The Shapers – Reckless Youth

The Shapers Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

Having gotten their melodic punk claws into other parts of the world, French trio The Shapers are now concentrating on the UK with the uncaging of new EP Reckless Youth which is set to be followed by a British tour. The release offers a captivating collection of songs bred from the heart of punk rock and brought up embracing its numerous strains. It is punk ‘n’ roll to breed a hungry appetite for and an encounter which starts with a bang and, though it arguably does not always maintain its initial impact, only leaves a want for more.

Hailing from Toulouse, The Shapers emerged in 2009 from the union of vocalist/guitarist Anthony Cauvin, bassist/backing vocalist Raphaël Bouissière, and drummer Benoit Holin. Quickly unleashing a hunger to play live, by 2011 the threesome was touring China and Indonesia to such success that the band retuned again in 2015 to eagerly awaiting fans, adding the likes of Thailand to their global CV. Two years after that first tour, The Shapers was going around North America where they shared stages with NOFX and Pennywise, the prize for winning a ‘best up-and-coming band’ competition. With the release of debut Everybody Needs To Have A Dream in 2012 equally drawing potent acclaim to go along with shows alongside the likes of The Flatliners, Silverstein, Face To Face, and Dream on Dreamer over time, The Shapers have been on a unstoppable roll set to continue with Reckless Youth.

The Shapers Cover Artwork_RingMaster ReviewThe EP opens with a gentle caress of guitar as Can’t Forget slips into view. Within a few more breaths it is rumbling through ears with sturdy beats and ravenous bass riffs as band shouts crowd the voice and guitar enterprise of Cauvin. Initially there are few surprises but certainly an alluring dose of hooks and anthemic prowess which has the body bouncing and energies aroused. Subsequently though, an electro hinting broadens its presence to sizzle and provoke, the song from an opening Blink 182/Pennywise like character with a hint of Buzzcocks to it revealing a fiery G.R.I.M scented invention. Melodies and adventurous twists only add to the increasing creative drama and virulent persuasion of the song, resulting in a superb and invigorating introduction.

The outstanding start continues with Secrets and straight away it is taunting with beats as the guitar enjoyably hassles the senses with its spicy intimidation. The grooved bait of the bass only adds to the swiftly gripping tempting, as too an excellent mix of lead and group vocals. Carrying a fuzzy electro pop mischief into its imagination and urgency, the song reminds of Russian band Biting Elbows in a punk ‘n’ roll stomp that only gets the body and emotions fully involved.

The following Another Chance equally shows its muscle and catchiness early. The bass offers the menace whilst beats and hooks uncage the infectiousness which fuels the songs’ surge into attention and a keen appetite. Again maybe uniqueness is not as high on the agenda of the song as stirring up a good time, but whilst lacking some of the spark of its predecessors, the track only pleases with its feverish enterprise and refreshing energy loaded revelry.

The instrumental Lonely Moments comes next with an acoustic guitar hug of melodic charm which is enjoyable but does not quite fit in with the company of the songs around it, something which No Regrets has less problem with. It too is an acoustic bass croon with Cauvin as potent as ever vocally and impressively backed by band harmonies. It also misses the same elements which made especially the first pair of songs so captivating but again it only leaves satisfaction full before Youth Disaster takes over with its grumbling riffs and skittish percussion around more of Cauvin’s engaging. Offering a tenacious landscape of classic rock laced, punk seeded rock ‘n’ roll, the track plays like a mix of Good Charlotte and Sum 41, blossoming from a strong start into an inescapable, almost stormy roar thick with anthemic persuasion.

Ending almost as powerfully as it certainly started, Reckless Youth is one of those releases easy to find yourself drawn back to time and time again. As mentioned The Shapers have their eyes on the UK now and going by the potency of their EP, it is hard to see them failing to stir up another wave of eager fuss.

The Reckless Youth EP is available from Friday 26th February through all digital platforms.

http://theshapersofficial.com   https://www.facebook.com/TheShapersOfficial   https://twitter.com/theshapers

Pete RingMaster 24/02/2016

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POPULAR FRENCH POP PUNK OUTFIT, THE SHAPERS RELEASE NEW EP!

