The Men That Will Not Be Blamed For Nothing – Double Negative

The Men That Will Not Be Blamed For Nothing are indeed guilty as charged; charged by us of unleashing one of the most incorrigible, darkly mischievous, punk ‘n’ roll gems of this and many other years maybe going back to the Victorian times and arcane deeds  theming their sound and glorious new outing, Double Negative. Irresistibly addictive, deviously manipulative, the British outfit’s fourth album is a coming of age of sorts but you can be assured just the beginning of richer shenanigans as they nudge on much greater attention.

Suitably, the band was birthed in the surrounds and history of Old London Town, springing from the new friendship and creative coming together of guitarist/vocalist Andrew O’Neill (SunStarvedDay/Plague Of Zoltan) and vocalist Gerhard ‘Andy’ Heintz (Creaming Jesus). The former was breaking into a successful stand-up comedy career around the time and soon invited the latter to help write and perform some daft songs and play musical saw to enhance his act. The beginnings of The Men That Will Not Be Blamed For Nothing were sown, subsequently seeing bassist Marc Burrows (The Pittstops), also a comedian and writer, joining the band  with drummer Ben Dawson (Million Dead/ SunStarvedDay) completing the line-up. This was a decade ago and since then the quartet has seen multi-instrumentalist/drummer Jez Miller (Lords Of The New Church)replace Dawson and release three increasingly well-received albums.

Their sound began with a certain air of and was embraced by the steampunk scene but has moved away from that style in heart and music by the release as now boldly proven by Double Negative. The album is pure punk rock yet has so much more to its depths; essences of metal, noise, and rock ‘n’ roll embroiled in its inimitable holler as too a devilish air akin to bands like The Cardiacs draped in that tenebrific and so often grisly Victorian drama and the brazen but never overpowering humour expected of exponents of stand-up.

It is a perfectly balanced and rousing mix which instantly fuels album opener Supply And Demand; a Burke & Hare inspired stomp bringing the listener to their feet from its first breath. Riffs and hooks collude with an inescapable rhythmic swing, the track recalling the heart of seventies punk before spreading its own theatre of enterprise within its cadaver littered tale. It had us bouncing and vocally roaring within a few swift moments, a sign of great rock ‘n roll in anyone’s book.

The following Baby Farmer is just as virulent its temptation and effect as Amelia Dyer goes about drowning unwanted babies in the Thames. The dark nagging bassline had its claws in instincts straight away, Heintz’s vocal snarl adding to the lure as the slim but potent lure of riffs, hooks, and beats. O’Neill’s even rawer backing cries only add to the overpowering persuasion before Hidden entices the listener not only into the broader depths of the band’s sound but its arcane shadows, O’Neill performing a rite called The Bornless Ritual within the song’s infectious prowl. With threads of heavy metal and gothic/psych rock entwining its punk core, the song just enthrals as it infests.

Disease Control is next, the track sparked by “John Snow’s discovery that the Soho cholera epidemic of 1854 was waterborne”. It harries and bustles around ears, its almost carnal climate a dirty punk ‘n’ roll infestation with another hip stirring groove and rhythmic teasing while Obscene Fucking Machine simply seduces from start to finish with its Dead Kennedy’s esque grumble. A damning look at Queen Victoria’s ”big, fat fucking machine” of a son,  Prince Bertie, the track is aural addiction in the waiting with its own healthy line in punk twists and rock turns.

Through the Jack The Ripper instigated Occam’s Razor, or rather the money breeding, conspiracy guessing industry grown up in its historical wake, and the raw metal punk scourge of God Is In The Bottom Line, closer attention is only enslaved even if neither quite sparked the level of lust of their predecessors. Each though fingered the wants and desires in our punk appetites which There She Glows and its ‘romancing’ of Marie Curie further rummaged with its Steve Ignorant & Paranoid Visions meets The Ghost Of A Thousand styled boisterous croon.

