Beth Blade & The Beautiful Disasters – Bad Habit

Gaining an increasing reputation and support for their hard rock nurtured sound, South Wales hailing Beth Blade & The Beautiful Disasters raise the ante with the release of debut album Bad Habit. It offers a lively and tenacious roar, already drawing comparisons to artists such as Halestorm, Joan Jett, and Heart, which swiftly has the body and appetite eagerly involved in its instinctive rock ‘n’ roll.

From Cardiff, Beth Blade And The Beautiful Disasters have quickly recruited and built upon an eager and loyal local following since emerging. The time since has seen them stomping across the UK with their own tours and with the likes of Marco Mendoza (Thin Lizzy, Whitesnake, The Dead Daisies) as well as sharing stages with others such as Ricky Warwick and Damon Johnson of Black Star Riders. Recorded with Nick Brine (Thunder, The Darkness, Bruce Springsteen) at the legendary Rockfield studios and Leeders Vale, and mastered by Pete Maher (The Rolling Stones), the crowd funded Bad Habit is a hefty poke at bigger national attention with success an easy to assume expectation.

Opener Hell Yeah swiftly has ears grabbed, its opening lure of riffs accompanied by the moody tone of the bass; instinctive attention inviting by them well before the fiery flames springing from Chris Gould’s guitar ignite with classic rock spicing. As rhythm guitarist Beth Blade brings just as tasty riffs into play, her vocals command even greater focus while giving richer strength to the song. Like a mix of Suzi Quatro and Cherie Currie, she stands bold with a tenacity matched in the infectious sound hollering around her.

It is a great start quickly matched by the album’s title track; a slice of foot stomping, chest beating heavy rock led by the swinging beats of drummer Sam Brain. Its forceful attitude is epitomised by the brooding tone of Nicko Goodwin’s bass, its menace tempered skilfully by the wiry melodic tendrils of guitar similarly coming at ears with a touch of discontent. Its rousing qualities are swift incitement to physical and vocal participation before Beautiful Disease offers its own potent blend of catchiness and predacious threat. Muscle and melody unite across the menacing prowl of a song which shows the band as adept at creating more composed and moody proposals as they are at flying at the jugular in spirit rousing charges.

Down And Dirty lives up to its name next, its bluesy grooves tonic for hips as rhythms and riffs surround the increasingly impressing tones of Blade with their grungy antagonism while Poster Girl For Pain reveals another aspect to the Blade’s songwriting and the band’s sound with its power driven balladry and emotive intensity. It is a slowly burning encounter compared to the hungry exploits of its predecessors but a temptation becoming more potent and irresistible with every passing minute and listen.

The heart bred snarl of This Bitch Bites fuels both vocals and music, Blade a spiky treat within the track’s quarrelsome nature. Again attitude soaks every strain of sound and intent escaping the excellent song, its defiance and combative contagion equally lining successor Hell In High Heels though its blues rock inflamed body has a ‘lighter’ and more keenly catchy nature which might not impress as addictively as the antics of the previous track but leaves pleasure in another lofty place soon reinforced by the classic rock ‘n’ roll nurtured romp of If You’re Ready To Rock. Carrying no real surprises, the song lacks the spark of its companions for personal tastes yet easily keeps enjoyment and feet firmly involved.

The album is brought to an end by firstly the heated beauty of Angel With A Dirty Face, Blade sharing a croon as magnetic and captivating as her rebel rousing deliveries elsewhere, melodies simmering and boiling up with equal elegance, and lastly through the ballsy, swagger loaded rock ‘n’ roll of Legends Never Die. It encapsulates all the galvanic and creatively vociferous qualities of the Beth Blade and The Beautiful Disasters sound and indeed Bad Habit itself in its bones, leaving instincts aroused and a hunger for more leading fingers keenly back to the start button.

Beth Blade and The Beautiful Disasters might not be the most unique proposition around right now in sound but for a fiercely enjoyable and raucous holler easy to get off on, they set a mighty example.

Bad Habit is out now @ https://bethbladeandthebeautifuldisasters.com/store

https://bethbladeandthebeautifuldisasters.com    https://www.facebook.com/BBATBDofficial    https://twitter.com/BBATBDofficial

Pete RingMaster 23/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dark Stares – Soul Contract

Dark Stares - Promo Picture

Their debut was a web of flavoursome inspirations woven into a striking introduction, its successor a more honed proposition with a less expansive but more singular and enthralling character to its sound, and now with their third EP, UK rock band Dark Stares has explored another captivating evolution in their sonic adventure. Soul Contact is a fiery and sonically spicy encounter, a handful of tracks which intrigue with a psychedelic air and feisty tenacity. It is a release which pushes the St Albans quartet and their sound on again whilst confirming the band as one of the UK rock scene’s finest emergences in recent times.

