The Amsterdam Red Light District – Sapere Aude

Though The Amsterdam Red Light District seized major plaudits as they boldly established themselves within the punk/hardcore/rock scene with second album Gone For a While in 2014, the release still missed stirring up the kind of fervour in us that others were finding the certainly highly enjoyable encounter. It seems that we were just waiting for a particular undefined spark which has now undoubtedly caught within the France based band’s new fury, Sapere Aude. THARD’s third album is a beast of a roar, as ferociously infectious as it is instinctively irritable and emotionally tempestuous and for us by far the best thing the band has unleashed.

With inspirations found in the likes of Refused, The Bronx, The Ghost of a Thousand, and The Bled, Europe has been the broad sounding board for the 2005 founded band’s sound over the past few years, THARD sharing stages with the likes of Refused, Anti-Flag, Thrice, 36 Crazyfists, Comeback Kid, and Slayer alongside their own successful shows and tours. This month sees the band off on their travels again with Sapere Aude lock and loaded in their arsenal.

It opens up with Nobody Moves Like You and a spiral of acidic grooves and heavy handed rhythms which lure ears and attention like a magnet. Swiftly it settles into a tempestuous stroll as catchy as it is belligerent, Elio Sxone’s vocals an alluring temper in its midst backed by those increasingly captivating grooves cast by guitarist Maxxx Comby. A blend of hardcore and metal, the track has a natural swing which alone infested the appetite with the dark tones of Greg Clert’s bass adding to the instinctive temptation. Vocally Sxone brings adventure and diversity to match the raw and skilfully woven sounds around him in one glorious inventive brute of an introduction.

The following The Best Is Yet To Come is just as quickly and intrusively gripping. Featuring Cancer Bats front man Liam Cormier, the track simultaneously grumbles and seduces in voice and sound, the rhythmic trespass of drummer Julien Chanel driving its intent and forceful urgency as the guitar and melodic aspect of the vocals bring a ferocity tempering enterprise. As its predecessor, it demands and commands willing attention with adventure and imagination.

Two songs in and already the album has whipped up personal passions missed by previous offerings and only ups the ante with the fiery punk ‘n’ roll of Need. Again vocals and music create a cauldron of contrasts and ferocity with balance and adventure, the song having something of Every Time I Die meets The Ghost of a Thousand to it as it too inflamed the senses and appetite before Wild Life sparked its own blaze of praise and ardour with its hellacious creative clamour. Blending various aspects of ferocious intrusion and melodic captivation to its punk metal, vocal harmonics adding to the drama, the track simply whipped up greedy attention.

Carry On is an infection of temptation, tenacious hooks and riffs colluding with the song’s emotional irritancy and rousing breath; all bound in an enterprise as persistently catchy as it is rapacious. It all comes though with an ebb and flow which only increases its fascination and imagination while Over The Fence in turn uncages a sonic squall and a senses battering rhythmic dance which holds similarities to its predecessor before unveiling its own quest of creative discontent.

The turbulent spirals of Waiting For The Day needs little time to incite intrigue and imagination next, its opening web subsequently draped in vocal and sonic dispute again as magnetic as it is corrosive in a psyche infecting mix which nags and harries as it bruises and excites. That raw incursion is only intensified in The Whole City Burns, its melodic metal aligning with feral punk in an invigoratingly abrasive holler loaded with spiky riffs, barbed hooks, and melodic fire.

The album concludes with firstly Evil Stakeholders, a slab of crotchety yet melodically bewitching raging which maybe did not quite inflame as others before it but only reinforced the impressive character and force of Sapere Aude. Its title track is the final offering, an outro of intimation and samples reflecting the portentous state of the world with bursts of rhythmic incitement. Maybe better served as an intro to the album in some ways, it is a fascinating last breath to one striking release.

From first note to last Sapere Aude truly stirred our fullest passions, that anticipation for bigger bolder things ahead sparked by its predecessor more than realised in a release sure to feature as one of the year’s greatest moments.