European trio ‘The Shapers’ set loose their spanking new EP ‘Reckless Youth’, through all digital platforms on Friday 26th February. Look out too as the gritty rockers prepare to tour the UK in 2016

The Shapers Online Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

Currently residing in Toulouse, France, Euro punk rockers ‘The Shapers’ delectably embrace the garage rock vibes of ‘The Hives’ and ‘Nirvana’, merged with the early urgent delivery of ‘Green Day’ and ‘A Day To Remember’. Born in 2009 and consisting of Anthony Cauvin (Lead Vocals/Guitar), Raphaël Bouissière (Bass/Backing Vocals), and Benoit Holin (Drums), this power trio have certainly undertaken the punk rock DIY ethos. With a keen zest for touring and adventure, the band headed out to China and Indonesia in 2011 to play a series of highly successful shows, and because of the response and support, the threesome returned the following year and again last year. In 2013, The Shapers won a ‘Best up-and-coming band’ competition, lapping up a prize to tour throughout North America where the alt-punks shared stages with punk rock legends NOFX and Pennywise. Last year, the band again toured, this time in Thailand. The three piece were overwhelmed with responses and will tour South East Asia again next year.

As well as a hearty diet for touring across the far reaches of the world, the band have also extensively played throughout France, and are currently planning their attack on the UK. Blessed with a CV that boosts support shows with The Flatliners, NOFX, Silverstein, Pennywise, Face To Face, and Dream on Dreamer, and critical acclaim for 2012’s debut album ‘Everybody Needs To Have A Dream’, which picked up rampant praise across the board, the band show no signs of letting up.

The Shapers dropped their video single “Can’t Forget”, directed by Mayol (media director of Vans, who has worked with successful bands like the Foo Fighters, among many others) this summer. The single is the opening track from the band’s hotly anticipated new EP ‘Reckless Youth’, which is unleashed this February. With six cuts of scuzzy punk, the record is a true calling to all fans of Punk in its varied forms. Drawing from the early vigour of Blink 182 and the raw power of Nirvana, marinated with a hint of The Subways, this EP is destined to break the band to the UK.

The_Shapers_Cover_Artwork.jpg_RingMaster Review

https://twitter.com/theshapers   https://instagram.com/theshapers  https://www.facebook.com/TheShapersOfficial/   http://theshapersofficial.com

The Decline – Resister

The decline_RingMaster Review

Third album in and Australian skate punksters, The Decline, continue to offer contagion fuelled stomps that simply rouse up the spirit. Resister is packed to the rafters with imagination crafted and wholly magnetic propositions, tracks which only want to offer a good time whilst uncaging a lyrical substance easy to get involved with. Pop/skate punk boundaries are certainly not worried too forcibly by the thirteen track adventure but any resistance to its unstoppable virulence is swiftly dead in its invigorating waters.

Formed in 2006, the Perth hailing quartet made its first strong attention grabbing mark with debut album I’m Not Gonna Lie to You in 2010, an encounter straight away pushing the band towards international awareness. Its acclaimed successor of the following year, Are You Going To Eat That, helped spark the opportunity for The Decline to undertake a headlining tour of Europe as well as a Japanese tour with Israeli pop-punkers Useless ID and So-Cal 90’s super band Implants. Across the years the band has continued to share stages with the likes of Descendents, Unwritten Law, Frenzal Rhomb, Propagandhi, Bodyjar, Bouncing Souls, Anti-Flag, Lagwagon, No Use For A Name, No Fun At All, Guttermouth, and The Flatliners, they amongst a great many others. 2014 saw the release of the crowd-funded Can I Borrow A Feeling EP as well as another hectic tour schedule whilst after a line-up shuffle earlier this year, The Decline set about recording Resister, its immediate unveiling coming just before the band hits the festivals Punk Rock Holiday in Slovenia, Munich’s Free and Easy Fest, and Rebellion, the latter one part of a UK tour running through August. With further global shows in the offing too, Resister provides the most potent incentive to check the band out and make this a summer of insatiable romping.

Resister Artwork_RingMaster ReviewThe release opens with New Again, a short, punchy encounter which quickly sets the creative scene for the album. Jangling melodies flirt with muscular rhythms whilst the potent vocals of guitarists Pat Decline and Ben Elliott unite and entwine across the tenacious start to the album. There are no surprises but plenty of fiercely flavoursome sounds setting up ears and appetite for the following Giving Up is a Gateway Drug, the first single from Resister. With the thumping beats of Harry steering the song into view, his drums a blur of activity, the song twists and turns with emotion and energy. Every second is a tempestuous and easy persuasion for ears, vocals again slightly outshining the sounds, but all aspects crafted with inventive and unpredictable elements.

