Escobar – The Biggest Sound

Whether you wish to call the Escobar sound grunge, punk, garage rock or something else, all flavours involved in its riotous tapestry, there is no escaping that it is one glorious rock ‘n’ roll cacophony. The irrefutable proof is to be found in the French duo’s new album The Biggest Sound, a nostril flared stomp more than living up to its container’s moniker.

Hailing from Limoges, Escobar was formed in 2014 by vocalist/guitarist Remi Lucas (Weird Omen, The Anomalys) and drummer Charly “Kayo” Cailleaud (The Bushmen, Daria). With the release of debut album エスコバルin 2015 and its successor Bird Of Prey the following year, the band was met with widespread acclaim which is sure to escalate through the rousing antics of The Biggest Sound. Such its addictive melodic hook laden clamour, it is easy to expect the album to thrust Escobar into the biggest spotlights as eureka moments go off in new ears to spark a fresh tsunami of lusty attention.

It is impossible to truly pin down the Escobar sound though a fusion of The White Stripes, Nirvana, and In The Whale gives a good starting point. As opener Terrible Man alone shows, the pair create a sound distinct and unique to itself and a temptation which swiftly and greedily infests body and imagination. The first song launches at the listener with urgent riffs, their infectious coaxing the prelude to a surge of flirtatious guitar clang and rhythmic incitement. It all settles into a vivacious garage rock stroll with a Latin-esque temperament as Lucas’ magnetic voice and guitar bounce upon the rhythmic web spun by Cailleaud. As virulent for the senses as it is increasingly concussive, the track simply seduces ears and appetite whilst getting the album off to a stunning start.

That success only builds as the insatiable punk ‘n’ roll of Misbehavior devours ears, again the two protagonists creating a noise clad contagion which sparks body and spirit. As with those around it, the song makes physical involvement a given in its swift but unquenchably boisterous escapade; a perpetual trait across The Biggest Sound in evidence again within Stuck On You. Carrying a power pop infection to its earthy rock ‘n’ roll, the track maybe leaps around with less intensity than its predecessor but with equal adventure as grunge instincts fuel the guitar. It is easy to hear Nirvana bred inspirations at play within the song but equally there are moments which seem nurtured by a fondness of bands such as Rocket From The Crypt and The Vaccines as it lays down another peak in the increasingly mountainous landscape of the album.

There is no time to relax as the outstanding Paradise rampages through ears with its Powersolo meets The Dirtbombs scented bedlam and Salvation teases and tempts with its raw and boisterous rock ‘n’ roll. The first offers a great if undemanding line in melodic dexterity within its noisy canter while its successor melds pop catchiness with scorched noise in its contagious swing and both simply up the ante in a release already fixing its permanent position in the passions.

The album’s title track steps up next bringing its own voracious infection to ears and psyche. The Biggest Sound is as much a declaration of the album’s roar as its own controlled and eager suggestion for hips and vocal chords; an invitation just a little dirty and a whole lot irresistible before Big Town bounds in with a swagger soaked in sonic dexterity to drag the energies into lustful compliance all over again. Compared to some, it too has a rein on its attack, saving it for the grunge bred eruptions which urge greater zeal from song and listener alike.

The psych rock kissed minimalism of Brain Out simply seduces and manipulates straight after; Lucas in guitar and voice a puppeteer as the song sculpts pop rock in its purest form. Slim and forcibly low key its glory is matched by the contrasting creative howl of Changeover. To be fair, the song too has a fine twist in infectious restraint and inventive enterprise but still escalates into a fiery roar which sears as it seduces. Both tracks hit the spot like a rock ‘n’ roll cupid though each is slightly outshone by the throbbing saunter of Stranger In Blood. As across the whole album, Cailleaud creates a rhythmic enticement which lures eager participation and rock ‘n’ roll instincts like a siren. His net is then entangled in the sonic machination of Lucas; the pair combining to beguile and incite without reservation.

The album concludes with the sonic commotion of Dumb Feelings, a slice of voracious punk rock with a whiff of Iggy Pop and the psychosis of Melvins in its seriously catchy riot and finally the irresistibly nagging of Drifting. The song is majestic, its jagged body of riffs and harmonic flirtation a show stealer as it slips through a celestial climate which haunts the senses. A final twist in the creative adventure of the album, the track sublimely and inescapably leaves a longing for more which that play button instantly satisfies.

There is always something new to explore to take us away from even the best records, fresh encounters to assess, but there are a few which make it very difficult to move on from without just one more union, and another….. The Biggest Sound is one of those; a joy which still resurfaces to bring our day to an invigorating conclusion and that is maybe reason enough for all to go explore.