The album concludes with There’s Going To Be A Revolution, the only fictional track within Double Negative yet certainly one incited by the poverty, injustices, and oppression of the modern world, of any era. It is a raw and imposing tempest of sound and discontent which rubs vociferously on the senses, gnaws on ears, and gives the album a stark and sonically rapacious curtain closer to get the teeth into.

Punk rock always need a new fresh breath to keep it ahead of the game and always seems to find it. Double Negative and The Men That Will Not Be Blamed For Nothing is the next wind to arouse and inspire even if a roar soaked in previous centuries and their nefarious adventures. We for one just cannot wait for its companion in the two album cycle started by this real gem.

Double Negative is out now on CD, Cassette, Vinyl and Digital Download via Leather Apron Records across most stores and @ https://blamedfornothing.bandcamp.com

Dates on The Men That Will Not Be Blamed For Nothing’s current UK tour:

SAT 17 MAR – York, Fulford Arms

SUN 18 MAR – Milton Keynes, Craufurd Arms

MON 19 MAR – Cardiff, Globe

TUE 20 MAR – Chester, The Live Rooms

WED 21 MAR – Leicester, The Shed

THU 22 MAR – Exeter, The Cavern

FRI 23 MAR – London, The Dome

SAT 24 MAR – Southampton, Joiners

SUN 25 MAR – Bristol, The Exchange

TUE 17 JUL – Detroit US, Motor City Steamcon

http://www.blamedfornothing.com/   https://www.facebook.com/blamedfornothing   https://twitter.com/blamed4nothing

 Pete RingMaster 14/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Amsterdam Red Light District – Sapere Aude

Though The Amsterdam Red Light District seized major plaudits as they boldly established themselves within the punk/hardcore/rock scene with second album Gone For a While in 2014, the release still missed stirring up the kind of fervour in us that others were finding the certainly highly enjoyable encounter. It seems that we were just waiting for a particular undefined spark which has now undoubtedly caught within the France based band’s new fury, Sapere Aude. THARD’s third album is a beast of a roar, as ferociously infectious as it is instinctively irritable and emotionally tempestuous and for us by far the best thing the band has unleashed.

With inspirations found in the likes of Refused, The Bronx, The Ghost of a Thousand, and The Bled, Europe has been the broad sounding board for the 2005 founded band’s sound over the past few years, THARD sharing stages with the likes of Refused, Anti-Flag, Thrice, 36 Crazyfists, Comeback Kid, and Slayer alongside their own successful shows and tours. This month sees the band off on their travels again with Sapere Aude lock and loaded in their arsenal.

It opens up with Nobody Moves Like You and a spiral of acidic grooves and heavy handed rhythms which lure ears and attention like a magnet. Swiftly it settles into a tempestuous stroll as catchy as it is belligerent, Elio Sxone’s vocals an alluring temper in its midst backed by those increasingly captivating grooves cast by guitarist Maxxx Comby. A blend of hardcore and metal, the track has a natural swing which alone infested the appetite with the dark tones of Greg Clert’s bass adding to the instinctive temptation. Vocally Sxone brings adventure and diversity to match the raw and skilfully woven sounds around him in one glorious inventive brute of an introduction.

The following The Best Is Yet To Come is just as quickly and intrusively gripping. Featuring Cancer Bats front man Liam Cormier, the track simultaneously grumbles and seduces in voice and sound, the rhythmic trespass of drummer Julien Chanel driving its intent and forceful urgency as the guitar and melodic aspect of the vocals bring a ferocity tempering enterprise. As its predecessor, it demands and commands willing attention with adventure and imagination.

Two songs in and already the album has whipped up personal passions missed by previous offerings and only ups the ante with the fiery punk ‘n’ roll of Need. Again vocals and music create a cauldron of contrasts and ferocity with balance and adventure, the song having something of Every Time I Die meets The Ghost of a Thousand to it as it too inflamed the senses and appetite before Wild Life sparked its own blaze of praise and ardour with its hellacious creative clamour. Blending various aspects of ferocious intrusion and melodic captivation to its punk metal, vocal harmonics adding to the drama, the track simply whipped up greedy attention.

