Dog ‘N’ Style – Pub’s Calling

dognstyle-promo-pubc-3_RingMasterReview

Unleashing a flavoursome dose of rebel and spirit rousing rock ‘n’ roll within its muscular walls, French heavy rockers Dog ‘N’ Style have just released debut album Pub’s Calling. A hungry and virulent roar from start to finish, the ten track encounter revels in the band’s stoner and hard rock shaded rock ‘n’ roll which in turn inspires ears to greedily devour what is maybe not the most unique incitement but certainly one which leaves thick satisfaction.

Formed in 2013, Epinal hailing Dog ‘N’ Style quickly hit their stride live, the following three years seeing the Spinalien quartet play over a hundred shows across France and further afield including tours in Russia, Spain, and Luxemburg. Sharing stages with the likes of No One is Innocent, The Casualties, Tagada Jones, Ultra Vomit, and Burning Heads along the way the band’s melody infused heavy rocking has been increasingly praised while their self-titled debut EP of 2015 introduced the band to a broader attention which Pub’s Calling can only further ignite.

An earthy revving of an engine opens up the album, its growl welcoming the meaty body and sound of The Best of Me. Straight away the song sets the character and intent of sound and release, riffs and rhythms heavy and imposing as fiery flames of guitar and rich melodies collude with an infectious boisterousness. As most songs within Pub’s Calling, there is something familiar about the opener but a recognisable air which wraps the band’s commanding and enterprising songwriting to fine effect.

art_RingMasterReviewThe great start to the album continues with I Did Something Bad, the growl lined vocals of Greg Hal a magnetic essence as swinging riffs and rhythms unite while the guitars of Yan Pierrat and Hal spin a web of sonic and melodic adventure. Like its predecessor, there is an instinctive catchiness to the song which is irresistible even when the bass of Robin Rob’s grooves along on its own. The band lists inspirations as the likes of Black Stone Cherry, Steel Panthers, Red Fang, and Nashville Pussy, and it is those kinds of influences which especially leap around within the album’s second track.

Pretty Fly reveals a grouchier intent in its nature and sound from the off yet again grooves and the inviting tones of Hal are quickly seducing ears as the mighty rhythmic swings of drummer Boub Tchak resonate. A cantankerously toned bassline entangles the warmer but no less intrusive riffs and grooves of the guitars, it all contrasting and mixing masterfully with the melodic and fiery imagination which blossoms across the track before One Day springs its Gruntruck spiced proposal and in turn Bad Motorcycle swaggers in with its hard/classic rock fuelled stomp. Neither track quite live up to the heights of the first trio of songs yet spicy grooves and infectious roars as well as the sonic dexterity offered ensures both leave enjoyment high.

The release hits top gear again with Night Losers, its funk infested basslines alone sparking an already eager appetite as the tendrils of tangy guitar entangle ears. Again vocals and rhythms involve the listener with ease and though originality is maybe limited the imagination is swiftly hooked by the songs inventive twists, turns, and snarling enterprise.

With its southern rock hued melodies, the same applies to the excellent Running Out which swiftly seduces as sultry sonic sighs amidst calmer vocals and energies immerse ears in its smouldering but rhythmically imposing climate. Carrying a fierce snarl in its mellower stroll, the track is outstanding, best track contender which though closely rivalled within the album leaves the moment which lingers longest even as the bruising and thickly catchy rumble of Never Trust An Asshole mightily consumes ears and pleasure next.

The album’s title track is heavy rock ‘n’ roll at it most compelling and rousing, rhythms and riffs enslaving instincts as grooves and almost toxic melodies infest the imagination. It too is a battleground of attitude loaded aggression and energy infused with a tapestry of warm melodic invention and dustily charming harmonies.

Ensuring the album ends on a high similar to how it started, it calls time on the boozy rabble-rousing with the final Couple Of Beers, a track again weaving all the traits and contrasting shades of the Dog ‘N’ Style sound and invention in one exhilarating escapade. It is a fine end to Pub’s Calling, an album which may not be about to change the direction of muscle driven rock ‘n’ roll but certainly gives it something to get lively about.

Pub’s Calling is out now across most online stores.

 

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Pete RingMaster 21/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Versus You – Moving On

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Since forming in 2005, Luxembourg’s Versus You has become one of Europe’s most captivating and hard- working pop punk bands, as well as the source of much anticipation when news of a new release comes to light. The release of new album Moving On has been no different in raising a keen appetite and equally does not detour from the band’s knack at providing a thoroughly enjoyable romp of punk rock at its most accessible and infectious. The album does not set a new trail for the genre or band come to that, instead it simply parades twelve songs which just do what Versus You does best, capture the imagination with virulent hooks and melodies whilst thrilling thoughts and emotions with superbly crafted and lyrically insightful songs.