The Biggest Sound is out now through Dirty Water Records (USA), Adrenalin Fix Music, Beast Records, and Strychnine Production and available @  https://escobartheband.bandcamp.com/album/the-biggest-sound

https://www.facebook.com/escobarbandpage

Pete RingMaster 31/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Fuzzy Vox – No Landing Plan

Fuzzy Vox in Space

Fuzzy Vox in Space

Wondering how to spend the weekend to its fullest enjoyment? How about filling your home with suitable alcohol, inviting a horde of friends over, and turning the speakers high as the new album from Fuzzy Vox provides a party to remember. I should warn that weak hips will be put under serious stress in this pursuit of fun because No Landing Plan is one of the most energetically feverish and tenaciously insatiable incitements to hit ears and bodies in quite a while. A collection of songs bred on garage rock and power pop, the French band’s second album is pure rock ‘n’ roll virulence with a character as varied and demanding as the medical bills received after it has seduced bodies to exhaustion.

Hailing from Joinville le Pont, Fuzzy Vox is the devilment of vocalist/guitarist Hugo Fabbri, bassist Greg Dessons, and drummer Nico Maïa. Emerging in 2011, the band quickly awoke national ears with the release of first EP, Technicolor in the October of 2012, breaching broader attention with debut album On Heat early 2014. The past couple of years have been especially lively and successful for the trio; tours all over Europe building on the success of their album with a recent adventure alongside Jim Jones Revue & Thee Vicars one particular highlight. Fuelled by the punk DIY ethic which again sees their latest encounter a self-released proposition, Fuzzy Vox is now ready to dive into major spotlights wherever they can be found, and with No Landing Plan as their key, betting against the band hitting new peaks of attention to match the plateau set by the album is pointless.

Recorded in Los Angeles last summer with Andy Brohard and Ryan Castle (Primal Scream, Black Angels), who also mixed the album, No Landing Plan gets straight to devilish work with opener Explosion Of Love. From the first slither of feedback a sense of mischief is a foot, and quickly playing with ears as jabbing beats join a web of temptation cast by guitar with the bass in swift seductive union. Hugo’s vocals alone show the energy and passion running eagerly through the song and sound, hooks and choppy riffs building on it with their own addictive dexterity.

art_RingMaster ReviewIt is a rousing start eclipsed by the following Distracted. The garage rock of its predecessor takes a more sixties scent in the second song, The Stones an easy clue which unites with a more Hives like tenacity as the track blossoms its anthemic adventure. Again feet and hips are as much a blur of involvement as ears and appetite are hungry recipients of the increasingly dynamic mesh of contagious sound and sonic bait.

With Told You Before taking little time to stir limbs into action with its punk rock/power pop shenanigans, the album has body and soul lock ‘n’ loaded in its high octane revelry. Wiry grooves and melodic flames only add to the imagination’s subservience and remember that mention of exhaustion? Already the signs are there barely three songs in.

That variety in sound is also pushing through by now too, the scintillating Grow Evil exploring a lively rock pop prowl with a touch of The Jam meets The Dirtbombs to its almost carnal temptation whilst I Got A Girl bounces around in a power pop stomp drawn from both the sixties and seventies take on the infectious flavour. Both tracks are superb but outshone by the jagged rock ‘n’ roll of Bo Diddley, a song living up to the sound its title suggests whilst creating a catchy incitement of viral proportions.

The Jam comes to mind again as Don’t Leave Me Behind steps up next with its melodic rock ‘n’ roll, equally though, so does an open Elvis Costello inspiration. It is a blend when woven into the band’s own invention simply sparks up further keen endeavour with and within the track, and indeed Charlie once it takes over with its R&B laced pop romp. As easy as it is to get entangled and absorbed by the carnival of sound, lyrically the songs within No Landing Plan are just as potent and impacting, Charlie especially striking. That diversity of sound is also in full swing within the song alone, a float through crystalline ambience following a thrilling surge of Oliver’s Army spiced devilment, leading to another anthemic whipping up of feet and emotions.

Easy Street frolics in ears next with a swinging festivity of sound and voice whilst teasing like something akin to a pop punk version of Supergrass whilst A Reason To Love leaves the listener in the throes of ardour for its surf rock coated, rockabilly bloomed slice of punk ‘n’ roll carrying flames of Living End/Tiger Army in its imagination. As an example applying across the whole album, for the references offered they are mere clues to the Fuzzy Vox uniqueness which fuels all tracks to gripping success.

