Seething Akira – Airstrike

Cruisin'_RingMaster Review

Like a raid on the senses and a mass riot for the body, the new single from UK rockers Seething Akira sets the world on fire in just three volatile minutes. Setting out the kind of tempest fans to the band’s fusion of alternative and heavy rock with electro and hardcore dub step are accustomed to, Airstrike equally thrusts its hellacious mitts into a richer and deeper vat of anthemic intensity and psyche twisting tenacity for one ferocious devilry.

Hailing from Portsmouth, and with inspirations from the likes of Prodigy, Senser, and Enter Shikari joining their own rebellious ideation, Seething Akira was soon inciting a potent and loyal local support when emerging in 2011. First EP, You Missed The Show that year showed the band was loaded in potential but it was from the Transmission EP a year later that they hit their stride in sound and broader persuasion. Live the band has only earned an acclaiming stature, the quintet taking in shows with bands such as Hacktivist, The Algorithm, Senser, Don Broco, Black Futures, Sonic Boom Six, Max Raptor, PWEI, and Heart Of A Coward over the years. Last year the Aggro Vito EP reinforced and pushed on the band’s sound and presence but for us Airstrike is the band’s most exciting and ridiculously involving offering yet.

Airstrike_RingMaster Review     Airstrike allows no escape for feet and emotions, let alone voice, stirring them up in its first seconds and then dragging them into its maelstrom of energy and attitude. It spews increasing slavery through voracious rhythms, psychotic enterprise, and a vocal assault which makes the term incitement seem lightweight. The thumping beats of Stu Mealcliffe alongside the pulsating synth stabs of Charlie Bowes cast the first lure, their union unrelenting until the subsequent vocal roars of Kit Conrad and Bowes add their united antagonistic charm. The metal spawn riffs of Harvey Sneezeface Ware aligned to the predatory prowl of Terry Brown’s bass instantly turns the already virulent temptation into a beast of a proposal, their entrance sparking greater intensity and aggression elsewhere too. The landscape of the song continues to evolve and unpredictably shift, sinister melodic endeavour from the guitars sparking a similar air to keys before the dynamics at the heart of the song explode once again in a torrential and commanding cascade of techno trespasses, heavy duty rhythmic and riff induced incitements, and vocal belligerence.

Airstrike is a brawl impossible to resist and it is easy to imagine Pendulum being offered as a hint to the song’s might. But more so it has the hues of bands like G.R.I.M, Axis Mundi, and a dirtier Pop Will Eat Itself to it. Those flavours do bring a certain familiarity to it at times but that is countered and overwhelmed by the sheer energy and unique enterprise of Seething Akira. This is a band which just gets bigger and better whilst persistently knocking on the fullest spotlights.

Airstrike is available from July 27th

Upcoming Seething Akira tour dates:

July 31st O2, Islington, UK *

Aug 1st Downstairs, Aberdeen *

Aug 2nd Audio, Glasgow, Scotland *

Aug 3rd Bannermans, Edinburgh, Scotland *

Aug 4th Warehouse 23, Wakefield *

Aug 5th The Asylum, Birmingham *

Aug 6th Academy 3 Manchester, UK *

Aug 7th Waterfront, Norwich, UK *

Aug 11, Knust, Hamburg, Germany *

Aug 12 West Park Eventhalle, Inglostadt, Germany *

Aug 13 Little Devil, Tillburg, Netherlands *

Aug 14 Hypothalamus, Rheine, Germany *

October 3rd, MAMMOTHFEST, Brighton

* Main support to Mordred on EU tour

http://www.seethingakira.com/     https://www.facebook.com/seethingakira

RingMaster 27/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Shattered Skies – The World We Used To Know

Shattered Skies low res

With their acclaimed first EP having escaped our radar when it came out around three years ago, The World We Used To Know is our introduction to Ireland  bred progressive metallers Shattered Skies, and have we been missing out. The band’s debut album is an enthralling and thrilling creative emprise which avoids all the self-indulgences and over blown excesses the genre can at times coax out of a band. Instead it creates an epic drama of passion and invention with a technical adventure and skill to match, leaving jaws dropped in awe and passions lustfully inflamed.