Formed in 2011, Dark Stares have been no strangers to keen attention and support since the release of the Tell Your Friends EP the following year. Its success was swiftly backed by outstanding singles Bad Machine and Shinigami later in 2012 with the former subsequently finding itself personally selected by Dave Fanning and Bono for a U2-single publicity stunt. Influences from the likes of from Queens of the Stone Age, Foo Fighters, Muse, Royal Blood, and Jack White openly flavoured their early sound and still spices its openly unique invention now, as shown by Soul Contact,. As second EP Octopon began to reveal this potent evolution through its unveiling in 2013, the foursome of lead guitarist Harry Collins, and the Howell brothers, Miles Kristian on vocals and guitar, bassist Brett Harland, and drummer Taylor, continued to lure national airplay and press coverage with the likes of Metal Hammer, Rocksound, Powerplay, and XFM whilst live sharing stages with bands such as Enter Shikari and The Darkness. It is easy to expect more of that eager attention to follow the release of their excitedly anticipated new release, and an even hungrier appetite for its impressive sound.

Dark Stares - Cover Artwork   It is fair to say that Soul Contact does not dramatically leap at ears and thoughts at any time, but seduces with an unrelenting and tantalising temptation which ultimately is just as effective. There are times when it misses the spark needed to explode on the senses but with imagination and emotions of the listener thoroughly involved with that of the band’s and every encounter on the release, it is more a showing of the potential still left to be explored within Dark Stares than anything lacking. Opener Liquid Reign is the perfect example, a track which never erupts with a voracious impact but smoulders with warm melodic flames and bubbles with imaginative twists. Its initial touch is a distorted tease which leads to a slow but swinging stroll under a psyche kissed climate. The bass instantly conjures that gentle swagger, backed perfectly by crisp beats and shadowed yet inviting riffs. The effect wrapped vocals of Miles Kristian offer a mellow seduction of their own, his tones gliding over the magnetic and lively sonic enterprise of Collins. The song is as immersive as it is gently catchy, and a great start to the release.

The band’s new single Hypnotize comes next and swiftly has ears basking in a blues bred, scuzz lined temptation aligned to muscular rhythms. The most aggressive and intensive song on the release, it still merges a sultry and welcoming persuasion with a rugged and imposing rhythmic landscape. Virulently contagious and inescapably addictive, especially around its gorgeous croon of a chorus, the song also brings a rich familiarity to it. Over time it is realised as being just of the increasingly established Dark Stares sound, though with a healthy wash of QOTSA to it too. It is a great gateway into band and release, an obvious and gripping single matched by the following Ordinary Way. It too instantly hits like a previously encountered friend with another fuzzy beckoning at the start sparking recognition before a rumbling bassline and rolling beats sculpt an engrossing cage to enclose it all. It is a trap soon coloured in excellent vocal expression and texture within a sunrise of melodic wine and sonic drama. Cavernous and inescapably immersive but intimate and emotionally provocative at its heart, the song is a spellbinding embrace.

Animal floats in next on a sonic croon under a sweltering atmosphere, again easily luring in ears and imagination with bordering on exotic colours and invention. The track truly comes alive with its blues rock fire of scarring riffs and dynamic energy, an intermittent but hunger igniting expulsion across the song led to and tempered by a just as emotive melodic humidity. It is a slow burner compared to the previous pair of songs but slips firmly into thoughts and passions before the closing Cruise Control reinvents its finest Josh Homme and co inspirations for a melodic and harmonic roar coated in Muse like spatial hues and lined with compelling scuzz fired drama.

The track is an excellent end to another great and compelling offering from Dark Stares. It is not a massive leap forward from Octopon yet everything about it from songwriting and sound to imagination has been stretched with fresh creativity and passion. Dark Stares continue to impress and remind that the British rock scene has some strongly creative hands at its tiller.

