The DeRellas – Freakshow

DeRellas_RingMasterReview

Kicking off their own album Rockaway Records in rousing style, UK punk ‘n’ rollers The DeRellas release new mini-album Freakshow. It is an insatiable six track roar of the band’s familiar glam infested sleaze punk rock ‘n’ roll but equally their most instinctive punk rock centred trespass upon the senses. The result an incitement which just fires up the instincts to be bad whilst treating ears to their most irresistible proposal yet.

Freakshow is also the first offering from the London hailing quartet without vocalist Robbie, one of the band’s founders along with bassist Timmy DeRella. Stepping forward to fill the spot as if he has always been there is Stevie D, the band’s line-up completed by lead guitarist Luca DeRella and also new drummer Bish, once of Flesh for Lulu. It is a foursome which goes straight for the jugular with the Pat Collier produced Freakshow; from its first breath tearing up its surroundings like Johnny Thunders meets The Boys infested with the raw power pop of The Quakes.

Rip It Up descends on the senses first, from its first rap of drums and spicy grooves winding around ears with a salacious attitude backed by tangy grooves and predacious rhythms. Stevie’s vocals are just as cantankerous as the sounds around him, carrying a great irritable edge potently backed by Timmy and Luca as a strong catchiness invades song and ears. Carrying a touch of The Damned to its darker riffs and rhythmic imposing, the song without ripping up trees is a strong and enjoyable start to Freakshow which blossoms into a greater beast hereon in.

Strung Out Sin City grumbles and rumbles upon an already keen appetite straight away next. A nagging potency lines its riffs whilst rhythmically the track is enjoyably heavier and darker than its predecessor, it all combining with a lively imagination which sees the song quickly eclipsing the opener. It too has a chorus which demands involvement whilst Stevie’s rhythmic guitar prowess is a great echo of the sonic enterprise cast by Luca. There is plenty about The DeRellas sound which is familiar but as here rarely to the detriment of creating its own character and persuasive individuality.

cover_RingMasterReviewHinted at in the last song, a great 999 flavouring invades next up Soho Hotel, an essence which accentuates the virulence of the song and its fiercely catchy demeanour led by the swinging bass groove of Timmy and Stevie’s rousing delivery. Bish’s beats equally make a lively impact throughout as sonic flames escape the strings of Luca. The song is another step up in power and adventure within Freakshow more than matched by the album’s outstanding title track. Taking best track honours, it is a bad boy encounter; defiant in heart and aggressive in bearing stirring up all the punk rock/rock ‘n’ roll instincts within itself and the listener.

Dress Up, Mess Up is another pushing thoughts towards 999 comparisons without losing its own DeRellas identity; the song a boisterous stomp of hungry riffs and bitchy rhythms as vocals and melodic toxicity inflame an eagerness to get involved. Again you could say surprises are low yet everything about the song and indeed Freakshow is fresh and all persuasive.

The release closes with a captivating version of the Adam and The Ants track Plastic Surgery, The DeRellas giving it a rawer Sex Pistols/The Adicts edge which just hits the spot dead centre.

Freakshow is The DeRellas at their most punk yet and no coincidence that the album outshines their previous and thoroughly enjoyable reputation marking encounters. It is also a great start to their new label which we would suggest in providing more of the same will be hitting, like the band, far loftier heights.

Freakshow is out now through Rockaway Records digitally and on CD and 10” green vinyl @ http://thederellas.bigcartel.com/

Up Coming Live Dates:

Friday 11 November – Birmingham, Hare & Hounds (with The Black Bombers and The Primevals)

Thursday 17 November – Bristol, Thunderbolt (with The Setbacks)

Saturday 19 November – Reading, Rising Sun Arts Centre (with Rage DC and The Go Go Cult)

Sunday 27 November – London, The 100 Club (with The Crunch)

Sunday 11 December – Edinburgh, Bannermans (with Buzzbomb + more TBC)

http://derellas.com/   https://www.facebook.com/TheDeRellas/   https://twitter.com/thederellas

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Autopsy Boys – Return of the acid casualty auto humans

AB_RingMasterReview

After tenaciously grabbing ears and imagination last year with their mischievous invention and punk bred sound through the singles No Ambition and Song For Debbera, electro punk miscreants Autopsy Boys are poised to release their eagerly awaited new album this month. We call the band electro punk but as their fans know and the upcoming Return of the acid casualty auto humans shows, the British quartet’s sound has more distinct styles and textures than a high street boutique. New wave, punk, horror punk, industrial rock, metal…the list goes on to the flavours making up an album which has the creative devilry and mischief of a Saw movie and the relentless hungry adventure of a computer game.