Carry On is an infection of temptation, tenacious hooks and riffs colluding with the song’s emotional irritancy and rousing breath; all bound in an enterprise as persistently catchy as it is rapacious. It all comes though with an ebb and flow which only increases its fascination and imagination while Over The Fence in turn uncages a sonic squall and a senses battering rhythmic dance which holds similarities to its predecessor before unveiling its own quest of creative discontent.

The turbulent spirals of Waiting For The Day needs little time to incite intrigue and imagination next, its opening web subsequently draped in vocal and sonic dispute again as magnetic as it is corrosive in a psyche infecting mix which nags and harries as it bruises and excites. That raw incursion is only intensified in The Whole City Burns, its melodic metal aligning with feral punk in an invigoratingly abrasive holler loaded with spiky riffs, barbed hooks, and melodic fire.

The album concludes with firstly Evil Stakeholders, a slab of crotchety yet melodically bewitching raging which maybe did not quite inflame as others before it but only reinforced the impressive character and force of Sapere Aude. Its title track is the final offering, an outro of intimation and samples reflecting the portentous state of the world with bursts of rhythmic incitement. Maybe better served as an intro to the album in some ways, it is a fascinating last breath to one striking release.

From first note to last Sapere Aude truly stirred our fullest passions, that anticipation for bigger bolder things ahead sparked by its predecessor more than realised in a release sure to feature as one of the year’s greatest moments.

Sapere Aude is out now via Red Light Records.

https://www.tarldtheband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/tarldtheband    https://twitter.com/tarld

Pete RingMaster 08/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Moments – Outlast EP

With potential as vocal and uncompromising as their snarl, Belgian outfit Moments release their new EP this month. Containing five hungry and irritable tracks, Outlast is a ferocious attack of hardcore and metal which manages to be a swiftly striking incitement of impressed pleasure and a slow burning cauldron of even richer promise.

Hailing from Tessenderlo, the quintet emerged in 2011 and has increasingly forged and earned a potent reputation and following at home and more recently across Europe with their live presence. They have shared stages with the likes of Bury Tomorrow, While She Sleeps, Our Last Night, and Stick To Your Guns as well as played numerous festivals such as Groezrock, True Spirit Festival, Summerblast, Cerberbrus and Rock Herk to great success. Now they are ready to poke at bigger attention with Outlast, a release declaring the possibility of a new potent force in hardcore town.

The EP makes an instant impact with its outstanding opener What If. As a busy street scene surrounds ears, the sonic trespass of guitars brews, swiftly taking over the landscape with wiry grooves and rapacious riffs. Dries Monsieurs’ vocals are just as quickly invasive and impressing, his ire coated roar supported by equally caustic tones and sounds from across the band. A raw yet infectious scent reminding of The Ghost of a Thousand carries appetite and imagination off into the irritable heart of the track, the hooks and grooves of guitarists Jeffrey Beutels and Kristof Fransen addictive as the imposing swings of drummer Benjamin Hendrickx simply bite upon the senses. It is a stunning start which is never quite matched again within Outlast but tenaciously and enjoyably supported by the likes of next up All It Takes.

The second song harries ears with an initial scrub of riffs, drums throbbing upon impact to match the resonating tone of Gert-Jan Vandervoort’s bass. If the first song it was a lingering threat, in its successor a predatory declaration is made yet with a catchy grooving as enticing as anything conjured by voice and guitar elsewhere. Harmonic backing to the throat scraping attack of Monsieurs is a great contrast to the antagonistic charge driving the song as too the citric melodic enterprise aligning with the sonic trespass abrasing the senses.

