Despite My Deepest Fear – Selfish Generation

It has been two years since UK melodic metalcore sextet Despite My Deepest Fear released their very well-received Make Or Break EP; time which, on the evidence of its successor Selfish Generation, has seen the band dig deeper into their imagination, uncap bolder adventure in their songwriting, and hone their sound into one fiercely enjoyable incitement. Their new EP is an attention grabbing protagonist, a carnivorous beast with a seductive heart as able to chew up and spit out the senses as it is uncaging an enthralment of melody rich temptation. With maybe major originality arguably not as potent as all its other aspects, the six track involvement suggests there is still the big potential of richer and more unique treats to be come from the band off of the back of this impressive encounter, that alone exciting to be honest such the impressiveness of Selfish Generation.

Formed in 2010, London hailing Despite My Deepest Fear drew on inspiration from the likes of We Came As Romans and The Devil Wears Prada in the creating of their dramatic and enjoyably invasive sound. The Make Or Break EP awoke a host of new fans and appetites for its flavoursome confrontation, its success emulating and stretched again by a live presence which has seen the band make acclaimed appearances at festivals like Breakout in 2014 and Camden Rocks this year, undertake a UK headline tour and a series of dates across Europe with Italians Hopes Die Last. Fair to say Selfish Generation has been an eagerly awaited and anticipated proposal which now here, is sure only to stir up stronger spotlights and greedy attention upon the band.

DMDF SG Front Cover_RingMaster Review     Selfish Generation opens up with its title track and indeed new single/video, immediately cupping ears in a rich emotive melody and a slightly portentous atmosphere, within which guitars weave a web of intrigue in league with the drama of keys. In no time the hostile nature of the track erupts, the stabbing riffs and spicy grooves sprung by Arron Yarrow and Olly Meager laying welcome siege to the senses along with the grouchy rhythms and harsh vocal squalls. There is a familiarity to the tempestuousness of the song but equally a fresh and individual character too which is more accentuated by the clean vocals and developing swinging gait of the track. We cannot say which of Ryan Endacott and Nick Nowak provide the coarse and mellow vocal persuasions but each is swiftly impressive and a striking texture in the roar of the track and indeed release.

The following F.Y.F continues with the shadowed air and noir toned ambience of its predecessor but sculpting its own furious and rousing incitement aligned again to flowing melodies and evocative contagion. The barbarous beats of drummer Toby Barnswarda take no prisoners to match the primal attitude of riffs, whilst bassist Julian Murray conjures an alluring shadowing to it all which perpetually grips ears and sparks further predation within the tempest. As across all proposals within Selfish Generation, it is a superbly bred and blended collusion of contrasts, the savagery intricately and seamlessly merged with creative and impassioned brutality; Stranded instant back-up of that success with its initial electronic shimmer within elegant keys subsequently overwhelmed by caustic assaults from riffs and rhythms led by the blaze of raw vocals. Nevertheless the calmer and beauteous elements are still working away, springing through the ebbs and flows of the antagonism to breathe heart spawned reflection and air into the turbulence. The track is constantly a revolving proposition, its body sweeping fluidly through its weave of emotions and enterprise to continue the mighty start of the EP.

The Repressed follows suit in design whilst creating its own insatiable theatre of power, craft, and increasing drama. It does not quite match up to the earlier successes on the release yet is a mighty lure in its inventive brutality and resourceful enticing through the melodic maze which emerges whilst its successor Infinite, unleashes a hellacious brawl with the capability of opening up moments of virulently catchy temptation. Where it wins though is in the full diversity making up these opposites, the invention blurring their lines and skilfully uniting them in one of the major peaks within the EP.

The release is brought to a formidable close by Long Way Home; Despite My Deepest Fear as now expected invading the listener with rabid energy and hostile craft, unveiling a fascinating weave of melodic and sonic imagination throughout, here with a deep rooted exotic hue and seduction to its imagination. The track provides a tremendous conclusion to Selfish Generation, a final thrilling and skilled slab of ferocity and craft.