Formed in 2011 by vocalist/keyboardist Lee Brunskjill and bassist Gary Hargreaves, who had already been making music together from 2006, the Leeds hailing Autopsy Boys stepped into the light when the founding pair were asked to open local hard-core punk and heavy metal all day event Beefstock IV. Recruiting friends for the supposedly one off moment, the band simply continued to play and create, with guitarist Alan Laird and drummer Sam Shelton (who recently left to be replaced by Billy James Mitchell) subsequently linking up with Brunskjill and Hargreaves. The following time also saw the earlier post punk inspired sounds of writers and band move into a hardcore punk arena of sound whilst still infusing the healthy revelry of synthesizers and samples into their horror movie/gaming inspired themes.

Singles like Rich Kids Playground/ Negative 8 and Crushing On Cynthia sparked increasing attention the band’s way as too debut album Def Elements in 2012. For all their successes though and that found by both No Ambition and Song For Debbera, the twenty one hefty Return of the acid casualty auto humans is looking like being a whole new ball game for attention and reputation. From start to finish, the album is a maelstrom of diversely flavoured and feverishly explosive tracks sure to ignite the buds of anyone with a taste for electronic, punkish, and bruising confrontational incitements.

Artwork by White Dolemite

Artwork by White Dolemite

Curated by Canadian actress/film director Debbie Rochon, Return of the acid casualty auto humans has attention quickly gripped; The acid test featuring Johnny Violent providing a brief intro with dark threatening shadows to its portentous coaxing on the way to turning into the rousing exploits of 27.8.89. With Blag Dahlia, who we are assuming is indeed the front-man of mighty punk band the Dwarves, the second song opens with an infectious electro rock tempting around steely riffs and firmly landed beats. Becoming more imposing as atmospheric keys collude with dark rhythms but never breaking its catchy intent, the Hadouken! scented song has appetite keen and ready for the fiercer proposition that is Just dance with me. Punkishly irritable and atmospherically sinister, the track quickly badgers and stirs up the senses with a hardcore seeded stomp carrying just a whiff of The Dickies to it.

As strong and heftily pleasing as the album is so far, I’m gonna kill myself lays down a certain pinnacle next. From Hargreaves‘ grievously throaty bassline to the intimidating fusion of vocals and belligerent riffs, it has body and emotions thickly involved in its punk rock challenge and lyrical adventure. Psych rock keys simply add to the raw and vibrant fun as the track reveals just some of the array of flavours fuelling the album.

The band’s early post punk style is still an element which has its say at times and Summers over makes riveting use of those textures with its nagging bassline and steely presence before erupting in a senses scorching crescendo. Like Artery on acid, the song is increasingly captivating just as the old school punk blessed Breakfast at retro Betty’s boutique which gets even more antagonistically incendiary as guest Al Skull adds to the contrasting vocal and sonic trespasses.

Through the power pop/grunge rock coloured STRAWBS! and Song for Debbera, the album demands attention, the first of the two uncaging virulent rock ‘n’ roll with the pugnacious nature of a street brawl. Its successor, with Rochon providing another great entrance to a song, is a contagious electro pop canter with an eighties new wave spattering of noise and bait hinting at bands like The Normal and Inca Babies. Both tracks keep pleasure full, though they soon get eclipsed by the muggy intensity and predacious character of  the excellent Lotti will conduct the same experiment on several different humans and in turn the similarly raucous and bracing Denton ward honey trap. Both tracks are simply shots of punk adrenaline giving the appetite more to be greedy over.

The chase scene provides a dance-punk /r&b infused distraction next; featuring Junior Bear and Debbie Rochon, the song is a lively eighties toned stroll which again enjoyably takes album and sound in another pleasing direction if without quite stirring up the instincts as powerfully as We’re gonna need more bodybags. Visceral in tone and punk ‘n’ roll predation, the song’s blending of metal, hardcore, and electro punk voracity has the body bouncing and energies exhausted by its close leaving Agoraphobia to exploit all with its own frantically bruising and anthemically inflamed incitement. There are numerous pinnacles to the heady landscape of the album, this an unmissable one immediately followed by another in the glorious Level 7: Compulsive. Basking in the involvement of Leeds duo Petrol Bastard, the track goes for the jugular from its first breath; weaving every strain of punk into its own hellacious addiction for ears as its punk irritability and addictiveness provides the canvas for the grin inducing vocal prowess and devilment of band and guest.