As the EP, the song simply grows in strength and enjoyment with each listen, a quality shared by all and indeed next up Crossroads which maybe did not quite hit the mark as fully the first few times around but blossomed to be another definite pleasure. It does not quite have the individual traits of its companions but employs more recognisable hardcore bred threads in a bold and heated metalcore spiced union of harsh and melodic craft.

Our Faults, Our Failures is a bracing tempest of emotion and sound straight after, it’s scalding sonic web as intensive as the rhythmic harassing and vocal animus of raw emotion and displeasure. It too is a grower reaching loftier heights with time whilst revealing open potential of bigger and bolder things with Moments. The band has been suggested for fans of artists like The Ghost Inside and Hatebreed, this track gives all the reasons why whilst still creating its own highly agreeable character again adding to that promise.

Outlast closes as it began, with a track which commands a quick appetite and hunger for its punk and metal quarrel. Riffs and hooks collide with the senses, sonic tenacity further searing the damage as rhythms create fresh bruises with every attack. It is addictive stuff, vocals almost cursing listener and world in tone alone, the bass showing a mutual discontent in its texture and grumble.

Moments is a band on the rise, Outlast a release which leaves a lingering scar and together a pair creating another reason to anticipate hardcore nurtured noise becoming especially exciting sometime soon.

Outlast is released May 26th.

https://www.facebook.com/momentsbe

Pete RingMaster 26/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Black Coast – Crows Of The North

Black Coast_RingMaster Review

Good things are openly being spoken about Black Coast and their metal/hardcore ferocity, praise that is easy to expect continuing as their debut EP, Crows Of The North, hits ears. The five track fury is a potent introduction, a powerful announcement of their arrival on the British metal scene with its melodic prowess within a commanding tempest of aggression and sonic animosity.

Formed in 2015, Black Coast is a band which is still looking for the uniqueness within their sound and it is fair to say that Crows Of The North provides few major surprises, yet it equally offers strong and open potential which certainly draws attention to itself. For a first release, the EP is a noticeably accomplished and carefully honed affair revealing that the Stoke-on-Trent quintet already has a good handle in equipping raging tempests with contagious hooks and suggestive melodies. They are qualities which have lured interest from the likes of Rock Sound and Alex Baker for his Fresh Blood show on Kerrang!, and will soon help the band in stand out within a crowded metalcore/hardcore fuelled scene.

Crows Of The North gets off to a bang with new single and best track on the EP, Violence Reigns. From its first breath, sinew sprung grooves are entwining ears with their enticement backed by heavy beats and the groaning lure of bass. Almost as swiftly, the vocal squalls of Charlie Hewitt unite with the adventurous sonic enterprise cast by guitarists Scott Pinnington and Joe Mayer, his entrance seemingly the spark to a great shift into unpredictable and an evolving landscape of sound and imagination. From vocals to hooks, rhythms to intensity, the track becomes a tapestry of maybe familiar but attention exciting flavours, persistently twisting and turning to incite an early keen appetite.

BLACK COAST CROWS OF THE NORTH FRONT COVER_RingMaster ReviewThe great start is nicely, or should that be grudgingly, backed by the irritable predation and antagonism of Mercenary, a track which blossoms into something between The Ghost of a Thousand and While She Sleeps. Swinging grooves quickly ignite ears whilst the intrusive strikes of drummer Matt Clarke seem to punctuate the turbulent emotion of Hewitt’s caustic vocal enterprise. Courted by a more ‘reserved’ trespass uncaged by Jack Beardsall’s bass and an infestation of swirling grooves and acidic hooks, the song leaves satisfaction ripe. Its pleasing success is then matched by the similarly intensive sonic and emotive inferno of Plagues where again grooves easily infiltrate the imagination whilst the broader melodic climate which comes and goes shows more of the invention and adventure lying within the songwriting and desire to merge sounds and contrasts. It does lack the same incendiary spark as the first pair of tracks though, being fully pleasing without drawing that extra excitement even if it has definite moments where riffs and anthemic rabidity, especially in its finale, hits the spot rather nicely.

