Kudzu – Defeated

With a sound as eclectic and unpredictable as it is ravenously catchy, US synth pop duo Kudzu have just released their new album, Defeated. It is an infestation of infectious hooks, flirtatious synths, and rousing escapades but to tag it merely as synth pop is an injustice to its diversity, the album a stirring web of post punk, electro punk, industrial and more across its seriously magnetic body.

Springfield based Kudzu consists of Seth Goodwin (vocals, synth, and drum programming) and Mark Gillenwaters (vocals and guitar). Inspirations to the project include the likes of Tears For Fears, The Cure, Spectrum, Guided by Voices, Sympathy Nervous, and This Heat but as suggested, their sound has a much broader tapestry which is as bred in the seventies/eighties synth landscape as the creative now. It makes for a proposition which is as familiar as it is boldly fresh and one massive treat of a listen.

It opens with the punk assault of Some Cops, a track bursting from its electronic shimmer with zeal and urgency soaked in creative dissonance. At the same time it is a virulently catchy incitement, its fuzzy fumes leaving the senses as woozy as the bone shuddering beats. Like Calling All Astronauts meets Artery at its core, the song equally embraces psych rock winds in its contagious turbulence to provide Defeated with one ear grabbing start.

Straight away the variety of the album is at play as the following and quite superb No Backbone breaks the dividing peace with electro pulses straight out of the early Mute Records catalogue. Instantly thoughts of bands like The Normal arise but are soon pushed to the background as guitar spun melodies and harmonic vocals tease and caress respectively.  The hook Gillenwaters casts with his strings is simply delicious, a psyche enslaving lure soon backed by the darker pulsation of keys and the snapping resonance of rhythms; kind of like a fusion of B-Movie, The Cure, and Modern English yet unique from start to finish.

The album’s title track brings a scuzzier breath to ears; its post punk irritability echoed in the John Lydon textured vocals but again there is a repetitious coaxing teasing and tempting at the centre of the fuzz ball which necessitates only submission to its infectious demands. As its predecessor, it brings another hue to Defeated as does next up Burn Yourself, though its electro punk surge is akin to the opener. With the increasingly magnetic vocals almost gliding over the tides of noise springing from synths and guitar, it was so easy to be swept up in the raw yet skilfully nurtured arms of the track as thoughts colluded with its lyrical insight. Defeated is described as “a reaction to mounting disappointments and frustrations with increasingly frustrating and disappointing realities” and with intimacy and a worldly observation its often dissonant words hit the spot whilst almost arguing with the rousing catchiness of their vehicles.

The mesmeric Balking the Grave is next, the song a riveting post/gothic punk shadow bound serenade which almost seeps under the skin with its slow drawl and bordering concussive clang while Sleep in Disguise is a boisterous slice of synth pop/new wave with the scent of bands like Mr.Kitty, OMD, and early Human League to its bright if slightly caustic breeze.  Both tracks border the irresistible yet still get slightly outshine by One Purpose with its flirtatious Blancmange like melodies and climate.

One definite peak in the lofty heights of Defeated is followed by the ear grabbing proposal of When You Were Mine. The song is almost like a weave of the best traits of its predecessors, a tenacious pop song with attitude and seduction in its raw charms which manages to grumble and serenade in the same breath before leaving to allow B.I.Y.E. to bring things to a transfixing close. With its cold scenery and instinctive bounce, the song merges the alluring traits of a Joy Division and Modern Eon in its industrially edged and melodically draped canter. It is a fine end to an album which we are finding hard to shake off as new propositions to look at build up. That is never a bad aspect to have and as Defeated is so enjoyable we are certainly not complaining.

Defeated is out now via Push & Pull Records; available @ https://kudzukudzukudzu.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/kudzuspringfield/    https://twitter.com/kudzuzudukudzu

Pete RingMaster 09/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Sam Ray – Next To You


Creating and recording in his home studio in Portsmouth, Sam Ray is a singer songwriter beginning to make a potent impact from the alluring shores of England’s south coast. Earlier this year he drew attention with debut single Modern Art, a success now set to be backed and pushed on by its successor Next To You.