The album is at its fullest height now, the past trio of treats matched by the psychotic drama of Every good sitcom gets cancelled after the pilot where Brunskjill seems to have been stuffed down a drain pipe to present his narrative whilst around him a tempest of rock ‘n’ roll boils over as an even more deranged than normal Cardiacs like kaleidoscope of insanity flirts with the imagination.

Lusty reactions continue to be stirred by the Rochon introduced Bubblegum where the guest vocals of Rebecca Lindley especially light up ears within more robustly tenacious endeavour. There is equally no relaxing of appetite and eagerness for Cigarette burns which follows with Al Skull again on board. Though carrying a feel of Peter and The Test Tube Babies and The Adicts to its raw punk storm, keys and the Autopsy Boys ingenuity only twists it inside out to forge another fresh infestation of the senses before the electro punk pop stroll of Every little thing has hips and emotions swinging.

The gentler but no less attitude loaded electronic proposal of Disco for psychopaths steps up next, its creative wares leading to nothing less than unbridled satisfaction. It is a success quickly matched by Town full of microdots and its hungry torrent of hardcore belligerence and rhythmic animosity with Al Skull back again to add to its ravenous snarl, and indeed the melodically acoustic and rabidly frenetic stalker that is Totally obsessed with you which brings the album to a devilishly magnetic close.

With so many tracks there was the fear even as a long-time fan and player of the band’s songs on our podcasts, that Return of the acid casualty auto humans would be a collection of undoubted triumphs but also a few fine but inescapable fillers. From start to finish though, there is no weak link or a song seemingly thrown in to make up the numbers. The album’s strong start just gets bigger, bolder, and more irresistible song by song with, of course particular moments which really ignite personal tastes along the way.

So come the end of the month, we suggest you go treat yourself to an album certain to ride high on many end of year best of lists. Did we mention that the album is to be released by the band as a free download too, with a CD and vinyl release at a later date; as their music might suggest, the band must be mad!

Return of the acid casualty auto humans is released 30th April as a free download via  https://autopsyboys.bandcamp.com/

http://www.autopsyboys.com   https://www.facebook.com/autopsyboys/   https://twitter.com/autopsyboys

Pete RingMaster 04/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Faintest Idea – Increasing The Minimum Rage

FI_RingMasterReview

Though understandably often tagged as a ska punk band, Faintest Idea definitely shows themselves to be a true punk band with a penchant for ska bred hip swinging revelry loaded with oi! inspired snarls upon new album Increasing The Minimum Rage. The eleven track stomp is an irresistible roar of politically charged songs that have no qualms in getting feet and bodies feverishly bouncing whilst thoughts and emotions are inspired by its lyrical bite. Most of all though, the British band’s new offering is simply one of the most rousing slabs of contagious rock ‘n’ roll heard in many belligerent moons and deserving of everyone’s energy and time.

Formed in 2008, the Kings Lynn hailing Faintest Idea initially was a jugular ripping punk band venting their political unrest and distrust. That attitude and defiance has never lessened even as the band began weaving in inspirations taken from two-tone, ska and reggae influences. 2013 saw the release of debut album The Voice of Treason on Manchester’s TNS Records to swift acclaim, soon potently backed by the videos for tracks such as Bull In A China Shop and Youth. Live the band has equally become an essential great time for many, the “rudeboy street punks” taking their rousing presence to shows and festivals across Europe and the UK, including in 2014, a 10 date tour of Russia.

Now the band is ready to uncage a new infectious call to arms in the shape of the Hieronymous Melchers (Capdown, Citizen Fish, King Prawn and Snuff) recorded and Massimiliano Giorgini (Anti Flag, Rise Against, Alkaline Trio, Common Rider) mastered Increasing The Minimum Rage. Featuring guest contributions from Vic Ruggiero (The Slackers) and Sean Howe (Random Hand), the album quickly reveals Faintest Idea to have a grouchier fire in their creative belly and a sound at its heaviest and angriest, musically and lyrically, yet with no detriment to their instincts to swing and inflame the listener’s body. The first track, Circling The Drain opens on a theme setting sample as horns meander in the background. From there as a guitar adds its vague musing, the song grabs a breath and leaps into a captivating stroll with Jack’s choppy riffs colluding with the flirtation of mischievous melodies amidst organ shared smiles. The brass flames of trumpeter Sara, trombonist Bobble, and tenor saxophonist Lil dan add to the infection quickly grabbing ears and imagination, creating a rich platform for the snarling vocals of bassist Dani and his dark throated bassline. There is a snarl to Jack’s guitar enterprise too and a firm hand to the beats of the other Jack but as the song’s climate gets feistier and more agitated, a rampant swing stills drives it and the listener before it slipping straight into the equally irresistible Cocktails.

