of Mind is available from March 16th via Red Cat Records on CD and digitally @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/Suburbs-Mind-Finister/dp/B00UDB9WPK

https://www.facebook.com/finisterband

RingMaster 16/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

 

 

Desert Ships – Skyliner

Desert Ships press image 2014

Four mesmeric flights flooded with celestial hauntings and shoegaze fascination, the Skyliner EP from UK band Desert Ships is as both band and release names suggest, an expansive and sultrily aired adventure. A release which is cinematic in its touch on the imagination and warmly sensuous in its lure on the senses, Skyliner shimmers and radiates like a mix of The Horrors, House Of Love, and Brian Jonestown Massacre with just a tinge of Inspiral Carpets for spicy measure. To be honest that is still a loose description of the psychedelic fuelled exploration found within the release but a good starting point for something distinct to Desert Ships.

Formed in 2012, the London trio of Mikey (vocals/guitar), Daniel (bass/vocals), and Claude (drums/vocals) swiftly sparked attention and acclaim with the release of their debut album that same year. The Mark Gardener (ex- Ride) produced Doll Skin Flag soon drew regular comparisons to the likes of Brian Jonestown Massacre, The Flaming Lips, Tame Impala, and occasionally the film scores of John Barry. Its success was backed by the band’s equally praised live presence which saw them tour with bands such as The Prodigy, Band of Skulls, The Rifles, and Babyshambles as well as play numerous festivals over the past couple of years. Reuniting with Gardener again in the studio, Desert Ships now unveil their new EP, a release taking its predecessor as a launch pad for broader and more expressive aurally visual experiences.

The release opens with its epic title track, a seven minute plus excursion into magnetic harmonies, sonic exploration, and fuzzy show gaze seducing. From its first breath there is a fresh and smouldering temptation at work, guitar coaxing Desert Ships-Skyliner-artwork -Final-HRthe lead into a weave of vocal harmonies and expression from across the band. That in turn is cradled by a tapestry of keys bred elegance and enterprise. The song emerges as a gentle maelstrom of gripping ideation and aural fascination, the vocals as varied and riveting as the spatial grooves and rhythmic shuffle courting their narrative whilst every immersive note is an exotic kiss upon the senses. Like soaring through a refreshingly muggy landscape, the track is enthralling leaving body and emotions submerged in blissful exploration.

The slightly slimmer length of Shell Shock is no less eventful next, embracing ears with a synth pop spiced temptation straight away. Laying down an eighties flavoured yet modern canvas of melodic hues, bands like China Crisis, Modern English, and The Flaming Lips coming to mind, the track croons with cosmic lustre and psychedelic colour. Again the imagination is sparked by and emotions immersed in an ethereal tapestry of sound and voice, the song the perfect pop proposition. It is a description which almost applies to the following Heart Beats and it’s more grounded but no less transfixing splendour too, though the magnetic offering does not quite have the infectious glow and compelling grandeur of its predecessor. All the same the feistier track is a masterfully and enticingly grooved invitation which is hard to resist as it reveals further shades and turns in the band’s creativity.

Skyliner is concluded by another epic holding of ears with its longest and relentlessly suggestive track, Ausgang. Somewhere between cheerfully funereal and livelily meditative, the persistent breeze of sonic and melodic enticing is a vibrantly repetitive affair which probably outstays its welcome but still provides an instrumental soundscape to create imaginative tales within. Though the EP is not one of two halves, like the previous track the closer lacks something of the first pair of songs but has plenty to entice and feed an already keen appetite for release and band.

Desert Ships has provided a treat of an encounter which is at its stunning best at the start and whilst slipping a level of persuasion or two in its latter part, perpetually leaves expectations and anticipation of big things from and for the band ahead rife. Ultimately Skyliner is a gorgeous flight which more than deserves a full investigation.

