The Tea Set – Back In Time For Tea

Like all those with horniness for music, over years of finding encounters which spark extra love, lust, and addiction within the heart there are some moments which rise even above that in the passions. It is fair to say that from the moment punk rock erupted we have discovered a horde of such essential triggers to eternally drool over but of those that reign over the passions most a certain two remain to the fore. One is the single, Sex Cells by The Table and the other was provided by The Tea Set in the shape of their 7”, Parry Thomas. The first of the two only produced two singles before their shall we say chaotic and certainly uncompromising existence finally came apart but the latter over their three years left a host of further adventures which indelibly left their mark on ears and passions. So it was major excitement that we jumped on the opportunity, thanks to our friend Andy at Perfect pop Co Op, to check out Back In Time For Tea, an album bringing all of The Tea Set recordings together in one place with two new rich brews to sup on.

Hailing from Watford, born within its art college to be exact, The Tea Set emerged in 1978 out of punk band, The Bears. Initially called Screaming Ab Dabs until they realised that was an early name of Pink Floyd they renamed themselves The Tea Set, though weirdly the guys found out that Tea Set was another incantation from which the Floyd would rise. The name stuck this time and with a line-up of vocalist Nic Egan, bassist Ronny West, drummer Cally, and keyboardist Mark Wilkins, the band quickly released the Cups and Saucers EP, upon which Stewart Kinsey played guitar.

We discovered the EP and its glorious vinyl wrapping art work after being seduced by its successor, Parry Thomas and it is the quartet of tracks making up Cups and Saucers which opens up Back In Time For Tea. The four songs revel in the punk instincts which made The Bears a well-loved proposition but more so reveal the broader post punk meets art school sound the band were developing. On Them steps up first, from its first breath the song daring the listener to jump upon its ear nagging canter for a ride of unbridled enterprise and mischief. There is something akin to bands like Television Personalities and O’ Level to the song but already and across its companions you could hear something individual brewing and across following releases standing unique to The Tea Set.

The hectic punk ‘n’ roll of Sing Song is one of those songs which just sweeps you up in its swing and antics, revelling in the creative nagging which marks out all the band’s songs, that a persistent urging which only ever led to eager participation while Grey Starling revealed the experimentation which also grew and became ingrained in their sound over future songs. The Swell Maps meets Wire-esque B52G completed the EP and already it was easy to hear the inimitable character of the band’s sound and the defiant imagination which only blossomed by the release as evidenced by the perpetually irresistible Parry Thomas single.

Its two tracks are next on the album and a release which again came bound in just as imaginative and pleasing packing, the punk DIY ethic fuel to The Tea Set’s own independence in all things, and yes we still have the tea bag which was included in its body, unused of course. The single saw Ronny on guitar with Duncan Stringer now teasing and taunting with the bass, and Parry Thomas sparking one of the major addictions in music we have spawn. Written about John Godfrey Parry-Thomas, a Welsh engineer and motor-racing driver who at one time held the land speed record, a subsequent attempt taking his life, the track’s engine idles over initially with drama lining every shimmer of keys, suspense of guitar, and low rumble of rhythms that emerges. Eventually it sets off, Nic’s vocals narrating the disaster to happen with the fascination all moments, massive and small, like that seem to trigger in us all. The song is superb and has never lost its magnificence and slavery on ears for so many.

Tri X Pan which accompanied the track is just as addict forming, it’s developing shot of choice punk hooks and manipulative rhythms another trigger to eager participation, one only further strengthened by the beckoning tones of Nic.

Though Parry Thomas is suggested as the band’s biggest moment we suggest it is their next single which is the one those outside fan love might know them for. Certainly it is the one song that outside of John Peel, which seemed to get radio airplay of some sort most often. Keep on Running (Big Noise From The Jungle) is a song written by Jamaican ska and reggae singer/ songwriter Jackie Edwards and another one of the delicious moments when The Tea Set simply refuses to let go of your ears and attention. Produced by The Stranglers Hugh Cornwell, the song strolls in on a rhythmic swagger knowing that your body is going to instinctively bounce to its throb and voice sing to its infectiousness.  As much pop punk as it is post punk devilry, the track just harasses and entices until you are hollering to its controlled yet wild endeavours and swinging with its virulence.

