The DeRellas – Freakshow

DeRellas_RingMasterReview

Kicking off their own album Rockaway Records in rousing style, UK punk ‘n’ rollers The DeRellas release new mini-album Freakshow. It is an insatiable six track roar of the band’s familiar glam infested sleaze punk rock ‘n’ roll but equally their most instinctive punk rock centred trespass upon the senses. The result an incitement which just fires up the instincts to be bad whilst treating ears to their most irresistible proposal yet.

Freakshow is also the first offering from the London hailing quartet without vocalist Robbie, one of the band’s founders along with bassist Timmy DeRella. Stepping forward to fill the spot as if he has always been there is Stevie D, the band’s line-up completed by lead guitarist Luca DeRella and also new drummer Bish, once of Flesh for Lulu. It is a foursome which goes straight for the jugular with the Pat Collier produced Freakshow; from its first breath tearing up its surroundings like Johnny Thunders meets The Boys infested with the raw power pop of The Quakes.

Rip It Up descends on the senses first, from its first rap of drums and spicy grooves winding around ears with a salacious attitude backed by tangy grooves and predacious rhythms. Stevie’s vocals are just as cantankerous as the sounds around him, carrying a great irritable edge potently backed by Timmy and Luca as a strong catchiness invades song and ears. Carrying a touch of The Damned to its darker riffs and rhythmic imposing, the song without ripping up trees is a strong and enjoyable start to Freakshow which blossoms into a greater beast hereon in.

Strung Out Sin City grumbles and rumbles upon an already keen appetite straight away next. A nagging potency lines its riffs whilst rhythmically the track is enjoyably heavier and darker than its predecessor, it all combining with a lively imagination which sees the song quickly eclipsing the opener. It too has a chorus which demands involvement whilst Stevie’s rhythmic guitar prowess is a great echo of the sonic enterprise cast by Luca. There is plenty about The DeRellas sound which is familiar but as here rarely to the detriment of creating its own character and persuasive individuality.

cover_RingMasterReviewHinted at in the last song, a great 999 flavouring invades next up Soho Hotel, an essence which accentuates the virulence of the song and its fiercely catchy demeanour led by the swinging bass groove of Timmy and Stevie’s rousing delivery. Bish’s beats equally make a lively impact throughout as sonic flames escape the strings of Luca. The song is another step up in power and adventure within Freakshow more than matched by the album’s outstanding title track. Taking best track honours, it is a bad boy encounter; defiant in heart and aggressive in bearing stirring up all the punk rock/rock ‘n’ roll instincts within itself and the listener.

Dress Up, Mess Up is another pushing thoughts towards 999 comparisons without losing its own DeRellas identity; the song a boisterous stomp of hungry riffs and bitchy rhythms as vocals and melodic toxicity inflame an eagerness to get involved. Again you could say surprises are low yet everything about the song and indeed Freakshow is fresh and all persuasive.

The release closes with a captivating version of the Adam and The Ants track Plastic Surgery, The DeRellas giving it a rawer Sex Pistols/The Adicts edge which just hits the spot dead centre.

Freakshow is The DeRellas at their most punk yet and no coincidence that the album outshines their previous and thoroughly enjoyable reputation marking encounters. It is also a great start to their new label which we would suggest in providing more of the same will be hitting, like the band, far loftier heights.

Freakshow is out now through Rockaway Records digitally and on CD and 10” green vinyl @ http://thederellas.bigcartel.com/

Up Coming Live Dates:

Friday 11 November – Birmingham, Hare & Hounds (with The Black Bombers and The Primevals)

Thursday 17 November – Bristol, Thunderbolt (with The Setbacks)

Saturday 19 November – Reading, Rising Sun Arts Centre (with Rage DC and The Go Go Cult)

Sunday 27 November – London, The 100 Club (with The Crunch)

Sunday 11 December – Edinburgh, Bannermans (with Buzzbomb + more TBC)

http://derellas.com/   https://www.facebook.com/TheDeRellas/   https://twitter.com/thederellas

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Ripper – A.D.

Photo by Kate Murray

Photo by Kate Murray

The background to US band Ripper is simple; four punks who list former and current bands like Grotto, The Hidden Chord, Rolling Blackouts, Bombay Sweets, Zoo Animal, and Ghostmouth on their CVs, and draw on inspirations such as Dead Kennedys, Germs, Sonic Youth, and The Beach Boys for their virulent 2-3 minute punk rock songs. What also is uncomplicated is the fact that the band’s tracks and indeed new EP A.D. are bad ass rock ‘n’ roll devilment to get lustful and greedy over. The five-track roar is a stomp of dirty and antagonistic punk ‘n’ roll but with a virulence and feverish energy that just whips up the passions one blistering anthem by another ferocious anthem.