As strong as its start is, Resister kicks up another gear or two from I Don’t Believe onwards. Featuring guest vocals from Cameron Baines of Bodyjar, the third track boldly enters on rolling anthemic rhythms, they in turn laced with sonic spicing from the guitars before it all colludes in one seriously infectious incitement. A whiff of older schooled punk embraces poppier exploits resulting in a rigorous and pungent anthem swinging punches at the music scene and stirring up new hunger for the release. It is an appetite fed just as healthily and fully by Almost Never Met You, a song littered with tangy riffs, sparkling hooks, and the ever impressing vocal combination. The throaty bass twang of Ray Ray as good as steals the show but is matched all the way by the spices just mentioned and a Green Day meets Bodyjar essence coating the excellent encounter.

Both The Blurst of Times and You Call This A Holiday? keep the album’s new levels roaring in ears and thoughts, the first with fiery atmosphere and attitude to body and voice, and the second through its seamless and magnetic passage from a riveting acoustic/vocal lure into another throttle to the floor ball of creative and physical energy. Each, but especially the former, has an air of The Living End to the full-blooded tempting whilst Camberwell Street straight after, explodes with a richer hardcore but melody drenched escapade. It does not quite live up to its predecessors, but again with skilled endeavour and ideation spicing every aspect the song, hits the spot nicely before making way for the similarly successful Broken Bones.

The thickly pleasing Wrecking Ball fires up the passions, even with its opening barbershop skit. Subsequently into an unbridled bellow of aggression and explosive energy, the track is an easy persuasion of rippling rhythms, inescapable hooks, and more potent vocal combinations. But as good as it is though, it gets over shadowed by the outstanding You’re Not The Waitress, another pop infused punk tempest which is pure contagion.

The thirty second Little Voices is more of the same, revealing a similarity to the previous track and others around it without losing its individual potency during a short tenure of ears. It stirs the emotions nicely which Underworld Tour takes on a thrilling ride straight after with its NOFX/Motion City Soundtrack/ Set Your Goals like fusion of sound and imagination. Again rousing is the best word to describe its heavy satisfaction breeding character as it leaves the listener on a high ready for the closing catchy onslaught of Start Again. The song sums up The Decline sound perfectly, melodically hot, energetically sizzling, and creatively lively in a gripping finish to a fine album.

As suggested earlier, major surprises come in rare batches across Resister yet few moments truly feed expectations and every song is a galvanic exploit hard to turn away from. That certainly works for us!

Resister is available now through Pee Records (Australia) @ https://peerecords.bandcamp.com/album/resister, Bird Attack (USA) @ https://birdattackrecords.bandcamp.com/album/resister-4, and Cargo Records (Europe/UK).

The Decline UK tour dates:

Sat 8th – The Maze, Nottingham

Sun 9th – Rebellion Festival, Blackpool

Mon 10th – New Cross Inn, London w/ MDC (Millions of Dead Cops)

Wed 12th – Brudenell, Leeds w/ MDC (Millions of Dead Cops)

Thu 13th – The Hope And Ruin, Brighton

Fri 14th – Owl Sanctuary, Norwich w/War On Women

Sat 15th – Nice N Sleazy, Glasgow

Sun 16th – Exchange, Bristol w/ Teenage Bottlerocket

Mon 17th – The Fighting Cocks, Kingston

https://www.facebook.com/TheDeclineMusic   http://www.thedeclinemusic.com/

RingMaster 03/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Mark McCabe – A Good Way To Bury Bad News

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    One man with his acoustic guitar and a few endearing additives along the way to add to the potency of the emotive endeavour, A Good Way To Bury Bad News the new album from Mark McCabe is a thoroughly accomplished and often magnetic presence with the folk heart of a continual ballad and the occasional outbreak of restrained melodic rock. It is an easily engaging release which reinforces the potency and stature already earned by the Scottish singer songwriter and though it is hard to say it is offering anything dramatically new it has an individual presence and emotive strength which at times sets a stirring spark within the passions.