A power ballad with the infectious energy of indie pop amidst tempting eighties inspired nostalgia, Next To You is a warm caress on the senses just as able to light up the dance-floor with it instinctive catchiness. Ray’s influences include the likes of Bruce Springsteen, M83, The Cure, The 1975, and The Killers; all flavours heard within both of his singles to date though equally his new offering carries an essence of Tears For Fears within its “both super sad and danceable” proposition.

sam-ray-next-to-you-art_RingMasterReviewA “love song about a guy who can’t tell a girl he likes her”, Next To You slips into ears from a distance, swiftly waking their attention once in full presence with warm atmospheric melodies around an electronic simmering which springs the song’s subsequent catchiness. A melancholic undercurrent openly brings shadows to court the infectious elements driving the track, that sadness at the heart of its emotion a temper and incitement to the body engaging adventure lifting the encounter.

Next To You is a captivating mix of old and modern endeavour; a nostalgic yet fresh proposal which hearts for eighties and current pop will find a flavour to whet their appetite for Sam Ray.

Next To You is released November 18th.

http://www.samraymusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/samraymusic/   https://twitter.com/samraymusic

Pete RingMaster 15/11/2106

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Glamour Assassins – Ain’t So Young

GA_RingMaster Review

The lure starts with a great name and becomes a vibrant persuasion with a debut album that gets feet moving and hips swaying. Glamour Assassins is that first bait, a title reflected perfectly in the melodic beauty and imposing potency cruising their music, and Ain’t So Young the captivating introduction to the Connecticut hailing band. The release offers a host of songs seeded in eighties new wave and synth pop but equally embracing dance punk and an indie rock flavouring. It is an encounter which has at times thick familiarity to it but also a striking freshness which combines for a persistently enjoyable proposition.

Hailing from New Haven, Glamour Assassins consists of Jared Savas, Nick Post, Jose Novo, Carrie Martinelli, and Gil Morrison, a group of musicians with a combined experience of playing with artists such as Dragonette, Matt & Kim, Plushgun, Freezepop, the Postelles, and Greg Hawkes of The Cars under their belts. As Glamour Assassins, they have earned a weighty reputation for an intense live presence which their album is now looking to back up with its theatre of striking songwriting from Savas and a sound which just wants to make you move as it feeds the imagination.

Produced by Joey Mascola and mastered by Grammy-nominated Emily Lazar, Ain’t So Young gets off to a rousing start and never really looks back. The Day Rock & Roll Died is the initial temptation, a song slipping through ears on a single guitar cast melody as keys and atmospheric tempting brews. It is soon into a catchy stroll, wiry hooks and a deep bass line colluding with punchy beats as the track quickly awakens attention and the first breath of involvement by the listener, especially when the vocals bring their strong persuasion to the mix with additional harmonies just as engagingly in tow. The track does not make a seemingly dramatic impact but swiftly the body is lending its moves and feet jabbing the floor as more enterprise blossoms in the increasingly infectious encounter.

cover_RingMaster Review    The rousing swing of the track is replaced by the emotive serenade of Hate Song Part I (Exile), a female delivered vocal caress on the senses awash with evocative keys and a laid back, shadow built bass prowl. It is a slither of a song at a breath over a minute but a transfixing set up for the electronic adventure of Phantom of the Disco. The band’s latest single is a bubble of dance bred electronica and varied impassioned vocals. There is a whisper of OMD to it, as too of Thomas Dolby and Blancmange, but they are mere essences in the thick ambience and emotional shadows fuelling the impressive drama.

