The Oversight – Far From Gone

The Oversight-52

   The Oversight hails from Boston and through the release of a couple of singles has been gaining quite a bit of attention it seems. They now release debut EP Far From Gone and having been quite captivated by its accomplished sound and skilled mesh of alternative rock and pop punk, it is not too hard to see why people are drawn to the band.

The band consists of vocalist/bassist Lucas Edwards, guitarist/vocalist Ryan Watanabe, lead guitarist Maggie Fraser, and drummer Josh Parra, a group of students at Berklee College of Music. Taking inspirations from the likes of Mayday Parade, You Me At Six, Go Radio, Angels & Airwaves, Brand New, The Wonder Years, and Paradise Fears into their compositions, The Oversight has had references to bands such as The Gaslight Anthem and Pierce The Veil, another influence, cast over them. A pair of singles earlier in the year in the shape of When 5 AM Turns and Far From Gone made potent teasers and attention grabbing lures to the new EP. Its quintet of tracks, which includes those two songs, carries on the strong emergence of the band, all soaked in a promise and craft which suggests bright horizons ahead for the Massachusetts quartet.

The track Collective starts things off, the relatively short song an introduction to the emotional intent of the release. With a spoken narrative over a melodic weave which increases in intensity and passion, it is a decent start to the DIGITIAL theoversight_farfromgone_cover_finalencounter if not fully convincing. That reservation is soon lost with the entry of Black & White. A lone guitar and the potent voice of Edwards make the first coaxing before the song opens out with bold rhythms and a wash of melodic enterprise which lures in even closer attention. The track does not explode in action at any point but ebbs and flows in energy and intensity with a skilled touch. It continues to stroll engagingly, providing a firmer rock invention entwined with an infectious pop punk relish which never breaks free of its rein but tempts throughout the highly enjoyable song.

The following Love Is A Fiction similarly makes a low key entrance, a guitar stroking ears with a jangling persuasion as keys add their respectful reflection to the growing presence of the track. Vocally Edwards again impresses, strongly backed by the tones of Watanabe, whilst the imaginative weave of melodies and understated hooks make for a compelling enticement. As its predecessor, the song does not exactly light a flame in ears or passions but certainly has them enthralled by its intelligent design and skilful presentation, increasingly more so as it grows and impresses the more you share time with its open qualities.

When 5 AM Turns soon shows why it made a great impression with its release earlier in the year. Once more there is a slow coaxing to start things off, something the band seems to like employing, before the track erupts into an exciting stomp of crisp and muscular rhythms against stirring riffs and melodically sculpted hooks. That alone wakes up a real appetite for the encounter, a hunger enthused further by the sweep of strings which add provocative texture and adventure to the proposition. There is an invention to the song too which, less open on its predecessors, just lifts ears and satisfaction up in its persuasive arms.

The title track brings the release to a close, and yes it makes a gentle first beckoning before a rhythmic teasing leads into a blaze of raw riffs and a melody fuelled maze of enterprise. Featuring guest vocals from AJ Perdomo of The Dangerous Summer, the track virtually dances on ears; it’s at times skittish gait and thrust of passionate intensity adding to the drama and lure of the song. Though not quite matching the previous track, it shows more of the strengths of the band in songwriting and their undeniable potential to help ensure a healthy anticipation of their adventures ahead is left behind.

For pop punk with a fresh rock and emotional instinct, The Oversight is a band to watch and their first offering something worthy of spending plenty of time with. There will be good times ahead with the band you suspect.

The self-released Far From Gone EP is available now @ http://www.theoversight.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/TheOversightBand

7.5/10

RingMaster 22/07/2014

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Come The Spring: Seven For A Secret

Come The Spring

    Seven For A Secret is the debut release from UK band Come The Spring, a six track mini-album which openly ripples with enterprise. It is a release to which recognition of its potency and accomplished craft in songwriting and sound is easy to state but despite all its strengths there is a feeling of lost opportunity with the band failing to ignite any strong passions with its presence.

Hailing from Brighton, Come The Spring has drawn plenty of attention and fervour towards themselves since forming in the middle of 2012. With members who have the strong experiences of being in bands like Rydell and My So Called Life previously, and also sharing stages with the likes of Hot Water Music, Greenday, Nofx, Texas is the Reason, and Braid, the quintet hit the ground running and soon drew the attention of Engineer Records who release this their debut. Musically the band craft a sound which is rich in the essences of bands such as Hot Water Music, Fightstar, The Gaslight Anthem and more, that possibly the reason the release did not ignite the fires inside which one was expecting considering the brewing excitement around the band, their sound having a too strong a similarity to others.

Conditions opens things up strongly with its initial sonic embrace soon joined by firm beats and an eager wash of striking guitar comethespringcaresses. As the rich and expressive vocals make their presence known, an infectious hook veins the track to help ensure the song is a lingering pleasure. Into its stride the melodic flames of the guitar and rich tones of the bass standout along with the vocals to enthral and satisfy making an impressive and promising start to the release.

The following Northern Star contrasts the keen energy of its predecessor with a restrained and emotive gait. It is a gentle encounter with a certain passion which brings crescendos within the expressive breath of the song. The bass with its melancholic and exhilarating downcast voice steers the stormy atmosphere and reflection of song and its heart into a compelling company for ear and thoughts. As its moves towards its climax, the song shifts and raises the heat with good variety and invention and across its length evolves into a magnetic long-term treat.