Formed in the earlier moments of 2011, the now London based band swiftly gripped attention and critical praise with the Reanimation EP that same year. The time between releases has been filled with a host of reputation growing shows alongside the likes of Machine Head, Dimmu Borgir, Alice Cooper, TesseracT, Scar Symmetry, SikTh, Animals as Leaders, Twelve Foot Ninja, The Algorithm, After the Burial and many more, as well as performances at festivals such as Holland’s ProgPower and Bloodstock in the UK, two appearances at Britain’s Techfest and a trio of visits to Euroblast in Germany. The World We Used To Know will be the biggest lure to the world from the band yet and like for us, it is hard to imagine many genre fans and beyond resisting the fiery imagination and seriously accomplished sounds tempting from within the album’s fascinating walls.

As aflame with inescapable hooks and grooves as it is with breath-taking exploration, the release opens with the short and emotive temptation of Collapse Of Man. A provocative caress of Albumcoverpiano, the instrumental piece draws ears and thoughts into the release with a sense of drama which simply explodes in the following The End And The Rebirth. The band’s new single too, the song dances on the senses with a vibrant electro smile before ruggedly spicy grooves and matching crunchy riffs join the vivacious tempest. Instantly enticing whispers of TesseracT and Circles, the track casts its own uniqueness as it expands and glows with enterprise and invention. The striking melodic vocals of Sean Murphy are an instant treat, his ability and expression as dynamic as the sounds and ideation around him. It makes for a scintillating kaleidoscope of adventure spun on the skills of guitarist/keyboardist Ian Rockett and the simultaneously savage and addictive rhythms of drummer Ross McMahon and bassist Jim Hughes, quite simply it is a stunning start.

Things only explode with greater potency and ingenuity when 15 Minutes takes over, vocals and melodies again a sure seduction against the slightly carnivorous breath of the djent inspired guitar predation and rhythmic stalking. As mentioned before, each track has an inventive and sonic theatre to its songwriting and sound, one which over the first song and especially this has a feel of early My Chemical Romance to it. The track is sensational, a cantankerous croon of an incitement within a whirlpool of unpredictable and fluidly flowing experimentation.

Both the gripping enticement of Haunted and the inflamed serenade of Elegance And Grace keep album and ears burning brightly. The first is an angst fuelled weave of acidic grooves and stabbing riffs aligned to ever mesmeric vocals and harmonies. Its rhythms equally impose their strengths with ease, intimidating rather than coaxing the same plaudits in thoughts and emotions. Its successor is a smouldering romance of charm loaded keys and impassioned vocal expression in comparison. The song simmers and boils across a climactic canvas of riveting Muse meets Dioramic like endeavour, and as the last song engrossing ears and imagination with increasing strength and drama.

The guitars are back snarling and abrasing the pleasures in the following Show’s Over, though as discovered in all always Shattered Skies songs, they only provide one moment in evolving landscapes. Their bait and Meshuggah like growl is never far from the frontline of the song though, just in a constant and seamless flux of fresh sound and inventiveness. The track is an inescapable contagion, so much so that it is hard to think of many progressive metal bands which can rock body and passions with such catchiness to their enormous technical prowess as Shattered Skies.

As The Sea Divides is a tempestuous turbulence of sound next, its blustery guitar bred climate and inhospitable rhythmic trap the scenery for siren-esque keys and the soaring tones of Murphy to poetically and magnificently colour. A little longer to draw similar lustful responses as other songs, it grows to new heights with every listen, though it still misses the top step found by the last song and the outstanding Flipside which follows. Almost bestial in its prowling gait and sonic tempting, the track manages to be savage and impossibly infectious with a melodic bloom of voice and sound to put any crooner and pop band to shame. The song is quite delicious, a must be second single to our minds and another irrepressible reason why Shattered Skies will take the progressive metal world by storm, well this and ten other great reasons on The World We Used To Know.