Habit is the same, a track which does little wrong but misses the ingredient, even with its excellently crafted animus of emotion and sound, that helps turn a good song into a great proposal. Again though, it has to be said that it reveals creative incidents which only suggest that Black Coast is moving in the right and potent direction to be a notable antagonist in British metal ahead.

The EP’s title track closes Crows Of The North off; its attitude driven concentration of belligerent intensity and sonic tenacity highly captivating especially when bound to searing yet inviting grooves and barbarous rhythmic confrontation. Ultimately breaking into a bruising punk ‘n’ roll stroll clad in metallic ferocity, the track provides a thoroughly satisfying end to a fine first look at Black Coast.

Originality is maybe scarce within Crows Of The North but imagination and the sparks of future individuality make for a promise which time will see realised or not. Finding out should be an enjoyable adventure with Black Coast though just as the EP is now.

The self-released Crows Of The North EP is available from February 26th through iTunes and other stores.

https://www.facebook.com/blackcoastuk   https://twitter.com/blackcoastuk

Pete RingMaster 26/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Massacres – Brutus

Massacres Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

With a sound that does a fair job on the senses replicating the suggestiveness of their name, UK hardcore quartet Massacres have announced their introduction in ferocious and heftily enjoyable style with debut EP Brutus. The four-track fury is a merciless tempest of hardcore antagonism and belligerence loaded with punk rock hooks and a rock ‘n’ roll breeding which just compels ears and incites the body. Bolder things may be heard this year but for thoroughly exhilarating and fresh imaginative hostility, Massacres hits the floor running with Brutus.

Formed in the Spring of 2015, Massacres swiftly set about creating a collection of ravenous tracks before unleashing them on the live scene to increasingly fevered and acclaiming responses. Soon references were understandably offered to the likes of Every Time I Die, John Coffey, Pissed Jeans, and Cancer Bats; spices easy to bring up whilst listening to Brutus which the band began working on last summer. Uniting in Stakeout Studio with producer Jason Wilson (Reuben, Fightstar, The Ghost Of A Thousand), the London quartet emerged with an EP that barges into ears, bullies the senses, and ignites a keen appetite for more.

Massacres Cover Artwork_RingMaster ReviewOne Of The Boys launches at ears first, a nagging sonic scything from the strings of guitarist Kris Mayzee colluding with the similarly stabbing vocal spikes of Dave Rogers as the track gets a foothold in the psyche straight away. Soon venomously prowling the senses with urgency and grouchy invention, bruising intensity and burrowing hooks aligning for a potent lure, the song irritably stomps like a mix of Every Time I Die and Reuben with the additional animosity of Cancer Bats yet equally Norwegian band Shevils and British noise fiends The St Pierre Snake Invasion are nudged into thoughts to describe the predominantly individual flavour of the song and indeed subsequent release.

It is a rousing and increasingly addictive offering powerfully backed by the rawer viciousness of Death Knell. Again hooks and grooves are a persistent tonic in the volatile climate and character of the track; grooves especially spicy and insatiably alluring as they wind around the pleasing vocal variety shown by Rogers. The bass of Martin Walker is a bestial incitement, though it too develops an irresistible swing at times as it bridges the scorching temptation of guitars and the insistent brutality of Andy Sartori’s rhythmic swings.

New single Everything I Want To Do Is Illegal rages next; exploding off of a singular tendril of guitar bait with robust rhythms, fiery grooves, and the uncompromising emotive squalls of Rogers. As Max Raptor like infectious as it is The Ghost of A Thousand like choleric, the track is a dynamo of energy, hook loaded enticement, and unbridled emotion with the band giving their virulent all in craft and arousing intensity.

