The Dahmers – Down In The Basement

For any sporting or physically demanding endeavour it is advisable to go into some sort of training. With music it is not a requirement that is until you come up against the new album from Swedish rock ‘n’ horror fiends, The Dahmers. The band has just released Down In The Basement, a beast of a record bursting with eighteen tracks of rock ‘n’ roll fever as ferociously energetic as it is virally infectious. From its first heartbeat to its last the bands third full-length is an insatiable incitement keeping the body rigorously and eagerly bouncing.  It is relentless, exhausting, and pure pleasure from start to finish.

Bromölla hailing, the Dahmers has been no strangers to keen attention having released a pair of ear enticing albums in Demons (2015) and In the Dead of Night (2017). Each has shown and evolved a sound which is bred on a patchwork of numerous flavours ranging from garage and classic punk to vintage rock ’n’ roll, sixties pop and garage rock. Each of those releases certainly pleased ears but have now been imply blown out of the crypt by the simply irresistible and irrepressible Down In The Basement.

With a mass of tracks the size Down In The Basement offers you would expect a few fillers here and there but they are conspicuous by their absence; from the opening surge of Blood On My Hands the album a full-on meal of prime cuts. The first track bursts into life on a tide of voice and guitar bred persuasion, straight away twisting and turning like a dervish whilst unleashing a wave of catchy mischief. The vocals of Christoffer Karlsson lead the way in manipulation but more than matched by his and fellow guitarist Josef Underdal’s devious hooks and the rhythmic salaciousness of bassist Tobias Augustsson and drummer Karl-Oskar Hansson. Something akin to The Hives meets Asylums the track simply stomped into ears and the passions setting the album off on a mighty course.

The following Murder Ride is just as reckless and tenacious in its own punk infused charge, sending insistent grooves and rapacious hooks through ears with a fifties rock ‘n’ roll meets seventies punk irreverence before Street Of the Dead brings its garage rock/indie pop boisterous to the already devilish party. More reserved than its predecessors but just as equipped with ripe catchiness, the song had the body fully employed in no time.

Across the classic hard rock tinted antics of Down On My Knees and the corrupted boogie woogie nurtured devilment of The Ripper new flavours and rascality sweeps across Down In The Basement, The Dahmers already revealing their most diverse web of sound which Hit ‘N’ Run exploits for its contagion loaded adrenaline fuelled punk ‘n’ roll romp. All three tracks infested body and spirit with ease, the latter mercilessly before Howling merged the rock ‘n’ roll decades with its nefarious holler for a matching success.

As suggested the album is a perpetual rush of treats which simply continue with the revengeful punk ‘n’ roll of I Spit On Your Grave and the fiendish infestation of Demon Night. Both had the body twisting like a possessed soul, their pop seeded rascality pure manipulation and inescapable corruption in the outstanding second of the pair.

Classic rock gets a nudge within next up Creepiest Creep, another track with hooks and grooves which worm under the skin like invaders into a six foot buried offering while Reoccurring Dreams is just a punk rock scourge of temptation draped with surf molestation. Both make a play for best track honours though already the list is a fair size and only about to grow as Without a Face declares its option through a sixties pop ‘n’ rock spiced saunter abound with rousing vocals and rhythms heated with fiery melodic flames.

The cinematic breath of Kiss of Dario has the imagination as busy as ever, Man Obsessed straight after sparking grinning lips as it flirts with Blondie for its prime hook as it teases an already lustful appetite for the album. Even so both are outshone by the voracious rock ‘n’ roll rascality of No One and a quite glorious cover of the Devo masterpiece, Social Fools. Both tracks show The Dahmers at their most irresistible, the first a prize roar of their untamed imagination and boldness, its successor of their inimitable punk ‘n’ roll enterprise which did not improve on an existing gem but certainly re-energised its might.

The final pair of November with its deceptively calm sixties hued, pop coated calm and dark instrumental The End brings the album to a magnetic close. The last track is another moment of cinematic intimation, an industrial creased piece which replaced a bouncing body with an imagination conjuring suggestiveness to keenly intrigue.

Down In The Basement is a momentous offering from a band due bigger and broader attention; it is not just us saying that but a collection of tracks which demand your soul.

Down In The Basement is out now via Lövely Records across most online stores.