Faintest-Idea-Front-Cover_RingMasterReviewThe second track similarly bounds through ears with rhythms and riffs as inescapable bait and a virulent catchiness to its energy and attitude equally matched by the band’s vocals. Throughout hooks grip and again flirt with the imagination as the song’s skittish gait takes care of the body, vocals in turn challenging thoughts at the same time as brass unveils a rich seducing in something akin to Rancid meets Random Hand meets The Members. Its mellowing departure simply simmers into the sultry embrace of Down Pressure, a funk infested and ska fuelled romp as light on its feet as it is antagonistic in voice. As its predecessors, the song defies the listener not to become fully involved, dares them not to offer their hips and support; a challenge impossible to win as the song leaps around with kinetic persuasion.

The power pop/ska punk exploits of Echo Chambre steals attention next, working its addictive charm on every aspect of a willing disciple as guitar jangles and pop punk rhythms act as ringleaders to another thrilling proposal embracing smouldering brass and lively shadows furthered nurtured by Dani’s vocal attitude. Its tenacious exploits lead to the thick energy and aggression of The Well Has Run Dry which, from its first breath, is a confrontational proposition equipped with spiky hooks and a flaming melodic coaxing courtesy of guitar and some emotive lip prowess. United it stirs up air and emotions before the outstanding Stick Em Up (Lords of War) takes a stand with its punk ‘n’ roll contagion. As jazzy and funky as it is ska and old school punk spun, the track tantalises and badgers in sound and tone. Female vocals bring a B52s spice to certain parts whilst other times the song rumbles along like a mix of early Specials and The Adicts, revealing itself as another enjoyably multi-textured adventure.

Through the Clash/ Serious Drinking like chest beating of the beguiling Throw Away The Key and the ballsy rock ‘n’ roll of No Consequences, greed and thick enjoyment for the album is only confirmed before being given another big shot in the arm by the brilliant pairing of Ouroboros and Corporation. The first of the two is a web of flavours and styles as surf rock spiced guitars entangle with ska spawned riffs and intrigue loaded progressive punk grooves whilst Dani and co take potent shots at political and social injustices. The track is glorious and swiftly matched by the dramatic theatre of its successor. With vaudevillian prowess to a sinister soaked sound, the band bring the exploits of the song’s villainous title protagonist into panto-esque but certainly not trivialised view before descending upon them with oi! fuelled animosity and anthemic incitement. The track is ingenious; pure creative theatre and heading numerous memorable moments within the album.

Closing on Tightrope with its strongly brooding persuasion of sound and imagination, Increasing The Minimum Rage makes it so easy to say it is destined to be one of the year’s highlights. From start to finish it has every aspect of the listener enthralled and involved; only increasing that hold with subsequent plays whilst showing that to stand up and be counted does not have to see an absence of unbridled fun.

Increasing The Minimum Rage is released via TNS Records on 1st April @ http://tnsrecords.bandcamp.com/album/increasing-the-minimum-rage

http://www.facebook.com/faintestidea   http://www.twitter.com/faintestidea   http://faintestidea.bigcartel.com/

Pete RingMaster 31/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Skurvi – Get ‘Em In

skurvi_RingMasterReview

Since emerging in 2008, booze and rebellion, belligerence and unbridled fun have been all potent elements to the punk rock roar of UK quartet Skurvi. Equally, inescapable hooks, voracious riffs, and a sing-a-long prowess second to none have shaped attitude loaded songs which nag and incite whilst lending themselves to insatiable partying. Nothing has changed in the Brighton band’s new album Get ‘Em In, though fair to say that every element has been turned up numerous notches for its thirteen tenaciously rousing punk anthems.

Creating contagious brawls of old school punk, oi!, and raw rock ‘n’ roll since day one, Skurvi has earned a potent reputation for their bracing anthemic confrontations and the 2014 released Pints Half Full EP. It has led to strong anticipation for the first album from the foursome of vocalist Jimmy Skurvi, guitarist Perry, bassist Liam, and drummer Craig; a wait quickly made very worthwhile with opener Till We Die. Straight away rhythms and riffs gang up on ears as a swinging hook lays down easy going but potent bait. Led by the rousing tones of Jimmy, the band is soon calling the shots with their gang shouts around as catchy a slice of punk rock as you are likely to hear this year.