Sapere Aude is out now via Red Light Records.

https://www.tarldtheband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/tarldtheband    https://twitter.com/tarld

Pete RingMaster 08/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Amsterdam Red Light District – Gone For A While

PHOTO HD Promo3 TARLD

With a mouthful of a name and a flavoursome depth to their captivating sound, French rockers The Amsterdam Red Light District unleash their new and highly anticipated album Gone For A While. It is a striking encounter which intrigues and pleases at every turn, the band’s mix of alternative rock in a fusion of melodic punk and hardcore, ensuring a persistent drama and vivacity to each and every track. That it does not ignite the passions as rigorously as it maybe should have is a mystery and probably a personal thing, but certainly the eleven track proposition provides a tasty stomp for ears and imagination to invest a real appetite in.

Seemingly with members based in Lyon and California, The Amsterdam Red Light District since forming in 2005 has earned a potent reputation and recognition for their sound and live presence. Employing inspirations from the likes of Refused, The Bronx, The Ghost of a Thousand, and The Bled into their own distinct ideas and invention, the band has made striking marks through debut album Dear Diary in 2010 and the I’m Not Insane EP two years later, their success backed by a live presence which has seen The Amsterdam Red Light District play all over Europe with great regularity, feature at festivals such as Groezrock, Mair1, Resurrection, Sylak and Rockstorm, as well as play with bands such as Refused, Anti-Flag, Thrice, 36 Crazyfists, Comeback Kid, and Slayer. In July this year the band set about recording second full-length Gone for a While, its release like the first with Red Light Records, now upon us and likely to only intensify the spotlight on the band.

Opener Time Flies swiftly has ears and feet involved in its feisty stomp, riffs and rhythms an immediate frenzy bound in enticing grooves. Vocalist Elio Sxone is a commanding presence within the raucous persuasion from his first syllable, whilst guitarist Maxime Comby is soon complimenting his caustic riffs with sonic enterprise. Arguably there are no real surprises within the song but equally it is a refreshing and magnetic offering with real power to its energy and persuasion capped by the great Red Tape like vocal roars alongside the velvety shadowed tones of bass provided by Gregory Clert.

The attention grabbing start is surpassed by the fascinating Just Have A Good Time, its initial Southern rock/Cajun twang the lead into a ferociously fiery and impressive incitement. Swiftly the_amsterdam_red_light_district_hb_251114revealing more of the depths and diversity to the band’s sound, the heavy rock fuelled track stomps with contagious and aggressive intent driven forcibly by the imposing skills of drummer Julien Chanel. The song though is still as welcoming and catchy as its predecessor, whilst the blend of raw and melodic vocals work a treat across song and subsequently the album, their union as bracing as the contrasting sounds igniting the beast of a song.

   Million Miles Away is no slouch in getting the blood running hungrily through band and listener either, its on-going charge littered with spicy hooks aligned to harsh and melodic elements of punk. Fuelled with a torrent of barbed and addiction forging twists, with further outbreaks of chunky riffing and virulent grooving piling on the temptation, the song keeps the album flying high before handing over ears and emotions to the similarly compelling and voraciously sculpted A Chance To Change. Its energy is as full and insatiable as in its predecessor, and with a thick melodic tempting to its rigorous tenacity, provides another weighty slab of punk hunger and irrepressible contagion.

The brief evocative presence of Final Boarding Call is underwhelming, the track seemingly an intro into the album’s following title track but lacks anything to halt the urge to simply move straight to Gone For A While, itself a song lacking something compared to the first quartet of encounters but reinforcing the craft and imagination surging through the album with ease, if not the earlier adventure shown. Its gentler caresses definitely make for a satisfying companionship before Behind Your Sunglasses unveils its fiercer presence and emotion. Still missing that spark of bold inventiveness, the track impresses as it bawls and croons simultaneously, the vocals especially gripping within the tasty web of chords and hooks.

Both These Kids That Your Parents Warned You About and Come Closer leave ears and appetite full of lingering pleasure, the first with gnarly bass tones and bordering on hostile rhythms, a grouchy and thrilling protagonist. Its growl is wholly infectious, as is the return of that bolder inventiveness which marked the start of the album as the track shows itself to be another lofty peak in the landscape of the release. Its successor is built from the same template, a hearty snarl coating every predatory note and heavily swung beat, not forgetting the raw vocal side of the band, whilst grooves and hooks find their own unique venom to infest the imagination.