Upcoming Live Dates:

02/11 – Skövde In Rock Fest   Skövde, SWE

03/11 – Halloween Meltdown   Eskilstuna, SWE

04/11 – Kulsturkvarteret   Kristianstad, SWE

15/11 – Cinema   Aalst, BEL*

16/11 – Dusseldorf   Ratinger Hof, GER*

17/11 – Eindhoven   Helldorado, NL*

* Supporting The Dwarves

https://www.facebook.com/Dahmers/

Pete RingMaster 26/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Autopsy Boys – Song For Debbera

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Listening to the Autopsy Boys always sparks thoughts of the film Re-Animator, probably not particularly surprising when the bands own passion for horror movies and their inspirations songs is so open, but why pretty much always that particular Stuart Gordon offering is hard to say. The same has happened with the British synth punk’s new offering Song For Debbera, that and the equally recurring sense of rich enjoyment. Another stirring fusion of synth pop and horror punk, the song manipulates the body and teases the imagination with its nostalgia meets modern tenacity roar of contagion. In some ways it is a single out of its time but equally a rousing twenty first century incitement which might finally open doors to the kind of spotlights the band is long overdue.

The band was formed in 2011 by vocalist/ synth player William Brunskjill and bassist Gary Hargreaves, the pair infusing inspirations from 80’s TV and horror movies, especially bad B-movies, into an emerging sound influenced by bands such as The Dwarves, Germs, TSOL, and The Queers. With a collection of songs and motivated by encouraging words from favourite band The Dwarves, the pair left their jobs and enrolled on intensive music courses to gain entry into Leeds Music College. A buzz amidst increasing online support gathered around the band through tracks they had posted, they leading to a live gig at a Leeds based music festival which in turn led to attention from a local record label. Deciding to do things DIY though, the band proceeded to record and release debut double A-sided single Rich Kids Playground/ Negative 8 in their own hand built studio, its success and that of first album Def Elements in 2012, waking up thicker and increasing attention in fans and media alike.

cover_RingMaster Review   Subsequent singles Crushing On Cynthia and recently No Ambition which came out earlier this year, continued the ascent in reputation and sound of Autopsy Boys, though each is now outshone by Song For Debbera. The single is the start of big things for the band. It is the debut song from their upcoming second album Revenge of the acid casualty auto humans and the first of five singles which will be accompanied by music videos depicting a chaotic 24 hours in suburbia, they being endorsed and distributed by B-movie legends Troma Entertainment.

Song for Debbera is curated by Canadian scream queen Debbie Rochon, a big fan of the band herself. Her introduction on the single brings a great Tales of The Crypt like coaxing to the emerging contagion of spicy hooks laid down by the keys of Brunskjill and guitar of Alan Laird. The song soon settles into a lively predatory stroll with electro bait bouncing off the crisp beats of Sam Shelton whilst the dark hues cast by Hargreaves’s bass shadow the distinctive vocals of Brunskjill. The flowing infection only ingrains itself deeper as a classic horror hook winds its way across the sinister landscape and punk infused energy and enterprise springs its trap within the already inescapable lure of the song. At times there is a feel of seventies bands The Normal and Naked Lunch to the encounter, in other moments Calling all Astronauts and Rabbit Junk; these all spicing another individual synth punk escapade ultimately unique to Autopsy Boys.

Things are certainly looking up for the band with Song For Debbera also set to be a bonus feature on Debbie Rochon’s latest movie whilst Autopsy Boys is to appear on VHS Massacre, a documentary about the decline of video nasties and physical media. Their biggest key to major things though just might be this one irresistible song ahead of an already highly anticipated album.

Song For Debbera is out from October 2nd via Underdogz Records.

http://www.autopsyboys.com/   https://www.facebook.com/autopsyboys    https://twitter.com/autopsyboys

Pete RingMaster 02/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Pears – Go To Prison

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First released back home in 2014, this month sees the European release of Go To Prison via Gunner Records, and an irresistible antagonistic riot it is too. The debut album of New Orleans punks Pears, the ten track brawl of punk and hardcore is no stranger to critical acclaim since its initial uncaging and can expect plenty more on this side of the Pond. Like 999 meets The Dwarves with Kid Dynamite and a dirty version of Hagfish in close attendance, the album is an insatiable brawl of punk varied sounds and anthemic tenacity with its middle finger raised and stomp in top gear. There is pop punk involved, hardcore abrasing employed, and old school contagion in abundance, yet Go To Prison manages to be as much a fresh and unique proposition for ears as it is something similar to being an old friend. It offers punk rock as it should be, in your face, rifling your pockets, and leading you into sinful revelry.

