The Betrayer’s Judgement – Philosopher

tbj promo philosopher

Engulfed in plenty of acclaim and promise, French hardcore/djent quintet The Betrayer’s Judgement unleashes their next slice of carnivorous invention with the Philosopher EP. It is a rampant and predacious force of imagination and enterprise with a hungry energy to match and though it does not always tempt to the same consistent heights across its antagonistic body, the release is an engrossing and excitingly promising encounter.

Formed in 2009, The Betrayer’s Judgement were soon taking a swipe at attention with firstly The Worst Sickness demo of 2010, a metalcore bred encounter, and even more so with debut album Run Out Of Fuel the following year. Shows and festivals have only increased and accelerated the band’s reputation and ascent, the five piece sharing stages with the likes of Caliban, The A.R.R.S, and Betraying the Martyrs along the way. The Twin Peak Records released Philosopher is the next potent and formidable step in their rise, a six track ravishment of the senses and imagination to raise a very healthy appetite for the band’s explosive and bold sound.

Broken Mirrors instantly sets ears and release off in incendiary style, the orchestral sculpted dawning of the song an epic and EP_coverrigorously persuasive invitation which finds greater potency as the intensive riffing and rhythmic barracking explodes into action. It is a breath stealing blast to the senses, the towering rhythmic punches and predatory riffing rabid and the technical craft riveting. With equally rapacious snarling vocals from Cyril Szczepaniak, his delivery a grouchy scowling pleasure, the track is a bestial provocation with an open evolution just waiting to prey on the impressive canvas already cast. The returning stringed emotive flight is a returning temptation which constantly enhances the pleasure whilst the clean vocals of guitarist Jean-Aimé Leclercq make a tempering addition to the storm. His smooth tones are strong and hard to dismiss but for personal tastes the slight defusing of the firestorm of intensity is not as successful as an anticipated all-out ravaging but still enjoyably imaginative.

Both Lights Out and Elapsed Time: Real Life rage against the senses with a skilled and uncompromising enterprise, the first of the two dragging its guttural toxicity to stalk the emotions within a rabid maelstrom of rhythms from drummer Arnaud Lefebvre and the voracious air scorching riffs and sonic pestilence crafted by Leclercq and fellow guitarist Flavian Dutoit. Again the barbarous delivery of Szczepaniak reigns over the clean but the mix is a much stronger and impression union though the outstanding track lacks the spark to match the opening pinnacle. The second of the two features Ryan Kirby from Fit For a King and instantly unleashes a vocal tsunami of malevolent intensity and passion. Strings coax the passions as potently as in the first song and the bass of Raphaël Darras finds a dark resonance which as across all songs just seduces the passions. With great classical and melodic teasing from the keys and a constant oppression aggression to drool over the track is a thunderous furnace of sonic causticity and inventive fire, though again the clean vocals as accomplished and flawless as they are do not really enhance or sell the track, though as mentioned this is just a preference rather than a criticism of Leclercq’s ability.

The title track makes for a dramatic and blustery oppression on the ears, the track a labour intensive listen which rewards with some inspiring intrigue and invention to its design beneath and immersed into its brutal touch and craft which leaves the senses shell-shocked. There are no clean vocals on show and it works a treat, the band and sound suggesting they would benefit by a reduction of its use which is reinforced at times again by the destructively sculpted track The Journey. The track employs spoken vocals aligned to the raucous bile soaked growls alongside a mouth-watering blaze of disorientating rhythms, melodic searing, and a delicious melodramatic discord kissed wantonness to the keys. It is another impressive and intrusively persuasive assault to inspire real suspicion and anticipation that The Betrayer’s Judgement is a potential major force of the future.

Completed by a decent enough remix of Broken Mirrors by The Algorithm, though it is not a patch on the original as it dissipates virtually all of the brutality and rapturous voraciousness, the Philosopher EP is an outstanding violent goading of the passions and a striking marker on the rise of The Betrayer’s Judgement.

