The RingMaster Review picks its favourite metal, rock and noise releases of 2018

Across its busy year 2018 unleashed a horde of gripping and rousing metal, rock, and noise driven releases. Here we pluck out those covered by The RingMaster Review which had the juices flowing most lustfully of all…

1. Black Space Riders – Amoretum Vol. 2

2. Coilguns – Millennials

3. KEN mode – Loved

4. VNDTA – Pale Glow

5. Mammüth – Outlander

6. Black Space Riders – Amoretum Vol. 1

7. Eryn Non Dae. – Abandon Of The Self 

8. The Great Sabatini – Goodbye Audio

9. U-Foes – No More No More

10. Dead Register – Captive

11. Naberus – Hollow

12. Bailer – Self Titled

13. Hostile Array – Self Titled 

14. In Vain – Currents

15. Vantablack Warship – Abrasive Pulmonic Speak

16. Skulk, The Hulking – Afterbirth Of A Nation

17. The Ugly Kings – Darkness Is My Home

18. Spookshow Inc. – Visions Of The Blinded World pt I & II

19. The Castor Troys – Legends Never Die

20. Owl Company – Iris

21. Deville – Pigs with Gods

22. Arcaeon – Balance EP

23. Maudlin – Sassuma Arnaa

24. The Senton Bombs – Outsiders

25. Verni – Barricade 

The Great Sabatini – Goodbye Audio

Pic by DAVE LEVITT

Four years on from their psyche ravaging third album, Dog Years, Canadian noise sludgers The Great Sabatini return with another maelstrom of noise bred dissonance which, to continue a trend set from their first releases, is their most irresistible trespass to date. Goodbye Audio is around thirty five minutes of sonic abrasion as unpredictable creatively as it is expectantly striking; an invasion of raw and toxic noise intent on caustic seduction.

The Montreal quartet of Steve, Sean , Rob, and Joey Sabatini have in many ways continued exploring the less destructive but deviously manipulative essences of its predecessor with Goodbye Audio but equally the new encounter again openly embraces the ravenously raw ferocity and bedlamic seeds of their sound exposed from day one. It makes for a release which tempts, seduces, and flirts with the senses and imagination as at the same time it marauds, pillages, and corrodes them.

The album opens up with recent single Still Life With Maggots, instantly descending on ears with a sonic and rhythmic harassment before taking a momentary breath and repeating the assault with the causticity of raw throated vocals enrolled. Melodic taunts and imposing tenacity also add to the short but evolving landscape of the song, that unpredictability swiftly fingering the imagination and igniting an admittedly already in place appetite for The Great Sabatini adventure set through previous escapades.

As next track, Dog Years quickly confirms this is a new psyche twisting caper with the band though but an exploration unafraid to hint at possible inspirations as the likes of Melvins, Unsane, and Sofy Major come to mind at certain moments across the whole of Goodbye Audio. The second song is an immediate bestial infringement, its carnal instincts fuelling sound and voice alongside intent as it crawls over the senses. Sludge metal and noise punk provide smog of irritability and raw tension but again if with less openness there is an underlying incalculable adventure which teases before exposing its majesty in the outstanding Strip Mall or, The Pursuit Of Crappiness Parts 1-4. The track is superb, from its initial hip manipulating flirtation breaking open a fissure of thick prowling malevolence veined with toxic grooving, that in turn twisting into corruptive punk ‘n’ roll rebellion before finding a quickly corrupted paradise.

You’re Gonna Die (Unsatisfied) stalks years and thoughts next, the guitar again inviting and taunting with its riffs as rhythms stroll and fly through the skulking throaty bass and swinging sticks. It is a maelstrom of threat and ferocity with the most frenetic prowl while Tax Season In Dreamland provides a feral punk tango exposing scars and lust with equal creative savagery. Its moments of emotionally hazed tranquillity are just as imposing stirring up emotive reflections as potent as the physical reactions its uproar provokes.

