Daylight – One More Fight

Daylight_RingMaster Review

Though released back home a year ago, One More Fight gets its own UK release this month on the eve of Spanish pop punks Daylight’s UK tour. Such its storming collection of contagious anthems it would be no surprise if a great many of British genre fans have already a copy of their highly persuasive release in their collection, but if not, the time has come to grab some, not ground-breaking but inescapably rousing, pop punk either for the speakers or live.

Formed in 2004, the Barcelona hailing quartet has over the years toured through Europe, Russia, China, and Japan, as well as successfully play Groezrock, headline The X-Games, and shared stages with the likes of MXPX, McFly, Reel Big Fish, Zebrahead, and The Ataris. Their imminent tour around the UK is their first though and as mentioned marked by the release of One More Fight. Produced and mixed by Andrea Fusini (Upon This Downing, Ms. White, Ready Set Fall) alongside Andrew Wade (A Day to Remember, The Ghost Inside, A Loss for Words), the album instantly leaps on ears igniting body and appetite with boisterous ease.

Opener Anthem Of The Broken lives up to the first part of its title immediately, vocal harmonies and roars within tenacious riffs igniting ears as punchy rhythms give them a healthy examination. There is nothing flawed musically in the song either, the heavy wiry tone of Olek Burek’s bass irresistible whilst the guitars of Wojtek Burek and Albert Domenech almost dance on the senses as they cast magnetic aggression and fiery enterprise. The combined vocal persuasion of the Burek brothers is just as impressive too, the track strolling with lively attitude and physical prowess into waiting imagination and enjoyment.

cover_RingMaster Review     The following Kickbacks is a touch more reserved in its assault but still a thumping encounter built on the voracious swipes of Victor Vera’s muscle on drum skin. With the body soon bouncing as eagerly as the song’s, rich satisfaction is alive without a care for the kind of general familiarity which seems to come with pop punk releases as a whole. As the track shows, The Daylight touch and impassioned energy brings an ingredient which makes already strong songwriting standout from the masses too, that and an ability to create instinctive hooks and melodies which seem to know what tastes like and want.

The forcibly catchy Consequences takes over with its own easy going and rigorously infectious stomp next, guitars and bass a busy maelstrom of enterprise pierced by again heftily swung beats and wrapped in the captivation of the vocals. It also continues the imagination which brings resourceful and unexpected twists in certain moments, an invention even more open in the sonic shimmer of Now Or Never. The song entwines elegant melodies around expected catchiness, vocals leading the gentle but anthemic roar as in its lining, a great glimpse of discord and shadowed contrast comes and goes to further entice.

We Are Strong has a Jimmy Eat World spicing to its tempting, the electro winking of its predecessor again pulsating in the enthused hug of the song. With a New Found Glory scented air brewing up and subsequently soaking the heart of the track, its more than agreeable presence swaps with the equally alluring loud croon of Another Day. Though neither proposition incites the same energy of responses as those before them, each leaves ears with a smile and pleasure strong before being eclipsed by the Good Charlotte meets Weezer meets McFly like Best Days of Our Lifes. There is a touch of Green Day to the song too, and a wealth of imagination from Hammond-esque keys to rap shaped vocals which ensure it is a proposition which, without major originality on show, offers a fresh and bewitching weave of eclectic contagion.

The song should be the closing track to One More Fight, its feel good factor the perfect way to end the album. In fact it could even be as the track line-up is marked two ways on the promo sent to us and on the band’s Bandcamp different again, so do not take our line-up as read, just that it is true to the quality of the great release.

The thrilling Revolution is next in our schedule, from a grouchy bassline and confrontational incitement from drums and guitars, the song challenges and enlists full involvement in its aggressive anthem of a roar. Green Day again springs to mind as the track rivals the starters for best track honours, its defiance in word and emotion the griping fuel to the sound igniting fresh greed.

The final two songs on the album keep things rolling along with joyful energy, End Of The World releasing its Living End spiced rock ‘n’ roll first leaving Crazy Youth Gone Wild to bring a thoroughly enjoyable romp of a release to a rewarding close. As suggested One More Fight is not Daylight breaking down walls or reshaping the pop punk scene but it is them proving they are one of the genre’s most potent if for many still secret pleasures.

Britain time to get on those feet and romp…

One More Fight is released in the UK on 23rd October.