Already there is no escaping the diversity to the album and Glamour Assassins’ sound, a quality continuing with the soulful roar of Sex Life. Synths once more envelop ears in a suggestive hue whilst the minimalistic beats and groaning bass lures bring the funk. Vocals and guitars add extra catchy and resourceful enticement in a track which you can easily offer hints of Duran Duran and Tears For Fears too. That recognisable air is in many guises a constant to the band’s sound it is fair to say, and just as honest to admit it only adds to the success and virulence of songs as proven by first the album’s title track and straight after London Fog. The first of the two thrusts indie tenacity and raw sinews into the mix, bouncing along with attitude and feisty energy as crystaline keys court jangly guitars across jabbing rhythms. In contrast its successor sculpts an aural theatre with an epic atmosphere which evolves into a more intimate and sinister proposal over time. Musically it is like eighties era Ultravox meets The Slow Readers Club with another bewitching range of vocals building unique adventure to the narrative. The track is as immersive as its title suggests if not as muggy with keys providing a shining provocative light throughout.

Indie pop ‘n’ roll has voice and limbs heavily involved next through Scumbag, bands like Late Cambrian coming to mind, whilst the contagion soaked Never Get Caught draws from Visage like territory for its pulsating seducing, though to this the band fuels the vocals with a rapacious edge and angst as the guitars spin a riveting web of sonic and melodic imagination which is seemingly Cure inspired. Once more Glamour Assassins turn familiarity into something of their very own though, just with an old friend like nature.

The album closes with Hate Song Part II (Death or Love), a track which kind of sums up the album and the band’s invention in one go. Part rock, part synth pop, and bursting with an array of crafty hooks, alluring grooves, and an infectiousness which never leaves ears and appetite alone, it is an impressive end to a thoroughly enthralling and enjoyable release.

Eighties new wave and synth pop seems to be having a strong influence on numerous emerging bands right now, of which Glamour Assassins is one of the most exciting and potential flooded propositions. Their album…well if you want to dance to some old school but freshly inventive contagion then Ain’t So Young hits the spot.

Ain’t So Young is available now

Pete RingMaster 10/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Stillhound – Think This Way

stillhound_RingMaster Review

Backing up their well-received debut single Seethe Unseen of earlier this year, Scottish quartet Stillhound are poised to release its successor Think This Way, revealing more of the depth to the band’s songwriting and sound at the same time. Whereas the first single wrapped its radiance in just as fascinating shadows, the new offering explores a brighter and lively climate, though again the band blends contrasting darker hues to great effect. It is fair to say that the band’s first release potently sparked attention; now its successor is here to dance with those satisfied ears and lure many more matching appetites.

single cover_RingMaster Review     Formed by school friends Fergus Cook, Laurie Corlett-Donald, and Dave Lloyd, and with a line-up completed by latest addition Cat Myers, Stillhound create soundscapes of dreamy and almost spatial electronic pop draped in atmospheric evocations. As shown by both their singles to date, Stillhound have a sound as inciting to the body and at times the dance-floor as immersive to ears and imagination. They are said to have holed up “various mountain lodges in their homeland taking inspiration from art, geography, and the far flung soundscapes created by Boards of Canada to the pop aesthetic of Tears for Fears,” to write their songs and you can feel that kind of scenery impacting on the singles, especially Think This Way with its eighties synth pop essences within an expansive almost stark radiance.

The new single makes a low key start but within seconds is a pulsating and provocative saunter littered with small but enticing electro hooks, moodier bass tones, and sparkling harmonies around endearing melancholy oozing vocals. It is when the song kicks up a livelier energy and attitude fuelled by a driving beat around its chorus, that the Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith inspiration shines, though it is only one rich hue in a tapestry of sound and magnetic ambiences entwining the reflective and invigorating vocals.

Busy and eventful, Think This Way lights the ears with ease, continuing the strong emergence of Stillhound with craft and virulent coaxing. It is early days and only two songs in but already we, as so many, have a taste for the band’s inviting aural travelogue. It is not a ravenous hunger yet, but in time it may be, especially if the band can build on this potent next step.