The Soul Contract EP and new single Hypnotise are available from 6th April on EP and digitally through all digital platforms.

http://www.darkstares.com     https://www.facebook.com/DarkStares

RingMaster 06/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

4th Street Traffic – Innocence (Don’t Walk Away)

4th Street Traffic pic 1

Welsh band 4th Street Traffic describe their sound as stadium rock, a tag which means very little to our mind, but when a song like Innocence (Don’t Walk Away) roars with an energy and emotion which reveals all in merely four minutes, there really is no need for labels. The new single from the Caerphilly quartet is a bellow of a song, a resourceful tempest of melodic tenacity and emotional drive leaving a rather healthy new interest and appetite for a band already no strangers to acclaim.

Formed in 2001, 4th Street Traffic has earned their spurs through an undeterred assault on the national music scene. Their emergence has constantly garnered increasing attention and support. From debut album Wake Up Call through to its successor, the 2012 Romesh Dodangoda produced Kick the Habit, the band has nudged and drawn elevated attention, a growing spotlight backed by extensive UK tours and shows including performing at Party In The Park in 2005. The second album was the spark to bigger things it is fair to say, especially once Kelly Jones and Richard Jones of Stereophonics came across it. An invitation by the pair to open up their Summer In The City concert in Cardiff City Stadium took 4th Street Traffic to even keener attention, that moment backed by the continually impressing and selling 2nd album and backed by shows alongside bands such as Electric Six, Toploader, The Darkness, Mike and the Mechanics, The Stranglers, 10CC, Dodgy, We Are Scientists, The Enemy and many more. Taken from their similarly well received third album Claim To Fame of 2013, Innocence (Don’t Walk Away) is the first teaser to and step in a busy year ahead for the band, and with a new line-up in place re-energising their appetite, you suspect a successful one too.

The new single launches at ears with thumping beats and a blaze of easy going but alluring riffs. Their relaxation only moments in, then allows the potent tones of vocalist Alastair Britton to open up the narrative as a resonating dark bassline courts his every syllable. It is a magnetic start with a touch of a southern rock whisper to the brewing enterprise and energy. Taking on a pungent stride thereafter, one constantly guided by the crisp jabs of the drums, the track is an insatiable persuasion on the senses with every blaze of its melodic endeavour and flavoursome vocal call a powerful temptation. It would be fair to say that the song is not venturing too far from established climates in heavy melodic rock but equally expectations are barely fed and imagination given a healthy croon of fiery creativity to run with.

4th Street Traffic is looking towards having a strong and successful year, which if their new songs are anywhere as rampantly convincing and enjoyable as Innocence (Don’t Walk Away), will be a sure thing.

Innocence (Don’t Walk Away) is released February 9th.

Check out upcoming festival dates for 4th Street Traffic:

May 3rd Main Stage – Sound Stock Festival / Essex

May 23rd Main Stage – Exmouth Festival/ Exmouth

May 24th Main Stage – Plymouth VolksFest/ Plymouth

Jul 10th – Main Stage – Volksstock/ Coventry

Jul 12th – Main Stage – Oakwell Festival/ West Yorkshire

Aug 15th – Main Stage – NHSOB festival/ Newport, S Wales

https://www.facebook.com/4thstreettraffic

RingMaster 03/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Gifted Kings – Lose What Makes You

gifted kings pic

    It is hard to say that Lose What Makes You, the debut album from Scottish rockers Gifted Kings, ignited a fire in the passions for their accomplished and soulful sound, but certainly the 2012 formed band sparked an appetite and satisfaction with their enjoyable release which many emerging bands can only dream of. Consisting of eleven impressively crafted and expressive songs, the release makes a potent and promising introduction to a band we are sure to hear and enjoy a lot more of in the future.

    Hailing from Glasgow and consisting of two sets of brothers, Derek (guitar/vocals) and Andy Murray (lead guitar) alongside Gary (drums) and Paul Smith (bass), Gifted Kings build on the undeniable potential and presence of first single Dead End Road, which has just received its video release also, in fine attention grabbing style with the album. It is not unfair to say that the band’s sound has a rich familiarity to its presence right now, not of any specific band but in general which defuses some of its ability to surprise and stoke those emotional flames, but there is little else to raise a quizzical and disapproving eyebrow over. Recorded with producer Nick Brine (Oasis, The Darkness, Bruce Springsteen) at the same studio which housed the making of Oasis’ What’s the Story Morning Glory and Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody, and mastered by Pete Maher (U2, Depeche Mode), the album proves its case with a stirring presence and potency which easily awakes positive reactions and attention to match that already brewing as far afield as Russia, Ukraine, Thailand, and India over the band. With their music already gracing several shows on Channel 4, S4C, ITV1, and Sky Sport as well as being adopted for advertising campaigns by Ripcurl and O’Neill Sports targeting the USA, Australia, and Asia, the quartet are on a rapid visible ascent which What Makes You Lose has all the qualities to accelerate.