Through the shadow draped increasingly contaminated celestial breath of Brute Cortege and the intimidatingly mercurial fourteen minute emotional wilderness of Hand Of Unmaking, the album is brought to a mighty close; both tracks a provocation of body, spirit and thought with the latter a complete trial and adventure of its very own to hungrily immerse in.

We are not afraid to say that The Great Sabatini has been one of our favourite bands for a long time but even that usual readymade submission to their adventures was taken aback by the thrills and spills of Goodbye Audio. If noise annoys run for cover as the Canadians have it down to a fine raw art.

Goodbye Audio is out now on vinyl from No List Records, Ancient Temple Records and No Why Records with a cassette version featuring exclusive bonus track Drain The Swamp available from Pink Lemonade. Head over to https://thegreatsabatini.bandcamp.com/album/goodbye-audio for digital release and more…

 http://thegreatsabatini.com   https://facebook.com/thegreatsabatini   https://twitter.com/greatsabatini

Pete RingMaster 01/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Glorious Rebellion – Euphoric

 

Live at the Haven 05/30/2015. Photo by Sandy Rushing. — with Zeke Rushing, Wade Scianimanico and Billy Myers III.

Live at the Haven 05/30/2015. Photo by Sandy Rushing. — with Zeke Rushing, Wade Scianimanico and Billy Myers III.

Euphoric is the kind of bully no one can have a problem with. It is a release which harries and bruises the senses as if it was created to do nothing else, though truthfully, the debut mini album from US noise rockers The Glorious Rebellion is just as uncompromising and seriously compelling with its range of intrusive hooks within an infectious swagger. The band creates corrosive rock ‘n’ roll with a bite and attitude as virulent as the imagination that fuels it.

Formed and driven by vocalist/guitarist Billy Myers III, the Florida hailing band was soon lighting up their local live scene, that success stretching further afield as their dirtily rapacious noise rock ferocity and sonic rabidity grabbed attention. As rich in almost savage melodic mischief, their music seemed to easily spark crowds as The Glorious Rebellion shared stages with the likes of Jucifer, The Phuss, Black Tusk, Ken Mode, Lo-Pan, Black Cobra, Child Bite, Holly Hunt, Hollow Leg, and Destroyer of Light amongst many over time, successes luring new fans whilst enhancing the band’s reputation pushed again by the release of their two track single I in 2014. The years have also seen numerous line-up changes over the years; in fact it seems any page you look at and info found has a different line-up suggested. Importantly for the album though, it is Myers igniting ears with everything apart from drums which the impressing dynamics and swings of Wade Scianimanico takes care of. With additional vocals provided by Dan Manata, Euphoric is a sure-fire ball buster of sound, attitude, and intensity, which predominantly leaves pleasure emulating the album’s title.

The album opens with It’s A Sucker’s Game, Kid and straight away has ears under sonic and rhythmic siege whilst already sparking an eager appetite for what is to follow. What do badger the senses next are thick and predatory grooves around just as grouchy riffs and rhythms.  Already a heavy catchiness is laying potent bait, lures reinforced by the excellent attitude sculpted roars of Myers and an even strong spice to the grooves. In full aggressive stride, there is a Pigs meets Unsane feel with a tasty whiff of Motorhead to the track, though to be fair, all are passing essences in the band’s distinctive animosity of sound.

Glorious rebellion euphoric_RingMasterReviewThe great start continues with the equally infectious and fearsome Emmett Brown Has Never Met A Scott That Wasn’t Great. From a more low key start, a thick tide of riffs and rhythms descend on ears before stepping aside momentarily for that great initial coaxing to grip attention all over again. Throughout, the song makes for an intrusive and abrasive proposition but digs into the psyche just as potently with its unpredictable and inventively twisted web of noise and ear gripping adventure. It’s easy to offer Melvins as a hint to the song’s escapade whilst the even more outstanding Benaquyl and its enslaving rock ‘n’ roll nudges thoughts of bands like Gruntruck and The Great Sabatini in the course of sculpting another pinnacle within Euphoric straight after. The song also highlights more of the variety of spices in the band’s sound, stoner and punk as open as this slab of noise rock breeding.