To The Victor, The Spoils brings the release to a close by crowding in on ears with a controlled barrage of predatory rhythms and vocal crabbiness amidst intrusive sonic enterprise. Within the stormy confrontation though, kinder melodies hang in the shadows where equally a catchy gait lurks, both waiting to escape the combative swell of sound and discontent. It is a intent that never occurs as such but all the time they add inescapable imagination to the unforgiving animus of the song.

Brutus is a strong and, more importantly, thoroughly riveting entrance by Massacres on the UK hardcore scene, an area of ferocious rock ‘n’ roll easy to see the band growing to be a driving force of if they fulfil their potential.

The Brutus EP is available through all platforms on from February 5th.

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Pete RingMaster 04/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Murdock – Dead Lung

MURDOCK-Promo1

How to describe Dead Lung, the new album from Dublin trio Murdock? Well quite simply it is a BEAST! In sheer power, ferocity, and primal instincts the album is a devourer of senses and psyche. Similarly though it has all the creative wile and lithe characteristics of a predator and once it has its claws in there is no escaping the savaging of hardcore, noise, or the technical trespass assaulting ears and igniting the imagination. Dead Lung is just immense.

Since emerging Murdock has earned an increasing and devoted following to go along with the reputation bred of being one incendiary device live. It is a devastating experience which in the words of the band has the attitude, “If you are not bleeding or exhausted, what is the point?” The band has ignited stages alongside the likes of Every Time I Die, The Dillinger Escape Plan, Unearth, Sick Of It All, Lower Than Atlantis, Coilguns and numerous more, either on tour or at individual shows but now it is their debut album Dead Lung, released via Basick Records, that is poised to be the detonator to greater intensive climes, and with little to surely stand in their way such its might and hellacious alchemy.

The album opens with the first single taken from it, Deer Noises. It is a track going for the jugular from its first breath, riffs gnawing the senses whilst rhythms venomously batter them, and it is fair to say that the sonic spicing wrapping both is up to no good either. It is a magnetic entrance enhanced further by the raw vocals of guitarist Aidan and the contagious elements flaring up in the tempest of sound and emotion. It is not just an infectious essence emerging either, an inventive unpredictable flurry of fierce and melodic twists adds to the gripping turmoil too. Coilguns comes to mind listening to the song but equally spices of bands like The Ghost of a Thousand and Kunz tease thoughts, all mere whispers in the roar though as the album gets off to a thumping irresistible start.

Albumcover   The band has so many weapons that impress, that unpredictability a major one outside of the sound itself and it continues to seduce across the album starting with I Am Not A Continent next. This also has the listener’s throat in its sonic jaws from the first second, guitars and bass snarling and ravaging the senses whilst the beats of Ronan show more restraint yet still unload with a punishing intent. Slips into mellow scenery equipped with sultry harmonies and progressive beauty virtually flirt with the listener inside the encounter too but always they have to submit for the similarly riveting fury fuelling the proposition.

A lustful appetite is already brewing by the time What You Don’t Like takes over; its psychotic character and agitated rhythmic bait a swift proposal to be feared and embraced. It is even angrier than the rages before it but also in some ways lacking the same addictive quality, though this is more to do with personal preferences across Dead Lung. The track seems to lean deeper in the hardcore side of the band compared to its more evenly sculpted predecessors but also arguably more experimental ideation with its Deftones like detours. It provides another fascinating incitement though but one soon surpassed by the band’s latest outstanding single Erk. An avalanche of rhythms bruise and inflame ears first, riffs and sonic ferocity just as toxic from within the storm. The bass of Rob lays down a mean throaty lure throughout the increasingly anthemic and volatile brute of a triumph also, but the song is a success again unafraid to slip into melodic beauty and evocative caresses. Its hooks are sheer addiction on top of it all and the band gets more accomplished in ability and imagination in three and a half minutes than most others will across a whole album.