Think This Way is released on 3rd August and available as a free download @ https://soundcloud.com/mixmag-1/premiere-stillhound-think-this-way

http://stillhound.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/stillhound

RingMaster 27/07/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net


Graveyard Of Souls – Shadows of Life

Graveyard Of Souls Bandpic - 1000

The debut album from Spanish metallers Graveyard Of Souls is an intensive and powerful experience which takes the listener on a journey through at times exhausting but perpetually enthralling melodic death and doom soundscapes. Shadows of Life certainly makes you work for your rewards at times, its heavy breath and rapacious imagination brought under a uniformal predatory crawling surface of intensity, but given the effort and time emerges as a very promising and satisfying proposition.

References to the likes of Paradise Lost and Tiamat have already fallen upon the album and there is little to spark disagreement with those thoughts across the nine track encounter. Released via FDA Rekotz, Shadows of Life unveils emotive and breath-taking atmospheres within melancholic and often suffocating ambiences and provocation. Throughout though there are melodic flames which seduce and wrap their sonic invention around senses and thoughts, persuasive depths and textures working tirelessly and dramatically to seduce within violent intensity. As mentioned it is not an instant persuasion needing multiple journeys to reveal all its thoughtful and passionate essences and at times almost defies itself with a sonic monotony to its embrace, but eventually it proves to be one pleasing slab of aural temptation.

From the so-so intro Genesis, the album gets to work in capturing the imagination with its title track, a warm beckoning ambienceGOS_Cover_Web punctured by guitar stabs evolving into persistent riffs and inviting melodic lures. With crisp rhythms slowly adding their frame the guttural vocals lay their heavy ponderous coarse presence into the already intriguing equation. With the keys adding their descriptive hue to the dark narrative and guitars carving steadily and with emotive impact across the ear, the track makes for an imaginative and welcome adversary. At times the union of venom soaked vocals and black hearted shadows sounds with the seductive melodic elements is initially not easily accessible but whilst the dispute is adding further dramatic texture to the track it eventually proves its case.

Both Dreaming of Some Day to Awake and Memories of the Future (We Are) explore deeper impacting and darker realms, the first through enchanting yet smothering atmospheric structures, the air rich with acidic elegance and devouring emotion whilst the second  of the two seeks and expels a bestial hunger to its invading intensity. It has a darker carnivorous fascination compared to its equally alluring predecessor, the fall through its ravenous breath and evocative clawing at the senses guided by impressive melodic flames and riveting primal suggestiveness. There are also elements of eighties goth to its sinewy embrace with at times Sisters Of Mercy making whispers within the incisive progressive/classic metal weave.

As Follow Me continues the intrigue, the recognition that the album not being suitable for ‘light’ listening is open, glances from the ear only discovering a generally raw and similar sonic bluster and breath across the surface of most songs but there is plenty awaiting and rewarding for those bold enough to dive into the hungry seas of the songs, their invention and musical craft undeniable. Whether the production could have helped more to bring the underbelly of songs nearer the sizzling surfaces it is hard to say but with its caustic approach exposing the excellent passion and intensity of the release it is hard to be too critical.

One of the biggest highlights surprisingly comes with the cover of the Tears For Fears song, Mad World. The track has never sounded better than in the doom clad death soaked hands of Graveyard Of Souls. They have reinvented and made the it their own, so much so that it took a minute or so to confirm it was the song it was. As voracious yet consuming as a tsunami, the track is a thrilling unexpected treat, guitars and bass sculpting new shadows and emotions for the song whilst the scarring vocals bring a distinctly unique and savage interpretation to the classic.

Through the excellent Solitude’s My Paradise, the track a sobering but contagious furnace of aggressive and melodic ravenous fire, and the equally infectious Dead Earth, arguably the lightest and most accessible song on the album, the appetite for the band rises with further greed whilst the closing There Will Come Soft Rains soothes all the lesions and ruptures on the senses with a sonic mist of melodic beauty. Though the corrosive vocals for the only time on the album do not work within the elegance for personal tastes it proves not to be a fatal flaw for a great piece of imagination.

Not a flawless album for sure but Shadows of Life is an impressive introduction to the band and its inventive songwriting and sound. As the album eats and inspires thoughts and emotions there is only a single assumption at large, that this is the start of something much bigger.