The two songs has body and thoughts back hungrily engaged before making way for the addiction causing Set The World On Fire, the track one of those anthemic stomps which only a loss of hearing can deter. Its muscular brawl of a seduction is followed by closing track Waiting For So Long, an encounter featuring Justin Schlosberg from Hell Is For Heroes. A final blaze of rugged and melodic punk vitality which maybe misses truly lighting the passions, it nevertheless gives the album a furnace of a send-off whilst egging on the urge to dive right back into the heart of Gone For A While.

At the start we said that the album did not inflame the strength of ardour that it probably should have. It is hard to define why, certainly there is not an abundance of surprises but there is plenty to enthral and spark a greed for more. It is easy to expect Gone For A While to be a major trigger for the passions in a great many though, and for the rest of us it has to be said The Amsterdam Red Light District has placed a strong enough grip with the album that anticipation for their next endeavour is unavoidable.

Gone For A While is available now via Red Light Records, digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/fr/album/gone-for-a-while/id918599363 and on CD @ http://tarld.bigcartel.com/

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RingMaster 26/11/2014

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Life and Death Experiences: an interview with Corey Skowronski of American Standards

AS

Things are starting to happen for US hardcore band American Standards in awareness and stature, though the Arizona quartet have been brewing up a fine reputation ever since forming a few years back. Their Still Life EP pulled strong attention towards the band with its exciting blend of punk and noise rock within the hardcore intensity whilst their live performances have made the four piece one of the most talked about and thrilling proposition emerging from the US rock underground. Recently signed to Victory Records we thought we should learn more about the band, their music, and their promising to be explosive future. Thankfully bassist Corey Skowronski was more than happy to help our exploration of American Standards and let us in on a secret or two.

Hi Corey and thanks for sparing time to let us find out more about yourselves and the band.

First of all simply introduce the band for us and tell us about the origins of American Standards.

American standards started a few years back in 2010 and in the course of two and a half years we’ve really come along way.

How did you all meet?

With the new line-up we’ve all met through mutual friends and playing shows together.

Was punk and hardcore the music which you grew up to or did you have a wider ‘soundtrack’ to your informative years which your music does suggest?

Growing up punk was a genre of music I was heavily into and other than that just old metal but for the most part I listened to a little bit of everything. If it sounded good to me I’d listen to it.

What was the spark to actually decide to start the band?

For me personally it was always something I wanted to do, to play in a band. I had quit the job I was working at the time in 2010 and was ready for something new that’s when I decided that I would commit to the idea and the dream and begin looking for people to start a band with, and here we are now

You come from Phoenix, Arizonia, apart from the obvious names coming from the city like Jimmy Eat World, The Bled, and Job For A Cowboy, is there a vibrant bed of punk and rock talent in the more underground scene?

Everyone that I know of in bands from here has talent that needs to be heard. There’s all the band that we help with and are close to like Your Young, Sleepwalker, The Last March Of The Ents. Then there’s the old Column III dudes and Lariats of course.

Many bands say their home town/city has influenced or made a big impact on their music, is it the same for American Standards?AS2

Honestly I don’t feel that at all. We write music that we like to play and as far as actually playing here, yeah there are people that are in the scene and care but for the most part it ain’t what it used to be…

Last year you released your excellent Still Life EP how did you find the recording process and what did you learn from it which will impact on future recordings?

Me personally I like to write the song, record it, listen to it, then add or take things out that don’t fit. That’s the time to kind of experiment, in my eyes, with all the ideas you have for that song that you have accumulated over the whole process.

I feel that we did do that for the Still Life EP and with J & M they were totally cool with that. The one thing I think we will try now with the new stuff is to get everyone involved in the experimenting with ideas stage so every song has something from everyone and it shows.

Talking of recordings you are working on your debut album I believe?

Sort of…Geoff and Brennen our drummer and guitarist are stepping down but we are having Mike Cook of Your Young drum and Craig Burch of The Last March of the Ents play bass. I’ll be swinging over from bass to guitar and am very stoked. The songs we have recorded right now are going to be released as an EP titled The Death of Rhythm and Blues and after that we’ll then start on the all new full length.