It is a spirit inflaming start to the Pat Collier mixed and mastered album; not offering major surprises but commandingly fresh and virulent as it gets the listener to their feet with vocal involvement included and sets the appetite up for things to come starting with Skinhead. UK Subs like in many ways, the street punk toned track jabs and pokes with its jangling riffs and intrusive rhythms as Jimmy vocally challenges. There is no option but to get physically and vocally involved; a submission all tracks draw to be fair and majorly highlighted by the outstanding Snatch Squad with its rolling rhythms and deliciously throaty bassline entangled in more anthemic vocal incitement from across the band. With a ring The Adicts to it, the song as the first track upon Get ‘Em In, becomes a firm favourite with lingering persuasion.

art_RingMasterReviewDrunken Nights whips up attention with its harmonic vocal calls and niggling hook next whilst Alright follows with a great Stiff Little Fingers like character to its full throttle stomp. Both provide choruses which instantly spark eager participation; again a constant success which is just as inescapable in the likes of Isn’t Where It Ends, a seventies scented oi! bred track which might lack the final spark of previous tracks but still whips up nothing less than thick enjoyment.

Skum Rises brings a Spunk Volcano and the Eruptions to it which is no surprise as the track was written by Spunk himself, the only non Skurvi written provocation on the album. With its middle finger forcibly erect, band and song quarrel with ears whilst leaving them greedily satisfied before Better Way bounds in with sinew swung beats and a feisty attitude in sound and word to the fore. Again whether there is anything new in the song can be debated but with its refreshing urgency and cantankerous imagination, there is little care as it continues the album’s unstoppable infection of ears and the passions.

She’s Coming is a straightforward and seriously enjoyable stirring of punk instincts whilst Wanting More has a Crashed Out meets Royal Oi! scent to it; both tracks again only feeding an increasing greed for more though the pair do get outshone by the blistering assault of Geezer. Bruising and imposingly catchy, the song shows that punk comes best raw and without any graces before the closing pair of Work and Her leave release and listener on a breathless high with their own individual punk riots. Hooks and anthemic vocals are as keen and weighty as ever in both, their pairing providing a mighty end to a relentlessly enjoyable rock ‘n’ roll scrap.

Skurvi do not try to reinvent the punk scene with their sound and indeed Get ‘Em In but instead focus on having and giving bruising fun whilst creating invigorating spirit rousing proposals. It is punk rock to the core, boisterous rock ‘n’ roll as it should be, and boy is it fun.

Get ‘Em In is out now via STP Records @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page4.htm

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Pete RingMaster 22/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Top Buzzer – Inside is a Room Vol. 1EP

top-buzzer-inside-is-a-room-vol-1_RingMasterReview

It has been two and a half years since British pop punk ‘n’ rollers Top Buzzer had us leaping around with the thrilling stomp of The Sprollie EP. It is a time though which has seen the band still a busy live proposition and its members, especially vocalist/bassist Andy ‘Dukey’ Duke, get involved in a horde of other projects and bands alongside the ‘day job’. Now to stir up and entertain ears at home again, the London based trio have uncaged the Inside is a Room Vol. 1 EP; four tracks of the band’s inimitable and contagious rock ‘n’ roll. It might be more recognisable prime Top Buzzer devilry but the release also reveals a broader embracing of punk and varied rock flavours within a fresh snarl and even keener hooks than ever.

Originally Jersey bred and formed in 2011, Top Buzzer has been a feisty punk proposition from day one, in sound and DIY attitude. Quickly they created their own label Back2Forward Records for first release, the Hands Up EP, and in turn the highly successful single Remission which followed. Praise and support followed across the written press, such as Kerrang, Rock Sound, and Big Cheese and on radio as UK and US shows and stations, terrestrial and online, took a shine to their mischievous pop punk revelry. Debut album Outside Is A World, again released that first year, grabbed greater and keener attention which was subsequently eclipsed by The Sprollie EP in 2013 and the band’s contribution a year earlier to the 2012 Rebel On The Underground – A Tribute To X-Ray Spex compilation.