     The album makes an instantly engaging and gripping start with Rains Will Come, its opening a sonic intrigue of guitar which expands with a rhythmic jabbing and fiery melodic glaze as company. It is not a startling entrance but one which secures full focus especially as the expressive vocals of Derek Murray joins the already pulsating lure of the song. Thoughts of Bristol band Mind Museum offer a suggestion whilst essences of Placebo also hint throughout the increasing emotive brewing of the track; all to a positive effect. The only strange thing about the song is that it never explodes, just simmers as if an intro to the album rather than a stand-alone proposition. Nevertheless it is a great start matched right away by The Last Time. A heavy throaty bass sound and imposing rhythms make the initial temptation as the guitar’s thoughts crowd around in a sonic breeze before making inviting weaves of melodic endeavour around the incoming vocals. Again there is something recognisable about the encounter, though it just makes it an easier ride to immerse within, which with its especially persuasive rhythmic enticement just infects.

     Both No One Knows and Drive keep the album bubbling in thoughts and emotions if missing the heights of the previous pair. The first is embraced by powerful emotive melodies and crescendo like rises in energy and passion as melodic veining arguably inspired by the previously mentioned Mancunians works away, whilst the second strolls with a reserved and enticing alternative rock weight and texture to draw in the imagination. Neither sets sparks to tease the passions into major action but definitely each provides a healthy offering for the appetite to chew over and enjoy, as equally does Dead End Road with its alluring and richly expressive narrative and sound. Though definitely not the best song on the album it is still easy to see why it has drawn such eager responses the band’s way since being released as the first single from the album.

     The following pair of Tell Me Something and Fortune In The City return the release to the commanding and contagious levels it started on, controlling rhythms and rich melodic fire rigorously and anthemically tempting the senses within the first whilst its successor explores another evocative climate with an inventively gripping groove and an infection clad chorus within an unpredictable exploratory landscape. Both tracks alone reveal the depth and potential of the band in sound and songwriting, reach easily lighting keen anticipation for future endeavours.

   From the pleasing and very decent creative exploits of Last Trace Of The Sun and the sonically colourful, not forgetting contagious Wait, the album’s best moment is brought with Neon, a song built on addictive nagging riffs and crisp rhythms which persist until full submission is given for their vivacious bait. Once more the band casts a virulent infection over the ears and imagination which is impossible not to find a lingering hunger for, it’s dramatic touches and blues kissed strikes quite irresistible. Alongside the closing and strong if underwhelming in comparison Written On The Wall, the pair bring Lose What Makes You to a thoroughly entertaining conclusion.

     Gifted Kings has laid the strongest base with their debut, the first of many potent and impressing encounters ahead you suspect.

http://www.giftedkings.com/

8/10

RingMaster 23/02/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Emperor Chung – Self Titled

Emperor Chung Online Promo Shot

If their self-titled debut album is a sign of things to come, UK rock band Emperor Chung is going to be one impressive and incendiary proposition for British rock music. The eleven track release is a riveting introduction to a band which has been causing quite a stir with their fresh and diverse sound. It is an album which does miss the opportunity to be an instant classic but as a reservoir of promise and the seed of expectations of big things to come, it is a striking and potent triumph.

Coming from Ilkeston in Derbyshire and formed in late 2011, Emperor Chung has taken little time in making their mark locally and further afield with a sound which has drawn comparisons to those such as Queen, Thin Lizzy, Coheed & Cambria, and Alter Bridge in various ways. Consisting of vocalist Martin Jackson, guitarists Danny Beardsley (formerly of Isolysis) and Richard Shaw (also of NG26), bassist Dan Hayes, and drummer Eddie Hodgkinson (formerly Eight Idle Hands), all bringing strong experience from their previous exploits, Emperor Chung has been on a rapid and impressive rise which their album is sure to accelerate. Their performance at Download earlier this year set the country’s rock scene on full alert, which the album creatively reinforces and with appearances at the YNOT festival with The Darkness, Macmillanfest with Tesseract, and numerous other shows taking the year into the next you can only feel their ascent is picking up speed.