The brilliant Have I Told You Lately That I Loathe You? snarls and rages next with vocals and guitars as irritable as each other and just as pungently enticing around the rancorous grumble of the bass. Within that hostility though, band and songs cast some of the most addictive and infectious essences to be found on the release. They are elements which turns hunger into a lust for more which The Dirtiest Dream Jobs feeds with its cantankerous tone and sonic enterprise soaked in melodic acidity. Admittedly personal tastes are not quite on fire for the song as for its predecessors yet it is nothing less than a highly enjoyable and in turn lingering tempting drawing attention back onto band and release.

The album closes with Bitches Hate Misogyny, an ill-tempered and tempestuous blaze of sound and vocal incitement which tells you all you need to know about the band in noise, craft, humour, and thrilling adventure. It is a hellacious mouth-watering end to an equally impressive release which was our introduction to The Glorious Rebellion but the beginning of a major kinship between ear and sound we suspect; something hard to see us being alone in.

Euphoric is out now via Magnetic Eye and @ https://thegloriousrebellion.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thegloriousrebellion   http://thegloriousrebellion.bigcartel.com   https://twitter.com/TGRnoise

Pete RingMaster 18/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Tirades – Lifetime of Wars

Tirades _RingMaster Review

It all started in February 2014 when guitarist Munoz was in the Andes. His car broke down along the Los Libertadores and help was far away. Out of nothing came Nauhel, an Indian from the Mapuche tribe in Chile.

Nauhel invited Munoz to his camp and insisted that Munoz stayed overnight. It turned out that Nauhel was a musician in traditional Mapuche music, and Munoz had 20 drafts to what once would become Tirades’ debut album. Munoz and Nauhel exchanged musical ideas throughout that night as the moths danced around the bonfire. Nauhel gave Munoz the name “Pülü”, meaning insect in Mapuche, to commemorate the moths who kept them company through the night. This night caused all other musical projects to be set to side, and Tirades became the main priority from here on out.

That is the background to a band which unleashed one of last year’s unexpected and seriously exciting roars in the shape of Lifetime of Wars. A slow start release wise to a new year always allows for a catch-up of propositions that initially escaped but deserve attention and without doubt the first album from Norwegian hardcore protagonists Tirades qualify. Whatever its origins and seeds, Lifetime of Wars is a glorious and challenging slab of rock ‘n’ roll which rousingly embraces a web of noise and punk fuelled flavours driven by imagination stirring adventure.

Album cover_RingMaster Review     The September of 2014 saw Bergen hailing Tirades enter into the recording of their album with producer Andrew Neufeld (Comeback Kid). Alongside guitarist/vocalist Esteban Munoz, also the drummer of Social Suicide, stood bassist/vocalist Remi Arefjord also of Jeroan Drive and guitarist in Social Suicide, Of Grace and Hatred drummer Mathias Simonsen, and guitarist/vocalist Markus Den Ouden from Blodig Alvor. Together they have created a confrontation as sonically intrusive and emotionally cantankerous as it is anthemically and energetically inspiring. Released in the latter moments of last year through Fight! Records, the punk ‘n’ roll blaze is an immediate contagion drawing, as mentioned, on varied spices of metal and punk driven rock ‘n’ roll to brawl and stomp with the listener.

Fear The Saviour is the first potent incitement, the opener springing from a suggestive guitar spun invitation into a predatory stalking of the senses with beats and bass leading the way. Tribal spicing colours Den Ouden’s bait whilst the bass of Arefjord has a carnivorous tone to its snarl, both tempered by the ethereal vocals and wiry enterprise of guitar. Electro spicing equally adds more drama and texture to the post punk scented introduction, the song playing like a blend of Morkobot and Tones on Tail as it leads ear and an instantly awoken appetite towards the bracing confrontational tempest of Death Bell. Smothering ears in thumping beats and sonic provocation from its first breath as vocals challenge, the track swiftly has body and emotions aflame with its rousing and contagious canter. Subsequent clean vocal chants and the ever primal tone of the bass only add to the lure of the rousing seduction, the song twisting into the infection loaded hardcore and corrosive rock ‘n’ roll which fellow Norwegians Shevils are as equally adept at unleashing, they the closest comparison coming to mind for the uniqueness of Tirades.