As mentioned it has been a fair old gap between releases, but now Dukey, guitarist/vocalist Soni, and drummer/vocalist Welshy ensure the wait for something new is a quickly forgotten moan with Inside is a Room and indeed opener Trapped In The Room. Straight away ears are accosted by a swarm of riffs and rhythms, guitars and bass instantly lining that initial surge with sharp catchy hooks before expanding them further as the song settles into its tenacious stroll. Feet and hips are a swift blur to the equally animated nature and motion of the song. Dukey’s familiar tones adding to the recognisable air of the song but equally pushing the new lusty and punchy nature to the band’s sound. Like the ‘bad’ kid down the road your mother warned you about, the one destined to cause trouble and encourage develop bad habits, the track stirs up the spirit and an urge to lose inhibitions.

That same irresistible nagging arises with Meanwhile in San Francisco and its deliciously spicy melodic beckoning around Welshy’s enslaving anthemic bait. There is a touch of The Vibrators to the song as it settles and blossoms a thick lure of beats and bass temptation whilst on top Soni’s guitar uncages a blues frisked spiral of sonic enterprise. Ultimately creating a rousing proposal which at times is almost akin to Toy Dolls meets The Adicts, the track has body and voice firmly involved before allowing Denny’s Song the chance to run its grittier hard rock meets pop punk persuasion by ears for a matching success. Again resistance to getting physically and emotionally involved is futile once hooks and swinging rhythms seize hips and the imagination; the vocals across the band only stirring things up further with their boisterous encouragement.

The EP ends with the old school punk seeded Live is Blind where the three prong vocal attack alone is a riveting and thickly enjoyable incitement. Imagine The Ramones, Radio Stars, and The Wildhearts colluding for a riotous, rip-roaring stomp and Top Buzzer have that covered with the excellent closer to another thrilling incitement of ears and bold fun.

We have had a serious sweet tooth for Top Buzzer since that first EP, no denying that, and with releases like Inside is a Room EP, it only gets more acute. Pop infested punk ‘n’ roll does not get much more fun and to be honest better than this.

The Inside is a Room EP is out now via most online stores and @ http://back2forward.bigcartel.com/product/inside-is-a-room-vol-1-cd

http://www.topbuzzer.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/topbuzzermusic   https://twitter.com/topbuzzermusic

Pete RingMaster 18/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Kingcrows – Funland

 

Kingcrows_RingMaster Review

For all the exceptional punk releases and bands igniting the rock scene over recent years, there is no still no substitute yet for the special tingle which only lifts its head with a ‘77 found roar. As we all know, it is a never diminishing inspirational period for punk rock and the never ending torrent of bands spawning their own identity with its antagonistic hues. Some breed a sound which is as close a cousin as you could wish for, amongst them The Kingcrows who are simply a rousing bridge between the late seventies and modern punk ‘n’ roll. Their previous releases have already made that declaration but new album Funland sets it in stone, the UK quartet involving the listener in something energetically aggressive, attitude driven, and most of all undiluted sleaze wrapped fun.

Hailing from Leeds, the quartet of vocalist Phil E Stine, guitarist Lee J., bassist Rocco, and drummer Ratbag have been a bruising and thrilling live presence across the north of England moving outwards. Emerging in 2005, The Kingcrows has torn up stages with their filthy rock ‘n’ roll ever since, playing alongside the likes of Spear Of Destiny, UK Subs, The Rezillos, TV Smith, Anti Nowhere League, Tokyo Dragons, Vice Squad, The Lurkers, 999, The Vibrators, Red Alert, The Outcasts, Peter & The Test Tube Babies and many more legendary and emerging bands over the years. They have also released a clutch of attention grabbing EPs, which made an even bigger impression when collected together and released in the shape of Corvus Maximus through STP Records in 2013. The album awoke a broader focus and awareness of the band’s unfussy and virulent sound, which Funland should now push into new spotlights and recognition.

The album erupts with Here We Go, the first riot initially blooming from a fairground organ and its warm invitation. Soon rhythms rumble with attitude and riffs stir up the air as the opener’s eager rock ‘n’ roll seizes ears and attention. The song is quickly into its virulent and persistent stride, cruising with jabbing beats spearing grouchy guitar and bass tenacity. The track is like a mix of Spunk Volcano and The Eruptions and The Adicts, similarity and nostalgia colluding with fresh attitude and revelry.

cover_RingMaster Review     A potent start to the album is further ignited by the following She’s My Rock ‘N’ Roll and its thrilling tempting. An alluring rhythmic enticing sparks a rockabilly bred grooving flirted with by spicy harmonica, they in turn kick-starting a heavy anthemic canter of contagious rhythms and incendiary sonic enterprise led by the ever magnetic tones of Stine. The track is glorious, punk rock at its tenacious and riotous best, and again as old school as it is imposingly new. The album’s first major pinnacle is backed, if not quite matched, by On The Road Again, a swiftly engaging and infectious stomp which has ears, feet, and appetite locked in within a handful of chords and resourceful seconds. There are no big surprises within song and arguably Funland in general, yet they only provide a nonstop and fully satisfying stomp to get eagerly involved in.