You are known as a DIY band so how did the link up with Victory Records who will release your next release come about?

We were at a point where we felt ready to take the plunge into looking at possibly teaming up with a label and at the time we had many offers and we decided that Victory and the sub label We Are Triumphant was the most promising.

946270_660704840625239_2035397775_nCan you give us some ideas as what the EP will hold and does Still Life give a good indication of what to expect, more diversity and sonic/noise exploration?

The way I look at it, The Death of Rhythm and Blues is the second half of Still Life.

Have you approached the new songs and EP differently to how Still Life was created?

A little…We definitely worked together more in writing the songs and took our time with it. We didn’t want to pump a song out and call it a day.

When can we expect the EP?

The 14th of September is the date.

Tell us more about the it and what you have developed further in the new songs from those on Still Life.

New songs are great we have worked on a few things in them to give them that cherry on top and their own character and like I mention I feel this is the second half to Still Life. It feels that way at least to me.

How does the writing process within the band work?

We all come together with either a riff, half of a song, or just a little idea and we give it some structure. We jam it out and more ideas come to mind and we try and incorporate those as well.

So it is a democratic process within the band for songs and stuff?

Definitely democratic, we want to give everyone in the band their voice. Every one of us has ideas for songs and good or bad we want to hear them cause who knows what can come from them.

You have a great reputation for your live show, any particularly memorable moments or shows to date?as3

The show we just played in Tucson, InFest, that was a great show. We had a lot of fun. For me a long time ago we played a show in Tucson again, at the old Skrappys. We were getting down and playing and somehow I smashed the head of my bass into my own head and I just started pouring blood. I kept playing, can’t stop the good ole’ boys in American Standards. That story has never been shared with the outside world until now. You are all free now to make fun of me for hitting myself in the face.

Is the live aspect of the band the most thrilling for you or more the creation of new songs and records?

Writing, recording, and hearing the new songs matter. With all the songs we’ve done, once we finish them I’m stoked on them, and when I can play a song that I get stoked on, the energy I pull from it just kicks in and that’s when we can go crazy and let it all out.

Once released the energy from those songs just takes over and that’s what I love. When a song can take you from one point, one mind set and in the course of two and a half minutes it carries you to a completely different one.

Once more thank you to talking with us, anything else you would like to add?

September 14th get the new EP and let us know what you all think.

Lastly would you like to give us the five most influential records on you personally?

The Fall of Troy – Manipulator

Pantera – Reinventing the Steel

Phil Collins – No Jacket Required

Norma Jean – Oh God the Aftermath

Smashing Pumpkins – Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness.

https://www.facebook.com/AmericanStandards

Read the Still Life review @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/06/27/american-standards-still-life/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 25/07/2017

 

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North Paw: Trepidation EP

North Paw Promo Shot

A year ago North Paw emerged from the ashes of Forever Wednesday to introduce themselves with their impressive self-titled EP. Now they return with its successor Trepidation to show that the early acclaimed thoughts about the band were maybe short changing them. The new EP sees the Alton, UK band with a maturer incisive sound and an accomplished craft which sets them apart from most others.

The Hampshire quintet of vocalist Charlie Grout-Smith, guitarist/vocalist Spencer Huet, guitarist Josh Irvine, bassist Jack Robinson, and drummer Andy Allen since their debut has been heavily gigging including a tour with Violet, in support of their debut, and all to strong responses. The EP itself though with a limited release also sparked a marked increase in their ever growing fan-base to match the enthused reviews and acclaim it received. Taking influences from the likes of Glassjaw, Thrice, Norma Jean and The Bled, the band has found another level of quality to their song writing and sound to make their imaginative new record a real breath of fresh air within UK post-hardcore.