     The melancholic and often dramatically emotive lyrical thrust of his songs as on the album are said to come from the Aberdeen hailing McCabe’s lonely days at University where he first began writing songs with his acoustic guitar. He recorded debut album Is That Really How You Feel? in 2009 and spent plenty of time playing around mainland Europe, for which he relocated to Paris, in its support. Shows with the likes of Frank Turner, PJ Bond, Asptai, The Flatliners, Chris T-T and many more followed before he returned to Scotland in 2012. Sold out shows with again Turner came next as well as festival appearances and a tour with Oxygen Thief before undertaking a US tour down its East coast with After The Fall, Anchors, and Antillectual. Using 2013 to concentrate on writing and working on his second album, McCabe now unveils the Cats? Aye! Records released A Good Way To Bury Bad News and it is confident to say fans and many more will be elated with its craft and skilled temptation.

     Released January 20th with a European tour to support its arrival, the album opens with the thirty second or so Summer In Album ArtworkScotland Is But A Word. Plain and decent it sets the climate for the Scottish landscaped melancholy set to consume and inspire ahead before the following Doubts emerges from its closing to continue the emotional reflection. The track makes a coaxing start but soon elevates its pull with thumping beats and a stringed breath which is soon soaking the tale with magnetic shadows. A brewing intensity raises its call as the song progresses, the rhythms sturdier and military in combat to add greater tension and enticement the longer the song plays, whilst the vocals of McCabe are strong and expressively powerful to further the potency thought it is the seduction provided by the violin of Gillian Ramsay which steal the passions predominantly in what is an impressive and compelling song.

     Easy For Me To Say with its country twang and skittish rhythms makes an immediate impression rising to another absorbing incitement, the Scottish lilt of McCabe’s vocals enjoyable alongside the again violin provoked stroll which eagerly breaks out from within the emotional angst. For personal tastes when McCabe brings in extra flavours and sounds whilst lifting tempo and intensity simultaneously, the album catches fire but that appetite is never quite fulfilled, just individual teases brought to a solemn end by songs like Crutches. This is not to say that the skilfully crafted and presented track is carrying any real faults, just lacking the same spark but again it is down to personal wants and needs primarily.

    The lively Catch The Wind with a bordering on feisty element to everything from the drums of Sam Henley and electric guitar of Matthew Morris alongside McCabe’s acoustic prowess, scoops up the emotions and appetite in its refreshing melodrama soaked hands. It has an air of fellow Scottish artist Letters to it and provides one of the highlights of the album with its folk rock/pop excellence. The irresistible lure of the track is matched by its successor Welcome Party, a less rampant but still energetically enthused ramble through heart felt and shadowed doused thoughts and emotions. Both tracks draw the imagination and personal thoughts deeper into the album and thus into the same elements of McCabe, providing further reason to be fully enticed by the release.

    The trio of This City And I Have A Lot In Common, That Time I Almost Killed Martin, and Being Lost Presents You With A Better Chance Of Being Found lets the keen impetus of the release and reactions slip though not one of the three is a proposition to find any real faults with; again it is just that missing fuse and kindling for the same enthused responses as spawned by the previous pair of songs. It is clear though that each provides an emotionally coloured canvas that will find a hunger waiting within folk and melodic songwriter bred passions.

    The best song on the album is the irresistible My Disguise Is Better Than Yours though it has to be said, and surely by mere coincidence, the track is at times a very incestuous cousin to I Melt With You, the Modern English hit from the eighties. Nevertheless it is an infectious and captivating slice of rock pop which provides melodic bait and fiery energy which simply sets those awaiting passions ablaze. A definite single of the future, it is the perfect temptation for the album

   The closing Join The Crowd is a final piece which sounds like it was recorded on the local bar stage; a union of voice and nagging guitar bolstered by strong group vocals and harmonies including those of Grant George who often provides great backing vocals across A Good Way To Bury Bad News, leaving a lingering allurement on the ears. There is very little to put up against the album to temper all the positives and persuasions offered except those singular things to this reviewer, something not really relevant as you assess whether to take the plunge. Mark McCabe provides an engaging and personal view into his music and life, an invitation to be honest we can only recommend trying.

http://markmccabe.co.uk/

http://markandhisguitar.bandcamp.com/releases

7.5/10

RingMaster 17/01/2014

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