Despite My Deepest Fear have returned with a bang, with a release which suggests they are heading towards being one of those doing the inspiring whilst providing this year with one of its most enjoyable metalcore offerings.

The self-released Selfish Generation EP is out now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/selfish-generation-ep/id1048897037

January 2016 Tour dates:

15.01.15 Northampton – The Racehorse

16.01.15 Manchester – AATMA

17.01.15 Glasgow – Audio

18.01.15 Newcastle – Think Tank

19.01.15 Birmingham – The Rainbow

20.01.15 Basingstoke – Sanctuary

21.01.15 Plymouth – Underground

22.01.15 Swansea – The Scene 2

23.01.15 Bridgwater – Cobblestones

https://www.facebook.com/dmdfuk/   https://twitter.com/DMDFuk

Pete RingMaster 03/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Islasorna – E.D.E.N

Islasorna Online Promo_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Band and sound might be tagged as progressive metal, but the best description for both elements and the creative and technical fury of Scottish band Islasorna, is psychotic. The Edinburgh quintet’s debut EP E.D.E.N is a tempest of bedlamic ideation, a deranged onslaught of inventive noise which could be declared a sonic psychosis and should be acclaimed as one intoxicating slab of thrilling turmoil.

Formed at the beginning of 2014, Islasorna create the most unpredictable maelstrom of sound. It is indeed bred in from a progressive seeding, but from second to second comes infused with a diverse array of flavours and psyche twisting imagination. Inspirations for the band are drawn from the likes of The Devil Wears Prada, Northlane, Whitechapel, Sikth, The Dillinger Escape Plan, Animals as Leaders, and Metallica, varied spices adding to a striking proposition in sound matched by a live presence which has increasingly earned acclaim and attention as the band shared stages with bands such as Bleed From Within, Carcer City, Demoraliser, Martyr Defiled, and Continents over the past year or so. E.D.E.N is a fierce nudge on broader awareness and recognition, and though for some it might be a creative turbulence too far such the intensive nature of the EP, Islasorna will surely be a name on a much wider roar from hereon in.

The EP opens with Obliteration and a melodic twang of guitar which alone soaks the air in a sultry yet slightly portentous suggestiveness. It is a hint quickly realised by the forceful beats of Michael Devlin and the vocal roar of Justin Dilworth. At first their presence only brings a small element of imposing urgency with it, a slither of increased intensity but also a stronger and darker apocalyptic hue which toys with and ignites the imagination. At the song’s climax a voice skirts the senses and provokes thoughts, menacingly flirting from the shadows before the following Achluophobia emerges to bring its words to thicker destructive reality.

Islasorna cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster ReviewThe second track instantly expels a djent spawned predation around a blaze of vocal scowling and sonic intimidation from the guitars of Dean Watson and Jamie McArthur. As the first track, it is more a prowling ravenous predator than a vicious onslaught yet the pathological agitation its title suggests is fuel to the attention gripping enterprise and imagination cast by the band. Simultaneously the track is savage and seductive, extremes entwining and in revolt against each other as the listener is dragged through a landscape of metalcore and grindcore to name two of the open essences sculpted in a progressive and experimental voracity.

Judas in comparison is a calmer incitement on ears and senses, and opens with a thoroughly engaging melodic caress of guitar courted by the darker lures of Mark Brunton’s bass. It is a fascinating start, the equally mellow tones of Dilworth adding to the tantalising proposal. The feeling that something is brewing is never far from the surface though and by midway the brief but potent offering has uncaged a caustic climate of sound and emotion though it is still with restraint as the band reveals more of their diversity in songwriting, sound, and individual prowess. Its magnetic bellow makes way for the harsher but no less inventive Choices. The song continues the melodic and dazzling progressive elements of its predecessor but cages them in a jagged confrontation of riffs and barbarous rhythms, both Devlin and Brunton as carnivorous in their attack as the guitars are melodically riveting. Arguably the encounter fits into the more expected template of progressive metal and the inspirations to the band mentioned earlier, yet it is a perpetual provider of unique twists and senses spearing sonic flirtation again setting the band apart from the crowd.