Daylight’s UK tour dates:

27 Oct – London, Boston Music Room

28 Oct – Edinburgh, Opium

29 Oct – Ayr, West Of The Moon

30 Oct – Dundee, Drouthys

31 Oct – Glasgow, Nice And Sleazy

01 Nov – Sheffield, The Hop

02 Nov – Derby, The Vic Inn

03 Nov – Frome, Cheese And Grain

04 Nov – Swansea, The Scene

Pete RingMaster 23/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Versus The World – Homesick Roadsick

LORES Versus The World _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

If you are already a fan of US punk rockers Versus The World, new album Homesick Roadsick probably holds few major surprises and if a newcomer to the band, it will be found to healthily recall the pop punk exploits cultured and famed within California over past decades,. For all though, it will be a thoroughly magnetic proposition containing the most rounded and mature songs from the band yet. The release rumbles and strolls along with open contagion and undiluted passion to whip up attention and rich satisfaction, and though it might not prove to be the best punk release this year, it certainly reveals itself as one of the most enjoyable and memorable.

The third album from the Santa Barbara quintet sees the band returning to Kung Fu Records, the home of their self-titled debut full-length of 2004. As its predecessors, Homesick Roadsick was recorded with Bad Astronaut guitarist and producer Thom Flowers and as last album Drink.Sing.Live.Love in 2012, mixed by Ian MacGregor (Katy Perry, All-American Rejects). Fair to say that Versus The World has boldly and inventively grown in presence and songwriting since those early days, honing a vivacious sound setting them apart from the pop punk crowd, even with its recognisable inspirations. Now the line-up of band founders, vocalist/guitarist Donald Spence, bassist Mike Davenport (ex- The Ataris), guitarists Chris Flippin (Lagwagon) and Tony Caraffa (Murderland), and drummer Bryan Charlson have explored new depths and potency to it with Homesick Roadsick and conjured up another treat

It opens with The Santa Margarita, a song written by Spence for Tony Sly, the late frontman for No Use For A Name. Featuring guest Dave Hause, the track quickly has ears in a fiery embrace of raw riffs and sonic tempting driven by the forceful beats of Charlson. Hooks, musically and vocally, stir ears and attention, the song swinging along with an infectious manner and an incendiary energy in its builds to and eruptions of mini crescendos. The song is rich captivation, a rousing start continued by the less urgent but swiftly as flavoursome stirring of The Black Ocean. Heavy scythes of riffs pounce on the senses first, their inviting bait bound in tangy tendrils of guitar as the impressive tones and delivery of Spence croon with expressive passion. More a smoulder than the kind of roar expressed by the previous song, it rises to breach the same creative and gripping plateau before A Storm Like Me unveils its controlled but rousing anthem. Its chorus is an inescapable lure soon involving the listener whilst the guitars, as the vocals across the band, whips up the imagination and appetite with ease.

HSxRS_Vinyl_Front_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Seven Thirty One bounds in expelling emotive flames and tenacious exploits like a mix of The Ataris and Billy Talent next. It quickly sets another peak in the landscape of Homesick Roadsick, the bass of Davenport a dark seduction speared by the volatile swings of Charlson as the guitars of Flippin and Caraffa ooze spicy enticement and fiery persuasion. Further fuelled by the excellent vocal delivery of Spence, the track is raw flirtation followed by both the inventive A Brooklyn Rooftop and the addictive qualities of A Sight For Sore Eyes. Neither song can quite match up to their predecessor but each grips ears and enthrals attention with their dramatic and skilled propositions, especially the latter with its initial and lingering Ruts like jagged riff. It also has one delicious shadow rich bassline amidst a web of melodic and harmonic drama, a combination as fascinating as the songwriting bearing them.

The album’s title track is an initially headstrong rampage setting emotions and appetite aflame, and even though it dips slightly once evening out its attack as melodies and vocals emerge to climb all over ears, it remains a raucously emotive and physical tempest leaving pleasure full and greedy for the just as sizeable and persuasive presence of Bullet Train. Expectations are fed a little by the structure and invention of the track, but with another grouchily incendiary bassline, swirling guitar enterprise, and a vocal resourcefulness which only wins plaudits, the song makes a highly satisfying proposal before being overshadowed by the excellent Detox Retox. Davenport’s bass is carnivorous in tone, his adventurous and thrilling designs increasingly open and potent in the second half of the album, whilst guitars spiral from ravenous riffs into fiery entrails of sonic imagination driven by the energetic whipping of beats. It results in, as the album, an encounter which does not shake the boundaries of punk and maybe the band’s existing originality but leaves the listener encased in fresh enterprise

There is no lessening of enjoyment in the closing pair of songs either, Self Preservation Is Killing Us All first to flame with sonic and melodic dexterity before Our Song offers one final thick bellow of rock ‘n’ roll. They ensure a fine end to another invigorating offering from Versus The World. Homesick Roadsick is undoubtedly the band at its best, though there are times across the album where it seems to hold check on invention heading towards new and potentially startling doorways. It is an album to constantly please and enjoy nevertheless, and a highly pleasing success in anyone’s book.