As with its predecessor, Trepidation is a burning fire of expression and explosive sound, a stirring merger of unbridled aggression North Paw Cover Artworkand melodic flames which is as compulsive as it is welcomingly intrusive. Evolving from that first release though the new EP has discovered an even more defined breath and imagination to its passion and invention. The first EP was not lacking in that department but this five track beast has an unpredictability and depth of skilled ideas which seamlessly inspire and invigorate the core of the already established sound. It is not given to you on a plate though, each song making demands on the welcoming senses with the extra ingenuity veining each track the richest of rewards.

Extinction is the first to place its fiery hands upon the ear, an opening abrasion of shadowed guitar sonics, scarring vocals, and punchy rhythms wakening the senses before the track steps wholly into view with an energy which makes you step back. Into its stride the band combines great clean vocals from Huet  accompanied by Grout-Smithwith those already secured coarse squalls of verbal passion. It is a strong and well-crafted mix which reflects and spears the similarly structured sounds. The bass of Robinson is a wonderful gnarly presence throughout whilst the guitars manipulate and wring their notes of every ounce of heart and skilled invention they hold.

It is a heady start equalled by the following Face Needs and Habitus. The first is as intense and dramatic as the opener, a song which ravages the ear whilst caresses the gaping wounds with warm heartfelt harmonies and sizzling melodies. Everything about the band is impressive within each song but the vocals certainly stand out, especially the clean delivery, and are something other bands could learn from in combining extremes without depleting their strengths against each other. The later presence of Face Needs is a delicious wrap of alternative rock and a hardcore like spicery which has one flinching and drooling. The second of the two is a fury of punk and hardcore fired intensity with rampaging damaging riffs, towering rhythms, and a deep grazing of harsh vocals which reminds of US band Red Tape. It is a sonic scourge and one irresistible violation which still finds room to seduce with fine melodic invention.

Oil, Gratulerar continues in a vein very close to Habitus which at first was a disappointing beginning though the song soon slaps that emotion into touch when it unveils a terrific charge of barbed rhythms, scarring riffs and a wealth of infectious harmonies. It is the addition of the doleful keys though that sees the track takes a further elevation in the passions, its unexpected entrance adding emotive depths and a sense of resigned peace to the surrounding tempest.

Closing with the sensational Artificial Respiration, another track where violence and gentle caresses find a mutual home to declare their passion and immense enterprise, Trepidation is an outstanding release which just improves with each and every listen. A year ago we declared Northpaw as a band on a rise and to take close attention of, the new release only goes to prove us right and more.

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RingMaster 28/01/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Giants: These Are The Days

British punks Giants have just raised the intensity of their already ascending rise to the fore of UK rock music with their new mini album These Are The Days. Raw and abrasive yet melodically smouldering and as expected fully anthemic, the release is a thumping explosion of melodic, skate and hardcore punk which elevates an already impressed view of the band.

The Essex quintet still approaching two years into its life, first grabbed wider attention with their debut self released EP, as well as their storming sets alongside the likes of The Bled, This Distance, The Ghost Inside, This is Hell, For The Fallen Dreams, More Than Life, Azriel, and Haste The Day, each show and step creating a honed sound and an irresistible energised experience for a growing following. The new release is set to accelerate the rate of their ascent to what one can only see is national recognition.

These Are The Days opens on the thumping clash of sound and energy which is Did It Mean So Much To You, the track a fiery riot of muscular riffs, coarse vocals and scarring melodies. It is a hungry and forceful assault brought with craft and unbridled passion, the guitars leaving a smoking trail whilst the bass is simply a deliciously heavy dark predator throughout. It is a mighty start to the release and already shows a deeper strength and maturity to the sound of Giants which the following songs all endorse.

The following song When It Comes Down To It is a continuation of the aggression, its raw breath a scraping rub upon the ear smartly soothed by heated harmonies from excellent clean vocals amongst caustic shouts and sharp incendiary melodies. The track bristles and swaggers throughout before launching into one of the best finales in a song for a long time, its united shouts and driving thrust irresistible.

The tempest of attitude which is Snakes with its snarling bass intro next leaves one breathless and sets things up powerfully for the first of two tracks which are easily the best on the release. Won’t Be Told is an immediate anthem for voice and heart with group chants and metallic intrusive riffs riling up the senses. The following melodic vocals amongst further squalls of spite and knee buckling rhythms  as the song moves forward, are sparking and rabid making for a storm of total pleasure. Violent and merciless it lights up the air with fine craft and imagination.