The exhilarating stirring of the passions makes way for the more barbarous riot of Ghost, though it too is soon evolving within ears as the band explore fresh hues and resourcefulness employing varied styles. Far too short for personal greed, the track gives way to Sleepless. Featuring Kvelertak guitarist Maciek Ofstad, the track evokes defiant attitudes with its aggressive bawl of sound and voice, only adding to the chest beating potency with catchy moments of clean vocal led incitement. As its predecessor, a major highlight is uncaged, a song which is as imaginatively unpredictable and addictively alluring as it is fiercely exhaustive and more than matched by the exceptional Precious Demon which flows out of its tail blast. Further invigorated by Social Suicide vocalist Marius Jahnsen and Tarjei Strøm, another maelstrom of invention and noise rabidity descends upon and swallows the senses, it too inciting lusty involvement with its caustic collusion of diverse textures and punk rock aggravation.

There is a touch of NVRVD and Bear to the track whilst in its successor Relignorance a spatter of The Great Sabatini teases as it’s more restrained hardcore hostility allows vocal melodies and noise rock tendrils to captivate from within the fierce romancing and subsequent haunting atmospherics unleashed. Volatility is as much a constant in a Tirades song as attitude and ferocity and the track embraces all within its compelling design before Reach Victory batters forcibly on ears and in turn Skin scorches the sense with its sonic toxicity and ravenous intensity. The first of the pair is an abrasive bellow with its own line in dynamic rhythms and agreeably searing hooks matched to the constantly anthemic vocals whilst its successor is an emprise of punk belligerence and feverish imagination drawing on another diverse range of metal, heavy rock, and blissful noise

False Prophets keeps the fires of satisfaction burning forcibly next, its skilled merger of contrasts and addiction forging ingenuity making the appetite greedy whilst immediately after Never Again grumbles and rumbles like a bear with a sore head; one wanting to tear apart the body and dance with the skeletal remains. It is hard to remember in recent times a crushing destructive protagonist as virulently catchy and irresistible as the superb song, though within the album it is just one of a band of demandingly contagious and rabidly inventive trespasses.

The album is completed by the acoustic croon of 1996, an evocative piece of stringed and acoustic expression shaped by voice and emotion which only impresses but still pales against the sheer magnificence of what came before. A bonus remix by Ralph Myerz also adds to the thick enjoyment of Lifetime of Wars, an album which hopefully is the first of many given the other commitments of its creators.

In a recent review we remarked on the pinnacle 2015 ended on in the number of seriously striking releases unveiled. Tirades are another one in the list, maybe the very best of that moment and in the cream thrilling the whole year.

Lifetime of Wars is out now via Fight! Records through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/tiradesofficial

Pete RingMaster 08/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Hag – Fear Of Man

HAG_OCT_2015_RingMaster Review

Sucking ears, senses, and emotions into its tar thick tempest, Fear Of Man is an incitement hard not to get a little lustful over. The nine track primal roar of punk fuelled, noise lit sludge ‘n’ roll is the return of London based Hag, a trio which first gripped attention with their self-titled debut EP back in 2010. The past five years have seen the band on the backburner in regard to attention but things are ready to boil over as their striking first album begins crawling over the metal/heavy rock scene.

The trio of Ian Baigent (vocals/guitar), Robin Freeman (bass), and Tamas Kiss (drums), united again with Part Chimp’s Tim Cedar at South London’s Dropout Studios to record Fear Of Man. The result is a dirty and sonically corrosive slab of instinctive rock ‘n’ roll with persistently salacious riffs, nastily bred rhythms, and cantankerously snarled vocals. Getting its subsequent release via the newly formed DNAWOT Records, the album is insatiable virulence; a gut twisting, psyche bending contagion which leaves ears and appetite very greedy.

art_RingMaster Review     The album’s title track starts the thrilling violation, its lumbering body prowling the senses initially as guitar and bass spread intrusive riffs backed by the hefty swipes of Kiss. Almost deceptively the song is soon enveloping the listener, vocals fusing melody and aggression as they lead the swarm of gnarly sound and invasive shadows. Even more invasive as the album proceeds, Fear of Man is like a cauldron seeded in Melvins, High On Fire, Pigs, and The Great Sabatini but becoming more distinct in character and individuality with every raw trespass offered.