     The pair of Aesthetics and Saviours seduce senses and emotions next, the first exploring the scent of bands like Tool and The HAARP Machine in a magnetic tapestry of emotion soaked expression and soaring harmonics. Unafraid to have a raw edge too, the song is also ridiculously catchy, something emulated by the darker squalling presence of the second of the two. An antagonistic cage of riffs and drums from the first second, it scowls and teases with scarring tenacity whilst within the raw frame keys and the stunning vocals of Murphy roar and soar.

The track is exceptional but so is the closing eleven minutes plus of the title track which brings The World We Used To Know to a mighty close. An epic journey and creative escapade in its own right, the song seems to draw on all the hearts of its predecessors as it draws a mouth-watering and bewitching soundscape all of its own. Everything about it is sensational and its lengthy presence seemingly over in a flash thanks to its wonderfully busy maze of startling craft and volcanic enterprise.

2015 has already in its brief time seen some quite invigorating encounters, the new 6:33 and Cold Snap albums coming to mind, and on that frontline of excellence Shattered Skies sits looking rather sensational with The World We Used To Know.

The self-released The World We Used To Know is available now @ http://shatteredskies.bigcartel.com/product/the-world-we-used-to-know and digitally @ http://shatteredskies.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/shatteredskiesofficial

RingMaster 15/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Nexilva – Eschatologies

Promo2

If Eschatologies is the portent or soundtrack to mankind’s ultimate destination as a species it is hard to know whether to be engulfed in bliss or unbridled fear. The new album from UK progressive death metallers Nexilva is a maelstrom of brutal invention and exhaustive experimentation, a tsunami of sound and vindictive intensity which is as excitingly unpredictable as it is frighteningly intrusive. It is an encounter which is almost too involved and adventurous for its own good, smothering the senses with so much imaginative mayhem and creative exploration that even after a dozen or so rampages through its hellacious depths new corners and facets are still emerging. The accompanying promo suggests the release is for fans of bands such as Born of Osiris, The Faceless, and Fleshgod Apocalypse, something you cannot disagree with and certainly it will not sit easy with every metal bred heart because of its vast experimentation but if technical violence and an unrelenting examination of senses, psyche, and imagination ignites fires for you than Eschatologies is a scintillating must.

Hailing from Sunderland and formed in 2009, Nexilva released their first demo The Viral Annihilation that same year before more dramatically stirring up attention with debut album The Trials of Mankind a year later. Followed by the Defile the Flesh of Innocence EP in 2011, the releases showed a band with not only massive potential but also the ability and bravery to cross pollinate numerous extremes of metal into one threatening yet compelling fascination. Their live presence was no less potent and exhausting either, the band gaining strong recognition as they shared stages and tours with the likes of Exist Immortal, Aliases, and The Algorithm as well as their own shows and festival appearances over time. Eighteen months in the making and mixed/produced by guitarist Andy Mallaby, Eschatologies is the next mighty step for Nexilva. It is a journey through scenery draped in technical, death, progressive, and black metal to simplify the landscape; climates of the fantastic, realistic, and portentous investigating the end/rebirth of man.

