Partisan – Two Lovers

Partisan_RingMasterReview

Two Lovers is the new single from UK rockers Partisan and the portent of a similar union between ears and band if the single is a sign of things to come. Hailing from Manchester, it is fair to say that the band has already whipped up appetites with a three track EP last year and songs like Pushing Up Daisies and Juggernaut, and now seem set to make an even bigger impression with their latest proposition.

Partisan was formed early 2013 by vocalist/guitarist Stuart Armstrong, with bassist Dan Albon and drummer Rob Jones, after the demise of previous band Six10Repeater the year before. As mentioned their first EP suggested Partisan was a band worth keeping an eye on; ahead of a new EP being recorded with producer Jim Spencer (The Charlatans), Two Lovers now confirms it.

The song instantly hits a feisty stride with jangling guitar and a moody bassline to entice ears before a slight relaxation of energy, as Jones’ beats keep a lively essence going, brings in the engaging vocals of Armstrong. It is a potent mix which gets attention and appetite firmly involved and ready for the fiery chorus which erupts with Armstrong’s vocals especially magnetic to match the blaze of melodic spicing and tenacious energy which fuel the rich crescendo.

Repeating the enjoyable cycle throughout, Two Lovers is a song which maybe does not bask in major uniqueness sound wise but it has a very memorable character to its infectious presence and imagination which means lingering enjoyment. So with that new EP in the works, 2016 could be a big year for Partisan, certainly if they can build upon the success of Two Lovers.

Two Lovers is released March 3rd

http://www.wearepartisan.rocks/   https://www.facebook.com/wearepartisan   https://twitter.com/wearepartisan

Pete RingMaster 03/03/2016

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MountainJam – EP

MJ_RingMaster Review

UK rockers MountainJam first got in touch with their double A-sided debut single around a month ago, the release just one moment in a busy time since the band emerged in March of this year. Since then the Hinckley based band has released another track, those three subsequently making up part of a self-titled EP released just a matter of days ago. All songs have introduced to ears a band with experience in their blood, craft in their hands, and passion in their hearts, and also some rather juicy songs.

The seeds of MountainJam pretty much began when vocalist/rhythm guitarist Dean Dovey met lead guitarist Andy Varden and bassist Nick Roberts as part of Midlands rock band The Silent Union in late 2013. Early 2015 the trio left that band, linked up with drummer Pez, a long-time friend of Varden and Roberts, and stepped forward as MountainJam. In no time a clutch of demos were written and recorded, with live shows just as rapid a move with their first being at The Soundhouse in Leicester. July saw the Jealous Of Me/Lust single unveiled to eager responses with third track The Lord of My Hours revealed soon after to more positive responses. As August closes its eyes, the band have now released their first EP made up of those three songs and two more quietly but firmly imposing incitements.

cover_RingMaster Review     Musically the band finds hues in the inspirations of bands such as The Who, The Doors, Cream, Small Faces, The Charlatans, and Stone Roses to colour and inflame a sound which has a potent air of nostalgia but equally a real freshness and vitality to its energy and invention. Lust is a perfect example, its romps with ears and appetite with a blend of sixties and nineties guitar rock yet creates a presence which if not quite unique is recognisably individual. Its early caresses of guitar are soon veined by a spicy melodic acidity cast by Varden, this in turn leading to the addition of crisp rhythms and the mellow but fiery tones of Dovey. The stroll of the track is controlled and at times reserved but the sultry lacing of melodies are bewitching and the middle section when its chorus is as inescapable a hook as you could wish, magnetism.

Jealous Of Me has an even stronger feel of sixties/seventies rock, its first breath and spread of riffs carrying hints of bands like Small Faces and occasionally Bad Company. Continuing to swing more rigorous rhythmic hips and flirtatious riffs and grooves, the track has body and appetite fully involved in no time. Again it has a familiarity to it which only works in its favour and a tenacity which just rouses the energies of the listener and a want for more.

The Lord of My Hours is cut from the same feisty cloth, a healthily energetic encounter infusing even richer bluesy spices into its winding grooves, dancing melodies, and engaging vocals. Rhythmically the song is a festival, Pez never quite uncaging a full-on stomp of beats and percussion but providing an addictive shuffle which the thick bass lures of Roberts court with relish and enterprise. The track is irresistible to feet and appetite, rich enjoyment which is found again in the emotively and resourcefully lively Maybe Next Time. One of the other two songs making up the EP, it has a grip which is more of a nineties guitar escapade but again comes thick with essences and textures bred in earlier decades to grab the imagination and further keen involvement.

MountainJam also show they are adept at serenading the senses with the sultry shimmer that is Shadows of your Mind. The guitars glow with melodic, almost surf rock like charm whilst Dovey provides a similarly enticing croon to the gentle canter of a song, whilst the additional keys adding the cream to the flavoursome treat. The influences of psych rock come through vibrantly across the song and though, as the last one mentioned, it fails to quite match up to the success of the other three songs for personal tastes, it leaves a warm glow and oozing satisfaction in its place.