Homesick Roadsick is available from June 23rd via Kung Fu Records digitally and on Vinyl/CD @

Versus The World Summer UK/EU Tour Dates w/ Strung Out:

30.06.15 DE Berlin – Cassiopeia

01.07.15 DE Cottbus – Gladhouse

02.07.15 DE Erfurt – Eburg

03.07.15 CZ Mighty Sounds Festival

04.07.15 DE Aachen – Musikbunker

05.07.15 FR Paris – Le Petit Bain

06.07.15 UK London – Underworld

07.07.15 UK Manchester – Ruby Lounge

10.07.15 UK Brighton – The Haunt

11.07.15 BE Ostend – Elysee

12.07.15 DE Saarbrucken – Garage

14.07.15 IT Milan – Circolo Magnolia

15.07.15 CH Geneva – Usine

+ More TBA Soon!

RingMaster 23/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Larusso – Life in Static


Immersed in a mixture of creative alternative rock and contagious pop punk, Life in Static the new album from US band Larusso is one healthily appetising proposition. Not a release to set crowds screaming from rooftops maybe but one to bring energetic life to any solitude drenched night or raging festivity, the album is a thoroughly engaging proposition with some quite tasty encounters within its vibrant walls.

Hailing from Salt Lake City, the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Aaron Condrat, drummer/backing vocalist Justin Trombetti, guitarist Nick Sasich, and bassist Tyler Grundstrom have earned and built up a potent fan base and attention through a series of self-released EPs and albums, as well as their live performances which has seen the band play with bands such as The Almost, Go Radio, Transit, The Ataris, Finch, Dance Gavin Dance, and Cartel. Also regulars at local festivals and having played the Ernie Ball stage at Warped Tour, Larusso finds itself with a lively buzz around them to which their new album will certainly do no harm.

Chase the Sun starts the album off in vivacious style, hooks and melodies an instant coating to keen riffs and jabbing rhythms. Vocally too the song shines immediately, the tones of Condrat backed by Trombetti, smooth and harmonious. It is not a startling encounter but one showing the musical strength and songwriting craft of the band as more than accomplished and seriously catchy. The track strides with ripe enterprise before making way for The Voice. As its predecessor, it too carries no real urgency in its gait and attack but makes for a catchy and captivating slice of rock pop with excellent vocal prowess and tidy hooks within a melodic breath.

Things suddenly spark more thrillingly with Drifter, a track offering irresistible hooks from its first touch and unpredictable endeavour throughout. Like a mix of Jimmy Eat World and Brand New, the song flows and strides with a Life in Static Cover Artdelicious creative appetite to the vocals and swinging grooves to the sound. The bass of Grundstrom brings a snarl too which adds to the appetite awakening potency of one of the album’s most impressive propositions. Its triumph is not quite matched by the next up Daniel with an L, but with its emotive melodies and almost melancholic air the track still captures the imagination with ease. As evidenced by it alone, there is nothing flamboyantly excessive about the band and its songs but they push do push an eager invention across increasingly persuasive and riveting exploits.

The evocative caress of Living Proof comes next with guitars casting a weave of expressive chords and melodic colour as Condrat adds an emotionally intimate lyrical narrative. The track is more a lead/intro to the current single The Recovery than a standalone prospect, its successor a crooning incitement which makes for a warm and skilful if not a passion stirring companion. Again it shows the impressive craft of the band in composing, playing, and imagination though but lacks a spark to make it more than a pleasing encounter, certainly when up against the more impacting tracks on Life In Static. Nevertheless ears are satisfied before turning to Places and Set Phasers to Fun for more adventure. The first of the two has an underlying swagger to its pop lit composure and intent, but tempers it with an evocative smoulder of emotion and sonic intrigue whilst the second shows another fun side to its sound and band with its acoustically led playful romp. In the hands of other bands, the song might feel like a filler but Larusso give it a smile and grace which makes a very worthy and enjoyable inclusion to the release.