The wintery scene to the start of I Vow This Day brings in instant drama and menace which has thoughts licking their lips, especially whenEmperor Chung Cover Artwork a tight inviting groove from the guitar beckons. The impressive vocals of Jackson soon make their appealing mark also and when the chorus with Beardsley adding his strong tones moves over for an even greater lure to that original groove, the track has full eager attention. From there it does not exactly hold its grip but with good sonic displays and feisty rhythms perpetually nagging the ear, it is a pleasing if not striking start to the album.

The following To Bring Justice and Downpour soon raise levels as the band and release begins to stretch their creativity and adventure. The first is a smouldering heat of strong vocals and melodic imagination which from its stirring opening flexing of sinews and emotive intensity evolves into a tantalising weave of progressive rock and evocative colour crafted by the guitars and veined by the throaty call of the bass and the snarling riffs. It is the first pinnacle of the album and does makes its predecessor look a little pale. The classic rock sculpted build of its successor provides a muscular and equally warm sonic blaze. The track creates a contagious web around the ears but as a few times on the album just does not take that final step or bite to secure a lingering slavery of the passion; nevertheless the song as the album is a richly appetising encounter which leaves satisfaction full.

The album is themed by a story of an Emperor Penguin, Chico Chung who is hunting down the members of the Chinese zodiac who murdered his father. It sounds a little Kung Fu Panda like taken out of context but the wrap of the bands enterprise, which starts with the outstanding artwork around the album to the lyrical fun and craft not forgetting gripping sounds, brings the premise successfully within the potent persuasion of tracks, like the next up My Next Foe and Pyramid. Both tracks in their individual landscapes paint an evocative progressive/melodic narrative which explores the imagination, and though neither grips the plateaus of some of the other songs they leave a brewing hunger in their wake for more, which the likes of No Mercy and the band’s first single The Bloodline supply with accomplished craft and inventive temptation. The first of these two has a familiarity to it and often reminds of Coheed & Cambria whilst the second offers a slowly building melodic caress from guitars and vocals which takes little time to seduce attention and thoughts. It is an obvious lead into the album for newcomers if not the best track on the release.

That honour belongs to Our Weaknesses, a scintillating track which from its intriguing guitar mystique at the start soon expels a technically teasing and invigorating fire of intensity and invention which reminds of Tesseract though across the enthralling song and not for the first time on the album, there is also a strong breeze of Manic Street Preachers coating its irresistible flames. It is the best thing on the album by far, which considering the strength of all songs gives an idea of its majesty, guitars carving out an addictive entrapment which the great rhythmic predation and snarling vocals stalk and ignite further.

The impressive Victory’s Calling and the mouth-watering Apex bring the album towards an intensely enjoyable close leaving Free At Least and its melodic yet rapacious suasion to conclude a thoroughly thrilling and impressive release. As impressive as it is you do feel there is an element of a lost opportunity with not enough songs fulfilling their open potential but with all drenched in unmistakable and infectious promise it is only a matter of time before Emperor Chung do create a ‘classic’ you feel. For now their debut is a wholly enterprising and hunger sufficing treat from a band destined to major things.

http://emperorchung.com/

https://www.facebook.com/TheEmperorChung

8.5/10

RingMaster 14/10/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Dark Stares – Octopon EP

Dark Stares - Promo Picture

With their debut, the Tell Your Friends EP, UK rockers Dark Stares not only impressed and raised plenty of attention in their direction but also suggested they were still in the midst of finding a unique sound. Even so, it and they stood out as something fresh and different meaning the arrival of its successor, the Octopon EP was greeted with eagerness, quizzical expectations, and a very healthy appetite to see how the band had progressed.

The four song release has stepped forward as another outstanding slice of rock ‘n’ roll from the St Albans quartet, the release a slab of accomplished and slightly dirtier rock invention that answered all questions. Whereas the previous EP seemed to be searching for that one sound with many aspects and references to other bands playing their suggestions throughout, Octopon has found a narrower stance. It still employs essences of the likes of Foo Fighters and Muse for example but that is a cloudy breath now within an almost brawling singular presence that captivates from first note to last. Arguably there is less originality to the new songs than before, possibly and predominantly from the fact that they have a similarly crafted sound and presence, but for maturity, craft, and sheer compelling persuasion the EP is a mighty and refreshing piece of invention and step forward. Dark Stares has come of age so to speak with Octopon and suggests a feisty ride ahead with the band starts here.