The single saw Ron back on bass with guitarist Nick Haeffner now part of the band, both just as tempting in their part of single B-side, Flaccid Pot, a psych pop instrumental seducing the senses around the first’s  masterfully pulsating bass before it bursts into an inescapable sing-a-long inducing punk ‘n’ rocker.

The band’s next single was no stranger to certain radio shows either, the again wonderfully wrapped two song line-up of South Pacific and The Preacher simply one more memorable and again irresistible moment with The Tea Set. South Pacific is another track which just swings on the passions like a simian tease, the song a contagion of tantalising hooks and ravishing devilment getting under the skin as quick as a blink of the eye and an incitement even a bag of bones surely could not resist the urge to swing their inhibitions aside for.

The Preacher arrives on a cosmic mist of psych rock, a spatial missionary for the imagination and again nothing less than full pleasure as the band weaves another flight of originality and captivation.

Back In Time For Tea is completed by that couple of never heard before tracks, the first being Walk Small. It is a song recorded just before the band broke up sharing the same seeds as the previous track in many ways to blossom into a fascination of ethereal pop. There is a tinge of The Monochrome Set to it but so uniquely The Tea Set and so majestic you wonder if it had been released back in time theirs might just have become a name on the lips of so many more.

Pharaohs was recently recorded, a fan favourite which we can only feel blessed has found the light of day to light up speakers and ears alike and a song which sums up everything wicked, disobedient, and wonderful about The Tea Set and their idiosyncratic sound and indeed imagination.

So that is the recording history of The Tea Set, a band which has lit up stages alongside the likes of The Clash, U2, Iggy Pop, The Stranglers, and The Skids and been one big reason why music has been essential to so many, and that is Back In Time For Tea, the biggest treat for fans and newcomers alike.

Back In Time For Tea is out now via Cleopatra Records @ https://theteasetuk.bandcamp.com/album/back-in-time-for-tea and https://cleorecs.com/store/shop/the-tea-set-back-in-time-for-tea-cd/

https://www.theteaset.net/   https://www.facebook.com/left12/

Pete RingMaster 29/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Elizabeth The Second – Two Margaritas at the Fifty Five

photo by Filippo Galvanelli

A handful or so weeks back Italy based outfit, Elizabeth The Second, unveiled their debut single ahead of their first EP. It was a rousing introduction to the trio and a flirty teaser for Two Margaritas at the Fifty Five, which now here equally suggests this is a band to keep a close eye and eager ear upon.

Consisting of Ben Moro (guitar and vocals), Michele Venturini (bass guitar) and Luca Gallato (drums), Padova hailing Elizabeth The Second spring a sound upon ears which is part garage rock, part punk, and an infectious amount of dirtily edged pop rock. Inspirations come through the likes of by The Clash, Blur, The Libertines, Artic Monkeys, Nirvana, and The Stone Roses; all hues which certainly flavour the band’s sound as too the breath of seventies nurtured power pop and nineties Brit pop.  For all that though, the band’s music escapes speakers with open individuality casting a great mix of familiarity and undisguised freshness.

Two Margaritas at the Fifty Five opens with that previous single and fair to say that No One Cares instantly grabbed ears with its first lure of guitar, its melodic clang equipped with a swing which is soon equally embraced by rhythms and vocals as the track hits its catchy stride. The fuzzy grumble of Venturini’s bass in turn takes over the virulence, its lone coaxing delicious before Moro’s guitar returns with its own shade of the contagion as Gallato’s beats bounce. The song is an irresistible slice of garage pop ‘n roll, its repeated cycle all the more addictive, and itself as a whole as potent as when it graced ears alone to provide a great start to the release.

Its persuasive traits are keenly embraced and built upon across the following tracks too, Mickey weaving its own infectious blend of pop and rock in a boisterous proposition blessed with lively rhythms and a spicy hook. With its body woven from an array of flavours and Moro’s vocals further great persuasion the song effortlessly hit the spot before Yesterday I Was 20 stepped forward with matching prowess. A sixties hue teases from its melodic grace as that power pop essence fuels its shuffle, the song in some ways reminding of bands such as Purple Hearts and The Chords and though it did not quite raise the passions as those around it, there was only pleasure and an appetite to indulge again in its infection.