As potent as the opener is, it is soon eclipsed by the outstanding Kingdom O. The track instantly showers ears in a barrage of addictive riffs and barracking beats entwined with catchy enterprise and a juicy sonic hook that seems to linger even as the rawer treats within the song have their say. It is gripping and addictive tempting that just gets more busy and tenacious with every thumping rhythm and punkish expulsion within the winy stoner-esque climate.

Rainbow Dust has body and soul snagged by its first wall of noise and enslaved with the swift web of sonic imagination which nets ears and the dark corners of song and voice soon after whilst Trauma Yauma provides a bedlamic provocation bulging with feverish sonic rabidity and knee buckling rhythms. Both tracks twist and turn within their core intents, the second especially riveting as the bass grumbles with craft and imaginative expression whilst prowling the ravenous tempest of guitar and confrontational vocal. The track is a major highlight amongst many and quickly matched by the anthemic nagging of Low. Like The Fat Dukes Of Fuck meets Sofy Major, the heavy rocker swings along with creative muscles to the fore but all the time it brews grooves which get right under the skin.

Up against the previous pair, Metal Detector Man struggles to escape their shadows yet still it unwinds a tapestry of binding grooves and a bracing collusion of riffs and rhythms that is easy to be eagerly entangled in with a want for more. To be fair, the track simply grows in the ear and over time stands as impressive as most before, and after it like the sonically dirty and predatory White Lion and after that the acidic rumble that is Beaten At Your Own Game. The first of the two is an intrusive infection of heavyweight, fire bred rock ‘n’ roll taking chunks out of the senses whilst laying deep rooting hooks into the passions like a Cenobite whilst its successor creates its own slightly cleaner but no less rapacious blaze of volatile sound and intensity lined with melodic imagination.

The album finishes with Wrong Bar, a final tsunami of brooding energy woven into winding sonic tendrils and crawling discontent shaped as rolling rhythms and anthemic persuasion. It is a masterful and invigorating end to a release which persistently leaves the inspiration to challenge the world in its wake.

Hag may have taken their time to back up their earlier EP but are back fiercer, bolder, and more relentlessly impressive in all aspects with Fear Of Man.

Fear Of Man is available from January 8th via DNAWOT Records @ https://hag-noise.bandcamp.com/album/fear-of-man

https://www.facebook.com/HAG.LONDON   http://hagband.com/

Pete RingMaster 07/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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False Flags – Hexmachine

artwork_RingMaster Review

Casting belligerent revelry in a tempest of hardcore, punk metal, and noise rock within debut EP Hexmachine, UK quartet False Flags quickly suggest they are a raging on the ear that giving attention to can only be rewarding. It is a five track causticity loaded with noise infested hooks and discordance fuelled enterprise that snarls and gnaws on the senses with a combination of familiar and fresh ferocity. Major surprises are scarce, originality in some ways slim, but fair to say band and release stir up a very healthy appetite for their uncompromising persuasion of sound and intent.

Hailing from Leeds, False Flags emerged from the ashes of Red Stars Parade, Whores Whores Whores, and Year of the Man some when around 2011. Drawing on inspirations from bands such as Unsane, Breather Resist, Botch, and Coalesce, False Flags saw its members exploring new avenues for their hardcore bred ideation and adventure; better explained by guitarist Charles Pritchard, “after the break-ups of our previous bands in Leeds and all previously being friends from the DIY scene here, we wanted to form a band that took influence more from the noise rock / discordant hardcore end of the spectrum.” It was an aim soon finding success and a quickly growing following to a live presence which including sharing stages with the likes of Noothgrush, Narrows, and Envy. Long anticipated, Hexmachine is their first studio unleashing, a fierce roar on broader spotlights which more than lives up to the buzz their shows have bred.