Looking at songs in the order we came across them instead of the track order on the EP, they all unite to provide a very pleasing potential loaded introduction to MountainJam. They are a band hard not to see luring greater spotlights and success upon them as they evolve and simply gets more time and experience under their young belts as a band.

The MountainJam EP is available now at the band’s Bandcamp profile.

Pete Ringmaster 02/09/2015

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Towns – Get By

Towns promo

When the opening track Get Me There from Towns’ debut album Get By hit the ear it must be admitted that the defences rose up just a touch as a mesh seemingly bred from the world of Madchester consumed the ears. It was not an abhorrent proposition but seemingly recalling a scene happily left lonely in our thoughts many years ago. It has to be said though that through time, even within the first encounter with the release, the Bristol based band’s first album has seduced doubts and resistance to emerge as a rather riveting proposition. It has not defused all reservations but standing as a unique proposition in sound even with its heavy essences of The Stone Roses, the Charlatans, and a Shaun Ryder-esque swoon, the album is a magnetic call within which certainly extra additives of The House Of Love and My Bloody Valentine help the persuasion.

Formed by childhood friends, Towns has had a shed load of experiences since forming to test any band’s perseverance and confidence. From being declared as the best new band of 2011 by NME after just a pair of demos and no live shows, the band endured a former booking agent running off with over £1000 of the their money to almost bring the band to a stop and after having the high of working with Owen Morris (Oasis, Verve), seeing the label paying the costs being swallowed up by a major to their detriment. It seems to have made Towns only stronger though as they continue to draw acclaim and attention. Live their performances, which have seen them alongside the likes of Paul Weller, Spiritualized, The Twang, Toy, and Eagulls, has only enhanced their presence and emergence something expectations assume Get By will accelerate.

The first impressive thing about the Towns sound and release, is the wall of scuzz seeded sound which glazes every note and imaginative Towns_-_Get_By_-_Artworkswell within their songs. It makes for an almost mesmeric wash which the smooth smouldering vocals accentuate and blossoms within, something which definitely shines from within opener Get Me There. Emerging from a sonic mist with a grinning bassline and fiery guitars, there is an immediate swagger to the song, its rhythmic shoulders swinging and confidence almost arrogant within distorted melodies. It is an appealing lure but sounding so close to earlier bands mentioned and holding a Happy Monday’s like irreverence that it lies dormant against personal appetites even if winning over attention easily. To be honest the song does become more potent and enticing over time but always there is something stopping a full recruitment to its charms as subsequently achieved by other tracks. Nevertheless with its eager gait and thick breath of sound it makes a welcoming lead into the following Marbles.

The second song springs from a scythe of feedback with a percussive shake and acidic guitar flames before settling into a tender coaxing. It is smouldering lure which erupts into climactic expulsions of intensity and raw guitar enterprise as vocals simmer and glide with mellow countenance. The bass as with the first song stands out, this time with a rapacious edge whilst the guitars scorch air and senses with impressive endeavour which a cavernous production cannot deflate. It is an intriguing and gripping track which flows seamlessly into the throaty prowl of Trip Over. Like a blend of its predecessors, the song strides with sureness in attitude and sound which worms away under the skin, the album already at this point causing a reassessment of earlier thoughts. There is causticity to the song as in the previous one, which brings thoughts of Birdland to the surface.

Both Gone Are The Days and Just Everything add new raucous invention to the album, the first unveiling a blues toxicity which permeates every riff and flaring of guitar sculpting to great effect, whilst the second brings a sultry twang to its melodic bait again to carve an engagingly infectious persuasion. The surface feel and touch of Town’s songs do carry a too familiar edge amongst themselves and to other bands previously mentioned, but in their belly a cauldron of enterprise and instinctive invention is diversely at work, you just have to look closer.

Too Tired emerges from a crystalline resonance soaked sky to sway and swirl over the senses, its body a temptress and voice a spellbinding waltz which caresses with elegant expression and warm invasive melodies before making way for the thrilling Young At Heart. Its opening tasty groove is irresistible and again has that Birdland like lilt to captivate from its first intensive note. From there the song discovers a harmonious sixties beauty to its enticing which in turn coaxes a greater richness in vocals and sonic colour from within the song. The album is at its pinnacle in its middle as evidenced by this pair and Heads Off with its delicious gnarly riffs aligned to floating melodies and vocal harmonies. In full stroll the song is a raw and abrasing treat which its soothing twists revitalise for another hungry devouring of the caustic rub of the excellent track.

The emotive call of Mirror Ghost slowly envelopes ears and thoughts next, its loud provocative whisper casting a melancholic smile which tantalises the imagination and to a lesser degree emotions. It is a slow burner which convinces in proportion to its creative growth especially the further it drifts into a sonic antagonism, and though it lacks the spark of previous songs it is impossible to not find a good appetite for it.