As its companions the following Soho revels in its catchiness and playful enterprise, melodies and enticing hooks as manipulative as the roar in Moro’s voice and the dexterity of the rhythms driving the song, let alone the imagination gluing it all together. Again an array of styles make up its character and voice before it leaves the just as potent Gimme One Euro to bring the EP to a spirited close with its own recipe of just as varied ingredients and flavours. As with every song on the EP, pop, punk, and rock essences meld perfectly with the classic rock wiring which escapes Moro’s guitar especially in his spice rich solos and in all tracks there is nothing which allows attention to be cast elsewhere.

One superb single and one addictive EP, there could be a rather rosy reign for Elizabeth The Second ahead.

Two Margaritas at the Fifty Five is available now digitally and on CD @ https://elizabeththesecond.bandcamp.com/album/two-margaritas-at-the-fifty-five

https://www.facebook.com/elizabeth.the.second.band   https://twitter.com/Elizabethe2nd

Pete RingMaster 28/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

RingMaster Reviews Interviews – Mark Vennis

For those who may not know who you are, introduce yourselves quickly.

MARK VENNIS & DIFFERENT PLACE: WE ARE A GENRE JUMPING BAND ALL TIED TOGETHER BY PUNK ROCK ATTITUDE

Describe your sound in as few words as possible.

JOHNNY CASH AND BOB MARLEY MEET THE CLASH

Who are your three biggest influences as a band?

THE CLASH, BOB MARLEY, JOHNNY CASH.

What’s the meaning behind your band name?

MUSIC TAKES YOU TO A DIFFERENT PLACE. IT CAN TRANSFORM THE EVERYDAY AND GET YOU TO LOOK AT THINGS DIFFERENTLY.

How did you approach your latest release in terms of writing and recording?

I WRITE AND WRITE, THEN I RECORD. THIS ALBUM WAS A COLLECTION OF EPS AND SOME EXTRA SONGS, SO ALL THE THREE EPS WERE AVAILABLE OVER THE PAST THREE OR SO YEARS. SO IT WASN’T RECORDED IN ONE GO.

Do you have any personal favourite songs on the release?

‘RATTLE SNAKE’, ‘ACHILLES REMIX’

Explain the meaning behind the album title.

‘A BEAUTIFUL LIE OR THE UGLY TRUTH’ IS THE TITLE. AND ITS REALLY ABOUT WHETHER YOU WANT TO BELIEVE THE BULLSHIT OR NOT.

Do you have any dates lined up at present?

CANNES FILM FESTIVAL 2019, FLASHFEST PORTSMOUTH 2019

What are your favourite songs to perform live?

‘WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE’, ‘AINT NO CHOICE’.

What are the best and worst shows you’ve played to date?

BEST: VOUT O RENEES, LONDON. JAN 2019, WORST: BLOTTED ANY BAD EXPERIENCE OUT OF MY MIND!

If you could open for anyone, who would it be?

PAUL WELLER

Any comical stories from your time as a band you can share with us?

NONE THAT I CAN REPEAT

What’s the plan for the rest of 2019?

GIG. RECORD. RELEASE NEW ALBUM.

Any closing comments?

WE BELIEVE IN THE POWER OF ROCK N ROLL TO BRING PEOPLE TOGETHER, MAKE THEM DANCE, MAKE THEM THINK AND, IN A LITTLE WAY, CHALLENGE ARTIFICIAL DIVISIONS IN SOCIETY.

https://www.facebook.com/Differentplaceband/

Questions by Elliot Leaver

AM Taxi – Shiver by Me

As much as craft and imagination guides our choice of musical pleasures and favourites it is instinct and organic connections which truly steer reactions and loves, both fully behind our swift and unconditional ardour for Shiver by Me. Not that the creative invention and agility of AM Taxi and their release falls short, it all going to make for one rousing slab of punk ‘n’ roll, but quite simply it is an album which just knows what our personal wants and pleasures are and feed all with tenacity.