So get those dancing shoes on and corks popped because Fussy Vox has one memorable weekend, indeed any moment in time you wish, ready and waiting courtesy of No Landing Plan.

No Landing Plan is available from February 26th  from most online stores.

http://fuzzyvox.com/    https://www.facebook.com/fuzzyvox   http://www.twitter.com/fuzzyvox

Pete RingMaster 26/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Exploring the emotional hues: an interview with Sad Sir of End Of Green

Foto: Dani Vorndran / komplette Galerie

Foto: Dani Vorndran

German metallers End Of Green have been a persistent provocateur for the imagination and emotions through their impossibly anthemic sound and equally compelling releases. This has never been more potent than with their new album The Painstream, a release through Napalm Records which takes the band’s fusion of heavy and gothic rock with doom and alternative metal tendencies to stronger contagious imagination. It has a familiarity which plays like an old friend but equally uses that recognition to create a charm and virulent persuasion unique to the Stuttgart and Göppingen hailing quintet. Seizing greedily on the chance to find put more about the band, we talked about the album, pain and passion, melancholy and much more with guitarist Sad Sir .

Hi and thank you for taking time out to talk with us.

As a scene setter to readers new to End Of Green can you give us some background to the band and its beginnings?

We’re five guys from Stuttgart, Germany. We’re loud, intense and occasionally pretty dark. And we’re around since a veeeerry long time. A couple of weeks ago I’ve seen that Frank Turner writes on his setlist “show #1245”. I don’t know how many we played, we simply forgot to count.

Obviously the band’s sound has evolved over the years but has the intent and passion for forming the band has changed or evolved also?

We probably had some updates done over the past couple of years – that’s a natural thing. But one thing has always remained: End Of Green was formed being a loud and intense band. That passion is still our motor for almost anything we do. Things we learned: we don’t booze as much as we used to. I guess eight years ago we were some catastrophe on wheels (laughs) – still playing well, but constantly harming ourselves.

How do you see the difference in your music as found on your excellent new album The Painstream and your first recordings?

Actually, I have never thought about that at all. (laughs). Obviously I think it’s a good sign, that each album we did is different, but still “End Of Green”. We did all those records, there’s no need in doing it again. I guess nowadays we’re a bit more focussed, more “in your face” and a little more cynical with the lyrics. But I still get the kicks playing “Left My Way” or “Away”.

The band name is intriguing, sparking undefined ideas; please tell us its origins and meaning.

In the German language “green” symbolizes “hope”. And we basically set our homes at the end of that scale. Then again: it means, there is still some hope left (laughs). We might also have taken some huge slaps of inspiration by a great Irish rock band.

As we said The Painstream has just been released, your eighth full length release; what explorations does the album take which is End-of-Green-300x300new or distinct to the release from your previous albums?

I think we’ve been growing, especially in terms of not giving too many fucks about what other people think we should do or sound like. We’re starting to become one of these grumpy, old and stubborn men. I like that (laughs). I guess a couple of years ago we would not have done songs like “De(ad)generation” or “Death Of The Weakender”. We know our roots, we know our hearts and we’re feeling confident about that. We’ve always been in it for the songs – that’s about it. It’s not our duty to advertise some sort of lifestyle.

The release and your songwriting as since the beginning is drenched in the darkest shadows with varied hues of pain and passion, two guarantees of life which are never far apart, fuelling their explorations and cores. There is a feeling that this is a reflection of your personal experiences and emotive characters, how close are the music and lyrical narratives to all your day to day lives?

Sometimes too close (laughs). It’s not that we are some mobile suicide command or constant moaners – au contraire: we’re pretty fun guys to hang out with. But most of our music is rooted in those moments when you’re alone, alienated, pissed off, really angry or simply sad. That’s when we write down lyrics, that’s when we pick up our instruments and write a song that makes you forget what mood you’re in. We write songs about the stuff that moves us. Some days ago I had an interesting conversation about, why we’re not writing political songs; and I honestly think we’re very political. We write songs about that time of the day when crisis finally hits the coffee mug off your table.

Is this melancholic darkness to your imagination and invention musically predetermined or always an organic emergence from your inspirations and thoughts?

I think melancholy is a good feeling – i just can’t go with sensitivities like “My girlfriend left me and my friends don’t love me. Save the Whales” (laughs). What happens in our songs is most of the times very organic – one thing leads to another. There’s some melancholic melody that picks you up where you are and words or thoughts pour out instantly. But I guess we could never go like “Come on folks, let’s write and intense dark song about all the bad shit in the world.” That’s not us. Sometimes I even think we’re somehow funny.

