Fallen Eight – Rise & Grow

FE_RingMasterReview

Fallen Eight is a Paris based quintet reminding all of the strength of the French underground metal scene right now. The band recently released debut EP Rise & Grow, a collection of songs gripping ears whilst being fuelled by attention grabbing potential. It offers six tracks which at times ignite the passions and in other moments leaves ears merely richly satisfied with the band’s unsurprising yet refreshing metal bred exploits, but from its opening second to its rousing last it only sparks a want to hear more.

Formed towards the rear of 2011 in Seine et Marne, Fallen Eight quickly set to writing and honing a sound merging the rousing essences of extreme and melodic metal with those of heavy rock. Within a year, they had the Paris music scene in their sights as locally they continued to be a potent live presence. Playing their first shows in the capital from 2013, Fallen Eight has gone from strength to strength in sound and support found, getting to the final stage of FallenFest that same year. The next year saw the band work on their first demo and open up for Black Bomb A while 2015 saw a line-up change within the band; vocalist Clément, lead guitarist Medy, and drummer JP joined by guitarist Florian and bassist Joffrey. That year ended with Fallen Eight having supported The Arrs and preparing for the release of Rise & Grow, which now is sparking a keen fuss and its initial teaser in the shape of the single Final Shot.

The EP opens with a bang, the band setting its stall out in sound and quality straight away with Reborn. From an initial vocal cry, quickly surrounded by feisty riffs and senses whipping rhythms, the track rumbles and growls; attitude and ferocity swift hues to the early Skindred like air of the song.  Almost as quickly its character evolves and expands as the band sweep across the senses with melodic tenacity without defusing their almost post hardcore meets melodic metalcore confrontation. Clément’s vocals impress as much as the musical craft and imagination revealed by the band, all combining for a powerful and thickly engaging opening to Rise & Grow.

EP Rise & Grow_RingMasterReviewThere is certainly some very familiar textures and essences to the song and indeed EP, but something to embrace as another flavour rather than admonish a song for as shown with Come From The Sky. Initially the second song caustically bellows with raw throated vocals to the fore but is soon in the process of weaving in clean harmonics and melodic imagination, subsequently alternating the contrasts thereon in. Whether the coarse vocals attack is also from Clément we cannot tell, the diversity suggests not, but whatever it is a major part of the band’s success and the enthralling tapestry of songs.

Leaving a Linkin Park feel in its wake, the excellent track is soon eclipsed by the EP’s best track, Final Shot. Its rhythms and riffs border the carnivorous, grooves and sonic enterprise the seductive, and all orchestrated by the outstanding and rousing vocal incitement of all involved. Listening to the track, you can visualise audiences swelling and rising as one to the track’s incendiary chorus alone, and especially the anthemic line incorporating the its title.

In some ways the EP is a proposal of two parts, the first trio of songs inciting the biggest reactions in personal tastes though that does not stop Breath Of The Ages making a powerful impact and keeping enjoyment on a lofty plateau. It just seems like the uniqueness of ideas are slimmer and less striking in the final trio, a spark missing, but as the fourth track reveals as it comes close to matching its predecessors, creative drama is as open and fascinating as ever. The irritability in sound and nature of the song is another virulent lure too with the vocals and individual prowess of all shining through.

Light prowls the senses next, its first riffs and grooves predatory before being reined in by a bluesy spicing to grooves and hooks as the band share some Avenged Sevenfold flavoured classic and heavy metal resourcefulness. It too has ears and appetite hooked before Worst Nightmare brings the release to a raw and ravenous close. The most aggressive and tempestuous track on the EP, its shows that Fallen Eight can savage the senses as skilfully and eagerly as they can seduce them with melodic imagination.

It is a fine end to a richly pleasing encounter from a band with the potential to indeed Rise & Grow to big things.

Rise & Grow is out now through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/FallenEight   https://twitter.com/FallenEightBand

Pete RingMaster 05/05/2016

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Heart Attack – Stop Pretending

heart attack pic

It may have taken French metallers Heart Attack six years to unleash their debut album but the time was well spent honing their rapacious sound as Stop Pretending is one impressive and attention grabbing encounter. Consisting of ten mighty and finely sculpted aggressive provocations, the release instantly marks the band as one with a formidably promising future and an already accomplished and carnivorous enterprise.

Hailing from Cannes and formed in 2007 by schoolmates vocalist/guitarist Kevin Geyer and bassist Flora Capello, Heart Attack with guitarist Chris Cesari and drummer Chris Icard alongside the founding pair has built a strong reputation around the French Riviera through their mass of shows which has seen them play with bands such as Dagoba, Loudblast, The Arrs, Headcharger, Lolicon, Vetha, and Cliche Boys. 2009 saw the release of their Lullabies For Living Dead EP and though it is fair to say the release did not take their awareness far from home you can only suggest that the Apathia Records released Stop Pretending will amend that situation.

The promo labels the band as groove and thrash metal and though you have to agree with both suggestions there are other rich heart-attack-stop-pretending-webessences of sound ripe for use in their invention. The title track ravages the ear first, its intense riffs a heavy suasion on the ear backed up by the immediately impressive and continuing to thrill drum attack of Icard. Finding its muscular stride with a more thrash laden intent to its combativeness, the song barracks the senses with a tight acidic groove, throaty bass menace, and that already thoroughly compelling rhythm attack of the drums. Vocally Geyer grazes the ear with a strong and expressive delivery, one which reveals its ability to shift tact and attack as the album progresses along its sinewy course.