The successor to We Don’t Stand A Chance, the Chicago band’s well-received 2010 Virgin Records released debut, Shiver by Me provides a romping, stomping fusion of old school punk and alternative rock with modern pop instincts. It snarls as it bounces, reeking defiance as it unleashes virulent catchiness across eleven boisterous encounters, all the while leaving ears and appetite greedy for more. It bursts into life with a bang and never leaves a want for anything thereon in.

Saint Jane provides that explosive beginning, cavorting rhythms linking up with a teasing guitar jangle as vocals wait to add their lively energy. Hitting full swing as guitarist Adam Krier adds his lead tones, the track is an insatiable pop punk temptation springing seventies punk with indie pop feverishness. There was no escaping its manipulation of body and vocal chords nor the swift ardour sparked and carried on by the following Harpoon. Echoing its predecessor, the track is just as persuasive and irresistible vocally as it is musically, Krier and the band’s backing effortlessly getting under the skin just as the swinging beats of Chris Smith, the brooding but eager grumble of Jason Schultejann’s bass and the melodic shenanigans of Jay Marino’s guitar alongside those of Krier. With devious hooks at every twist and turn, the track is viral contagion to which personal hollering was inevitable.

Next up Movie About Your Life proved to be no less of a puppeteer either, its acoustic strum and persuasive handclaps teasing to the great vocal snaring quickly in tow with melodic intimations lining the captivation as it bubbles up while Swim Before You Sink (Short Time on Earth) straight after uncages bold imagination brewed rock ‘n’ roll which fed every want in the personal book. Both tracks are simply outstanding continuing the impressively rousing roar of the album already in full flow.

Fighting in Cars is relatively calmer but still a spirited proposition with its lithe rhythms and melodic web while L’ Patron provides an ear romancing saunter with a fire in its belly and passion in its heart. Each of the pair hit the spot with their openly individual proposals; success fully matched by the indie rock hued punk pop canter of Stuck Around. The hook springing and vocal prowess of the band, let alone an inexhaustible rhythmic agility, is persistent across each track within the release and no more tantalising than here.

Through the Clash kissed Brandy Don’t Let Me Down and the reflective and skilfully dramatic Minute Alone, the album is as compelling and striking as ever, both slices of pleasure matched in creative kind by the soul nurtured Shaken Over You. Sam Cooke is named by the band as one of their influences, an inspiration breeding this treat, a song elevated further by a Jam-esque whiff.

The album closes with Warsaw Blues, a gentle slice of melodic intimacy which maybe did not inflame the passions as those before but left a certain pleasure and appetite for more of its almost smouldering temptation.

Shiver by Me is one riveting adventure from start to finish and AM Taxi a band no punk or rock ‘n’ roll fan should skip by without giving at least a curious listen.

Shiver by Me is out now @ https://amtaximusic.bandcamp.com/album/shiver-by-me and also available on limited vinyl this April through Mutant League Records.

https://www.facebook.com/amtaxi/    https://www.amtaximusic.com/  https://twitter.com/AMTAXI

Pete RingMaster 11/02/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Reckless Intentions – Lights EP

UK outfit Reckless Intentions might be primarily tagged as pop punks but as their debut EP shows, they have an instinctive devilment and creative belligerence which reveals there is much more to their aggressively magnetic sound.

Embracing inspirations from the likes of Green Day, The Clash, and Foo Fighters through to others such as All Time Low and Moose Blood, Reckless Intentions host varied flavours in their music which is clearly audible and potent within the Lights EP. Equally, the Brighton hailing quartet bring an individual character to their songs and presence which is maybe still slightly more potential than realisation but is already helping shape them into a prospect which stands out.

Formed in 2016, the band concentrated scene last year on establishing themselves on the south coast music, and successfully so, before linking up with Alex Gordon at Brighton Electric Studios to work on and record their first release in the sprightly shape of Lights. With its five boisterous tracks, the EP quickly shows it has the intent and energy to stir up richer attention the way of the foursome but more so the imagination to make Reckless Intentions a rather exciting prospect.