The combination of brothers Miles Kristian (vocals/guitar), Taylor (drums), and Brett Harland Howell (bass) alongside Harry Collins (lead Dark Stares - Octopon EP - Front Coverguitar), start things off with the mighty encounter Bad Machine. Since forming, the band has ripped up stages playing with bands such as Enter Shikari and The Darkness, and across numerous festivals, and from the opening song alone you feel they have watched, learned, and developed those experiences into their own distinctive brand of creative energy, for songwriting and performance. The track immediately surrounds the ear with thumping rhythms, concentrated abrasive guitar, and prowling basslines. The vocals of Miles bring again good expressive and keen vocals but they just glide through the brewing intensity rather than deflecting its impending climb. With a wash of scuzz to every atom of the sonic narrative, from vocals and sound through to production, the weighty edge to the presence of the song makes a mountain of a start. There is a familiarity to it also which makes the song easily accessible for limbs and voice to join the pounding treat whilst the acidic raw groove which cores it drags emotions into its richly satisfying grip with ease.

It is an excellent start soon eclipsed by the following Shinigami, the new single from the band. It launches off of the plateau set with a stronger sizzling energy and Muse toned melodic suasion, its sound again caustic but compelling, with the energy of band and song anthemic in voice and effect. The track romps across the senses and into the passions with no respite of its temptation, the excellent aside of melodic beckoning and rhythmic pouting a chance to snatch a breath whilst the temperature within still rises heartily. With a fiery crescendo bringing the song to a sudden stop, again for the listener to gain some composure, the band unleash another rising wave of noise bred rock with a burning climax that just seals the deal.

Steal Your Girl continues the excellent and intensive pleasure next, again the sound of the song holding a familiar air but without making clear declaration as to why. It strolls along with a swagger and enterprise that lifts the spirits and emotions, not to forget feet and hunger for much more. There is a touch of wantonness to its infectious charge too, reserved slightly but open to those that look, like a horny unsatisfied housewife on the prowl (the hell yeah of window cleaners everywhere ringing out right now). It is another irresistible piece of dirt clad rock ‘n’ roll that cements the new stature of Dark Stares.

Final track Blackfyre has a blues flame to its imagination, the guitars breeding from the potent source with heated intent to light up the skies around the equally emotive and flaming vocal delivery of Miles. The least raucous and instant of the four songs but arguably the most sonically poetic and creatively infused, it is a burning conclusion to the EP and shows the depth of the band still maybe yet to be explored.

Octopon is a great release which may have surprised a touch at first but left thoughts and passions alight with its skilled muscular entrapment. Dark Stares are poised to ignite UK rock; that the prime thought earned by their excellent release, oh other than excitement of course.

www.facebook.com/DarkStares

8.5/10

RingMaster 04/08/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

DARK STARES new EP ‘Octopon’, out 5th August‏

Dark Stares -  Online Promo Picture

RISING UK ROCKSTERS DARK STARES RETURN WITH STOMPING NEW RECORD!

Flaunting a twisted alternative rock sound that is in part influenced by the captivating hooks of the Foo Fighters, the dark angular groove of Them Crooked Vultures, and the song-writing guile of Jack White, Dark Stares are geared up to raise the bar with their stunning new EP ‘Octopon’, out Monday 5th August.
Formed in 2011, and coming from St Albans, Dark Stares are rapidly rising through the UK scene, aided by a growing army of fans and backed by a hefty diet of touring and recording. Since their formation, the alternative rock ‘n’ rollers have supported the likes of Enter Shikari and The Darkness, and have shared festival main stages with everyone from The Subways to Fun Lovin’ Criminals. The assiduous quartet released their debut EP ‘Tell Your Friends’ at the foot of 2012, which drew extensive national recognition and harnessed nationwide radio airplay on XFM Rock show. The band also released their debut single ‘Whisky’, which in turn pushed the foursome out to an international audience.
Dark Stares step up again with the release of their sophomore EP ‘Octopon’. Dispatching four blistering tracks, the record twists and pulls with real vigour, from the pounding groove of ‘Bad Machine’, to the stomping edge of their new single ‘Shinigami’, right through to the boisterously brilliant and down-right sleazy ‘Blackfyre’ and the contagious craft of ‘Steal Your Girl’. Now watch the band blow the roof off every fleapit and sweat box as they hit the road again this summer in support of the record. Hit up the band’s Facebook for tour updates.
Dark Stares - 'Octopon' EP - Front Cover
==DARK STARES RELEASE ‘OCTOPON’ ON MONDAY 5th AUGUST THROUGH ALL DIGITAL STORES==