The EP erupts with Earl Black, the opener emerging from a distant sonic haze in a brawl of thumping rhythms and caustic sonic violation. It is an assault bound in an infectious tenacity and lure too even though the vocals of Chris Jenkinson are throat raw, every syllable bearing the blood of his vocal chords as around him the guitars twist a mesh of flavours from punk to metal to heavy rock. Pritchard’s fingers keep song and imagination busy with his prowess on string as too the dark bass tempting of Mark Snellgrove, his prowling invention superbly aligned to the scything swings of drummer Mike McGoran. First impression of the track is strong, second great with it further impressing with each subsequent play.

The same applies to the following Last Screen Goddess. It makes a bolder entrance, beats badgering ears from its first breath as riffs and grooves entwine in a web of temptation. More predatory in gait and energy than its predecessor, the track is a cantankerous involvement which again only becomes more compelling over time. It is probably fair to say that it lacks the same imagination as the first song in the bulk of its body but saves that for a passage where everything twists around each other in a riveting and bruising noise infested trespass of the senses. Satisfaction is only left full across its bellow and filled again by the confrontation of Fate (Has a Driver). Like a blaze seeded in Sofy Major like rock ‘n’ roll and the scarring contagion of The Great Sabatini, the track heftily pleases; its grooves and bass rabidity especially incendiary sparking an even greedier appetite by this point.

Pet Wolf sculpts its barbarous infestation of air and ears from a similar canvas to the last song but turns it into a much more volcanic and volatile proposition veined by southern hued, sludge coated grooves. Bass and drum endeavour is as bewitching and punishing as the sonic incursion courtesy of the guitar, it all led by the harsh vocal and lyrical devilment. It is a great bullying which continues in the noise/punk inferno of Namedropper. Once more contagious hooks and flaming grooves join barbarous rhythms and vocal abrasion to create an assault as addictive as it is debilitating.

From one great track to another as Phone My Wallet brings Hexmachine to a rousing and brutal end, the track a bedlam of tasty repetitive grooves and intrusive hooks amidst a raging storm of voice, rhythms, and intensity. It sums up the False Flags sound in one invasive blow and ensures the EP leaves on a lofty plateau.

With a want for a touch more bold originality and diversity to Hexmachine the only slight wish of the EP it is an impressive and thoroughly enjoyable introduction to False Flags. With their pedigree and open talent, it already feels like the emergence of a unique character to their sound is on the cards; another reason to be confidently excited by the band.

Hexmachine is available from November 20th @ http://falseflags.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/falseflags   https://twitter.com/falseflags

Pete RingMaster 20/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Sofy Major – Waste

Sofy_Major_pic2015_RingMaster Review

After the merciless conditions which opposed the band when recording their acclaimed second album Idolize, including hurricane, flooding, loss of equipment for the band and the studio they were recording at, we assume the recording of its successor was an easier time for French rockers Sofy Major in comparison. What we can be certain of is that the time since the 2013 release and the unveiling of Waste has seen the band grow in presence and sound to hit another lofty peak with their new proposition. Waste is a glorious slab of rock ‘n’ roll; a storming proposal retaining the raw energy and uncompromising snarl of previous releases but also revealing a more melodic and composed touch to the wonderful volatility that persistently sets the Sofy Major sound as something to get excited over. Also as the last album, the Clermont-Ferrand trio has offered another essential slab of rock adventure to devour greedily, a temptation hard to see many refusing.