Narrowcasting finds a post punk coldness and monotone elegance to its prowling presence next, the song managing to sound like a hybrid of Palms meets late seventies band Artery. It is just as intimidating in its doom lined mellowness as it is in the outbursts of pent up vocal and sonic vitriol and takes album and listener on a completely new direction to what came before whilst continuing in the same vein as the previous provocations. The track is mouth-watering stuff matched by Brainface which explodes in the face after the brief jazzy and progressive instrumental seduction of 51 West 95th St. This leads straight into the sonic windstorm and blistering inhospitality of Brainface, a relatively short punk brawl clad in noise rock devilry and furious dissonance.

Neither The Signal In The Noise nor Leave Me Here For The Crows take any prisoners, the first a scorching and scarring sonic consumption speared by magnetic rhythm invention, warped slithers of unconnected styles, and rabid vocals. Once feeling in the senses returns, there is only pleasure for the might and thrilling violation of the track, the same applying to its successor. This takes a more controlled assault to the senses yet is still a volcanic maliciousness which intensifies its potency and weight with every passing swipe and grazing riffs, whilst its core groove just makes the tongue pass over lips.

Juices spill again with the cyclonic Old Blood Dead Lung, a glorious beating with convulsive rhythms and a bass sound you can only describe as demonic. The guitar enterprise and vocal vehemence of Aidan strip ears of their stability magnificently and in no time the track is locked in as a favourite across the increasingly impressing album.

It should be noted that every glimpse of the song we are trying to portray is as just that, choice moments in the ever evolving and twisted landscape of the tracks, each conflicts you can make assumptions and have expectations over but will never get a full handle on until heard, as Vebalectomy next. It is hardcore and punk in its heart but a broad and constantly shifting diversity of sound and ideation in presence, and arguably this is one of the more straight forward tracks in its make-up.

      Dead Lung comes to a close through firstly the portentous doom seeded Nineteeneightyfive, a sinister and almost meditative soundscape as hypnotic as it is threatening and lastly Monographia which blooms from within its predecessor and returns to the post punk hued atmosphere and persuasion glanced over previously in the album. The vocals of Aidan and Rob are smouldering caresses within the raw and caustic but similarly reserved sounds, though in time it all becomes a turbulent and bracing proposition.

It is a superb end to an engrossing and simply thrilling album. Even the pair of singles put out just before Dead Lung barely gave a true picture of the variety and scintillating depths of songwriting and adventure of sound to be found within it. The list already is getting long for possible album of the year contenders but there is no other option than to add Murdock’s name to it.

Dead Lung is available now via Basick Records @ http://music.basickrecords.com/album/dead-lung

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RingMaster 17/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

The Amsterdam Red Light District – Gone For A While

PHOTO HD Promo3 TARLD

With a mouthful of a name and a flavoursome depth to their captivating sound, French rockers The Amsterdam Red Light District unleash their new and highly anticipated album Gone For A While. It is a striking encounter which intrigues and pleases at every turn, the band’s mix of alternative rock in a fusion of melodic punk and hardcore, ensuring a persistent drama and vivacity to each and every track. That it does not ignite the passions as rigorously as it maybe should have is a mystery and probably a personal thing, but certainly the eleven track proposition provides a tasty stomp for ears and imagination to invest a real appetite in.

Seemingly with members based in Lyon and California, The Amsterdam Red Light District since forming in 2005 has earned a potent reputation and recognition for their sound and live presence. Employing inspirations from the likes of Refused, The Bronx, The Ghost of a Thousand, and The Bled into their own distinct ideas and invention, the band has made striking marks through debut album Dear Diary in 2010 and the I’m Not Insane EP two years later, their success backed by a live presence which has seen The Amsterdam Red Light District play all over Europe with great regularity, feature at festivals such as Groezrock, Mair1, Resurrection, Sylak and Rockstorm, as well as play with bands such as Refused, Anti-Flag, Thrice, 36 Crazyfists, Comeback Kid, and Slayer. In July this year the band set about recording second full-length Gone for a While, its release like the first with Red Light Records, now upon us and likely to only intensify the spotlight on the band.