Released via Ghost, Eschatologies opens the first chapter with I: Teste Humanitatem Mori, a short piece which unveils an initial dark nexilva-coverand welcoming ambience soon lit by a wonderful caress of guitar, its classical melodic touch soothing and inviting. All the while shadows are converging adding their menace to the rising vocal harmonies and warm melodies. They eventually break through with roaring caustic growls and stabbing riffs though they still court the elegance which voiced the start. It is a respectfully dramatic piece bringing clouds and uncertainty into view ready for The Misdirection of God to erupt with seemingly insidious intent. Immediately the vocals impress; the diverse ever shifting style and delivery from Gary King, very ably backed by that of bassist Ryan Banks, magnetic within the equally revolving and evolving tempest around them. The rhythms of drummer Connor Jobes rampage with crippling sinews and ferocious agitation from their every beat whilst the guitars of Simon Atkinson, Rownan Tennet, and Mallaby cast a simultaneously vitriolic and enticing web of sound around ears and thoughts. As mentioned previously there is so much accosting and intriguing senses that you cannot at first take it all in over one song let alone the album, but as traverses of and time exploring the song unveils irresistible bait like the classically honed keys with at times stand to the fore and in others flirt from a hollowed distance, the adventure just gets stronger and more spellbinding.

Both Our Progenitor and This Is Humanity, distinct in their characters and offerings are bred from the same almost bedlamic onslaught, though it is all controlled and precisely sculpted. The first of the two again concocts a lethal and enchanted storm for the beleaguered senses to immerse within, its predacious intent as rabid as it is contagious. The keys again seduce from within the uncompromising voracity and not for the last time whilst slipping easily aside the malevolent raging they provide a wonderful discord fuelled friction which just lights the imagination and pleasure further. Its successor takes a more premeditated preying of its recipient, grooves and keys seducing whilst riffs and rhythms cause havoc within the irresistible caressing. Twisting and turning not only itself but the psyche, the song adds hardcore vocals and progressive flights to its savagery, like the album making expectations redundant.

The melancholic II: Scientaia Tenebris opens up the next movement of the album to provide a respite before the venomous Necromancer seizes control whilst still employing the emotive melodies of its predecessor within its serpentine toxicity and rapacious enslaving of ears and emotions. Like all tracks, the song leaves you gasping for breath in body and thought, every turn a new extensive exploration to be taken within its whole endeavour. The Collapse immediately proves to be the same and with equal potency and success before the outstanding title track raises a new pinnacle for the release. The track spews malice and hostility from its first vocal and rhythmic touch, aligning them to punishing sonic and rhythmic frenzies. As all tracks to describe everything within would need a page per song but needless to say Eschatologies is a nonstop bordering pestilential rampage.

Cybernetic Lucidity disorientates and lacerates the senses next, its flailing rhythms and riffs a welcome distraction to the intensive suffocating invention broiling synapses from within their cage whilst after the dark and wildly simmering peace of III: СКЕЛЕТ, the band unleash the classically walled, viciously vehement Premonitions which features a guest appearance from Ricky Lee Roper. The track parades riffs and rhythms with a horde like mentality and appetite upon ears whilst its successor Invasion, lashes and chews on the wounds with sonic invention and a combined riff and rhythmic rabidity.

The album closes with first the tremendous Evil Will Prevail featuring Exist Immortal vocalist Meyrick De La Fuente, the song a ferocious blaze of spite, antagonism, and creative imagination. The track bewitches as powerfully as it annihilates, the expressive clean vocals and melody crafted passage towards its end a seduction within the masterful turmoil that lingers long into the final instrumental IV: Non Magis Adrogantiam.

Eschatologies is a thoroughly demanding and intensive proposition which only expands and broadens its hold and depths with every listen. As said there is a multitude of inventive exploits within every twist and turn which at times makes it a difficult listen in regard to taking it all in but unrelentingly thrills and invigorates as it bewilders and exhausts. It is a glorious maze of sound and invention from Nexilva, simply a ravenous fascinating aural kaleidoscope.

https://www.facebook.com/nexilva

9/10

RingMaster 08/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

 

The Betrayer’s Judgement – Philosopher

tbj promo philosopher

Engulfed in plenty of acclaim and promise, French hardcore/djent quintet The Betrayer’s Judgement unleashes their next slice of carnivorous invention with the Philosopher EP. It is a rampant and predacious force of imagination and enterprise with a hungry energy to match and though it does not always tempt to the same consistent heights across its antagonistic body, the release is an engrossing and excitingly promising encounter.