The Skyliner EP is available now @ http://desertships.bandcamp.com/

http://www.desertships.com

RingMaster 11/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Kobadelta – Remain Distracted EP

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Having been enthralled by their rousing EP, The Hidden Door earlier this year, there was keen anticipation waiting for the release of its successor Remain Distracted. Both EPs come from the creative minds and resourceful imagination of UK band Kobadelta, and each provides a fascinating climate of sound and excitement to greedily immerse within. Remain Distracted takes the strengths and potency of its predecessor into new emotive and adventurous sonic flights, pushing the potential and emerging presence of the band into riveting and sultry landscapes. In some ways it is a slow burner compared to the last release but through a quartet of fiery and seductive songs, sets down the most potent and heady pinnacle from the band yet.

The release of Remain Distracted comes in a potent year for the Newcastle quintet which has seen them chosen to play Newcastle’s Evolution Emerging festival, as well as Stockton Weekender (with Happy Mondays and Public Enemy headlining) and Split Festival (with Maximo Park, The Cribs and Dizzee Rascal). Added to that there has also been a live session for BBC Introducing as well as numerous successful shows with bands like Allusondrugs. The new release adds another strong moment in the band’s year and one more irresistible enticement to develop a rich hunger over.

As soon as the sultry stroke of guitar from Alex Malliris opens up first track Siam, there is a potent temptation at work, its smouldering yet ripe lure a swift caress and announcement of the dark psychedelic invention the band is already acclaimed for. Another breath sees the hypnotic throaty basslines of Jon Marley join the evolving enticement of the guitar and the enterprising rhythmic framing of Chris Malliris. It is a glorious flame brought further to life by the mellow yet nicely raw tones of vocalist Dom Noble, all this against the already tantalising weave of melodic expression cast by the keys of Jordan Robson. It is a stunning track, elements of The Doors colluding with other whispers of bands like early The Horrors, 13th Floor Elevators, and Thee Exciters in an original fire of sound equipped with infectiously imposing hooks and grooves.

Repetition steps up next and instantly finds a heavier growl to its riffs, though that weight is not quite transferred to the crisp beats and elegant bassline. That restraint on some aspects and the mix of dark and light within the song works kobadelta epa treat all the same; its steady but feisty canter evolving through a sultry slow flight of immersive keys before breaking back with increasing tenacity in energy and attack. The Birthday Party like song is an intriguing shadow blessed proposition, not as dramatically gripping as its predecessor but growing into another absorbing and incendiary involvement of the imagination and emotions.

Its successor is less slow in gripping the passions, They Can’t Hurt Me floating in on another delicious almost sinister bassline. Its dark tone inspires a haunting essence to the minimalistic melody of the guitar and vocal croon of Noble, the merger offering a noir wrapped sultriness in presence and sound. There is a definite Cramps essence to the song as well as that of Jim Morrison and co, as well as hints of Damn Vandals and The Dropper’s Neck, but with an ingenious addiction sparking bait from bass and guitar aligned to similarly anthemic beats, the track is a slice of brilliance distinct to Kobadelta and their greatest song yet since forming.

The EP is closed by The Heretic, a sizzling sway of sonic causticity and melodic temptation driven by a swaggering rhythmic and riff crafted enterprise. As in other songs there is a prime hook which is inescapable for ears and passions, its coaxing leading the senses into the scorching haze of guitar and atmospheric heat of the keys. With the delivery of Noble again parading the song’s narrative with an unfussy but magnetically expressive texture, the song is a mesmeric consumption of the senses and a fine end to another impressive release from Kobadelta.

The band just gets better and better as evidenced by Remain Distracted ensuring whatever comes next from Kobadelta will be met with greedy anticipation.

The Remain Distracted EP is available from September 26th @ http://kobadelta.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/Kobadelta/

RingMaster 26/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Jubilee Courts – Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight

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As shoegaze seems to be pushing its boundaries in sound and intensity, UK band Jubilee Courts add their own striking and tantalising slice of sonic climate with the Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight EP. Holding five tracks which are as sultry as they are invasively seductive, the release brings a delicious merger of eighties post punk and psychedelically fuelled shoegaze with an incendiary and modern sonic rapacity. It makes for a proposition which carries a potently inciting familiarity but equally a uniquely fresh and provocative enticement.