With a decade of stirring up audiences and fans on the impending horizon, Versus You has kept the energy and passion of their presence and intent alone impressively high over the years. Renowned for their hunger to tour and take their sound to fans, the band has been a regular attack of gigs and tours across their homeland, as well as East and Western Europe, sharing stages with the likes of NOFX, Alkaline Trio, Rise Against, White Flag, The Casualties, Bayside, Jimmy Eat World and many more. Equally their previous trio of albums as well as EPs and an outstanding split release with White Flag, has thrilled and helped thrust the band to the fore of Europe’s punk scene, even with a spate of line-up changes especially in the sticks swinging department. Fourth full-length Moving on is another commanding and deeply satisfying proposition, as said not one to change the face of pop punk but easily reinforcing Versus You as one of the leading lights.

Produced by Chips Kiesbye, the album opens with the immediately rigorously coaxing When It All Goes Down, its initial scrub of guitar an intriguing irritant to awaken attention and appetite alike. The song is soon into a feisty stroll Versus You Moving On Packshot 960x960with the rhythms of drummer Jerry Kirpach punctuating the mesh of caustic riffs conjured by Eric Rosenfeld and Dario Bruno. It is not an unrelenting attack though, the song respectful in its aggression and open in its web of easily snagging hooks with the bass of Giordano Bruno adding its own throaty lure to add extra bait to the first easily addictive blaze of sound from the album. Lyrically the song is one of many looking at band life, whilst other Rosenfeld penned themes include traveling, making friends, relationships, and life’s issues, songs never afraid to deal with unexpected things directly.

The following If The Camels Die, We Die makes the strong start look like a mere appetiser, its eager energy and urgent enticement of catchy melodies and deeply hooking snares impressively catchy. The bass finds an extra snarl to its tone which hits the spot perfectly whilst the slightly grizzled vocals of Rosenfeld only add to the raw and honest edge of the encounter. The guitar designs also standout with their imagination within the narrow but full flight of the track, a success emulated and more by the next up A Way With Words. The song is a real pop song, its compelling power pop radiance irresistible to feet and voice. Essences of its sound remind of Good Charlotte and Smashmouth, these spices teasing thoughts pleasingly whilst around them riffs and rhythms cast a more sinew tempting to the potent revelry.

Both On The Town and Be Better Than Me gets the fire in the belly raging, the first a terrific stomp of grazing riffs cut across by flames of acidic melodies as the excellent vocals explore relationships. Its successor is a mellower enticement but no less riveting in its punchy beats and rock ‘n’ roll bred suasion which brings a touch of Pinhead Gunpowder as well as irresistible unpredictable twists and excellent additional female vocals to its glory. The pair push the rising stature of the album up another step, the first especially a highlight of the album with its dramatic air and ridiculously contagious incitement musically and lyrically. Their success is matched easily by Skinny And Distracted, roguish rhythms and stabbing hooks uniting for a Boxcar Racer like treat. At ease persistently changing its urgency and sinew built gait, the track is another anthemic coaxing impossible to resist joining in with but just as strongly brings new thought provoking adventure and imagination to its body.

One That Can See is a resourceful and adventurous romp for ears and emotions, though not finding the same heights as previous songs even with its appealing sonic endeavour, whilst Stay Down, Stay Strong also lacks that same passions igniting spark though it provides a fiery rock song which is as infectiously binding as it is evocatively coloured by a melodic rock intensity. Both tracks leave appetite and reactions well fed nevertheless before Kitchen-sink Drama leaves them bloated and blissful from its insatiably contagious and bruising stomp. There is an antagonistic and defiant edge to the song which emulates from the vocals and lyrics to inspire a strong drama and depth to its presence, whilst hooks and melodies complete the enslavement with masterful and instinctive invention.

30 Pills unveils another big highlight within the album, the provocative song themed around somebody being HIV positive. Hard hitting lyrically and musically, Rosenfeld alone bringing a deeper growl to his narrative, the track roars and incites yet still employs some of the juiciest hooks and melodically drenched chords to persistently inflame ears and emotions. It is a glorious strike leaving the final pair of Still I Persist and You Are My Friend a hard task to follow. They make valiant attempts though, the first a vigorously solid slab of muscle driven punk rock with passion fuelled intensity and the closing song a slower slice of punk balladry which with Green Day like melodic potency, brings a smouldering and evocative finale to greedily embrace. It is a fine end to a great album.

Moving On is arguably a release which delivers what you expect from Versus You without the band making great strides forward but with songs that simply fill every need and want of a pop punk enticement, and with plenty of extra thrills included, it is a release which simply leaves pleasure and contentment the overriding result and that is more than good enough to unreservedly recommend the album.

Moving On is available now on Bomber Music @ http://bombermusic.limitedrun.com/products/528789-versus-you-moving-on-cd-and-vinyl-lp-and-dl in download, CD, black vinyl, and Ltd Ed vinyl versions.

https://www.facebook.com/vsyou

8.5/10

RingMaster 21/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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