Across The Painstream there is a light, a hope spawned certainly by some of the melodic imagination you infuse into your songs. You are people who accept the darker tones of life; take the offensive before it but one senses also looks for that glimpse and warmth of happiness in all shadowed corners?

Definitely! There’s nothing wrong with being happy, even when it sometimes seems like there’s nothing scheduled like that in the near future. I guess it’s always a good choice to be aware of darkness and the good life at the same time. We basically do this in our songs as well. There is always at least some glimpse of hope there, though this might sound like a one liner from a Chinese cookie. I think it’s true. Or maybe i just want this to be true. Thinking about it: this might be the essence of melancholy.

Do your preferences in other art forms, art, film etc. also find a stronger companion with the darker hued explorations than lighter themes and joyful scenarios?

I personally like them all. I enjoy a good laugh as much as I go for some deep Arthaus stuff. For instance watching “Dexter” tells me as much about life, as “Curb Your Enthusiasm” or slapstick like “Hangover”. What I find more important is that there are drops of real life in any form of art – something to connect with. That includes a good laugh and total darkness as well – and everything in between.

EoGAs the album shows once again your music is layered and textured with an array of flavours and styles, what would you say are or have been the biggest musical inspirations which have impacted on your ideas and inventiveness most openly?

Probably the late 80s and 90s. The stuff we listened to when we grew up. Alice In Chains, Metallica, The Cure or Sisters Of Mercy. We draw a lot of inspiration from all sorts of different music, simply because we all enjoy music very much. The latest Carcass record knocked me off my boots as much as “Bish Bosch” from Scott Walker, the latest Placebo, Lucero or The Dirtbombs did. I guess we do not care about genres, because we do not have to. Who would when there’s so much good music around? There’s certainly nothing wrong with being inspired, as long as you don’t rip off your faves. It’s strange: sometimes Roky Erickson gives me a swing in a direction that absolutely does not sound like him. That’s the magic of music.

How does the writing process work generally within the band?

It’s a drag (laughs). No, someone comes up with an idea and the rest improves it. That’s about it.

Is it a democratic approach once ideas are nailed down into a basis for a song?

Yes, but one part of democracy will always be: stepping back from your own ego. Sometimes I think “that’s shite!”, but when the rest of our band goes “no, that’s great” – I might argue or even be totally pissed off at first – but I will always trust their opinion, because I know they are not idiots. That’s important, I think. Basically, it’s more about trust and taste, than about democracy.

For us we found the first half of the album was a stronger potent proposition to the remainder of what is still an impressively satisfying album. It had us wondering about song orders and if, for what is obviously a personal preference, how much of a change a different order would have achieved. How do you, taking The Painstream as the example, set about deciding the best order of tracks, how much time and debate do you take over the decision?

Honestly: I can’t. You sit there with eleven songs, all recorded and every other minute you come up with some new order that would totally make sense. There is no such thing as the best decision in discussions like that. Sometimes we’re happy when others come up with ideas like “this would make a great opening track” or “perfect last song”. If it sucks, we can blame it on them afterwards (laughs).

De(ad)generation seems to be the track, which certainly to people we have talked to, that is the pinnacle and most virulent bait for the album. Can you tell us about the song and its inspiration?

We probably never came closer to “art” before (laughs). It’s a really catchy and cheesy song that makes you sing along until you realize what you’re singing. And that was basically our motivation.  We’re not judging in that song, we’re describing – well aware of the fact, that we are all part of “the problem”. And sometimes it just creeps me out that 12 year olds seem to know better about fucking that about grammar. Everybody wants to be a celebrity – better get your four minutes of fame now, before everything falls apart.

Is there a particular moment or aspect of The Painstream which gives you that extra tingle or glow?EofG3

“Death Of The Weakender”, probably. Michelle’s vocals are outstanding in that one. He was sick during the recording and I can literally see his vocal chords snap every time I listen to the song. I asked him, if he’d prefer to take a break, and he went “no, let me do one more. My throat really hurts.”

What comes next for End Of Green now the album is out there working its seduction?

Some breathing, lots of touring, more breathing and new songs. That’s what we always do. (laughs)

Once more thank you for sharing your time and thoughts with us.

It was all my pleasure, believe me.

Anything you would like to leave the readers with?

Nothing but good feelings. Thanks for all the support. We really can’t tell you how much we appreciate your interest in our music.

http://www.endofgreen.de/

Read the review of The Painstream @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/09/13/end-of-green-the-painstream/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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