Collision Course is another big highlight with its feisty riffs, mightily swinging rhythms, and agitated yet contagiously coaxing grooves. As across the album it is fair to say there are few real surprises, the song no exception but the band does dig out and explore essences of sound and familiar ideation which is fresh and invigorating. The superb offering is followed by the emotive balladry of Take Me Away where keys, orchestral strings, and vocals impress even if overall the track simmers rather than flames, something Dear Pandora manages to achieve with addictive tenacity. Thoughts of Amberlin edge forward as the song stomps with acidic grooves and biting hooks whilst melodies and harmonies make another inescapable lure. It is an enthralling success setting up the finale of Chemical. Also acoustically sculpted, the closer is a mesmeric piece of design and expression, and a much more potent and gripping encounter than Take Me Away which lingers and shows another corner and depth to the band which would be good to see explored more in the future.

Life In Static is a richly enjoyable and magnetic release which shows why the buzz around Larusso in their homeland; a spotlight easy to imagine broadening dramatically with the album. It is not setting new templates but for melodic rock with a pop ingenuity, band and album is well worth a long look.

The self-released Life in Static is available now @


RingMaster 15/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Forever In Promise: Into The Storm

Impressive is the first word that came to mind as the debut EP from US metalcore band Forever In Promise infiltrates the ear. There has been a formidable collection of debuts in the genre and metal in general from new young and excellent bands so far this year to which the trio and their Into The Storm EP can be firmly added. Made up of five powerful slabs of metal the EP is a remarkable blend of vibrant and inventive sounds with direct and thunderous intensity. It is not the most brutal release you will come across but it is easily one of the most pleasing.

    Forever In Promise is a trio coming from Texas and New York who came together in 2011. Consisting of vocalists Jordan Cordova and Matt Barlett who provide the clean and growls respectively and multi- instrumentalist Zach Norman who provides guitars, bass, drums & synth, the band has produced a release that as well as ticking all the boxes for the genre brings its own diverse and imaginative extras. The result is an EP that pulls one eagerly in for a very fulfilling experience and a compulsive towering ride. The post production on Into The Storm was handled by John Naclerio from Nada Recording Studio (Senses Fail, My Chemical Romance, The Ataris, Brand New) earlier this year and there is no doubt there is an understanding between him and the band that has added something extra to the songs they recorded. There is a clarity and depth that allows each component to breathe and flourish even when the intensity thickens.

The release opens with the brief piano led instrumental Drifting. The track brings an atmospheric calm and ambient elegance to envelope the ear before the following explosive tracks led by Communications Are Down take hold. With a flavour of As I Lay Dying the track roughs up the ear with probing riffs and barracking rhythms whilst the coarse growls of Barlett are as uncompromising as the sounds. Once the clean vocals of Cordova join the forage within the senses the song takes on another dimension, his tones the perfect mediator between senses and the blistered intrusive sounds. The rhythms offer a djent inspired attack whilst bass and guitars plunder the ear with an aggressive but distinct design. The song also has the added delight of vocalist Evelynn from polish post hardcore band Nurth bringing further variation to the vocals.

The title track and the remaining songs The Deepest Part Is You and Message From Home all offer equal quality sounds and imagination. The first of the three with a more defined electronic flow behind the tumultuous sounds lights up the ear with a surety and craft to keep things persistently engaging and unpredictable. The combination of clean and caustic vocals is impressive, with the band finding the perfect blend between them. The Deepest Part Is You reminds a little of I Am Abomination, the melodic craft of the track veining the slightly oppressive intensity in a song that is thoroughly compulsive and further proof that  Norman is a skilled musician with an apparent flare on all instruments he brings to the project. The track demands like all the other songs full attention but needs not resort to battering the listener to do it. It may attack with a deliberate strength and feistiness but the influences from other genres and the vibrant nature of the sound sets the release and band apart from similar flavoured bands.

Closing on the brief and again atmospheric Message From Home which with the opener brings a book end like completion to the EP, Into The Storm is an excellent release and the cause of great anticipation and belief of even greater things ahead from Forever In Promise cons. The EP is available as a free download from the official band website @ so there really is no reason not to discover the fresh breath in metalcore that is Forever in Promise.

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