Hailing from L.A., New Jersey, Minneapolis, and Saint Paul, Ripper consists of vocalist/guitarist Danny Holden, guitarist Sean Levine, bassist /vocalist Noah Paster, and drummer Jeff Brown. January 2015 saw the release of their self-titled debut EP, a well-received introduction now eclipsed by the raw contagion and old school punk meets modern rock discordance of A.D.

photo- -Aaron-Oas

photo- -Aaron-Oas

The one minute incitement of Chain Fight gets the revelry off to a mighty start, guitars and feisty rhythms colluding in a sonic mugging driven by the just as quickly involving vocals of Holden, they potently backed by those of Paster. For those US based influences mentioned earlier, there is a just as open UK feel to the bracing roar to these ears, thoughts of The Vibrators and The Lurkers coming to mind as the brief and thrilling starter gets pleasure and appetite all riled up.

Latest single On The Curb follows and just as swiftly lays down catchy grooves and spiky hooks amidst a rhythmic and sonic tempestuousness. Within this storm though, the band skilfully slips the listener into mellower climes and with consummate ease belligerently leaps out of them again as that infectious attribute shown in the opener fuels verse and especially chorus. Again British comparisons come to mind more easily, the vintage and rousing attitude of Angelic Upstarts/The Boys aligning with the current discord irreverence found in bands like Asylums, the result a boisterously flirtatious incitement.

One Desire roars and brawls with the listener next, it a wonderfully antagonistic yet catchy invasion of the senses again bridging the decades of punk and noise rock superbly. As its companions, the song is the breeder of addiction; a want to indulge again hard to resist but postponed for the intrigue of what comes next, which is the just as outstanding Lick The Knife. Spicing its initial predacious prowling of ears with waves of off-kilter guitar seducing, an enticing weave punctured by the dark tones of Paster’s bass and rapier like swings of Brown, the track continues to restrain intensity and its assault as it slowly stalks the senses. The track is a compelling persuasion showing that there is much more than just punk influences to the heart of their riveting sound, whispers of post punk and noise rock igniting even greater greed for the release.

The EP is concluded by Never Win, a blaze of warped grooves and abrasive riffing speared by intensive beats amidst the throaty groan of the bass. The guitars of Holden and Levine, as shown elsewhere on the EP, are accomplished at unleashing a web of sonic bait to get eagerly entangled in, but here turning up the creative juices to spring their own thrilling trap within the larger delicious slavery of song and release.

Ripper is a band with the breath of the seventies and the creative devilry of all the punk years since, with plenty of their own distinctive imagination to shape, as shown by their EPs, fiercely memorable and exciting exploits.

The A.D. EP is available now as a co-release between Land Ski and Lawn Chair Records, and @ https://rippermpls.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/666RIPPER/   https://twitter.com/rippermpls

Pete RingMaster 08/12/2-015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Duncan Reid and The Big Heads – The Difficult Second Album

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If it was as problematic as its title might allude to, The Difficult Second Album from Duncan Reid and The Big Heads has no intentions of showing it within its fluid and mischievous power pop revelry. The trickiness of following an impressing debut is one of those issues which is arguably more imagined and supposed than generally realised, and certainly there is no hint of anything but an equally thrilling and potent encounter from Reid for his second solo offering. Spawned from the same punk and pop rock devilry which marked its predecessor and its creator’s career, The Difficult Second Album is a contagious romp which explores more power pop essences this time around but still provides an instinctive and inescapable incitement of hook laden rock ‘n’ roll.

Reid’s impact and inspiration on punk rock came as bassist/vocalist of melodic punks The Boys, an outfit which Joey Ramone declared his favourite band in the eighties, and indeed that decade saw Reid alongside fellow Boys member Casino Steel provide backing vocals for the live version of The Ramones hit, Baby I Love You. Alongside band founders Matt Dangerfield and Steel, as well as Honest John Plain and Jack Black, Reid and The Boys released four albums and a host of singles before splitting in 1981.Eighteen years later the band reformed for a couple of shows in Tokyo, which in turn eventually led to a full comeback and tours across varied areas of the world. Leaving the band in 2011, Reid set about recording his debut solo album Little Big Head which gripped attention and appetites upon its release in 2012. Now he returns with its successor and another excursion into majestic power and punk pop.