Produced by Dave Curran (Unsane, Pigs, Big Business), mixed by Andrew Schneider (Pigs, Julie Christmas, Unsane), and mastered by Carl Saff, Waste opens with its title track and an instantly intimidating and magnetic growl of noise and punk rock driven by heavy rock grooves and grizzly bass riffs. The vocals of bassist Mathieu Moulin roar with intensity yet equally an inviting tone, luring attention as a host of spicy grooves and tempting hooks add matching appeal within the increasingly carnivorous maelstrom of energy brewing across the track. It is a gripping and potent start to the release backed up in kind by We See Fire and a quickly emerging big hook of a slim but irresistible chorus. Twisting and turning with each breath, the song captivates like a fusion of The Great Sabatini, The Fat Dukes Of Fuck, and UK band The St Pierre Snake Invasion, great vocals from Moulin and drummer Mathieu Desternes around the increasingly enthralling guitar enterprise of Sébastien Fournet enslaving ears and imagination.

sofy_major_cover_RingMaster Review   Turning Point is just as adept and creative at raising the passions, its irritable bass bait inescapable addictiveness matched in success by the swinging gait of the song and its casting of contagious and psyche infesting grooves. There is a familiarity to this and the songs before it, but of Sofy Major only and taken to richer and more virulent levels, proof again coming with the bearish textures and roar of Slow Everywhere, it a bruising captivation as sonically antagonistic as it is roguishly captivating with the bass especially fiendish in its grumbling tone.

Variety is another returning aspect to the Sofy Major songwriting and ingenuity, the classic rock hook of Infinite Pill Case a wrong-footing tease from which the song tenaciously explores a weave of rhythmic agitation and guitar bred imagination impressively led by the ever alluring vocal delivery of Moulin. With unpredictability another constant throughout the rock ‘n’ roll bellow of the album, the song has body and emotions quickly involved, leaving an exhausted and full appetite in its wake for Black and Table to keep thoroughly satisfied through its slower wrapping of ears with sinister intent and stalking magnetism.

An essence of post punk flavours Iron Butt next, a spicing lacing the web spun by Fournet’s fingers whilst Devotion Man brings a more grungy essence to its enticing brew of noise and punkish confrontation. Both tracks get the blood racing in different ways as they inflame the air, the first with a more urgent tempest and its successor through a controlled yet predatory canter which uses every breath to create an infectious coaxing.

The album concludes with an excellent cover of the Les Thugs song As Happy As, Sofy Major taking the track to darker and again more post punk depths whilst increasing its virulence. Rarely does a cover match an original but the closing song on Waste is more than a thrilling match for its inspiration.

Fair to say a soft spot for Sofy Major through their previous albums, Idolise especially, has become much more lustful thanks to Waste. Rock ‘n’ roll does not get much more carnivorously attractive and exhilarating than this so get those ears and pennies ready

Waste will be released via Solar Flare Records on October 30th on 12″ vinyl, CD, and digitally. Preordering available @ http://shop.solarflarerds.com/categories/pre-orders

Pigs/Sofy Major European Tour Dates:

15.10.15 : London @ Power Lunches

16.10.15 : Paris @ Le Picolo

17.10.15 : Liège @ La Zone

18.10.15 : Vesoul @ Café Français

21.10.15 : Cologne @ Sonic Ballroom

22.10.15 : Lille @ La Péniche

23.10.15 : Rotterdam @ Poppodium Baroe

24.10.15 : Bruxelles @ Magasin 4

25.10.15 : Genève @ L’Usine

26.10.15 : Prague @ Exit Us

27.10.15 : Vienne @ Fluc

28.10.15 : Bologne @ Freakout Club

29.10.15 : Rome @ Init

30.10.15 : Savona@ Raindogs House

31.10.15 : Milan @ Lo Fi + Mutoid Man

04.11.15 : Montpellier @ Black Sheep

05.11.15 : Lyon @ Grrrd Zero

07.11.15 : Bergerac @ Gare Mondiale

09.11.15 : Clermont-Ferrand @ La Coopérative de Mai

10.11.15 : Bordeaux @ Iboat

11.11.15 : Toulouse @ Pavillons Sauvages

12.11.15 : Poitiers @ Grand Café

13.11.15 : Rouen @ Kalif

http://www.sofymajor.com   https://www.facebook.com/sofymajor

Pete RingMaster 13/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/