Opener Time Flies swiftly has ears and feet involved in its feisty stomp, riffs and rhythms an immediate frenzy bound in enticing grooves. Vocalist Elio Sxone is a commanding presence within the raucous persuasion from his first syllable, whilst guitarist Maxime Comby is soon complimenting his caustic riffs with sonic enterprise. Arguably there are no real surprises within the song but equally it is a refreshing and magnetic offering with real power to its energy and persuasion capped by the great Red Tape like vocal roars alongside the velvety shadowed tones of bass provided by Gregory Clert.

The attention grabbing start is surpassed by the fascinating Just Have A Good Time, its initial Southern rock/Cajun twang the lead into a ferociously fiery and impressive incitement. Swiftly the_amsterdam_red_light_district_hb_251114revealing more of the depths and diversity to the band’s sound, the heavy rock fuelled track stomps with contagious and aggressive intent driven forcibly by the imposing skills of drummer Julien Chanel. The song though is still as welcoming and catchy as its predecessor, whilst the blend of raw and melodic vocals work a treat across song and subsequently the album, their union as bracing as the contrasting sounds igniting the beast of a song.

   Million Miles Away is no slouch in getting the blood running hungrily through band and listener either, its on-going charge littered with spicy hooks aligned to harsh and melodic elements of punk. Fuelled with a torrent of barbed and addiction forging twists, with further outbreaks of chunky riffing and virulent grooving piling on the temptation, the song keeps the album flying high before handing over ears and emotions to the similarly compelling and voraciously sculpted A Chance To Change. Its energy is as full and insatiable as in its predecessor, and with a thick melodic tempting to its rigorous tenacity, provides another weighty slab of punk hunger and irrepressible contagion.

The brief evocative presence of Final Boarding Call is underwhelming, the track seemingly an intro into the album’s following title track but lacks anything to halt the urge to simply move straight to Gone For A While, itself a song lacking something compared to the first quartet of encounters but reinforcing the craft and imagination surging through the album with ease, if not the earlier adventure shown. Its gentler caresses definitely make for a satisfying companionship before Behind Your Sunglasses unveils its fiercer presence and emotion. Still missing that spark of bold inventiveness, the track impresses as it bawls and croons simultaneously, the vocals especially gripping within the tasty web of chords and hooks.

Both These Kids That Your Parents Warned You About and Come Closer leave ears and appetite full of lingering pleasure, the first with gnarly bass tones and bordering on hostile rhythms, a grouchy and thrilling protagonist. Its growl is wholly infectious, as is the return of that bolder inventiveness which marked the start of the album as the track shows itself to be another lofty peak in the landscape of the release. Its successor is built from the same template, a hearty snarl coating every predatory note and heavily swung beat, not forgetting the raw vocal side of the band, whilst grooves and hooks find their own unique venom to infest the imagination.

The two songs has body and thoughts back hungrily engaged before making way for the addiction causing Set The World On Fire, the track one of those anthemic stomps which only a loss of hearing can deter. Its muscular brawl of a seduction is followed by closing track Waiting For So Long, an encounter featuring Justin Schlosberg from Hell Is For Heroes. A final blaze of rugged and melodic punk vitality which maybe misses truly lighting the passions, it nevertheless gives the album a furnace of a send-off whilst egging on the urge to dive right back into the heart of Gone For A While.

At the start we said that the album did not inflame the strength of ardour that it probably should have. It is hard to define why, certainly there is not an abundance of surprises but there is plenty to enthral and spark a greed for more. It is easy to expect Gone For A While to be a major trigger for the passions in a great many though, and for the rest of us it has to be said The Amsterdam Red Light District has placed a strong enough grip with the album that anticipation for their next endeavour is unavoidable.

Gone For A While is available now via Red Light Records, digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/fr/album/gone-for-a-while/id918599363 and on CD @ http://tarld.bigcartel.com/

http://www.tarldtheband.com/

RingMaster 26/11/2014

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