With multi-instrumentalist Alexander Gold, guitarist Sophie Lynch, and drummer Ciara Lavers alongside him, Reid and the band swiftly light up ears and appetite with opener Another City. Within a breath melodies are teasing and captivating whilst crisp beats and a dark bass seducing are adding their potent coaxing to the songs immediately catchy invitation. It is not long before the tones of Reid bring their distinctive hues, his voice somewhere between Ste McCabe, Pete Shelly, and Ian Broudie, and fuelling the track with even greater temptation. With suggestive melodies dancing on the senses, the song is a lively croon setting the release off in fine and magnetic style.

The strong start is instantly surpassed by the outstanding Baby Doll, its entrance a flight of Devo-esque keys bred persuasion which has the imagination in the palms of their colourful hands. duncan_album_2Nestling into a minimalistic stroll with a tangy bassline escorting Reid’s compelling narrative, the song lyrically as intriguing and enthralling as the sounds it casts, it is in no time a devilish treat. With an even pace even through its mini crescendos, the track persistently inflames and ignites ears with spicy enterprise and Pixies like imagination across its singular rhythmic direction. The song is an early pinnacle for the album backed strongly by C’est La Vie, a juicy pop infused blaze of bracing riffs and glowing harmonies. Admittedly at its strongest in the verses rather than the hazy choruses, the track is a magnet for the passions and vocal participation, raising an eager smile at every turn of its mischief.

Both End of the World and Joe keep things bubbling vivaciously, the first of the two a weave of incendiary rhythms and flavoursome chords which at times are early Undertones like and in others more like The Briefs, whilst the second is a riveting drama of Beatle-esque melodrama and melodic rock colouring with a gorgeous breeze of melancholic strings matched by keys. Though neither can quite match those before them, each adds a rich new shade to the character of the album and a treat for ears to devour before Just As Good As I Used To Be unveils its quaint balladry. It is a slow embrace and admittedly persuasion until it suddenly erupts into a fevered pop punk stomp which in turn ignites the already appealing vocal lures with extra spice and energy. From its appealing but underwhelming start the track turns into the life of the party and feeds the greedy appetite now in place for the album with its exciting The Freshies like revelry.

Little Fingers and Toes steps up next and straight away is flinging spicy riffs and hooks which spark in the imagination with Rezillos like radiance. It should be stated that for all the references and reminders moments in songs inspire they more often than not are fleeting or simple essences which only spice up the unique propositions. The song itself has a curled lip to its presence, a belligerence which is all punk rock and lingering attitude, even as contagious hooks and vocal harmonies steal attention. As across the album, the excellent encounter is unfussy and to the point but still a masterful web of textures and sounds dragging feet and emotions into its persuasion with sublime ease.

The initially folk lilted Long Long Gone is next and strides with a blues flame to its accomplished design and air before making way for Not The Kind of Guy Girls Hug, another song with an open whisper of Lennon and McCartney to its charm. Adding another enjoyable twist to the album, the song still lacks the spark of its predecessors though admittedly that is more personal taste driven than any shortcoming in its skilled persuasion, though it is soon forgotten as One Night in Rio uncages its rock ‘n’ roll rampage. An out and out punk stomp with a blues rock underbelly, the track is the kind of song Reid has become renowned for which is hungry punk rock at its melodic and insatiable best, this track offering a great Ramones meets Eddie and the Hot Rods tasting.

The thrilling success of the song is instantly emulated by Wasting Time, this showing distinct and sultry personality with its first flame of blues and surf rock enriched glaze of guitar. It is a tempting which never leaves the rigorous lure of the song, only lays in wait during moments of predatory riffing for the chance to again soak subsequent melodies and harmonies. A radiant gem of a suasion for body and emotions, the song leaves for closer When We were Young to bring the infectious shindig to a close. Toying with synth rock and indie pop within its alluring body, the track is a tenaciously satisfying end to a release which makes you groan in disappointment once its last note is cast.

The Difficult Second Album hits the sweet spot time and time again across its nostalgia and modern infused body, and even when it misses the target for individual tastes, it still leaves a feverish and lingering wake which only leads to a hunger for more.

The Difficult Second Album is available now via LBH Records @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00MPNSP9I/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1634&creative=19450&creativeASIN=B00MPNSP9I&linkCode=as2&tag=uberoc-21&linkId=N5K5ZLSPALFB6SUJ

http://web.little-big-head.de/

RingMaster 17/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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