RingMaster 21/06/2013


Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from


Interview with Chris Aylett and Sam Nicholls of Scholars

The end of February saw the release of a single which with an eagerness and energy most bands flounder for immediately installed its creators as a band to swiftly check out and as ones to watch very closely. The band in question was UK rock band Scholars and their single Bad For Business a song which mesmerises whilst firing up the instinct to have fun and express oneself.  We had the pleasure to find out more about the band and their music withy the chance to talk to bassist Chris Aylett and vocalist Sam Nicholls.

Hi gentlemen and welcome to The Ringmaster Review.

For many you have just burst into view so could you please introduce and give a history to the band and its members?

Chris: In a nutshell we’re a 5 piece rock band from Hemel Hempstead. We’ve been together for about 5 years now. Myself and Mike (drums) have always played in the same bands, since we were 11 years old – incidentally our first band was fronted by Frank Carter of Gallows and now Pure Love fame. Tom and Sam knew each other from school and both played in bands of good local repute. We were a 4 piece until last February, when the second guitarist we’d been searching for years finally appeared, in the form of Mr Cal Owen. We’ve recorded and released a lot of demos and we’ve just now reached the point where we’re happy we’ve got enough quality material to record our first album. How would you describe your sound again for newcomers to the band?

How would you describe your sound again for newcomers to the band?

Sam: I think we probably span a couple of different genres and we do try to blend a bit of everything that we enjoy. It’s mainly an alt rock basis but the songs are structured like pop and they’re high energy and often a little pissed off like punk rock. It’s a bit of a frankensound.

What are the influences which have shaped your sound inside and outside of music?

Chris: Musically, our starting point has always been balls-out rock and emo, bands like At The Drive In, Hundred Reasons and Million Dead. You can add to that your classic ‘indie’ bands like The Smiths, The Cure and Tears For Fears – really strong songwriting which pushed the envelope lyrically and musically. You don’t seem to get many bands these days that manage to combine mainstream appeal with genuine musical innovation. More recently we’ve started getting into more electronic music – LFO, Aphex Twin, Flying Lotus – which is starting to have a bit of an effect on our sound.

Where does the band name come from and does it reflect you as musicians?

Chris: I wish there was an interesting story behind the name but there really isn’t. When we started out we had a different singer and me and him threw a few names around based on what we liked the sound of. Scholars stuck. Does it reflect us as musicians? Loosely at best I think!

Hemel Hempstead is your home town, is it a big inspiration for you and does it have a healthy music scene for a relatively small place compared to a city?

Sam: There used to be a really healthy music scene in our town when I was a teenager. I used to go to our local arts centre every weekend to watch local bands. But now they’ve closed down almost all the decent places to play, it’s harder for kids to get into rock music in our town. We’ve actually put on some of our own shows in the past and we hope to do so in the future. They’re always a bit success because everyone is crying out for live music in our town.

Having recently reviewed your fantastic new single Bad For Business, we reflected that though unique you are in the similar high energy and infectious camp alongside the likes of Max Raptor, Innercity Pirates and Baddies, is this comparison you can see yourselves?

Sam: Well having played with and been blown away by both Max Raptor and Baddies, I couldn’t be more flattered by that! They’re very different bands but we certainly do have some overlap with them. Even if it’s just how much we love ‘going off’ properly onstage.

Your first single Tornadoes and Fractures was another great track. How do you feel you have evolved as songwriters from the bands beginnings to the new release though it is actually a relatively short time?

Chris: We’ve definitely refined the process. We used to spend hours upon hours tweaking one song only to realise after several weeks that what we had to start with wasn’t great and we were effectively polishing a turd. We listen back to demos of old and realise how overcomplicated they were – we’d throw in every good idea we had. I think we’ve finally learned that less is more. A shout out must go to our manager Mark who helped show us the way; you can’t overestimate the value of an informed outside perspective.

How does the songwriting process happen within Scholars?