Formed in 2009, The Betrayer’s Judgement were soon taking a swipe at attention with firstly The Worst Sickness demo of 2010, a metalcore bred encounter, and even more so with debut album Run Out Of Fuel the following year. Shows and festivals have only increased and accelerated the band’s reputation and ascent, the five piece sharing stages with the likes of Caliban, The A.R.R.S, and Betraying the Martyrs along the way. The Twin Peak Records released Philosopher is the next potent and formidable step in their rise, a six track ravishment of the senses and imagination to raise a very healthy appetite for the band’s explosive and bold sound.

Broken Mirrors instantly sets ears and release off in incendiary style, the orchestral sculpted dawning of the song an epic and EP_coverrigorously persuasive invitation which finds greater potency as the intensive riffing and rhythmic barracking explodes into action. It is a breath stealing blast to the senses, the towering rhythmic punches and predatory riffing rabid and the technical craft riveting. With equally rapacious snarling vocals from Cyril Szczepaniak, his delivery a grouchy scowling pleasure, the track is a bestial provocation with an open evolution just waiting to prey on the impressive canvas already cast. The returning stringed emotive flight is a returning temptation which constantly enhances the pleasure whilst the clean vocals of guitarist Jean-Aimé Leclercq make a tempering addition to the storm. His smooth tones are strong and hard to dismiss but for personal tastes the slight defusing of the firestorm of intensity is not as successful as an anticipated all-out ravaging but still enjoyably imaginative.

Both Lights Out and Elapsed Time: Real Life rage against the senses with a skilled and uncompromising enterprise, the first of the two dragging its guttural toxicity to stalk the emotions within a rabid maelstrom of rhythms from drummer Arnaud Lefebvre and the voracious air scorching riffs and sonic pestilence crafted by Leclercq and fellow guitarist Flavian Dutoit. Again the barbarous delivery of Szczepaniak reigns over the clean but the mix is a much stronger and impression union though the outstanding track lacks the spark to match the opening pinnacle. The second of the two features Ryan Kirby from Fit For a King and instantly unleashes a vocal tsunami of malevolent intensity and passion. Strings coax the passions as potently as in the first song and the bass of Raphaël Darras finds a dark resonance which as across all songs just seduces the passions. With great classical and melodic teasing from the keys and a constant oppression aggression to drool over the track is a thunderous furnace of sonic causticity and inventive fire, though again the clean vocals as accomplished and flawless as they are do not really enhance or sell the track, though as mentioned this is just a preference rather than a criticism of Leclercq’s ability.

The title track makes for a dramatic and blustery oppression on the ears, the track a labour intensive listen which rewards with some inspiring intrigue and invention to its design beneath and immersed into its brutal touch and craft which leaves the senses shell-shocked. There are no clean vocals on show and it works a treat, the band and sound suggesting they would benefit by a reduction of its use which is reinforced at times again by the destructively sculpted track The Journey. The track employs spoken vocals aligned to the raucous bile soaked growls alongside a mouth-watering blaze of disorientating rhythms, melodic searing, and a delicious melodramatic discord kissed wantonness to the keys. It is another impressive and intrusively persuasive assault to inspire real suspicion and anticipation that The Betrayer’s Judgement is a potential major force of the future.

Completed by a decent enough remix of Broken Mirrors by The Algorithm, though it is not a patch on the original as it dissipates virtually all of the brutality and rapturous voraciousness, the Philosopher EP is an outstanding violent goading of the passions and a striking marker on the rise of The Betrayer’s Judgement.

Download the Philosopher EP as a buy now name your price release @ http://thebetrayersjudgement.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thebetrayersjudgement

8/10

RingMaster 29/11/2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0OBY0gJhMM

 

Engulfed in plenty of acclaim and promise, French hardcore/djent quintet The Betrayer’s Judgement unleashes their next slice of carnivorous invention with the Philosopher EP. It is a rampant and predacious force of imagination and enterprise with a hungry energy to match and though it does not always tempt to the same consistent heights across its antagonistic body, the release is an engrossing and excitingly promising encounter.

