Nature of Wires – Modus

photo by Russ Dalen

Some releases shine like a beacon attracting ears like moths to a flame. One such lure for us is the new album from UK synth pop outfit Nature of Wires. Almost straddling every decade of its prime genre whilst teasing of future exploration but most openly seeded in eighties influence, the album proved a swift magnet of sound and temptation firmly commanding current attention.

Formed in 1986 by vocalist Andrew Stirling-Brown and synthist/programmer Gary Watts, the Herefordshire band followed the 1993 release of their debut album, Modus Operandi, by going on hiatus the following year until reforming in 2015.  A year later the band unveiled their second album, Cyber Rendezvous, with CountessM on lead vocals and now the band has Modus to tempt the imagination, a collection of songs which harken back to those early years having been written between 1986 and 1993 but carrying a modern edge though being “recreated using 21st century technology.” It is also a dual album in one package, with a second CD featuring re-imaginings of the release’s tracks from an array of inspiring artists.

Straight away Modus embraces ears like an old friend yet just as quickly establishes a presence and character which is solely Nature of Wires. As soon as opener Feel the Hunger spreads its electronic arms, there is no escaping teases to the likes of Erasure, Heaven 17, and Blancmange but the song quickly breeds its own individuality in sound and enterprise led by the alluring tones of Stirling-Brown. Striking melodies are fuelled by infectiousness whilst rhythms as good as nag with their eager canter. Fair to say we were caught up in the song’s contagion in short time, vocal chords and body swings adding to its own eager endeavours.

Time is Come steps up next, again its initial coaxing shadow lined before bursting out with radiant melodies and vocal encouragement. Equally keen pulses core the lively croon with the song’s gait and energy as bold as it is spirited, a whiff of A Flock Of Seagulls only adding to the song’s infectious captivation before Negative Resolutions emerges with a darkwave breath, bubbles of pop soon joining the tempting before synths weave a tapestry of melodic intimation over an electro grumble. When its poppiness catches the song infested the body while its darker melancholic calmer moments are alone pure fascination.

Through the crystalline design and dark throb of Seagull and the reflective heatwave of Every Single Sun, captivation with Modus only escalated, the first a spirited seduction and its successor a weave of melodic flames and balmy caresses while Harry’s House eclipsed both with its creative drama and dance-floor animation.

It in turn was slightly outshine by Madame Serena, a song with electro rock essences which reminded of bands such as Original Mirrors and Modern English whilst hinting at the pop instincts of Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark. With emotive shadows and a great lining of dark threat, the track soon rises as another unique Nature of Wires temptation very easy to greedily devour.

The first CD closes with the immediately enthralling First Light, a song bringing yet another shade of flavour and enterprise to the album with its rich entangle of electronic and electro rock hues. Bringing the release to a potent close if not quite igniting the passions as those before it, though ears and imagination were firmly in its charge all the same, it potently  concludes the first adventure of the release before Modus turns to the second.

CD 2 embraces that collection of remixes and re-imaginings of its songs starting with the Atomzero Nightlife Remix of Feel the Hunger. Given a darker almost tenebrific air, the track takes on a whole new persona as it does with the NoW AT4 version which takes it to the opposite light with equally enjoyable effect.

Among the host of truthfully ear pleasing encounters, the untamed rock ‘n’ roll brought to Time is Come by The Cowls, the dramatic theatre sparked within the Klammer Remix of Harry’s House, and Leaether Strip’s voraciously virulent trespass of Madame Serena especially caught the imagination. Fair to say though that Cyferdyne’s Glass Half Full Remix of Negative Resolutions, Workings of a Madman Remix of Seagull, the St Lucifer reworking of Every Single Sun as well as the Mesh Remix of First Light and Room 1985’s progressive rock interpretation of Time is Come all left pleasure rich.

And that is a declaration which tenaciously applies to Modus as a whole, a release to hungrily spend time with as we eagerly await the next chapter and exploration in the adventure of Nature of Wires.