Chris: It’s varied over the years. We used to jam together and see what happened, and although that yielded some good results they were a long time coming. These days we each bring semi-formed ideas to the table and ruthlessly go through them, picking out the choicest morsels to develop. In honesty, we now find that if the bulk of a song hasn’t come together within one rehearsal, it’s not likely to happen. Bad For Business came from one riff and was written in about 20 minutes at the end of a rehearsal, for example.

There seems to be a definite thought given to the visual content of Scholars as well as the music it seems, as with the sleeve design for Tornadoes and Fractures and I believe I read you co-ordinate but vary the colours you wear on stage? Is this just extra fun for you or does it have a deeper importance to the band?

Sam: I think it all comes from a desire to be a little unusual and it just has to feel right to us rather than having any specific significance. We used to actually dress ‘colour coded’ onstage but it felt a bit Power Rangers so it’s more subtle now. The whole team have input on how everything looks and it was actually guitarist Tom who came up with the idea for the origami sleeve for Tornadoes. He brought a prototype to rehearsal and it was just clearly the way to go.

What does a Scholars show offer fans, are they as high energy as your singles so far have suggested?

Chris: High energy is pretty accurate, we’ve always gone for it live. We quite like people to think that we’re slightly unhinged and that anything could happen. I think some bands forget that when they play a show, the audience are also watching what they’re doing and that’s 50% of the entertainment. It’s actually a bit arrogant to think that your music is so special and mind blowing that you just need to stand around performing it and that’s enough for 30 minutes. Basically, people are overwhelmed with entertainment options these days and unless you’re Sigur Ros you’ve got to do something a bit special to stop people playing Angry Birds while you’re on stage.

More and more bands seem to want to recreate a live sound close to their recordings rather than the other way round these days but I get the impression you guys just go for it in your gigs, it is about having and giving a fun time and show primarily for you?.

Sam: I don’t know exactly how it started but we discovered somewhere along the line that putting everything into your live show just feels really good and I’ve honestly never felt more right with the world than when we’re playing live and really nailing it. It just feels like that’s what I was born to do. So there would really be no point in us meticulously crafting and polishing songs on record and then struggling to play them exactly the same note-for-note live. It’d lose all its appeal for me. I’d rather go the other way around and try to bottle the sound of the live show when we record. It’s a challenge though!

You have shared stages with the likes of Hundred Reasons, The Computers, The Xcerts, Don Brocco and Gay For Johnny Depp, any gigs that have stood out or been a highlight so far?

Sam: Certainly the last night of HR in Nottingham for me, but mainly because I got to do guest vocals on ‘If I Could’ (my teenage self would never have believed you if you’d told him that was going to happen). The whole Don Broco tour was a huge laugh. Shows with the Gays and The Computers are always great but also hard work because they’re ferociously good live bands. We have to seriously step it up so as to not be eclipsed by their madness.

And any you would rather were lost from the memory?

Chris: Yep! We’ve had a handful of absolute shitstorms. We did a round trip of nearly 10 hours in a hired van to do a festival only to have the event shut down seconds before we were about to start playing – we’d set up and were ready to go. On another occasion we had a row with a pissed up soundman whose wife threatened to knock Sam’s block off. In a way the terrible experiences strengthen the bond between you and make the good shows all the better so we tend to laugh them off.

Do you have a focused direction for Scholars in music and sound ahead or do you just let things evolve organically?

Sam: It would be difficult to try and have a solid plan for our sound I think. We’re always trying new things so it’s always changing but we’re also quite good at reining it in, I don’t think we’ll accidentally end up as a funk band or anything.

Is there an album on the horizon, or more singles first?

Chris: There is indeed an album on the way – we’ll be in the studio in April. We’ve got plans for a few singles leading up to it too.

As still a young and upcoming band how hard do you find it to get strong gigs that will elevate your stature compared to those that are great but at a level you have played for a while?

Sam: Well we’re really grateful for all the help and support and great opportunities we receive at the moment. Shows are rarely disappointing for us even if they aren’t necessarily stadium support tours and main stage festival slots. The big break for us would be to get out on tour in support of someone awesome. I’d just like to let Biffy Clyro know that if they’re ever short of an opening act… well y’know.

What is next for the band over the coming weeks?

Chris: We’re filming another video in the next couple of weeks…we’ve got a crazy idea for it and it should be a mental couple of days. Otherwise we’re going to be getting our heads down finishing off songs for the album and starting pre-production.

Many thanks for taking time to chat with us, good luck with your excellent single.

Would you like to end with words for the world?

Sam: Thanks very much. As a wise man once said… Do, or do not. There is no ‘try’.

Oh and lastly how about a dark shameful secret about another band member?

Chris: I’ve been racking my brains for about half an hour and I can’t really think of anything. We’ve all listened to some dodgy bands and had dodgy haircuts in our time but that’s all par for the course. I can give you an interesting fact – Tom (our guitarist, also responsible for recording many of our demos) works for Jeff Wayne of ‘War of the Worlds’ fame and has in his time recorded artists as diverse as Dani Filth and Rhydian off X Factor.

The RingMaster Review 05/03/2012

.MyFreeCopyright.com Registered & Protected


The best and easiest way to get your music on iTunes, Amazon and lots more. Click below for details.

Rendezvous – Another Round Please

Vibrant and rich in brightly lit melodies the new album from Israeli duo Rendezvous mesmerises and tantalises with well crafted sounds that form a weave of electronic finesse and refined creativity. The eagerly awaited Another Round Please will not disappoint with its blend of classic synth and progressive melodic flows wrapped in a chilled yet expressive collection of electro expanses.

The pair of Itai Simon and Hagai Izenberg release their album via Rough Trade / Moot Records on the back of their recent single The Murf which reached number 5 in the UK club charts. The impressive video that backed up the song gathered over 150,000+ views online in a matter of weeks, the combination inspiring a sure anticipation for Another Round Please. Mixed by legendary producer Dave Bascombe (Kylie Minogue, Depeche Mode, Tears For Fears) the album is a kaleidoscope of dazzling sounds that sweep through the ear to invite and incite imagery and feelings. With what are undemanding but intriguing and thoughtful sounds it is a blend that finds a welcome home within the ear.

Another Round Please is actually surprising in its light and glowing sounds due to the fact that a large amount of the albums tracks were recorded during the “second Lebanon war”. With neighbouring cities and towns feeling the destructive might of Hezbollah missiles and a mere few miles away from the duo Israeli planes dropping bombs on Lebanon it would have been expected that the music reflected and was affected by it. Despite that though the album removes itself from the background it found itself created in and other than the presence of obvious shadows within tracks like the darker toned Prisoner No. 251, the tense and dramatic Hands Up, and the fractured melodic laced emotive End of The World, the release offers positives, hope and vibrant light.

From the dazzling crystalline melodies of opener C Sharp the album is a compelling release which admittedly across its length does at times rely on a familiarity and similarity within its compositions but is always thoroughly intriguing and inviting. Adagio For Tiesto is a strong example, through its well drawn travel the piece does not step into any avenues of distinct ingenuity but constantly winks and flutters its creative eyes. It is suggestive as it slowly unveils its charms to eventually and slowly evolve into a climax that is dramatic, stirring and elegant.

The wonderful soundscape of Egypt is the highlight of the album, vast and sweeping it takes one across warm addictive sands immersing into an ever expanding majesty and visualisation within the mind. This is closely followed by the exuberant Blues In Space, a track infectious in rhythm and engaging in melodies. It offers a sound that is very recognisable and feels like one of those glorious soundtracks to an eighties sci-fi movie. This only adds to the fun and makes it a friend to play with often.

Rendezvous has created an album in Another Round Please that does nothing less than satisfy and place a smile on the face. Whether it does any more than that is debateable and will depend on personal preferences, but for 46 odd minutes it certainly gives a warm glow.

RingMaster 21/02/2012

MyFreeCopyright.com Registered & Protected


The best and easiest way to get your music on iTunes, Amazon and lots more. Click below for details.