Pears were formed in 2013 by vocalist Zachary Quinn and guitarist Brian Pretus, friends who had already a musical history together, and with bassist Alex Talbot who swiftly joined the band, through previous band The Lollies. Initially the line-up was completed by friend and drummer John Bourgeois and after weeks of practice and honing songs, Pears hit the stage for the first time supporting Off With Their Heads, who the members had played with before as The Lollies. The departure of Bourgeois a little time after that first show led to the recruitment of Tim Harman. Go To Prison came next, the album receiving a digital release before having a North American vinyl unveiling through Off With Their Heads mastermind, Ryan Young via his podcast/label, Anxious And Angry. The band undertook their first full US/Canadian tour soon after and has continued to ravage audiences with shows and tours which have included stage sharing with the likes of The Dwarves, Red City Radio, Off With Their Heads, The Dirty Nil, Night Birds, The Atom Age, Iron Chic, Iron Reagan, The Queers, Suicide Machines, Lower Class Brats, Direct Hit! and numerous more. Now Europe gets to feel their presence through Go To Prison, a release being backed by a European tour in February.

Less than a minute of pure punk rage and devilment opens up the album; You’re Boring roaring in ears and battering the senses with vocal confrontation, punishing rhythms, and coarse riffs; coverthis all wrapped in an anthemic infectiousness. It is a bitch slap of a start awakening attention and appetite ready for offerings like Victim To Be which instantly takes over. Teasing with a potent melody initially, the song erupts, relaxes with that first coaxing once more, and erupts again with a cantankerous and energetic stroll of spiky pop punk. Quinn stamps his vocal feet across the song, backed well by the mellower tones of both Pretus and Talbot, whilst beats and hooks similarly have an attitude to match the character of the vocals. The potency of the album’s opening continues with the song and is soon elevated thanks to the agitated character and imagination of Breakfast. It twists, flirts, and storms the barricades with precise hooks and snarling belligerence providing another inescapably catchy provocation.

The fierce yet again virulently insatiable Sycophant has complete control of body and soul next, its stabbing riffs and beats barely deflecting pleasure from the blend of seventies glam pop hooks, think Sweet’s Hellraiser, and Madball/Vandals like causticity. The track romps with menace and mischief in its heart softening up senses and emotions ready for the sour pop punk of Forever Sad and the more metal spiced of Framework, another pair of tracks magnetically and creatively gripping feet and thoughts. The first of the two has a feel of The Replacements to it in many ways, yet as the album, casts its own identity ultimately, whilst the second rages and bristles with a volatility which just fascinates as it abrases for another thoroughly enjoyable raging.

Terrible is simply hardcore soaked punk rock with a smile in its heart and a grudge in its presentation, its intimidation whetting the appetite for the next up cover of Judy Is A Punk. The band do little with it but still it sounds new and distinct to Pears, which tells you all you need to know about the potency of their core sound.

The album ends with firstly the highly flavoursome badgering of Little Bags, an accomplished slice of punk which just gets stronger and more anthemic with every second, and lastly the excellent Grimespree. It is the most adventurous song on the album, taking its opening rage and bruising presence into a part doom, part post punk exploration which takes a strong song into being an outstanding proposition.

Go To Prison is a must for all punk fans, something to feel invigorated and nostalgic with whilst riding a whole new breath of punk rock rebellion.

Go To Prison is available on CD/Vinyl via Gunner Records from Jan 30th. Get it digitally from http://pearstheband.bandcamp.com/album/go-to-prison

https://www.facebook.com/PEARStheband

RingMaster 29/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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http://pearstheband.com/

 

Autopsy Boys – No Ambition

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It is not often you can describe synth pop as predatory or unhinged, but that certainly is how it comes in the hands of UK rockers Autopsy Boys. Their sound is much more than electro based festivity though, the Leeds trio dragging it through the sinister landscapes of horror punk and the raw antagonism of old school melodic punk. The result is a continually infectious and unpredictable proposition no better presented than with the band’s new single No Ambition. Taken from debut album Def Elements, the song is an epidemic of raucous rock energy and anthemic electro devilment, and quite irresistible.