Download the Philosopher EP as a buy now name your price release @ http://thebetrayersjudgement.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thebetrayersjudgement

8/10

RingMaster 29/11/2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0OBY0gJhMM

 

Engulfed in plenty of acclaim and promise, French hardcore/djent quintet The Betrayer’s Judgement unleashes their next slice of carnivorous invention with the Philosopher EP. It is a rampant and predacious force of imagination and enterprise with a hungry energy to match and though it does not always tempt to the same consistent heights across its antagonistic body, the release is an engrossing and excitingly promising encounter.

Formed in 2009, The Betrayer’s Judgement were soon taking a swipe at attention with firstly The Worst Sickness demo of 2010, a metalcore bred encounter, and even more so with debut album Run Out Of Fuel the following year. Shows and festivals have only increased and accelerated the band’s reputation and ascent, the five piece sharing stages with the likes of Caliban, The A.R.R.S, and Betraying the Martyrs along the way. The Twin Peak Records released Philosopher is the next potent and formidable step in their rise, a six track ravishment of the senses and imagination to raise a very healthy appetite for the band’s explosive and bold sound.

Broken Mirrors instantly sets ears and release off in incendiary style, the orchestral sculpted dawning of the song an epic and rigorously persuasive invitation which finds greater potency as the intensive riffing and rhythmic barracking explodes into action. It is a breath stealing blast to the senses, the towering rhythmic punches and predatory riffing rabid and the technical craft riveting. With equally rapacious snarling vocals from Cyril Szczepaniak, his delivery a grouchy scowling pleasure, the track is a bestial provocation with an open evolution just waiting to prey on the impressive canvas already cast. The returning stringed emotive flight is a returning temptation which constantly enhances the pleasure whilst the clean vocals of guitarist Jean-Aimé Leclercq make a tempering addition to the storm. His smooth tones are strong and hard to dismiss but for personal tastes the slight defusing of the firestorm of intensity is not as successful as an anticipated all-out ravaging but still enjoyably imaginative.

Both Lights Out and Elapsed Time: Real Life rage against the senses with a skilled and uncompromising enterprise, the first of the two dragging its guttural toxicity to stalk the emotions within a rabid maelstrom of rhythms from drummer Arnaud Lefebvre and the voracious air scorching riffs and sonic pestilence crafted by Leclercq and fellow guitarist Flavian Dutoit. Again the barbarous delivery of Szczepaniak reigns over the clean but the mix is a much stronger and impression union though the outstanding track lacks the spark to match the opening pinnacle. The second of the two features Ryan Kirby from Fit For a King and instantly unleashes a vocal tsunami of malevolent intensity and passion. Strings coax the passions as potently as in the first song and the bass of Raphaël Darras finds a dark resonance which as across all songs just seduces the passions. With great classical and melodic teasing from the keys and a constant oppression aggression to drool over the track is a thunderous furnace of sonic causticity and inventive fire, though again the clean vocals as accomplished and flawless as they are do not really enhance or sell the track, though as mentioned this is just a preference rather than a criticism of Leclercq’s ability.

The title track makes for a dramatic and blustery oppression on the ears, the track a labour intensive listen which rewards with some inspiring intrigue and invention to its design beneath and immersed into its brutal touch and craft which leaves the senses shell-shocked. There are no clean vocals on show and it works a treat, the band and sound suggesting they would benefit by a reduction of its use which is reinforced at times again by the destructively sculpted track The Journey. The track employs spoken vocals aligned to the raucous bile soaked growls alongside a mouth-watering blaze of disorientating rhythms, melodic searing, and a delicious melodramatic discord kissed wantonness to the keys. It is another impressive and intrusively persuasive assault to inspire real suspicion and anticipation that The Betrayer’s Judgement is a potential major force of the future.

Completed by a decent enough remix of Broken Mirrors by The Algorithm, though it is not a patch on the original as it dissipates virtually all of the brutality and rapturous voraciousness, the Philosopher EP is an outstanding violent goading of the passions and a striking marker on the rise of The Betrayer’s Judgement.