The EP opens with the outstanding Ghost Town, a song swiftly making a successful claim for best moment and most potent lure within Lights. With a great slightly off-kilter indie rock revelry to its punk rock tenacity, the track like a mix of Asylums and The Wildhearts, things are swiftly bold and sweaty as the swinging beats of  Josh Woolnough scythe through the nagging riffs and spiky grooves of guitarists Matty Halliwell and Lewis Horsley respectively. The energetic vocals of the former equally inject an energy and fresh identity to the encounter, it all colluding in an adventurous and unpredictable mix driven by the alluringly throbbing groan of Laurence Burkitt’s bassline. In no time body and vocal chords are enlisted by the arousing antics of the song, its dynamic and almost bitchy start the perfect introduction to Reckless Intentions.

Stitches, the band’s latest single is next, its melodic bait and harmonic enticement quickly flirting with ears. The hooks of Horsley beckon within a more familiar temptation of sound; the track openly sharing All Time Low meets Brand New like essences within its infectiously swinging exploits. Halliwell again makes a potent vocal lead, his tones giving the track something more unique than other pop punk outfits though something its enjoyable sounds arguably lack a touch. Nevertheless, the song hits the spot before evolving into the short instrumental of the EP’s title track, a piece which neither detracts or adds to the overall strength of the release but keeps an appetite for its adventure on board.

The following Outcast only enriches the fun though, its instant Smash Mouth like swagger led by the ever flirtatious bass easy to get hooked on prime bait with vocals again a strong pull at its core. Becoming more punk ‘n’ roll with every lively beat and niggling riff, the song growls at and flirts with the listener, all the time brewing a pop catchiness which has hips enlisted in quick time. The song also reveals yet another hue to the band’s songwriting and sound, a variety exposed once more by closing song Home. With his own suggestive piano melody alongside, Halliwell plaintively croons from the speakers; melancholy lining his words and fingers. Alluring ears with ease, things only become more intense and potent as the band eventfully bring their emotion and craft to the reflection; the song catching fire with pop punk catchiness caught in an emotion soaked blaze.

It is a fine end to an ear pleasing first delving into the Reckless Intentions adventure, the first of many more highly pleasurable unions if they build on the undoubted potential and fun of Lights.

The Lights EP is out now across most online stores.

http://www.recklessintentions.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/recklessintentionsuk/    https://twitter.com/recklessband_uk

Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Creative gunslingers and seductive melodies: exploring the world of Prime

Prime has been a rising incitement of attention and pleasure within the British underground rock scene since emerging in 2014 and it is fair to say that the Nottingham outfit is only just beginning to arouse a broader and richer following and support for their multi-flavoured melody rich sound. Following the recent release of their new single and ahead of an upcoming EP we had the pleasure of finding out more about Prime with vocalist Lee Heir exploring the outfit’s origins, sound, latest single and  much more…

Hello Lee and thanks for taking time out of your day to talk with us.

My Pleasure.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all?

The band is currently myself on vocals, Kieran Hill on lead guitar, Daniel Ison on bass guitar, and Zero on drums. We’re looking to add a bad-ass guitar player over the summer so we shall see what happens.

Some of the band are recent recruits, has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

It has… I think we were about to get a bit soft before Kieran and Zero bought so high-impact, flamboyant playing to the table. Every song-ending now sounds like it’s veering off the end of a cliff! And Dan is looking for a certain level of intricacy in the music, he wants to build quiet and loud song structures and tell a 4-5 minute song through those theories.

What inspired the band name?

I wanted something big, a bit like T.REX, as Marc Bolan was a massive influence on me starting out. I got the name from the Lee Marvin film Prime Cut – it was in the TV guide one day when I was flicking through the film listings.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of Prime and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

There were no grand plans. It originally started off as a studio project, we recorded a studio album in 2014, but I suppose it was more like a solo project as most of the guys didn’t end up playing live with us, guys like Dan Ryland, who was a very creative drummer. The lads who played on the early recordings were all great, I just wasn’t happy with the mixes of the production at times.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Well Kieran is still fresh-faced, he’s only just turned 20! I think the lads are all the same as me: I’m driven by more musical challenges, I just wanted to make pure rock music originally, which in a way, we still do, but there’s more subtlety there now and more interesting songs.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Everything is better in my eyes. Zero instantly knows where he wants to take a song as a drummer, he has such an ear for which direction he sees our songwriting. Dan, for such a cocky bastard, doesn’t rate his own abilities as highly as he should: he is an excellent songwriter. The sound was more based in garage and punk, and although I love that stuff, with the exception of The Seeds or The Clash or Gang Of Four, they were never the most musical of genres.