The birth of Autopsy Boys came to pass in late 2011 when vocalist/ synth player William Brunskjill and bassist Gary Hargreaves united to create a post punk outfit using drum machines, synthesizers and the occasional guitar. The pair grabbed inspirations from 80’s TV, horror movies, and gaming for their unique ideation and emerging sound, a flavour which has evolved over time as a rawer punk confrontation influenced by bands like The Dwarves, Germs, TSOL, and The Queers was added to the mix. The band’s album and singles like Crushing On Cynthia has already awakened a hungry and eager appetite for the band’s uncompromising yet rigorously alluring sounds, a persuasion only reinforced by No Ambition and a brand new track accompanying the single.

     No Ambition courts ears with a spatial spattering of electronic spices initially, the lone guitar of Alan Laird adding to the evocative introduction before female vocals add their potent bait. It is all an appetiser to the main thrust of the song which erupts swiftly as Brunskjill flirts with his distinct punk seeded tones amidst a restrained yet feisty tempest of rugged riffs, spicy melodies, and anthemic energy. The song is electro rock at its best but also offers new strains of intoxicating imagination and feet inciting tenacity to set it apart from being just restricted to one style. It is a sure hit for the dance floor and a forceful provocateur for any crazed exploit of body and emotion.

The track is an enslaving treat but greater excitement comes with the brand new track Double Transgretion Theory which provides the B-side. It immediately shows itself to be a rawer more caustic proposal as a heavy smoulder of guitar encases the senses with just a punch of rhythms for company. Subsequently a blast of caustic air blows through, the trigger for a brawl of punk rock soaked rioting. Vocals shout and entice as guitars and rhythms rampage through the ears, their magnetic incitement the thrilling roar to which a riveting dark hearted bassline and dazzle of electronic temptation supply their thick enticements. The track is an outstanding voracious turbulence in sound and devilry, punk rock with a ferocious tail wind and quite delicious.

If the second song is a taster of things to come, and No Ambition as we know already the might of the Yorkshire band right now, it is hard to imagine anyone not losing their inhibitions, heart, and indeed some body fluids to Autopsy Boys.

No Ambition is available now via Underdogz Records on digital download and 7” green vinyl @ http://autopsyboys.com/shop

http://www.autopsyboys.com/

RingMaster 29/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Objex – Super Charged Little Nova

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Just like its title suggests, Super Charged Little Nova the new album from The Objex, is a lean, mean punk machine. A fireball of antagonism and in your face passion which explodes with incendiary intensity and belligerence across its magnetic canvas, the third album from the Sin City dwelling band confirms the raw and insatiable might of one of the genre’s most colourful protagonists aurally and visually. It is a tougher more aggressive provocation than before from the quartet, one with a hostile punch to match its breath-taking toxicity. Quite simply the eight-track release is The Objex’s finest and dirtiest rock ‘n’ roll rebellion yet.

Formed in 2006, the Felony Melony (real name Melanie Troxler) and Jim Nasty led band has provided a forceful and virulently contagious proposition since day one, their first demo Bound And Gagged waking up the local scene before debut album Attack Of The Objex in 2007 gripped further afield as it led the band to acclaimed appearances at events such as the SXSW music festival and The Afro Punk music festival as well as subsequently support slots with Demob, Goldblade, and The UK Subs on UK tours. Second album Reservation For Debauchery hit the world in 2009 earning the band even greater attention around the globe as well as awards and nominations respectively at the Vegas Rocks Award for Best Punk Rock Band 2010 and Hollywood Music Award for best alternative song 2011 and best rock song 2012.Across the years as well as sharing stages with others such as The Dwarves, The Addicts, Agent Orange, Sham 69,The Vibrators, and Guttermouth, line-up changes have crossed the band but now with a stable team of drummer Chili (Joaquin Espinosa) and bassist Ivan Del Real alongside vocalist Felony and guitarist Nasty, The Objex unleash their most aggressive and virulently demanding release yet. It is a dive into their most hostile depths though the primal rhythms and deeply barbarous hooks which marked their previous releases still seduce and rile up imagination with their toxic infections. The album is nothing less than a brawling treat for punk rock.

Super Charged Lil Nova hits hard and potently with opener Burn, its opening sonic bait the trigger for a heavy stride of intensive rhythms and scarring riffs within a metal seeded intensity. Instantly the song grips attention like a Super-Charged covermix of UK’s The Duel and Mongrel from the US, plundering ears with a throaty bass line aligned to increasingly rapier like beats as Felony roams their frame with her ever fiery and magnetic vocals. The track continues to antagonise and flirt with thoughts and passions, reinforcing their swift allegiance as the guitar of Nasty conjures wicked hooks amongst the abrasive sonic avenging to ensure even deeper satisfaction.