The following Patching the Cracks Doesn’t Make it Foolproof and Readbeforeyouwatch both offer capturing elements which entice and infect the passions but equally neither can sustain the effect as they employ familiar underwhelming loud whispers to wrap around the stirring moments. Despite that the two tracks do hold attention and thoughts firmly in their grasp during their company and it is only after that they disappear from view and memory too easily for the fullest of satisfaction. Again as in all songs, they do not leave the listener short on skilled musicianship and passionate songwriting and again help to breed a strong sense and promise that the band is moving on to major things and releases in the future.

      The State isn’t Important as Long as we’re One is the weakest song on the release, a track which passes by without inspiring any real reaction though again it is sculpted and presented impressively and makes a decent enough lead in to the excellent closer Statues. On military driven drum recruitment and angular guitar riffs the song strikes up sparks of real pleasure with its contagious energy and melodic beckoning and ensures as it began that the album ends on a high.

Come The Spring seems to be tagged as post hardcore but stand more as a melodic punk/alternative rock band, though they do recruit other strong flavours to their creative cause. Seven For A Secret is an appealing debut from a band which you can only see unleashing some very notable releases ahead. This album is not quite one itself but for an introduction easily inspires the wish to keenly investigate future efforts whilst in the now makes for an enjoyable to spend your time.

http://www.facebook.com/ComeTheSpring

6.5/10

RingMaster 22/03/2013

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Archers And Arrows: Alone Together

Archers & Arrows pic

    Alone Together is a rather intriguing and thrilling album from Swiss band Archers and Arrows, a release which as much as it pleases and excites equally instils further immense promise for the band ahead as it evolves and explores a truly unique voice to its already quite distinct invention. Though it does not quite continually ignite the fiercest fires inside the album nevertheless thrills with its peaks and engages fully in its less individual moments.

Bringing influences of the likes of The Lawrences Arms, Further Seems Forever, Hot Water Music, Mae, and Thrice to their sound, the 2009 formed quartet of Sebastien, Nicolas, Bunty, and Yves conjure a stirring mix of punk, melodic hardcore, and indie. The band first drew strong attention in their homeland with their self-titled debut EP of 2010 which earned Archers And Arrows good radio play on Swiss national radio satiation, Couleur 3. Since then the foursome has furthered their reputation with impressive shows alongside bands such as The Gaslight Anthem, The Bouncing Souls, The Get Up Kids, The Chariot, Polar Bear Club, and Roger Miret (Agnostic Front). Their debut album one suspects is set to trigger a wider enthused awareness and from much farther afield such its impressive and evolving strength.

Opening track Innocence takes no time in scything through the ear with tight sonic grooves and melodic teasing before the excellent vocals take their place in the already captivating song. With every note and syllable the track has a fresh and crispness to its engagement which startles and warms the appetite. Arguably it provokes and suggests more than it delivers in uniqueness but all the time there is the feeling and expectation of greater things waiting to emerge from the appealing start and constantly it offers enough to keep one captivated whilst brewing a hunger for more.

The following Numb/Dumb steps from the closing strains of its predecessor with a delicious bass twang and indie hook persuasion beneath group vocal harmonies. Settling in to its stride there is a dissipation of that initial seduction into something more expected but the band are in control and twist the song with various asides and unexpected detours within the purposeful destination of the track. Again great vocals and accomplished imaginative guitar play leaves flavoursome rewards whilst the energy and agitation of the rhythms and passion brings an intensity which settles nicely alongside the melodic beauty.

     My Own God, Sing To The Wind, and the hard-core veined Self-Made Man continue the strongly convincing invitation of the album, all again offering inspired imagination and skilled enterprise which has one irresistibly focused to each swerve of the songs within their triumphant mix of styles but each also not quite going through with all their ideas to leave one a little dissatisfied as they also involve familiar essences well-worn elsewhere.

The second half of the album though is where things creatively explode as the band is at its most riveting and inspired; songs where they step aside into their own distinct spotlight. Danse Macabre offers a gentle hand at first though its rhythms are biting at the bit to involve an eager gait. Soon they get their way as the track opens up its presence with a dual emotive weave of expressive vocals, senses jangling guitars, and anthemic rhythms. The song is a delicious stroll of a band freeing up its imagination and heart, a contagious and emotive recruitment which leaves a heated ardour in its wake.

The title track and Dirty Hands both rise to the challenge and stand side by side in quality and stature to the first of the three. Alone Together merges a coarser vocal delivery with melodic flames which singe the ear with passion but tempers the acidic touch with addictive anthemic choruses and precise seductive hooks. It is pure pop with punk intensity and raw emotion, an inciting and thrilling piece of triumph. The third of the trio also carries a raw breath to its sonic victory and further inspires, with its co-conspirators, thoughts of how immense the band could and should become on the evidence of they and the album as a whole.

The closing Emergency offers one last treat in excellent female vocals which assist its lasting firm caress, the song completing an album which grows and impresses more and more with each sharing of its companionship. Archers And Arrows is a band to watch very carefully and Alone Together is the perfect starting point.

https://www.facebook.com/archersandarrows

8/10

RingMaster 13/03/2013

 

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