A southern whisper lines the lure and rampage of Rock ‘N’ Roll Rebel Songs, the track aflame with sultry guitar endeavour, inviting group vocals, and the breath and atmosphere of ’77. Lyrically it also sparks memories of times past, it all colluding in one easy going and gripping persuasion, though outshone by Forgotten Son straight after. Its opening riff comes with dark intent and imagination igniting attitude, its bait continuing to enthral as the song grows and breeds new sonic colour and lyrical drama around it. There is a touch of Angelic Upstarts to the encounter though that is but one flavour within the emotive shadows and provocative narrative on offer.

The album’s title track kicks up a storm of attitude and insatiable rock ‘n’ roll next, the track forcibly prowling with essences of bands like Suburban Studs and Crisis in its armoury before making way for the irresistible presence of Kick ‘Em Down. The album is truly at its loftiest height at this point, the tasty provocateur, and its predecessor, unleashing welcomingly bullying and virulently infectious rock ‘n’ roll with the second also unveiling another tonic of harmonica belligerence, before the brilliant Apocalypso steals the whole show. Opening on a delicious throaty bass riff with tendrils of guitar adding their spice before the drums create a brooding and catchy confrontation, the track evolves into one seriously magnetic shuffle. The beats of Ratbag continue to incite song and ears with their anthemic swings, whilst around them voice, riffs, and contagion ebb and flow like virulent waves soaked in inescapable temptation.

Never Gonna Fall continues the album’s elevated and invigorating energy and enjoyment with ease, its thumping presence and gait luring many strains of rock into one bulging incitement whilst Sick Of Love Songs creates its own individual fusion of old school punk and new rock ‘n’ roll. The bass of Rocco breeds a bestial snarl to its tone whilst Lee J. once again leaves sonic vapours from his searing and ever to the point exploits. Led by the beckoning delivery of Stine, the track is another hitting the sweet spot whilst proving to be another proposition you only wish its two or so minutes was stretches longer.

Funland ends with Beer and Whiskey, arguably the weakest song on the album. In context though, with it holding ears and pleasure firmly in its rip-roaring escapade, it simply reinforces the might of the tracks which over shadow it. It is indeed a fine end to an excellent slab of rock ‘n’ roll, Funland rigorously feeding appetites for seventies punk and today’s punk ‘n’ roll from start to finish.

2015 has already been blessed with some mighty punk offerings which The Kingcrows now rival if not surpass with their new proposal, but few of those others will become as big a favourite as Funland is destined to be we suggest.

Funland will be released through STP Records at Rebellion on August 6th and then available @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page4.htm

http://www.kingcrows.com/     https://www.facebook.com/kingcrows

RingMaster 31/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Mobbs – Garage Punk For Boys

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Ever wondered what would happen when you mixed ’77 bred punk rock with garage rock? UK rockers The Mobbs obviously did and with additional doses of sixties beat and R&B have crafted a sound which insatiably infests body and soul. In the mischievous shape of their third album Garage Punk For Boys, this adventure it is fair to say also provides one of the releases of the year. The accompanying promo sheet for the album suggests that “The Mobbs play a Wilko Johnson infused Billy Childish explosion”, an accurately pungent description of their sound but to that we would add the unreserved devilry of Radio Stars, the raw charm of Television Personalities, and the bracing fever of Thee Exciters in its armoury. The concoction is a riveting and exhilarating stomp with a hunger as shown by Garage Punk For Boys, which infects the listener from head to toe.

Formed in 2008, the trio from Northampton has persistently lit up stages, earning a rich reputation for energy strewn live performances, a stirring presence backed up and spread further by their greedily received full-length It’s… The Mobbs of 2011 and its acclaimed successor Stiff Upper Lip & Trousers To Match last year. With a couple of singles equally stirring the passions, the band has been a live spark in the European garage rock scene, though it is easy to expect Garage Punk For Boys being the trigger to a far more ferocious spotlight upon the inimitable uniqueness of The Mobbs.