The excellent start is straight away matched by the predatory Crush, again a muscular urgency and a carnivorous metal based temperament leaking into the voracious punk heart of the song’s fire. Felony and Nasty cast a web of ridiculously riveting temptation with their individual assaults across the song, enticements impressively stalked by the rhythms of Chili and the bass grouchiness of Del Real. As its predecessor, the track is an eye balling aggressor which inflames and incites the emotions with sublime ease.

A spice of salaciousness hits next through the equally tempting and irritable Queen Cobra, its instant scrub of guitar the gateway to a barrage of bone shuddering beats and caustic riffs, one again lorded over by the irrepressible vocal roar of Felony. A devil bred temptress with intimately devious designs to its sound and intent, the track is a furnace of vicious sonic enslavement and merciless melodic seduction, each extreme uniting for a ridiculously addictive and rapacious trap.

The band uncage their latest single GG (Get It Done) next, an ode to punk provocateur GG Allin which maybe does not thrust as big a pair of shock loaded balls into the face as expected but provides an old school punk rabidity and motivation to greedily devour before the ferocious blaze of Grrr steams at break neck pace across the senses. As with all the songs, there is an unpolished beauty to the core and thrust of the tempest but just as irresistibly a spine of inventive barbs and melody kissed underlining grooves poison the imagination and passions with the fullest rabid charm leading to a subsequent lustful submission from the listener.

Both Milk Man with its torrential flood of senses blasting rhythms and guitar sculpted predation, and the spiteful seducing of Thanx 4 Cumming keep album and its recipient raging with unrelenting energy. Each in their individual way light a match to old school nostalgia and modern animosity, the first oozing with discord charmed harmonies within the twisted seduction of its uncompromising musical and lyrical revelry whilst its successor does not pull its forceful jabs either as it boldly stands up and bitch slaps senses and emotions. The pair are pure punk rock and prime The Objex, reaffirming that Super Charged Little Nova is at a new pinnacle of invention and sound.

The album closes with Trainwreck Suicide, a sensational pop punk predation which if you imagine a mix of Sweet and Penetration led by the hybrid of a cloned union between Suzy Quatro and Wendy O.Williams, you would not be far from guessing the quality of the glorious closing triumph.

The Objex has never been a band which has left a bland or uneventful mark on rock ‘n’ roll but without doubt with a greater maturity and stronger antagonism to their craft and open alchemy in their sound, Super Charged Little Nova places the band on a new genre inspiring plateau.

Super Charged Little Nova is available now at http://theobjex.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/objexlv

9/10

RingMaster 03/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Autopsy Boys – Crushing On Cynthia

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Riotous with an antagonistic breath to its virulently contagious sound, Crushing On Cynthia from UK punks The Autopsy Boys, is one of those songs which comes along and seduces the passions whilst simultaneously chaining them up in a blood soaked wrap of sinister devilry. Combining old school punk with eighties electro pop, though the song is even more flavoursome than that descript suggests, the single leaves hunger and emotions alive and greedily hankering for much more from the West Yorkshire quintet.

The seeds of The Autopsy Boys were sown in 2006 when vocalist William Brunskjill and synth player Gary Hargreaves united to create and perform as a post punk outfit using drum machines, synthesizers and the occasional guitar. Theming their songs with inspirations from 80’s TV, horror movies, gaming and marijuana borne through offensive lyrical content, the pair’s sound was compared to the likes of Big Black though it subsequently evolved over time to a more truculent punk confrontation influenced by bands like The Dwarves, Germs, TSOL, and The Queers. 2011 saw the duo approached to open a local hardcore punk and heavy metal all day event BEEFSTOCK IV, to which they agreed and set to expanding their line-up for what was intended as a one off occasion. Bassist Jamie McKenzie (Freaks Union, Dead Pets, Dun 2 Def),guitarist Alan Laird (Steroid Freak Pussy, Me and My mates, The Hydropaths, Dead Pets), and drummer JP Robinson were drafted in to help out and the rise of The Autopsy Boys was off and running with the single the next riotous instalment.