The adrenaline fuelled impressive start is immediately backed up by the following Face the Music. Emerging from a sample from Gladiator, the track rampages with the artillery of rhythms parading their irresistible might to instantly have knees buckling and a surge of intrusive riffing that leaves the appetite thoroughly awoken. Geyer mixes a death coated guttural attack with his cleaner delivery whilst the strings of Cesari dance with melodic flames trailing from their creative notes and narrative especially in a quite delirious solo. Primarily though the song is another piece of metallic rabidity that seizes and commands attention whilst employing neck and leg muscles in its predacious storm. As with a lot of the album it is fair to say boundaries are not being challenged in originality on the song but it is impossible to dismiss or refuse the craft and potent imagination at work.

The next up Sweet Hunting, which features Dagoba vocalist Shawter, again works its intensive charms on the passions with skilled antagonism and thought, its tsunami of crippling force merging with colourful enterprise. Like a mix of Machine Head, Hatebreed, and maybe John Bush era Anthrax, it is a blistering tempest of sonic danger and temptation, something you can equally apply to the likes of Lazarus and Raging Load too. There is surface chastisement across the album which does at times does blend tracks together if not paying attention but the rewards for that extra concentration are plenty and imaginative as shown by the again stunning guitar work across the first of these two songs and the rhythmic tsunami of excellent which especially makes its successor an incendiary proposition though the guitars again make their declaration openly clear. With the vocals again twisting in another dimension to their incitement the track stands out amongst numerous highlights.

If there is one niggle of the album it is that the fine bass craft and invention of Capello is often in the shadow of the rest of the sound. It is always there and you feel Capello’s presence throughout but sadly not always with enough clarity, though thankfully Down the Way is one song where she is allowed space to shine, and the lady can play as shown on further album pinnacles, 1902 which features William Ribeiro of Moghan Ra, and the scintillating and dirty Wasted Generation. Every song it should be said is a beast of a collision for senses and heart on this album, Thrash Your Neighbour especially savage and memorable, and leave only thorough satisfaction.

If Stop Pretending does as stated lack enough original inspiration to stand as a best of year contender it does stand as one of the better corrosive and inventively sculpted releases, one which for most is one formidable introduction to Heart Attack, a band we will hear a lot more of.

https://www.facebook.com/heartattackmetal

8.5/10

RingMaster 24/07/2013

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Karma Zero: Architecture of a Lie

Promo Pix 2

    Though it takes its prime breath from death core Architecture of a Lie, the debut album from French metallers Karma Zero has plenty of corrosive additives to place it apart from the majority of emerging bands within the genre. The release is a rabid and destructive brute of an album with senses ravaging and intrusive violence its prime directive but throughout it teases and seduces with an imaginative and passionate invention which you cannot fail to fall before. Whether it just wears one down into submission or manipulates with devious hidden alchemy the album and band eventually and certainly gained an exhausted and ardour driven recruit to their intent.

Formed in 2008 the band from Nantes brings a feverish blend of metal, metalcore, and electro to its deathcore heart, a sound which has seen the band earned strong support and responses in their homeland. Their self-titled EP in 2009 marked the band as  a promising rising force, that feeling soon supported by their performances alongside the likes of Madball, Shining, and The Arrs as well as successful festival spots at events such as Hellfest Metal Corner and Motocultor. Recording their first album with Stéphane Buriez (Loudblast) in 2011, Karma Zero is primed to explode into a much wider receptive recognition with its recent release via Ultimhate Records.

The title track sparks things off by immediately pounces on the ear with bone snapping beats and ravenous riffs completed by Karma Zero-Architecure of a Lie-2012-COVERequally predatory vocals. It is an assault which sets you back on your heels to then draw you straight in to its grasp with a maelstrom of sonic textures and a hunger driven intensity. The brawling vocal attack which shifts from a duo to a three prong attack is outstanding but initially distracts from the musical creativity going on beneath its snarl. Into its stride though the track opens up its arms to allow every element to takes its potent place in the course of the song and enriches the senses with a wealth of aggressive variety.

As the following Next Time and No Answers state their individual declarations the album continues to offer a magnetic lure and oppressive malevolence brought through strong musicianship and invention. The two songs do not quite light up the fires within as much as the first but still easily impress even if they arguably are two tracks which bring a more expected genre stance before the ear. The album is not one to rest on its laurels though and the further into its savagery it goes the stronger its imagination and greed to explore increases with songs like Frozen Angel and the outstanding Hidden Law stretching their boundaries and ingenuity with compelling creativity. The first of the pair transfixes the ear with militant riffs but bewitches with an emotive electronic ambience that leaves thoughts drifting into their own interpretation of the narrative. Finely crafted in its moments of reflection musically and dangerously nasty with all weaponry cascading upon the senses in other times, the track is a major highlight of the release soon surpassed by its successor. Hidden Law expels its deepest guttural spite to crawl all over the fierce sonic flames and uncompromising rhythms, its rapacious malice a unique delicious poison for the ear and insidious nectar for the passions.

Through the likes of the voracious Grown Up and the flesh scorching Ghosts the band leave further welcome scars whilst bringing one last elevated triumph with Snake, the most experimental and track on the album. As unfriendly as it is contagious, the song is a magnet for the passions with its riveting expanse of flavours, styles, and character.

Architecture Of A Lie is a decisive and inciting introduction to a band which one senses is heading towards making a strong mark for itself in European metal. Watch out Karma Zero is coming to feed upon your weaknesses.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Karma-Zero/123916180370

8/10

RingMaster 15/03/2013

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