Across Prime it sounds like there is a wide range of inspirations so as a particular process in the songwriting emerged to generally guide the writing of songs?

No particular process, it used to be jam out in the studio, so that’s why it was maybe more punky and frenetic and less subtle. Now most songs come from me or Kieran, or sometimes me and Dan, sitting down with a pint and thinking a bit more.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Everyday life, concepts, theories… Chris (Munton), our original bassist said to me “I try and write songs that give people direction and some meaning”, I suppose I do that to a degree, in more of a layered, subtle – or sometimes in your face! – way.

Could you give us some background to your latest release, out soon, the Bye Bye EP.

Well Bye Bye, our latest single and video are out now online on the usual places, so we’ve decided to enhance it with some tracks recorded live at the o2 Leicester and a remix by a really good electronic artist called Roger Portas who has previously remixed Donna Summer and has a project called Video Tape Machine. The track Bye Bye originally started off as a simple demo, it just sounds like pretty fuzzy rock with my vocal quite impassioned – or unlistenable I prefer to say! – I think I’ve improved on it a little bit since thank God!

What are the themes and premise behind Bye Bye?

It’s a very confused song about a broken relationship, and how people go round in circles until they just come to a dead end and realise that they are never going to be together.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We haven’t recorded in over a year, but it’s always best to go with the most complete song possible and put finishing touches to it, such as finish lyrics off, or add nice guitar overdubs and backing vocals, done by Shirena Ingram, who is a lovely girl and a really nice singer. We road test everything we record live, for many months before recording. If it doesn’t go down well live it’s pretty silly recording it; although Bye Bye was a rare exception to that rule.

You mentioned tracks live at the o2… tell us about Prime live?

We go out there to entertain first and foremost, if you come watch Prime anywhere in the country, you’ll never get the same show twice. I don’t think you get that with bands like Arctic Monkeys, from what I hear they’re pretty boring live.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

We’ve had more interest and luck up North I would say, our sets have gone down a storm in venues like The Wardrobe in Leeds. Christian Carlisle on BBC Sheffield has played us and seems to like what we do, although certain stations in the East Midlands don’t seem to, they seem to be more interested in plucking fifteen-year-old girls from obscurity… that’s their prerogative. I’ve been a bit frustrated by certain venues when we have gone down clearly very well to bigger crowds, yet a lack of follow up is done – the system is definitely flawed at times, but we push on. Next stop is London.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

I don’t see apart from the very poor royalties on streaming sites – virtually non-existent from sites like Soundcloud and Spotify – that the internet can be a bad thing. People from around the world can find out about Prime. That’s a great thing. Main problem is the lack of quality control, there’s a lot of shit content and bad music – from the kinds of bands you just mentioned -getting in the way of people finding us too.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

I’ll just say thank you for your time and thank you to your readers for supporting new or unsigned music. Without your support, new bands can’t exist, so keep doing it!

https://www.facebook.com/ukprime/    http://www.thepublichousebrand.com/prime

The RingMaster Review 13/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Authority Zero – Broadcasting To The Nations

June sees the release of the sixth album from US melodic punks Authority Zero and a riot for the spirit which shows the genre’s young bucks just how it is done. After twenty plus years, you could be forgiven for expecting the band’s obvious maturity in sound and craft to come with an aged controlled fire but Broadcasting To The Nations quickly sets the records straight. There is an excitement and energy to its body and heart which you would more expect from a band just starting out as well as a freshness and urgency bred in a newcomer’s hunger to make their first mark. Add that to the long established invention and infectious prowess of the Mesa in Arizona hailing outfit and you quite simply have one of the most rousing and seriously enjoyable punk offerings of the past few years.