Another Day, Another Year (Wasted) is similar in structure to its predecessor and alongside it steals the honours on this impressive release. Once more the bass is a real highlight, its tones a bestial and immense presence within another metal driven slab of punk rock. The band fusing multi genres with great skill without losing their core drive of sound.

With the brief instrumental Bottled Up leading in to the tempestuous closer Boneless, the EP is an energising and fully pleasing release which deserves every good word and acclaim it is destined to receive. These Are The Days shows that British punk rock is back at a forceful high with Giants right to the fore.

https://www.facebook.com/giantsuk

RingMaster 16/09/2012

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The Elijah: I Loved I Hated I Destroyed I Created

Whether the expansive and impressive sounds of UK band The Elijah find a welcome in the heart or not one cannot help but be stunned by the expansive and creative might the quintet possess.  It is safe to say they will not be a band for everyone but they certainly are not one you can ignore or forget. I Loved I Hated I Destroyed I Created is their debut album which at times is as equally challenging as it is deeply enveloping and emotively inciteful. It leaves one rich in thought and grasping for support before its magnetic beauty and intrusive and destructive veins. Arguably not an album to see off or dispel any black shadows within, in fact one wonders if it should come with a health warning for such dark times, it clasps the senses with epic weaves of compulsive ambience and striking textures. There is a haunting breath permeating every note to ignite emotions and thoughts incessantly whilst the music wraps itself around the ear with sheer quality and imagination veined with a kind of self harming intensity.

The Elijah according to the promo sheet with the album was “determined to make a record that sounds like no other”. The North Shropshire band certainly achieved that and though you could cite bands which have taken a similar premise as The Elijah it is hard to bring to mind many as dramatically successful and as startlingly powerful. The past year has seen the band leaving audiences breathless as they shared stages with the likes of Hope Dies Last, Matyr Defiled, Liferuiner, and The Bled and the band is on the back of the album, destined to again ahead as the five piece head out on tour with As Cities Burn in July and Hawthorne Heights in September and October.

Removing themselves to an abandoned mansion in the Shropshire countryside that feeling of isolation is felt throughout the ten tracks on I Loved I Hated I Destroyed I Created. There is also inspired rightly or wrongly, thoughts and emotions borne from despair and desperation as the tracks play like a soundtrack to enflamed shadowed passions to wonderfully encroach either tenderly or with a fuller intensity on the heart.  The songs from the opening In Misery through to the wrenching closer I Created are a sonically soaked emotional wave upon wave of sound, all carefully and diversely  shaped and flavoured but with an overall seamless presence. Like the way feelings and thoughts evolve through varied states within a deflated or elated heart the songs shift and expand within one album long emotive consumption.

The likes of I Loved, In Fear, and In Death combine inner peace and ignited harsher shadows wonderfully and though most songs stem initially from the quiet into dangerous and incendiary states they are brought with distinctly varied and gloriously imagined invention. The smooth vocals of Mike McGough are stunning throughout, the singer/guitarist marking himself as one very accomplished and expressive vocalist. Combining with him and bringing the corruptive element of the sound is Dan Tomley, his disruptively harsh delivery fuelling the dark and near violent shades of the album. From personal preference his delivery at times threatens to permanently distract from and spoil the beauty in the songs to leave one longing for a different or better control on his part, though saying that he more than adds to the anguish and distressed emotions during songs perfectly.

The highlights of the release come in the shape of the simply irresistible and majestic instrumental In Regret where the pure class and beauty of the band in play and composition is at its height and the unnerving emotional dissection which is I Hated. Both have a resonance and atmosphere which not only erupts the senses and mind into sparse thoughts but linger to continue inciting ideas and feelings.

We cannot say I Loved I Hated I Destroyed I Created is one of our favourite releases so far this year but it is definitely one of the most skilful and imaginative let alone provocative to treat the ear. The Elijah from this impressive opening is a band destined for global appreciation and acclaim. This album might not be the right key but it will happen.

RingMaster 26/06/2012

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