Creative mania returns in full lung bursting vocal and noise driven devilry next with 4-2-8, the track full warfare on the senses as Dilworth reveals his broadest vocal derangement yet and musically the band twists like a sonic and rhythmic dervish. The track is outstanding, not necessarily better than any other upon E.D.E.N but staking a favourite claim with increasing success over every listen. Its rigorous and rugged turbulence is instantly contrasted by the EP’s closing title track where once more Islasorna pull back the shades on another side of their imagination. An initial breeze of melodic beauty kisses ears and thoughts first, keys colouring a shadowed ambience with elegant charm before evolving into an electro rock seducing around militant rhythms and a union of harsh and harmonic vocals. Post hardcore, scream, post rock, they are all amongst the spices within the encounter, whispering hues within the enthralling finale going towards further proof of the band’s originality.

As outstanding as it is, E.D.E.N still feels like it is only the first big step of the band, one loaded with such promise that it suggests it is merely going to be the springboard for bigger, bolder exploits ahead. This only adds to the excitement of the emergence of potentially a new force in European metal.

The E.D.E.N EP is available from June 1st through all stores.

http://Facebook.com/islasornauk

RingMaster 01/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Virtue In Vain – For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore

Virtue In Vain Promos

Virtue In Vain Promos

Though it makes a strong impact first time around, it is with further intensive attention that For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore from Welsh progressive metalcore band Virtue In Vain wins out and defuses any initial doubts or uncertainties. To be fair there is little about the band’s debut EP which raises any major disagreements between ears and proposition from the start, but being as brutal as it is creatively uncompromising, there is plenty to try and take in which needs time to explore and appreciate. The potential of the band within the release is especially exciting, and fills any moments which do not quite work as well as other elements, with assumptions of greater things to come.

Hailing from Cardiff, Virtue In Vain began in 2012 sparking and spicing their sound with inspirations from the likes of The Devil Wears Prada, Napoleon, Whitechapel, and August Burns Red. Their impact and sound has led the quartet to be regarded as one of the strongest upcoming bands in the UK metal scene, backed impressively by shows alongside bands such as Napoleon, Demoraliser, Dead Harts, Astroid Boys, Ready Set Fall, Lock & Key, Fathoms and many more. Now they are poised to explode upon the nation attention with For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore, a release with more than enough to leave a hungry appetite in its ferocious wake.

virtue in vain     The EP opens with Prologue, a decent enough short instrumental soaked in drama and portentous ambience. Its dark tones do have the imagination supposing something predatory and intensive coming to examine ears, and so it proves to be once Martyrs emerges. A heavy snarling riff is first point of provocation, backed swiftly by uncompromising rhythms and a winy sonic lure of guitar. It is a gripping entrance, enticing bait which subsequently gathers its opening elements together to forge a more direct and slimmer raw incitement growled over by vocalist Hywel Thomas. Venom and antagonism spill from his gutturally bred syllables whilst the guitar of Emyr Thomas dances over the hellacious attack with sonic endeavour. Additional squalls of vocals add good variety whilst the guitars scythe through their attack and the corrosive potency of rhythms with addictive and acidic enterprise. The vicious swings of drummer Luke Sullivan bruise and tenderise the senses whilst the bass of Ryan Jones is a perpetual stalking of song and listener. Continuing to twist and show plenty of imagination in its varying gait, sonic trespass, and creative hostility, the track is an impressive full start to the release.

In Faith, In Ruin leaps in next and immediately has a great almost swinish texture to the vocals to shuffle things up there, whilst riffs and grooves again snarl with almost toxic intent. The more formula tones of Hywel Thomas provide the rawest challenge but variation again ensures that their alluring violation matches the persistently shifting landscape of the song. The intensive and busy nature of the track, as across the EP, means the technical and deeper layers within the encounter are often smothered but given time reveal the strong depths to songs, as shown again with the erosive persuasion of Left Behind. Its more restrained opening subsequently kicks up a gear though still reining in the violence and unleashing an addiction forging groove which lures the listener swiftly into the sonically cancerous and turbulent heart of the song. Aspects like that simply bewitch as does an unexpected and calm passage of melodic beauty which leads to a tempestuous climate, though the more expected sonic raging in the song does feed expectations and enjoyment equally. The potential even in the less striking elements though is inescapable and only adds to the anticipation for what comes next.