Download the Philosopher EP as a buy now name your price release @ http://thebetrayersjudgement.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thebetrayersjudgement

8/10

RingMaster 29/11/2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0OBY0gJhMM

 

Engulfed in plenty of acclaim and promise, French hardcore/djent quintet The Betrayer’s Judgement unleashes their next slice of carnivorous invention with the Philosopher EP. It is a rampant and predacious force of imagination and enterprise with a hungry energy to match and though it does not always tempt to the same consistent heights across its antagonistic body, the release is an engrossing and excitingly promising encounter.

Formed in 2009, The Betrayer’s Judgement were soon taking a swipe at attention with firstly The Worst Sickness demo of 2010, a metalcore bred encounter, and even more so with debut album Run Out Of Fuel the following year. Shows and festivals have only increased and accelerated the band’s reputation and ascent, the five piece sharing stages with the likes of Caliban, The A.R.R.S, and Betraying the Martyrs along the way. The Twin Peak Records released Philosopher is the next potent and formidable step in their rise, a six track ravishment of the senses and imagination to raise a very healthy appetite for the band’s explosive and bold sound.

Broken Mirrors instantly sets ears and release off in incendiary style, the orchestral sculpted dawning of the song an epic and rigorously persuasive invitation which finds greater potency as the intensive riffing and rhythmic barracking explodes into action. It is a breath stealing blast to the senses, the towering rhythmic punches and predatory riffing rabid and the technical craft riveting. With equally rapacious snarling vocals from Cyril Szczepaniak, his delivery a grouchy scowling pleasure, the track is a bestial provocation with an open evolution just waiting to prey on the impressive canvas already cast. The returning stringed emotive flight is a returning temptation which constantly enhances the pleasure whilst the clean vocals of guitarist Jean-Aimé Leclercq make a tempering addition to the storm. His smooth tones are strong and hard to dismiss but for personal tastes the slight defusing of the firestorm of intensity is not as successful as an anticipated all-out ravaging but still enjoyably imaginative.

Both Lights Out and Elapsed Time: Real Life rage against the senses with a skilled and uncompromising enterprise, the first of the two dragging its guttural toxicity to stalk the emotions within a rabid maelstrom of rhythms from drummer Arnaud Lefebvre and the voracious air scorching riffs and sonic pestilence crafted by Leclercq and fellow guitarist Flavian Dutoit. Again the barbarous delivery of Szczepaniak reigns over the clean but the mix is a much stronger and impression union though the outstanding track lacks the spark to match the opening pinnacle. The second of the two features Ryan Kirby from Fit For a King and instantly unleashes a vocal tsunami of malevolent intensity and passion. Strings coax the passions as potently as in the first song and the bass of Raphaël Darras finds a dark resonance which as across all songs just seduces the passions. With great classical and melodic teasing from the keys and a constant oppression aggression to drool over the track is a thunderous furnace of sonic causticity and inventive fire, though again the clean vocals as accomplished and flawless as they are do not really enhance or sell the track, though as mentioned this is just a preference rather than a criticism of Leclercq’s ability.

The title track makes for a dramatic and blustery oppression on the ears, the track a labour intensive listen which rewards with some inspiring intrigue and invention to its design beneath and immersed into its brutal touch and craft which leaves the senses shell-shocked. There are no clean vocals on show and it works a treat, the band and sound suggesting they would benefit by a reduction of its use which is reinforced at times again by the destructively sculpted track The Journey. The track employs spoken vocals aligned to the raucous bile soaked growls alongside a mouth-watering blaze of disorientating rhythms, melodic searing, and a delicious melodramatic discord kissed wantonness to the keys. It is another impressive and intrusively persuasive assault to inspire real suspicion and anticipation that The Betrayer’s Judgement is a potential major force of the future.

Completed by a decent enough remix of Broken Mirrors by The Algorithm, though it is not a patch on the original as it dissipates virtually all of the brutality and rapturous voraciousness, the Philosopher EP is an outstanding violent goading of the passions and a striking marker on the rise of The Betrayer’s Judgement.

Download the Philosopher EP as a buy now name your price release @ http://thebetrayersjudgement.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thebetrayersjudgement

8/10

RingMaster 29/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com