Formed in 2009, The Betrayer’s Judgement were soon taking a swipe at attention with firstly The Worst Sickness demo of 2010, a metalcore bred encounter, and even more so with debut album Run Out Of Fuel the following year. Shows and festivals have only increased and accelerated the band’s reputation and ascent, the five piece sharing stages with the likes of Caliban, The A.R.R.S, and Betraying the Martyrs along the way. The Twin Peak Records released Philosopher is the next potent and formidable step in their rise, a six track ravishment of the senses and imagination to raise a very healthy appetite for the band’s explosive and bold sound.

Broken Mirrors instantly sets ears and release off in incendiary style, the orchestral sculpted dawning of the song an epic and rigorously persuasive invitation which finds greater potency as the intensive riffing and rhythmic barracking explodes into action. It is a breath stealing blast to the senses, the towering rhythmic punches and predatory riffing rabid and the technical craft riveting. With equally rapacious snarling vocals from Cyril Szczepaniak, his delivery a grouchy scowling pleasure, the track is a bestial provocation with an open evolution just waiting to prey on the impressive canvas already cast. The returning stringed emotive flight is a returning temptation which constantly enhances the pleasure whilst the clean vocals of guitarist Jean-Aimé Leclercq make a tempering addition to the storm. His smooth tones are strong and hard to dismiss but for personal tastes the slight defusing of the firestorm of intensity is not as successful as an anticipated all-out ravaging but still enjoyably imaginative.

Both Lights Out and Elapsed Time: Real Life rage against the senses with a skilled and uncompromising enterprise, the first of the two dragging its guttural toxicity to stalk the emotions within a rabid maelstrom of rhythms from drummer Arnaud Lefebvre and the voracious air scorching riffs and sonic pestilence crafted by Leclercq and fellow guitarist Flavian Dutoit. Again the barbarous delivery of Szczepaniak reigns over the clean but the mix is a much stronger and impression union though the outstanding track lacks the spark to match the opening pinnacle. The second of the two features Ryan Kirby from Fit For a King and instantly unleashes a vocal tsunami of malevolent intensity and passion. Strings coax the passions as potently as in the first song and the bass of Raphaël Darras finds a dark resonance which as across all songs just seduces the passions. With great classical and melodic teasing from the keys and a constant oppression aggression to drool over the track is a thunderous furnace of sonic causticity and inventive fire, though again the clean vocals as accomplished and flawless as they are do not really enhance or sell the track, though as mentioned this is just a preference rather than a criticism of Leclercq’s ability.

The title track makes for a dramatic and blustery oppression on the ears, the track a labour intensive listen which rewards with some inspiring intrigue and invention to its design beneath and immersed into its brutal touch and craft which leaves the senses shell-shocked. There are no clean vocals on show and it works a treat, the band and sound suggesting they would benefit by a reduction of its use which is reinforced at times again by the destructively sculpted track The Journey. The track employs spoken vocals aligned to the raucous bile soaked growls alongside a mouth-watering blaze of disorientating rhythms, melodic searing, and a delicious melodramatic discord kissed wantonness to the keys. It is another impressive and intrusively persuasive assault to inspire real suspicion and anticipation that The Betrayer’s Judgement is a potential major force of the future.

Completed by a decent enough remix of Broken Mirrors by The Algorithm, though it is not a patch on the original as it dissipates virtually all of the brutality and rapturous voraciousness, the Philosopher EP is an outstanding violent goading of the passions and a striking marker on the rise of The Betrayer’s Judgement.

Download the Philosopher EP as a buy now name your price release @ http://thebetrayersjudgement.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thebetrayersjudgement

8/10

RingMaster 29/11/2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0OBY0gJhMM

 

Engulfed in plenty of acclaim and promise, French hardcore/djent quintet The Betrayer’s Judgement unleashes their next slice of carnivorous invention with the Philosopher EP. It is a rampant and predacious force of imagination and enterprise with a hungry energy to match and though it does not always tempt to the same consistent heights across its antagonistic body, the release is an engrossing and excitingly promising encounter.

Formed in 2009, The Betrayer’s Judgement were soon taking a swipe at attention with firstly The Worst Sickness demo of 2010, a metalcore bred encounter, and even more so with debut album Run Out Of Fuel the following year. Shows and festivals have only increased and accelerated the band’s reputation and ascent, the five piece sharing stages with the likes of Caliban, The A.R.R.S, and Betraying the Martyrs along the way. The Twin Peak Records released Philosopher is the next potent and formidable step in their rise, a six track ravishment of the senses and imagination to raise a very healthy appetite for the band’s explosive and bold sound.

Broken Mirrors instantly sets ears and release off in incendiary style, the orchestral sculpted dawning of the song an epic and rigorously persuasive invitation which finds greater potency as the intensive riffing and rhythmic barracking explodes into action. It is a breath stealing blast to the senses, the towering rhythmic punches and predatory riffing rabid and the technical craft riveting. With equally rapacious snarling vocals from Cyril Szczepaniak, his delivery a grouchy scowling pleasure, the track is a bestial provocation with an open evolution just waiting to prey on the impressive canvas already cast. The returning stringed emotive flight is a returning temptation which constantly enhances the pleasure whilst the clean vocals of guitarist Jean-Aimé Leclercq make a tempering addition to the storm. His smooth tones are strong and hard to dismiss but for personal tastes the slight defusing of the firestorm of intensity is not as successful as an anticipated all-out ravaging but still enjoyably imaginative.

Both Lights Out and Elapsed Time: Real Life rage against the senses with a skilled and uncompromising enterprise, the first of the two dragging its guttural toxicity to stalk the emotions within a rabid maelstrom of rhythms from drummer Arnaud Lefebvre and the voracious air scorching riffs and sonic pestilence crafted by Leclercq and fellow guitarist Flavian Dutoit. Again the barbarous delivery of Szczepaniak reigns over the clean but the mix is a much stronger and impression union though the outstanding track lacks the spark to match the opening pinnacle. The second of the two features Ryan Kirby from Fit For a King and instantly unleashes a vocal tsunami of malevolent intensity and passion. Strings coax the passions as potently as in the first song and the bass of Raphaël Darras finds a dark resonance which as across all songs just seduces the passions. With great classical and melodic teasing from the keys and a constant oppression aggression to drool over the track is a thunderous furnace of sonic causticity and inventive fire, though again the clean vocals as accomplished and flawless as they are do not really enhance or sell the track, though as mentioned this is just a preference rather than a criticism of Leclercq’s ability.

The title track makes for a dramatic and blustery oppression on the ears, the track a labour intensive listen which rewards with some inspiring intrigue and invention to its design beneath and immersed into its brutal touch and craft which leaves the senses shell-shocked. There are no clean vocals on show and it works a treat, the band and sound suggesting they would benefit by a reduction of its use which is reinforced at times again by the destructively sculpted track The Journey. The track employs spoken vocals aligned to the raucous bile soaked growls alongside a mouth-watering blaze of disorientating rhythms, melodic searing, and a delicious melodramatic discord kissed wantonness to the keys. It is another impressive and intrusively persuasive assault to inspire real suspicion and anticipation that The Betrayer’s Judgement is a potential major force of the future.

Completed by a decent enough remix of Broken Mirrors by The Algorithm, though it is not a patch on the original as it dissipates virtually all of the brutality and rapturous voraciousness, the Philosopher EP is an outstanding violent goading of the passions and a striking marker on the rise of The Betrayer’s Judgement.

Download the Philosopher EP as a buy now name your price release @ http://thebetrayersjudgement.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thebetrayersjudgement

8/10

RingMaster 29/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com