Electro spots hit the ears first on the song, drawing them into a raw graze of scuzzy synth swiped with crisp rhythms whilst the vocals of Brunskjill glance off their surface to engage the listener with an attitude reaped quality. Musically seductive in its verse and caustically brawling in its chorus the song bristles and buffets the senses with a feel of The Adicts and Peter And The Test Tube Babies aligned to an OMD synth persuasion. There is also a slight whisper of post punk involved in the enterprise, a certain Joy Division chill pervading at times from the core of the outstanding song.

Simple in its attack but skilfully crafted in its effect and seizure of the passions, Crushing On Cynthia is a thrill of an introduction to the band and another example of how varied and potent UK punk rock is right now. Watch this space in regard to The Autopsy Boys is the recommendation as we have seen nothing yet one suspects.

http://www.autopsyboys.com

9/10

RingMaster 13/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Destroy D.C. : The Pride Of The ASBO Generation

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    Having just caught our breath after the outstanding recent release of XXIV from UK Subs, British punk has another explosive piece of inventive ferociousness to thrill us with in the formidable and exhilarating form of The Pride Of The ASBO Generation EP from Destroy D.C. The four track release is a stunning intense fire of energy and passion honed into a formidable compelling force, an irresistible inciting fusion of progressive punk and roots and dub.

Destroy D.C. began when Spike T Smith, the drummer for Conflict, wanted a project to bring forth the songs he was writing and had created round the time the legendary punk band went on hiatus in late 2009. Enlisting guitarist Gav King who was also looking for a vehicle for his ideas, and bassist Si Turner, the trio squeezed in writing, rehearsal, and recording between their individual busy touring schedules, Smith on Steve Ignorant’s Last Supper shows, as well as festival appearances with Killing Joke and the New York Dolls, King with Fields of the Nephilim and both men more recently with the return of Conflict, as well as all three members being the backing band for HewhocannotBeNamed (The Dwarves) for his solo UK dates. Destroy D.C. was officially launched on 21st December 2012 with the March 26th released The Pride of The ASBO Generation through DIY label Revenance the first of a procession of EPs.

The release opens with the raucous and uncompromising Road To Redemption, a track which stares eye to eye with the listener Destroy DC EP Cover Finalwhilst teasing and tempting them with brawling vocals, lethal hooks, and a contagious breath. The fiery groove which frequents the song throughout is the first encounter for the ear soon joined by punchy rhythms and a rich growling bassline. As eager as it is hungry, the song rampages through the ear without a much respite from its corrosive riffs and melodic sparks, yet still teases and taunts with a wonderful adventure to its gait and prowl. Within a restrained yet intimidating deep breath in aggression, the band also brings a sensational diversion sculpted by imagination and ingenuity which seduces and eats the passions with equal strength to the marauding sounds elsewhere. Ending as it began with a further hardcore scowl to the vocals and intensity to its punk rock abrasion, the song is an immense first confrontation to band and EP.

The following Those Days Are Gone also strikes its first blow through a magnetic almost insidious groove which captures the imagination before the song fully unleashes its physical and inventive might.  A frantic inferno of attitude, passion, and ravenous agitated drums from start to finish, the song is potently veined with that addict making groove within an insatiable appetite to chew and incite thoughts and emotions. It is caustic rock n roll at its best, a fusion of hardcore and original punk which rewards as dramatically as it accosts the senses.

Whereas elements of the previous songs mildly suggest the roots and dub influences third song Tear It Down is a full on pleasure incorporating both aspects of their main influences for an impossibly compelling and thrilling ride. Like a blend of Dub War, Steel Pulse, and Ruts but with its own individual heart, the song is a simmering yet fiery piece of emotive and provocative majesty. A pulsating crawl through a reggae soaked reflection book ended by punk snarls, the track is a sensational creative declaration which rivals the aforementioned Ruts classic Love In Vain.

The band close up the EP with another striking slab of imagination in the erosive pop punk triumph of the title track. This is no glossy melodic piece of musical candy though but a caustic and raw stomp with loud dub whispers and old school punk aggression. The song shifts and evolves throughout to ignite further lustful ardour for the release especially with the drop into a slow melodic and shadowed prowl midway which recalls the Dirk Wears White Sox era of Adam and the Ants. It is a brilliant ending to an outstanding and invigorating slab of punk at its best.

Knowing that The Pride Of The ASBO Generation is just the opening assault of what creatively is to come ahead from Destroy D.C. it is safe to assume that the anticipation and wait for the next release is going to be very impatient.

https://www.facebook.com/DestroyDc

9/10

RingMaster 25/03/2013

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