Hailing from Northampton, Jubilee Courts was formed in 2011 by vocalist/guitarist Josh Falconer, guitarist Matt Bradstreet, and bassist/vocalist Harry Boyde. Soon building up a potent reputation with their live presence around their hometown and surrounding areas, the current line-up was completed with the addition of drummer Frank Robertson-Marriott. Drawing on inspirations from the likes of My Bloody Valentine, The Jesus and Mary Chain, Bauhaus, and Joy Division musically, T S Elliott and Delmore Schwartz lyrically, the band laid down a wider stretching lure with the Stalkers Records released single Room with a View at the end of 2013. Mixed by Temples frontman James Bagshaw, the track pushed the band into a fuller spotlight which Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight is sure to intensify. The band’s first EP is a thick and hazy adventure in breath and sound yet one which infuses at times a minimalistic intimacy and seductive romance to its ambient and melodic explorations, turning the imagination on its head whilst nagging with a monotone and humdrum persistence. Each song is an interpretation of life, an emotional and mental flirtation from which thoughts and senses find healthy inspiration.

City Flow brings the release to life, its initial sonic wind an attention taking intro from which a lone guitar begins teasing thoughts. Its melodic lead is swiftly accompanied by the dark shadows of the bass and the discord kissed vocals of Jubilee-Courts1-450x450Falconer. It is a raw and haunted enticement which instantly brings thoughts of The Jesus and Mary Chain and early Cure as the song wraps its evocative texture and sonic suggestion around the senses. Eventually the air and turbulence of the scenery increases, guitars creating a tension soaked flaming across bolder and broader rhythmic rumblings. It is a glorious start matched by the cacophonous beauty of Something Different. The again discord fuelled tempest which brings the song into view enslaves attention and appetite but soon makes way for a melody closely related to that within its predecessor, its niggling beckoning rich and irresistible. It too is only a moment in the journey of the track, a surf rock like stream of warmth and sonic acidity immersing ears in a sultry blaze. The instrumental is pure mesmerism, an inescapable soundscape through which the compelling dark bass lure of Boyde coldly tempers an escalating aural sunspot.

The startling entrance of the album is just as impressively continued by Outside Your House, its opening bait a heavy footed and slightly fuzzy bass prowl which is soon aligned to a percussive stomp and a ridiculously addictive guitar hook. A disorientating dance breaks out within the rhythms soon after, not for the first or last time Jubilee Courts binding a melodic elegance and smoothness with a seemingly disorganised and agitated but skilfully crafted contrast of ideation. There is always a rich essence of My Bloody Valentine to songs but here hints of bands like Birdland and Wire similarly add their suggestive whispers. The track continues to lay tender yet imposing melodic and sonic tendrils around the ears as the bass finds its darkest side yet to spark another wave of hunger for the EP which is matched to a lesser but still rich degree by Under the Sand Again. The song is the cloudiest of all on the release, its smoky air and turbulent weave of sonic trespass an insatiable pressure. Throughout though melodic veining shines pleadingly from within the thick atmosphere whilst vocally Falconer resonates and smoulders with his great unpolished tones. It is a heady mix but eventually clarity does free itself as the song builds to a fiery climax. The song is also one which misses that final spark which brings other tracks to bear so addictively on the passions.

The release saves its best proposal till the end, in the riveting and scintillating shape of Sunday Shift. A surf bred line of sonic irresistibility entwines itself around ears and imagination from its first breath, taking the initial lead as suggestive rhythms and a second strand of melodic toxicity rapidly add their spice. There is also fullness to the still minimalistic intent of the track which bounds across the senses but this time with every aspect finding its own clear voice in the entrancing weave. Providing an enthralling and nostalgic post punk temptation in its chilled hooks and rhythms as well as vocally, the track unveils an aural alchemy which even with its rich eighties flavouring and inspiration is innovative and virulently addictive.

To describe the music of Jubilee Courts thoughts of My Bloody Valentine and The Jesus and Mary Chain, as well as Joy Division are unavoidable but to that essences of The Horrors, Wire, Crispy Ambulance, and Artery come into the mix. The band has though forged a sound and release in Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight which stands alone in presence as it gives an impressive and thrilling twist to shoegaze.

The Go From the Blue Light into the Moonlight EP is available now.

http://jubileecourts.com/

9/10

RingMaster 04/08/22014

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