My Heart Is Bruised But Never Broken is another which takes longer to reveal all of its persuasion. Its technical and imaginative layers within the less attention sparking storm raging around them, are again the song’s major potency but once more needing time for ears to explore and revel in. It is nevertheless an intrigue and satisfaction igniting offering revealing more of the inventive songwriting within the band and their ability to skilfully create ruinous and inhospitable landscapes or scenery of pure melodic beauty as evidenced by the brief instrumental Relapse which follows. Like the oasis within the savaging of Left Behind, the piece is enthralling, spreading its elegance and charm into the EP’s title track which evolves out of its embrace.

The closing track is soon slipping into the darkest, ravenous depths of despair and sonic confrontation with a rhythmic battering to match, but still blending in the transfixing invention of its predecessor. The song slips from fury and violence to gentle seducing impressively and seamlessly, another aspect to the band’s creativity which it is easy to expect greater exploits from.

For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore is a strong and impressive introduction to Virtue In Vain, not one which declares the band as the future of British extreme metal but certainly with the potential to suggest they could make that kind of impact as they grow and evolve.

The For All You Know Is The Mask I Wore EP is available from May 11th through all digital platforms and at http://virtueinvain.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/VirtueInVain https://twitter.com/VirtueInVain

RingMaster 11/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

ISLASORNA REVEAL THEIR E.D.E.N’ ON 1st JUNE

Islasorna Online Promo shot

SCOTTISH PROGRESSIVE METAL OUTFIT ‘ISLASORNA’ NATIONALLY RELEASE THEIR DEBUT EP ‘E.D.E.N’ ON 1st JUNE, THROUGH ALL STORES.

Spawned from the depths of Edinburgh, and conceived at the start of 2014, Scottish experimental metal crew ‘Islasorna’ have picked up a legion of fans throughout the far North. And through dedicated and rampant gigging, word is beginning to spread about the band’s high octane live shows further afield in the UK. Adding more fuel to their fiery cause, the progressive metallers have supported the likes of Bleed From Within, Carcer City, Demoraliser, Martyr Defiled and Continents.

Consisting of vocalist Justin Dilworth, Guitarists Jamie Mcarthur & Dean Watson, bassist Mark Brunton and drummer Michael Devlin, Islasorna fuse together colossal riffs, tech playability and even hints of jazz to the melting pot. With inspiration coming from everyone from The Devil Wears Prada, Northlane, Whitechapel, Sikth, The Dillinger Escape Plan and Animals as Leaders to Metallica, the band offer a sound that is inherently steeped in metal, but undoubtedly pushes the envelope.

Islasorna are set to break out to the UK with the official release of their earth shattering debut EP, ‘E.D.E.N.’. The opening track ‘Obliteration’ pulls you in with its haunting atmospherics and pummelling drop beats. The five-some then crank it up with the sludgy riff assault of ‘Achluophobia’, which immediately grabs you by the nether regions. The band showcase their astute use of dynamics for the hypnotic track ‘Judas’, while the guttural attack of ‘Choices’ slams your eardrums, and the craft of ‘4-2-8’, framed by blistering guitars and jagged rhythms, is just pure intensity. The metallers draw the record to a close with the EP’s namesake ‘E.D.E.N.’, and it’s an eerie slab of moody heavy electronica which displays the band’s growing maturity. With shows in the can for this Summer, Islasorna are bursting to rise.

-ISLASORNA RELEASE ‘E.D.E.N.’ ON 1st JUNE THROUGH ALL DIGITAL OUTLETS-

Islasorna cover

http://Facebook.com/islasornauk

Kill The Conversation: Farewell For The Last Time

Already before its release the new EP from UK metalers Kill The Conversation seems to be splitting opinions remarkably, some loving it and others finding a loathing usually reserved for young Bieber. Farewell For The Last Time is a release which will either work for you or not. It admittedly has its limitations and unfulfilled potential but still is an impressively enjoyable slab of sonic brutality.