The final two tracks just do not have the same reach and success, Everyone’s Out which features Robin Stewart (The Naturals), Dom Mitchison (Velcro Hooks), and Richard Clarke (Scarlett Rascal) feeding rather than exciting expectations and the reflective part acoustic, part sonically messy title track, a disappointing end to what turned out to be a rather thrilling and enjoyable encounter. The last two songs will easily please other appetites though whilst Get By as a whole is a release it is fair to say brings a slice of fiery sun to anyone’s day.

Get By is available on limited 12” vinyl (100) and cd from Howling Owl Records as well as digitally from online retailers now!

https://www.facebook.com/townsband

8/10

RingMaster 02/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Cellophane Flowers: Staring At The World

Ringmaster Review – “Staring at The World engages thoughts and imagination like the sun invites the day, with warm mesmeric charm veined with heated enterprise. The Cellophane Flowers is a unique melodic joy to soundtrack steamy days and sultry nights.”

Since the release of their acclaimed If I Was A Girl EP and the following impressive Freeze Me single, UK indie pop band The Cellophane Flowers has been the source of much anticipation for their debut album. Staring At The World gets unveiled upon the world on December 3rd and without any reservations can be said to satisfy all hopes and expectations laid upon the London quartet and more. It is an enterprising and thrilling release of what the band term ‘psychopop’, not that their sounds have that deranged quality really but it does carry a certain disturbed presence which is captivating and quite delicious, a description which can be firmly applied to the album.

The four members of the London based band hail from four different corners of the world joining together to add their own distinct spice to a sound which is unique and imaginative. The first notable thing about The Cellophane Flowers is the distinctive and entrancing voice of Italian songstress Francesca Corradini, her sensual and magnetic distinct tones lighting up the heart of every song. Her vocals have an emotive caress which is as mesmeric as it is charmingly spicy to offer every song on the album a seductive flavour upon the already compelling sounds brought by guitarist Ian Sumner who grew up in Brazil, Australian-Italian-Maltese bassist Luca Napolitano, and drummer Nick Guy who has one side of his heart in Egypt and the other in Suffolk. The album was recorded with producer Dave Allen (The Cure / Depeche Mode / Human League / The Charlatans) and finds the band at their most potent and alluring yet, the ten songs it has within its distinct artwork melodic kisses of warm and tender mischievous pleasure.

 Voices is the first song to coax the ear and beyond, its initial simmering whispers a gentle breeze behind the teasing tones of Corradini and a rich sonic guitar enticement. The song has a building presence which incites the pulse and heart into adding their excitement to the rising energies of the track. As it opens its arms to their fullest melodic expanse the feeling of an imminent crescendo is realised with the energetic chorus and fairly rampant stroll the track elevates into. The teasing is repeated as the infectious charm of the song tinged with a shadowed breath overwhelms the senses for a glorious and inventive start to the release.

The following song The Promise continues the impressive engagement, its sinewy basslines and acidic sonics of the guitars combining to create an eighties gait which reminds of China Crisis at times and Au Pairs in other moments. The riffs of Napolitano has a wonderful snarl to their invention offering dark corners to songs which playfully counter the surrounding crystalline and glowing shards of melodies and rainbow like harmonies. The song finds this union at its height, though each and every track in their varied guises are fuelled by their superbly crafted companionship within the framework of sturdy and compelling skilful beats of Guy.

A trio of tracks in the glistening shapes of Pendulum Eyes, Forever Lost, and Tears Of A Clown sway and beckon next, the first two with a definite sixties air to their lush evocative sound. The first is a simple yet sharply defined pop song with an air of five decades ago whilst the second has a fuller soak of the same time within its smouldering elegance. Throughout there is a Donovan feel to the song within the at times scorching almost epic like indie texture of the song. The last of the three is a gentle weave of tender vocals and equally soothing sounds though again there is that miniscule of feistiness which marks all their songs.

The excellent Rock ’n’ Roll with its thumping and hypnotic drums, which the band say were recorded in a massive disused NHS hospital kitchen, sends extra thrills through the body alongside long term favourite song from the band, Belinda. The boisterous first song of the pair is a sizzling blend of raw guitar strokes and those contagious rhythms framing the ever absorbing vocals of Corradini. It is the most infectious ‘riot’ on the album which just sends tingles through the emotions when it opens up its pulse racing climaxes. It is like Throwing Muses and Whale at a teen hangout with Spinnerette and quite irresistible. Belinda is just as addictive with its calypso groove veined fiery caustic grazing of rock guitars and group harmonies. The track is a ‘collision’ of shadows and warmth lyrically and musically and quite brilliant.

Completed by the tangy western simmering Time, the persuasive Lucky Day, and the closing melodic fondle of In A Hole, the album is a release to accompany any emotion and The Cellophane Flowers a band destined to find a place in many welcoming hearts.

http://www.thecellophaneflowers.co.uk/

RingMaster 26/11/2012

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