Once again Broadcasting To The Nations is a proposition brought alive with the distinctive Authority Zero mixing of SoCal punk with reggae and ska and as ever delivered with a host of swinging hooks and anthemic dexterity which has lured persistent acclaim the way of their music and releases. Within the new album though, it all seems to have found a new appetite and imagination; like the quartet has reaped the best elements from previous successes and honed them into their keenest most rapaciously rebellious but fun adventure yet.

It launches with First One in the Pit, a baying eager crowd luring out the band and a stomp of brooding bass and swinging rhythms aligned with senses clashing riffs and rich vocal enticement. Within seconds ears are hooked on the vigorous anthem of sound and spirit, its vocal declaration matched in tone by the contagion of aggressive punk ‘n’ roll sound.

The galvanic start is quickly reinforced by the bold holler of Reconciliation where again the beats of drummer Chris Dalley splinter bone as they land and the heavy grumble of Mike Spero’s bass grips an already awoken appetite. Their predacious edge though is skilfully tempered by the melodic roar of frontman Jason DeVore and the spicy hooks and melodies thrown into the commandingly catchy affair by guitarist Dan Aid. As exceptional as it and its predecessor are though, both are still eclipsed by the stirring charge of the Bad Religion scented Destiny and Demise. Within moments it has its spiky attitude and bold tenacity into hooked into limbs and emotion, stoking the instincts with its raucous enterprise and bullish energy. Submission and involvement is quick and lusty, the track simply punk at its best.

The album’s title track is just as mercilessly compelling, its ska infested shuffle an infestation of body and heart leading the listener into a breath stealing bounce of air punching unity. Spero’s bass uncages a groove which devours the passions, Aid offering hooks which are more puppeteer than suggestion, whilst Dalley’s beats just bite; all together the band spawning an infectiousness which borders on rabid as DeVore anthemically roars.

 

Summer Sickness allows things to calm down a touch though its reggae nurtured grooves and hip teasing bait is swiftly in control and directing reactions alongside the magnetic presence of DeVore. Highlights have flowed since the first second of Broadcasting to the Nations, this another stunning pinnacle springing  in Latin brass flames and a punchy catchiness to get lustful over.

The band dives back into their more direct punk dexterity with Bayside next, the song giving an additional contagious coating its heavy bustle. It is the kind of goodness Green Day delivered back in their prime but with the devilment and heart of Authority Zero which has never wavered and now seems hungrier than ever as supported by the Clash meets Random hand like Revolution Riot, an inescapable stonking romping incitement, and Sevens with its melodic blaze of reflection and defiance.

There is a whiff of Strummer and co to next up La Diabla too, its festival of melodic sound and creative diversity a smouldering fire with more inventive flickers and magnetic exploits than most ferocious pyres of sound and energy. The track is sheer captivation with, as no doubt now you might expect, the listener’s physical participation at its finger tips.

The brassy stroll of Creepers has claws just as vigorously in feet and imagination straight after; its lyrical and musically feisty rock ‘n’ roll something akin to Russian punks Biting Elbows and an instinctive arousal of attitude and anthemic coupling while When We Rule the World simply hits the spot with its stylishly infectious canter. Certainly, like its successor, it is missing that little imaginative extra which set ears and album ablaze earlier but leaves pleasure rich and a greed for more slavering.

One Way Track Kid mixes all its shades of rock in its cry; hard, melodic, and punk rock as boisterous as the other in its dynamic bellow before No Guts No Glory brings things to a fine close with a punk assault as old school, raw, and incendiary as it is fresh, melodic, and galvanic. With a sniff of Flogging Molly to its glory, the song is a heady conclusion to an anthemically intoxicating release.

There is no escaping that as a band Authority Zero are growing physically old but equally it is more than obvious their music whilst impressively mature is lost in the rapture of youth; all the evidence in one of the essential punk roars of recent times.

Broadcasting To The Nations is released June 2nd via Bird Attack Records across most online stores and @ https://birdattackrecords.bandcamp.com/album/broadcasting-to-the-nations

http://authorityzero.com/   https://www.facebook.com/AuthorityZero/   https://twitter.com/Authority_Zero

Pete RingMaster 01/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright