Atomic Suplex – Fourteen Inches of Fist

Atomicsupplex_RingMaster Review

Great rock ‘n’ roll always benefits from a good dose of creative dementia in its devilry and you get plenty of that and more in the bedlam that is Fourteen Inches of Fist. The new album from London quartet Atomic Suplex is nonstop ingenious lunacy, a dangerous riot for body and soul, and quite brilliant.

The UK quartet has been stirring up sonic trouble for a number of years now, earning increasing acclaim with every release and a reputation as one ferociously exciting and uncompromising band live. Stages across the UK and Europe, as well as Asia, have been shared with the likes of The Hives, Guitar Wolf, The Gories, The Adolescents, Nobunny, The Kids, Jet Boys, Armitage Shanks, Richard Herring, The Spits, The Fat White Family, The Buzzcocks, Theee Bat amongst many more whilst singles and EP’s over time, and certainly acclaimed 2010 debut album Bathroom Party on Crypt Records, have marked the band out as a must investigation for a growing horde of fans. Now it is Fourteen Inches of Fist raising a storm since its recent release, and declaring Atomic Suplex as not a must but the essential riot for all rock ‘n’ roll fans.

Sound and album is garage rock, punk rock, noise rock…any kind of dirty, insatiable rock ‘n’ roll you can think of and a torrent of fun from its first to last breath. One Man Party kicks things off with the announcement “When I say I’m a dick, you best believe I’m a dick! D- I- K.” It sets the aggressive belligerent tone which rousingly fuels the whole album, and a song which is soon erupting into a salaciously tenacious slab of punk ‘n’ roll driven by the rousing tones of Jim Suplex. A sonic web of noise is soon grasping ears through his and Emma Leaning’s guitars whilst a gloriously throaty bass sound is conjured by Dan Suplex amidst the wicked swipes of drummer JD Kickdrum. The track is pure attitude, like early Damned merging with The Sonics, and instant slavery.

The album’s title track comes next, it too a concussive explosion of sound but this time infusing honky-tonk piano, blues rock spicing, and garage rock ‘n roll devilry into its mix of raw sixties and seventies rock ‘n’ roll. Flames of brass only add to the theatre of the muggy scenery as too the gritty backing vocals of Emma behind Jim’s raw incitement. As its predecessor, the track has ears and appetite lustful, a success 14 Inches of Fist relentlessly achieves from first song to last.

Cover_RingMaster Review   Set It On Fire has limbs scything through air next with seventies punk antagonism meets psych rock contagion, its guitars and brass a resourceful scorching, whilst Wild Love invites naughty deeds with a Rocket From the Crypt meets Dick Venom and the Terrortones infestation of sound. Both tracks are ridiculously compelling persuasive yet find themselves outshine by the outstanding Firing Line. The song is manna for the ears and heart, its Mighty Mighty Bosstones like opening alone igniting the instincts to party before rhythms provide a jungle of unstoppable temptation frequented by wonderful squirts of sax. They develop into subsequent deranged toxicity further in, colluding with a just as rigorously arousing web of guitar and bass enterprise. As ever like a side show barker, Jim adds his vocal stirring to the mix for one slice of irreverent creative alchemy.

Fifties inspired and seventies coloured rock ’n’ roll gets the Atomic Suplex corruption next, the raw and caustic devilment of S. U. P. L. E. X. a tempest of sonic and vocal raucousness pierced by melodic bait and fiery hooks. It is less than a minute and a half of catchy mayhem before Two Girls flirts like a punk incarnation of The Shangri-las tutored by The Rezillos. As all songs though, air is raw, sound scuzzy, and the encounter as abrasive as it is virulent, and again thrilling.

   J.D. Attack pounds the senses like the bastard son of a Showaddywaddy and Reverend Horton Heat union, its thumping rhythms and heavyweight brawl of sound one party you know would welcome gate crashers with devilish relish whilst the corrosively scarring Ass Tecnica is noise punk knavery which, as in the previous song, twists anything from surf and r&b to garage rock into its ravenous bellow. The pair unsurprisingly leave exhaustion and exhilaration in their wake, as too the eighteen second punk assault of No Pain No Gain, a song more than backing up its title.

Like The Cramps meets The Mobbs, You’ve Got Some Nerve has the body throwing moves hips were surely not made for across its forty odd seconds, a wonderful physical test followed by some respite through the hex that is Pancho. Sultry sax caresses ears initially though in no time it is joined by a wall of sonic intrigue and adventure which has a whiff of Oh! Gunquit to it. Continuing to spill funky hooks, searing grooves, and a garage bred invention; the song is as psychotic as it is clear infection, and another pinnacle of a very lofty landscape to Fourteen Inches of Fist.

Chicken Rich is a ragtime hued haunt seeded in the past which descends into anarchy the further its nostalgia persists whilst closing track White Shoes is quite simply incendiary rock ‘n’ roll which manages to spin a tapestry suggesting everyone from Billy Haley to The Cramps, King Salami and The Cumberland 3 to Turbonegro, and Screaming Jay Hawkins to Johnny Thunders within its epidemic of unbridled energy and senses inflaming rock ‘n’ roll.

Fourteen Inches of Fist is one of the best real and organic rock ‘n’ roll album this year and of a few before, maybe the best, and Atomic Suplex the one band you were meant to lose your sanity with.

Fourteen Inches of Fist is available now via Dirty Water Records on 12” vinyl, CD, and digitally.

RingMaster 25/08/2015

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Immoral Discipline / Dead On The Streets Split EP

IM DOTS 7 Inch Artwork FRONT

This week Rebel Sound unleash the 7” Split between Immoral Discipline and Dead On The Streets, two US bands raging with Oi punk voracity joining for one raw and enjoyable fury. Uniting a band born in the heyday of the genre with a new protagonist for an uncompromising rapacious front, the release makes a proposition which does not push boundaries or hold startling surprises but certainly brings forward another thoroughly satisfying and invigorating slab of street punk to stomp along with.

First of the antagonists Immoral Discipline is a quintet from Washington D.C. which formed in 1986.From their first days the band was making a strong imprint on the Oi punk scene with their presence and sound, one which has still lingered over the years since their break up in 1989. Their demo Boots and Braces, Stars and Stripes in 1987 set a marker for the band and following genre bred bands, which in the following year the EPs Battlefield and a self-titled successor replicated. Live the band also earned a formidable reputation as they played with the likes of Agnostic Front, Half Life, The Adolescents, Leeway, Biohazard, Forced Reality, Best Defense, Uniform Choice, Warzone, Black Market Baby, Youth of Today, The Exploited and many more. Several line-up changes occurred across the years before the band called it a day, that was until founding member Shawn Garard Leahy brought Immoral Discipline back in 2011 as attention and a potent buzz around the release of a retrospective CD continued to grow. With past members placed in different parts of the country, Leahy with their blessing recruited a new line-up going on to play festivals and shows with band such as Stormwatch, Steel Toe Solution, Broken Heroes, Hub City Stompers, Pharmacists, Unit Six, The Traditionals, Iron City Hooligans, Warrior Kids, and Offensive Weapon. Currently working on a new album, the band uncages a couple of new tracks for this release, two shots of caustic might which shows they have returned harder and fiercer than ever.

     Riff RAF hits ears first, the bleating of sheep within a sonic swarm the key to a belligerent stride of snarling riffs and thumping rhythms. It is prime punk rock, the vocals of Leahy a raging protagonist which rile against thoughts whilst inciting great anthemic lures of group shouts. Production wise it could have been kinder to the frontman’s attack, it lacking the depth of bite expected, but it does not prevent his incitement hitting as hard as the irresistible hooks and the perfectly stirring basslines which course through the tempest. The song feeds expectations yet opens up a freshness and voracity in sound which makes their forthcoming album something to keenly anticipate, something the following Stay at Home Skinhead adds to. Once again the guitars surround ears with a sonic breeze before striking the flint to a stomping rampage of rabid beats and scarring riffs speared occasionally by searing melodic enterprise. It is a full-on punk anthem taking no prisoners as it ignites the passions. Listening to the two songs it is easy to understand that though they did not get the full recognition at the time how Immoral Discipline has inspired future Oi sounds and bands since, Dead On The Streets we would suggest one example.

Hailing out of Pittsburgh, Dead On The Streets emerged with their animosity last year, thus a band as fresh as newly baked bread and just as flavoursome. They also enrich their invention with the origins of the genre, creating honest and straightforward contagiously potent incitements. Early Grave is their first offering, a track which beats out a rhythmic coaxing before spreading out a bruising of coarse riffs aligned with catchy hooks. Walking with a more punk rock fuelled gait, the track merges old school simplicity and again raw snarling vocals to dirty rock ‘n’ roll revelry. It also is not a surprising encounter but a thrillingly magnetic one left in the shade a little by America Today. Stabbing riffs and a delicious almost psychobilly like bass bait opens up song and eager attention initially, before the song casts a masterful blaze of grazing persuasion and virulent hooks. The bass constantly seduces across the song, its charm and growl irresistible, but equally the guitars flirt and enthral ears with an adventurous flame of enterprise. Whereas its predecessor was pleasingly yet predictably sculpted the second of their songs is a thrilling intrigue and imaginative fired riot showing more of the diversity and strength of the band’s sound.

Dead on the Streets is a band to keep a close excited eye upon and Immoral Discipline an inspiration which has returned to more than likely set new seeds down for future emerging artists. Together they make for a highly enjoyable and enthralling encounter with their split, of which more of the same would be very welcome.

Immoral Discipline / Dead On The Streets Split EP is available now via http://www.rebelsoundrecords.com/ on 7” vinyl (300 Black vinyl, 100 Red vinyl, 100 Milky Clear vinyl with Blood Red Splatter) and digitally (including an extra track from each band).

https://www.facebook.com/ImmoralDiscipline

https://www.facebook.com/DeadOnTheStreetsOi

8.5/10

RingMaster 01/07/2014