Kill The Conversation is obviously a band unafraid to try things and though it does not always come off it is refreshing. Though crossing a few genres, their sound is metalcore based and in a category which has become quite static in its invention, a band at least trying to be unique is better than one just offering another carbon copy assault. The five tracks on the EP are a concussive confrontation which leave a deep scarring behind them, at times painful and in others abusive but always intriguing and unpredictable.

Formed in 2009, the Dorchester quintet has already grabbed opportunities to make an impact through the sharing of stages with bands such as Sepultura, Rise To Remain, Malefice, and Revoker. Their debut EP Figure Of Speech also drew the attention of people but with Farewell For The Last Time it is accurate to say the band will not go unnoticed. Comparisons to the likes of August Burns Red, Bring Me The Horizon, The Devil Wears Prada, and Parkway Drive have been ringing in their ears as people try to find a tag but though the band echo of a few they create ideas like no one.

The EP starts with a melodic but agitated atmosphere around a sample from the Churchill speech at the declaration of war, though Fold soon erupts into a blistering surge of coarse riffs and an explosion of abrasive guttural vocals. Once into its stride, the guitars of Liam Garry and Luke Toomer offer up an acidic clinging groove and flesh wilting strikes before the heavy artillery of the band takes over with heavier impactful riffs, crippling rhythms and vicious vocals from Jack. The song is arguably quite straightforward and possibly not the most adventurous but still a powerful blood pumping exercise in towering metal.

The following Shattered Shell immediately comes at the ear at full throttle, its badgering riffs and malicious vocals a scurrying and predatory playmate for the senses. The track soon mixes things up with pace twists and rhythmic contortions from drummer Brad Birchall. As the song evolves it takes a break, putting the intensity on a leash for a breather whilst stabbing riffs and beats break the air. The sound at this point is clean but festering an anger which is soon expelled as the track returns to its malevolent ways. The climax feels like the song is standing over and chewing ones carcass amidst triumphant and gloating pig squeals from England. The track is a stirring and provocative brute which labours a little against the opener but opens an appealing well of invention from within the band, something the following song continues.

No More Fish In The Sea is simply chaotic magnificence, a sprawling wave of imagination. It opens with riffs rifling the ear and rhythms holding guard over the intrusion. Sonic manipulations litter the air to ignite deeper interest whilst again England spews his own style of vehemence. His delivery though not especially diverse, is soaked in passion and mischief adding fluctuating character to proceedings. The band throws chugging riffs and a melodic scorching across the senses as it works into the song and though again it is maybe not high on originality one eagerly basks in the towering combat being waged upon the ear. A break into a raw and hollow peace which leads into a post hardcore attack vocally and musically, allows the excellent bass work of Laurie Thomas the clarity it deserves but is often missing elsewhere. Returning to a metalcore climax the track is a gem with only the switch into the unexpected aside lacking not as successful as it could have been. The returning banshee shrills are good too though hopefully England will not overplay them in the future to diminish their strength.

The remaining two songs keep things running on a high. Blakes Demise is a bruising encounter which tests the resolve but counters its vindictive nastiness with cutting addictive riffs, an insatiable groove, and infectious ear candy melodics It is a good song surpassed by City In Ruin. Starting with another speech sample the track spears its air with fiery sonic bursts from the guitars before exploding into a riotous feast of energy and melodic enterprise which seemingly teeters on folk metal. The track is excellent with more twists and turns than a slinky on the stairs though again it is unable to bring fluidity to the transition between the contrasting sounds talked of and the charged metal onslaught which closes the song.

Farewell For The Last Time is an impressive release which holds great promise for Kill The Conversation. For sure the band is not the finished article yet and probably are destined to always rub some up the wrong way but if they carry on like this they will find and give formidable riches.

www.facebook.com/KillTheConversation

RingMaster 29/08/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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