The trio of vocalist/guitarist Joe B. Humbled, drummer Cheadle, and bassist The Bishop, who is making his recording debut with the band on the album, unleash an instantly grabbing eighteen second punk brawl through Gpfb to set GPFB-FRONT-COVERthings off, following it with the magnetic grooving of Get Your Hair Cut. Bass and guitar cast the first spicy lure on the second track, before snipping scissors unlock a feisty stomp littered with a wholly seductive bassline and similarly alluring hooks. Matching the devilment of the sounds, Humbled incites ears and imagination with his raw and unfussy delivery, a boisterous and infectious enticing to misbehave or conform depending how you want to take the exceptional track.

Its bewitching bounce is followed by the tangy presence of I Am the Anticlimax, clanging riffs an easy enslavement from the first breath. With The Bishop adding another delicious velvety tempting on the bass within the crisp rhythms of Cheadle, the track entwines beat and vintage punk rock, kind of like The Rockin’ Vickers meets Leyton Buzzards. Striding with attitude and sonic enterprise, the song is an instant anthem, as so much of the album, an almost concussive and certainly inescapable treat whipped up by scything guitar and punchy rhythmic enterprise, everything lorded over by the compelling tones of Humbled.

Do the Bishop! comes next and is just the wickedest instrumental baiting possible. The skills of The Bishop seduce and rumble throughout whilst Humbled’s guitar launches its own virulent seducing as Cheadle smashes anything in arms-length resourcefully. With a tang of blues sweetness to its epidemic waltz, the song sets up further hunger in the appetite for the album before making way for the melodic causticity and intriguing narrative of Demobbed. The track is primarily garage rock but at times you can almost swear there is an element of The Undertones in its slim but impossibly potent sonic endeavour.

The hungrily vivacious ride of the album is taken to another level with We Don’t Need a God, a brilliant furnace of searing grooves and greedy hooks ridden by the punk honesty of the vocals. It is pure addictiveness, every twist and tenacious slither of bait soaked in infectiousness and anthemic irreverence, leaving feet, body, and soul blissfully exhausted and thoughts rebellious. Imagine The Masonics flirting voraciously with The Adicts and you get not only the heart of the song but arguably of the whole release.

The title track is next, romping with ears and nostalgia through jabbing beats and jangly hooks, its title summing up song, sound, and the whole garage premise which fuelled punk and garage rock at their outsets. It also has thrilling melodic warmth to its gentle uprising, everything aligning for an irresistible rousing of pleasure, taken on again by the blink and you miss shortness of second instrumental Chicken Run. Its enticing strut is swiftly pushed aside by the exceptional sonic commentary of Where’s the Punk Rock!?, angst and fury as much a part of its gripping clang and garage punk fever as creative relish.

Photo 1   It is not exaggerating to say that every song on Garage Punk for Boys is devious rascality, all instinctively and simultaneously appealing to the styles it weaves its propositions from, One Erotic Thought another fine example with its sixties spawned beat infused garage rock tromp. As here, they all keep feet and limbs as busy as ears and imagination, and whilst thoughts may not be erotic as the song reveals of itself, they are nevertheless keen to indulge in knavish practices after each encounter.

Put It in Your Pipe clunks and swings in next, riffs bulky lures courted by compelling bass craft and vocal devilment, everything framed by precise and eagerly wicked beats. Stepping out with a punk seeded swagger, the track also wears the mischief breeding charm and adventure of King Salami and the Cumberland 3 and the aforementioned Billy Childish, drawing out more lust for the album from the passions.

The final stretch sees the blues rock induced R&B stamp of Just as Bad as You light up air and ears first before the exotic swing of Mk II immerses senses and imagination in a sultry dance of the seven salacious temptresses, well in my dreams anyway. Both songs leave appetite as greedy as ever whilst closing riot of Mad! is an aggressively spirited and ferociously contagious garage punk assault, and oh so scintillating.

It is impossible not to drool from start to finish over Garage Punk for Boys, a release which if anything from punk to garage rock, beat to flirty rock ‘n’ roll gets the juices flowing, is a must. The thing with The Mobbs is they not only create sensational stomps but do it with a presence and flavour like no other, this simply makes them one of the UKs seriously exciting and innovative bands.

Garage Punk for Boys is available digitally and on CD now via Cravat Records @ http://themobbsuk.bandcamp.com/album/garage-punk-for-boys

http://www.themobbs.co.uk/

RingMaster 21/11/2014

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