Modus is released August 16th through Analogue Trash across most stores and @ https://natureofwires.bandcamp.com/album/modus

Upcoming Live Dates

Sep 20 BERLIN – The Mazen (with The Pink Diamond Revue, LegPuppy & e-bit)

Sep 21 LEIPZIG – Noch Besser Leben (with The Pink Diamond Revue & LegPuppy)

Oct 12 COLOGNE, Germany – Wachsfabrik (with Bandmachine)

Oct 18  BIRMINGHAM – The Mill, Digbeth (with Among the Echoes & Toyah)

Nov 8   BIRMINGHAM – Scruffy Murphy’s (with Vieon, Among the Echoes & Vain Machine)

Nov 9   LONDON – Beat:Cancer Festival 2.0, Electrowerkz

http://www.natureofwires.com   https://www.facebook.com/natureofwires/   https://twitter.com/natureofwires

Pete RingMaster 16/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dicepeople – One From Many

Dicepeople has never been afraid to venture into the shadows within their electronic sounds but as already hinted by last album End Of Line; they have been increasingly tempted into the thick realm of dark electro. Now the UK band has fully embraced its lure with new full-length, One From Many, emerging with their most compelling and magnetic proposal yet.

Founded by Matt Brock (musician, songwriter and producer) back in 2013 and completed by Zmora (vocalist) and Rafael Filomeno (visual artist), London based Dicepeople have drawn increasing attention and praise across their albums and EPs to date and a live show as visually immersive as it is musically involving. As mentioned, their sound has evolved and grown by each moment and as suggested forged a new captivating plateau from within One From Many. It is borne from an eclectic array of flavours including synthpop, EBM, darkwave, and post-rock with its own identify and originality nurtured by the record. The new album openly embraces those essences also but ingredients in an aural Pandora’s Box where the imagination is exposed to “a provocative and otherworldly place, immersing you in your fears and dreams, and exposing you to the darkness and light within.”

One From Many opens with the sonic dissonance of Void and its passage through crystalline shimmers and distortions all leading to an evocatively challenging sample. Imagination provoking, it eventually leaves the listener to the waiting infectious trespass of Gone. Synths and rhythms immediately stroll through ears; each bringing a catchy lure to which Zmora adds her magnetic tones.  A relatively calm affair even with its infectious presence, the track has an underlying dark edge which provokes rather than invades the imagination, a darkness offering threat emphasized by the guitar of Roger Le Guin within its overall seduction.

The following irresistible Multiplicity instantly invades the senses and psyche with its kinetic pulses, resonance shaken off every synth cast palpitation before it expands into another virulently infectious escapade this time seeing guitarist Rob Ackerman adding his prowess. Brock joins Zmora vocally as the track invades with its inimitable contagion before Celestial brings a progressive rock breeze to bear on its electronic exploration. This time Brock is joined vocally by Sara Dee, their union a perfect fit with the Celtic folk hue which also arises in the outstanding encounter which soon had the title of best track on our lips, reinforcing its grip as its electro pop tenacity infested body and spirit.

From its ethereal and physical radiance, the album’s climate becomes darker and more intense through Nitro though the inherent relish of the band to create infection spun enterprise is never far from the surface. Featuring the vocals of Darien Graham-Smith and Atashi Tada, the song courts the dark corners of thoughts in something akin to Cauldronated meets Deutsch Amerikanische Freundschaft but undeniably individual to its creators.

The following Addiction nags and niggles on ears with repetitious catchiness in its arsenal and discord in its nature, a restrained yet feral weave of temptation which as so many tracks just compels lustful attention, while Pigs is a web of discontent and dark intrigue within a portentous atmosphere but again one as alluring as it is tenebrous as it envelops and manipulates the senses and imagination respectively.

Even darker depths and layers of intimation are unveiled by This. With Hemiola guesting on vocals, the track is electronic smog invading and enticing with equal relish. Its cloudy cacophony devours as it seduces, its inharmonious air woven from melodic prowess as deceitful and deceptive as it is hypnotic.

Duality brings the release to a close, it too bred from a discord of noise and suggestion before parting with melodic bonds for the ever ear gripping tones of Zmora. Light and darkness once again merge in magnetic inharmony; each making vocal claims on thoughts and emotions before everything falls back into the void.

It is a truly provocative and spellbinding end to an album which with moments of real magnificence captivates and excites from beginning to end. Dicepeople are deserving of major attention, One From Many just might, should be the key to unlock that recognition.

One From Many is out now through Syndicol Music; available on all digital stores and @ https://www.syndicolmusic.com/store

https://dicepeople.com/   https://www.facebook.com/dicepeople/   https://twitter.com/dicepeople

 Pete RingMaster 02/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright