Mils – We fight We love

There is a boldness to French outfit Mils which is within every aspect of their sound and invention, a fearless creativity and spirit within songwriting and its imagination, their sound and its execution which makes  We fight We love, their latest EP, one compelling encounter and pleasure.

Based in Montpellier, Mils began in 2008 initially as a studio seated collaboration. The release of their debut album, Man is a lonely Soldier, in 2012 lured strong attention the way of the outfit, especially with its re-energised push the following year through Dooweet Records. Praise carrying reviews and a host of new fans came with its reboot; support accelerated by the single Come Home in 2015 which was the first release with recently joined singer Mélodie alongside lead guitarist Tristan, rhythm guitarist Cerise, bassist/keyboardist Jack, and drummer Ben. Weaving a sound inspired by a host of flavours from varied rock, industrial, electronic, and new wave landscapes, Mils create a proposition as unpredictable as it is intriguing, again the evidence vocal within the Thomas ”Drop” Betrisey (Samaël / Sybreed / MXD) produced We fight We love.

Looking at themes inspired by “the confrontation of man with his own emotions and with others”, the EP opens up with that earlier mentioned single Come Home. The early steely union of guitar and keys is quickly joined by the alluring tones of Mélodie, an engaging growl to her tones matching that of the sound which already reveals an array of spices in its brewing roar. Once hitting its broad stride, electro and rock melodies weave their patterns around the firm kiss of beats, a more intimidating edge added by bass and riffs as things only continue to blossom and evolve. The track is sheer magnetism and easy to see why its potent draw and success as a single as well as the anticipation it nurtured for the EP.

The outstanding start is quickly and as powerfully backed by No Body; it’s opening electronic glide across industrial textures a blend of M83 and Nine Inch Nails. Soon the impressive tones of guest vocalist Duja, from electro rockers MXD, are captivating, his rich darker presence perfectly united with Mélodie’s fiery presence. Carrying a great eighties essence, the track is as thickly compelling as its predecessor, almost lava-esque in its emotive and energetic heat yet masterly controlled and harmonically elegant within its potent smoulder.

It is fair to say that Escape had a hard task to live up to the first pair but soon has the body bouncing with its lively electro shaped, muscular rock ‘n’ roll. Again there is a tempestuous edge to the great vocal presence of Mélodie, an aggressive instinct as tenacious in the broadly textured sound and boisterousness of the song. If it does not quite match up to those before it, it is a paper thin size miss as body and appetite can attest to as they devour its spirit rousing incitement.

A mellower but no less dramatic embrace comes with next up Strange Night; the song’s climate electronically seductive but with a sinister hue pushed by the controlled but rapier swings of Ben. Reminding a touch of Danish outfit Forever Still at times, the track smoulders and boils time and time again across its inflamed landscape, never being anything less than one incandescent proposition.

The EP closes with the equally roasting climate and emotive power of Casus Belli. Though the song has a firmer rein on its fire it persistently singes ears and stokes the imagination; a blaze which may have not lit the fires within as others before it but brings things to a striking piping hot conclusion.

Like for us, Mils may be a prospect which is new to ears. We suggest that you swiftly change that situation through the forcibly impressive We fight We love; and as to those in the know, the band has just grown to major new heights which real attention surely can no longer ignore.

We fight We love is out now via most online stores.

http://www.milsxperience.com/    https://www.facebook.com/MilsXperience/

Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Erkonauts – I Did Something Bad

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Having missed the release of I Did Something Bad first time around, we as so many others will be, are seriously grateful for its world-wide re-release through Kaotoxin Records. The debut outing for Geneva’s The Erkonauts, the album is a ferociously diverse and increasingly fascinating collage of genres and sound. As thick in unpredictability as it is rich in bold imagination, I Did Something Bad is one of those propositions that heavy duty recommendations swarm to. We can only join the crowd and with two additional new tracks to contemplate and devour for all, the album’s return is a not to be missed a second time treat.

Formed in 2014, The Erkonauts consists of ex-Sybreed members in bassist/vocalist Ales Campanelli and drummer Kevin Choiral, alongside guitarists Adrien Bornand and Sébastien Puiatti. Together they expel a sound which is as punk and heavy rock as it is metal, as much progressive enterprise as it is off kilter imagination. Fair to say the band made a hefty impact with the self-released outing of their debut album in 2014, the limited first and second press of I Did Something Bad greedily consumed with the band’s reputation growing in tandem through their live show and touring voracity. Produced by Drop (Samael, ex-Sybreed), the album is now poised to allow the rest of us slow coaches to dive into The Erkonauts bedlam, as mentioned with a pair of new songs recorded last year for extra rich taste.

The Great Ass Poopery opens up the tempest, a gloriously carnivorous bordering on carnal bassline infesting ears initially to be joined by the kinetic swings of Choiral. Alone it is gripping stuff but add the fiercely shimmering guitars aligned to rousing vocals and the air becomes aflame with rumbling attitude loaded rock ‘n’ roll. In some ways like Fear Factory meets Mudvayne with Suicidal Tendencies orchestrating, the punk metal assault is creative rampancy and virulent energy fired down the barrel of a dynamically hungry cannon.

art_RingMaster ReviewTony 5 swaggers in next, its body similarly spawned to that of its predecessor but swiftly sharing its own consuming tenacity. As biting rhythms and swinging grooves embrace the excellent mix of clean and aggressively rasping vocals, the song is a cantankerous affair but with a body of spiralling twists and sonic resourcefulness which makes other’s references to bands such as System Of A Down and Gojira understandable. As the first, the track is a ravenous swamping of ears with superb clarity within its smothering touch for the swarm of progressive tenacity within to equally entice and shine.

There is a greater initial hostility to the following All the Girls should Die, riffs and rhythms angrily badgering ears whilst readying them for the fluid slip into melodic pastures with emotive mellow vocals. Entwining melodic rock fire with alternative metal flirtation as other elements snarl and grumble, the song ebbs and flows in its sonic ire whilst providing a perpetually compelling persuasion. Again there is a rampant directness upon ears at times, the track managing to be simultaneously predatory and seductive before making way for the electro lit, punk fired triumph of Nola. The first invading bassline tells you all you need to know about what is to come; the track flinging hooks and rapier beats around like a dervish whilst expelling a groove infested sonic devilry around them. Vocals again are as varied and impressive as the maelstrom of delicious sound and the increasing imagination of the aural emprise.

A sultry climate comes with Dominium Mundi, its evocative air a suggestive calm for the imagination to expand upon before the heart of the storm breaks with again addictively stabbing rhythms and aggressively hued vocals. Though it brews an inferno of sound, the earlier haunting peace continues to switch and collude with the raging animosity, leaving ears ringing, emotions aflame, and the body exhausted by the persistent breakout of heavily flirtatious grooves. The latter is weaponry which increases its pull in Hamster’s Ghosthouse straight after. With irritable riffery and stalking beats, the track stalks and infests the senses. Its hardcore/nu-metal infused rock ‘n’ roll is pure temptation as it leads the listener into a following progressive garden of melodic and classic rock. As many songs, how they start is no hint to how they depart and certainly their ever intriguing journeys as superbly epitomised here.

The creeping devilment and sonic rapacity of Gog raises the greed in an already eager appetite with ease, its dark character and lively imagination awash with biting elements and imposingly suggestive textures and flavours whilst Your Wife hugs with an acoustic caress shaped by equally warm vocals. The croon does get feistier across its melody and harmony soaked captivation but never relinquishes its elegance and charm.

There is no escaping the great humour that runs through the band’s songwriting and attitude either ,with its boldest moment coming in the punk rage and fun of 9 is better than 8. It is an unbridled riot, simple as that and impossible not to get physically involved in before Machine brings its own commanding incitement to the party. The first of the new tracks exclusive to the release, it is a growling, thrashing slab of metal diversity. Hellacious in its body, infectious in its armoury of hooks, grooves, and anthemic rhythms, the track is as much punk metal as it is extreme metal toxicity and manna to the ears.

Concluded by the tempestuous Culbutos, it a merger of thunderous confrontation and seductive tempting, I Did Something Bad has all the quality and mastery to leave body and soul enraptured. As the intricately and dramatically woven final song, the album is a creative collage of sound turned into a riveting theatre of invention and fiercely arousing adventure that no one should miss out on.

Quite simply, with a new album proposed for later this year, time is ripe for all newcomers to grab your piece of The Erkonauts via I Did Something Bad.

I Did Something Bad is out via Kaotoxin Records from February 12th @ http://www.kaotoxin.com/shop/page/6/

Check out our interview with Ales Campanelli @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/03/25/exploring-the-roar-of-the-erkonauts-with-ales-campanelli/

https://www.facebook.com/theerkonauts   http://www.erkonauts.com

Pete RingMaster 12/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Beyond the Dust – Khepri

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Beyond the Dust is a French progressive metal band which has a very potent future on the evidence of debut album Khepri. It is not a release which puts the band up alongside the weightier and more robustly adventurous protagonists of their genre, but one which suggests with the ripe potential coursing through their songs, that the Paris quartet could find that success some when within their evolution.

The band made a potent introduction to themselves with their six-track New Dawn EP in 2011, a release which led the band to shows with the likes of Periphery, Sybreed, Protest The Hero, Monuments, and Becoming The Archetype. The song Reality Deformed opened up a new gaze of attention with its unveiling at the beginning of 2012; the song which featured ex-Aliases singer Jay Berast already showing hints of the new maturity in songwriting and sound which is ripe within Khepri. The band signed with Dooweet Records last year for the release of their first full-length, it a 57 min concept album which has been compared to “references like Dream Theater’s Metropolis Part 2: Scenes From a Memory mixed with Meshuggah’s Catch 33 and Periphery’s albums.” That might be a grand suggestion for Khepri but certainly Beyond the Dust has grown in creative strength and imagination between releases and this certainly lights up the album.

A mature male voice sets the scene as first track Rise waits in the shadows to reveal its presence. It is a dramatic scene being cast under a stormy sky, one soon joined by the melodic charm of guitars and a darker foreboding bass tone. Similarly the ambience of the track becomes thicker in dramatic hue, providing an intriguing premise that Meshuggah bred enterprise agitates and ignites. The instrumental is a captivating opening to the album, alone sparking the imagination and anticipation of what is to follow.

Clarity is the next offering, its own elegant start a potent coaxing before being immersed in a vibrant but cloudier weave of riffs and rhythmic incitement. It is not a particularly stormy encounter though and is soon mixing in peaceful melodies and certain emotional calms, but still prone to eruptions of raw vocals squalls alongside the predominant clean delivery, as well as fierce intensive roars of sonic voracity. The track continues to seduce and blaze away in ears, the band persistently impressing in craft and ideation but, and something which applies to most of the album, not finding that final spark to push the band beyond familiar territories.

After the Light is a valiant attempt though, a voracious predator from the start but guided by the excellent clean tones of the vocalist and almost as swiftly twisting into unexpected and khepricompelling detours. The song is quite gripping, luring in close attention as you wait to see where it goes next, and it does not disappoint with its imagination whilst still managing to stay within the original framework of the song’s tempest. There are moments where it veers towards the precipice of too much but always turns away and explores new just as sonically theatrical and engrossing ventures. A proposal to take your time exploring, much as Khepri itself to be fair, it emerges as a peak of the release which grows even more impressive over time.

A smoother embrace comes with Relief, melodies and harmonies as resourceful as the guitar escapades and vocal variety. There is a small sense of flamboyancy through the solo which will appeal to some and maybe less to others but it is the lack of the bold almost warped ingenuity of its predecessor which prevents the song lighting emotions as potently. As a rapacious melodic rock track though there is little to ignore and refuse, much as with Last Breath, though the song is much more volatile emotionally and aggressive creatively. The further into its short but eventful body it travels, the greater the creative temptation discovered where again a more twisted invention is allowed to flirt with the listener even if in short doses.

Both Zero and Silence and Sorrow have the imagination heavily invested and ears fully attentive, the first a tenaciously expressive and inflammatory instrumental coaxing thoughts and emotions into the savage jaws of its successor. The most carnivorous track on the album, riffs and rhythms a barbarous incitement, the song proceeds to explore a sonic tapestry of bedlamic enterprise and melodic ingenuity. Funk, jazz, and math rock all seem to have a part of its breeding whilst the ever impressing vocals in their harmonic styling only add to the magnetism of the tempestuous encounter. As After The Light, the track stands as a pinnacle of Khepri, the moments where something new is truly breached.

The three parts of The Edge of Earth and Sea complete the album, each a part of an epic twenty plus minute narrative also standing well individually if taken that way. Part 1: The Tears Of Departures is a mellow and evocative embrace, though as expected it has a fiercer energy to its air and a darker nature to its shadows. They subsequently boil over into a brawling hardcore-esque vocal expulsion over jagged riffs and tingling melodies, the evolving vocals and warm guitar expression ensuring though that there is plenty of adventure in the growing maelstrom, a stormy scene which slips into again the more restrained and charmed opening to Part 2: The Fear Of The Journey This in turn rumbles with storm like emotion and intent across its colourful and technically extravagant soundscape. The mid way collapse into hellish domains, where the safety of the narrative’s protagonist is lost, suddenly ignites the track to new heights matched by the voracious stalking of the senses from riffs and rhythms. There is a new inescapable drama to the scene which you wish was there sooner and longer as Part 3: The Bliss Of The Gathering comes in. With its rugged terrain and hungry hostility aligned to harmonic reassurance, the bliss of its title seems to come at a price thematically, but with a new pleasing adventure offered to the listener.

It is potent end to a fine first album from Beyond The Dust, not one to rave endlessly about but easily a release to recommend progressive metal fans take a good look at. Khepri is a seriously solid and enjoyable proposition, not pushing the band above the crowd but with songs like Silence and Sorrow and After The Light showing flair and promise which definitely excites, it hints that their time in a singular light will surely come.

Khepri is available via Dooweet Records now @ http://dooweet.bandcamp.com/album/khepri

https://www.facebook.com/beyondthedust   http://www.beyond-the-dust.com/

RingMaster 28/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Mutagenocide – Devolve EP

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If UK metallers Mutagenocide have not reached your neck of the woods or gaze yet never fear they are coming with their ferocious and feverishly flavoured sound, certainly if new EP Devolve gets the breaks and attention it deserves. Made up of seven voracious onslaughts which rage and stampede with pure metal aggression, the release unleashes an unpredictability which is as compelling as the invention and array of styles which fuels its adventure. The band has been making a stir across the metal underground in the UK and now Devolve suggests the time is ripe for the quintet to find a wider intensive attention.

Oxford based, Mutagenocide showed their intent and brewing depth of sound with a self-titled debut in 2012, the four track EP a potent reinforcement of their already keenly followed and recognised live performances. Now the line-up of vocalist Jay Taylor, guitarists Pat Scott and Paul Clayton, bassist Tom Greenway, and drummer Ben Wilsker pounce with a provocation which suggests they are ready to stir up a countrywide hunger with the potential to fuel attention much further afield.

From the first swipe of sonic belligerence over a persistently winding flume of guitar, opener Hysteria has ears and appetite wide awake. It is a dramatic entrance which is soon twisted into a tempestuous charge of thrash bred antagonistic DEVOLVE COVERriffing and vicious rhythmic hostility, this ridden by the caustic vocal squalls of Taylor. But as is a constant across the whole release, it is merely a moment in an evolving landscape, grooves and addictive hooks as well as subsequent progressively seeded ideation, veining and working its way into the heart of the fierce and impressive incitement.

The immense start is swiftly emulated and surpassed by the title track, it also an immediate fury and explosive assault through ears. A melodic and progressive teasing plays within the demanding surge before merging into an addictive web of tenacious grooving and venomous melodic metal coaxing. It is a blistering mix which again seems to find a new avenue to investigate and contagious bait to expel within the unrelenting voracity of the song. It is a brilliant encounter which is full of drama and intrigue, incendiary craft and seductive predation, but most of all sheer compelling invention.

     Entombed and Swallowed makes a reserved entrance next, a guitar painting an emotive hue into an evocative atmosphere which carries no threat yet has an air of foreboding to it. It is the same as a melodic wind of progressive rock spicing opens up its narrative, guitars impressing with every expressive note but the darker shadows of the bass ensures a portentous tempering is lurking. That darkness seeps into the growing weight and punch of the rhythms before fuelling a corrosive maelstrom of acidic sonic endeavour, acutely jagged riffery, and an increasing spite to the commanding swings of Wilsker. Like a brawl instigated by Lamb of God and Sybreed with thoughts of Cambion also making their hints, but an aggressor with the poise and exploratory expression of melodic metal and the emprise of post metal, the track is a riveting blaze of adversarial emprise. It is soon outshone though by the similarly cultured but rigorously individual Half-Born, it’s closing seduction before a corrosive finale alone passion firing but as a whole proposition the song is a startling and ruggedly imposing and shifting triumph.

     Remeron Nightmares with its stomping thrash sculpted entrance and Wretched bring the release to a mighty conclusion. The first proceeds to spin a malevolent web of precision crafted inhospitable toxicity encased in a simultaneously intimidating and alluring storm, its presence as primal as it is intensively honed. Equipped with a familiar swagger, a sonic invention which leaves lips licked, and a primal virulence the track is a monstrous treat. The same which can almost be said about its successor, a final enthralling furnace of raw and hellacious enterprise which whilst lacking the stature and uniqueness of its predecessors, is still a mighty end to an outstanding triumph.

There is very little to put up against the Stu Mckay (Malevolence, Desolated, Ingested, Annotations Of An Autopsy, Eternal Lord) recorded and Tim Turan (Nuclear Blast, Candlelight Records) mastered release though a bit more variety to the admittedly excellent vocal delivery of Taylor would be welcome and interesting. It is a minor thing in a big thrilling step from Mutagenocide, a band you can expect to hear and see a lot more of ahead.

The Devolve EP is available now @ http://www.mutagenocide.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/mutagenocide

9/10

RingMaster 15/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Voice Of Ruin – Morning Wood

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When a band’s bio starts with, “Voice of Ruin was born in 2008, driven by the common desire of five Swiss farmers who dreamt of leaving the family farm and becoming rock stars. Hungry for success and recognition, the five strapping young lads abandoned their shovels and harvesters to take on a different type of instruments, with the goal of becoming icons of sex, alcohol and rock ’n’ roll (or horny famer metal),” you cannot help offering it highly intrigued attention whilst also making inevitable assumptions. As shown by their new album Morning Wood though, the band whether by design or just by natural instinct do not realise the complete tongue in cheek encounter imagined. Certainly lyrically the songs upon the release come with a humorous swagger and intent bred from their ‘background’ but musically what you get is highly accomplished and passionate, not forgetting inventive metal. Like a mix of Lamb Of God, Sylosis, and The Black Dahlia Murder with plenty of extra additives, sound and album captures senses and imagination from start to finish. Admittedly severely original moments are as scarce as udders on a bull but it cannot stop Voice Of Ruin from providing a rigorously enjoyable onslaught.

Plucking relevant info from their farmyard history, Voice Of Ruin first made a mark with their debut EP The Crash in 2009 to be followed to greater acclaim by their self-titled album two years later. Its success led to the band breaking out into Europe with album and their live presence, countries like France, Russia, and Ukraine overwhelmed as the band’s homeland by their ‘Horny Farmer Metal’. Going onto share stages with such bands as Caliban, The Black Dahlia Murder, Entombed, Textures, Tankard, Sylosis, God Dethroned, Benighted, Dew Scented, Sybreed, Do Or Die, Breakdown Of Sanity and many more, the Nyon hailing band now uncages Morning Wood to take another step in cornering the worlds metallic dairy market.

Welcome To The Stud Farm makes an intriguing and impressive entrance to the album, guitars casting a web of sonic enterprise and voice_of_ruin_morning_woodenticement around crisp rhythms and a throaty bass lure. Its presence and energy intensifies deepens into its minute and a half as it feeds the imagination a colourful and magnetic bait leading to the following Party Hard. The second track launches itself with a roar from Randy Bull exploding within rampant rhythms, a torrent of riffs, and another immediate weave of temping scorched melodic endeavour crafted by guitarists Nils Bag and Tony Cock. It is a fiery proposition, nothing startlingly dramatic but potently gripping and skilfully unleashed.

The strong beginning continues just as pungently through both Through The Eyes Of Machete and Day Of Rage, the first delivering a coarse battering of rhythms from drummer Oli Dick and antagonistic riffery veined by acidic grooves. The track almost spirals around the senses with its excellent guitar play whilst the bass of Erwin Van Fox stalks with a dark resonance. The encounter is another elevation in the release but it is the glorious unveiling of clean vocals cast by Van Fox within a more reserved passage which steals the strongest satisfaction and shows the potency of the songwriting and invention within the band. Its successor is a natural predator; from its first gnaw of riffs and the toxic breath which covers air and the varied squalling vocals a bestial yet resourcefully sculpted scavenger. It is an unrelenting incitement which ravages senses and emotions for another pleasing assault, the twisted grooves and the simple voracious urgency of the track irresistible.

The unbridled ferocity of The Rise Of Nothing consumes ears next, its intensive pressuring from the first second led by a superb carnivorous bass stalking and vindictive rhythms whilst its core canvas is a breeding ground for heavy metal colour and virulently tempting hues painted and sent soaring by the excellent guitar work. As mentioned earlier there are few times that the sound and songs throw you a curve ball in originality but it has to be said and epitomised by this track alone, that working its alchemy under the surface of songs is a bewitching flow of dramatic invention and contagious unpredictability, it is just you have to work to see it as openly as it deserves.

Both the title track and its successor Viols Désinvoltes provide thoughts and pleasure with further captivating adventures, the first at certain moments wrapping its uncompromising aggression and serpentine hostility with absorbing flumes of clean vocals which takes the track from a strong if expectations feeding level to something of a pinnacle on the album. It is not the vocals alone which make the difference though, piercing and technically thrilling invention equally effective as it spills out from the tempest to great success as the track leads into the second of the pair. The most anthemic track on the release, and the most hostile with its industrially kissed fury, the new song is pure sonic rancor framed by equally adverse rhythms and vocals; raw metal moonshine of the most toxic potency.

   The following Cock’n Bulls and the instrumental Today Will End descend with their own inhospitable bodies next, both belligerently intrusive and appealing. The first infusing a southern twang and groove to its admittedly increasing persuasive torrents and the second emerging from a black hearted storm with deliberate winds of sonic painting and reserved but still unstoppable intensity. In many ways neither matches earlier triumphs but do reveal more of the scope and skills of the songwriting and band whilst providing further variety to the almost pestilential attack overall of the album.

The trio of the salaciously jaundiced Sex For Free, the severely bruising Big Dick, and the closing creative storm that is Dirty bring the truculent album to a senses wasting close; the first of the three with its poisonous melodies and barbarous rhythms the most contagious and exciting of the closing stretch. Morning Wood is a thoroughly enjoyable ravaging even if one which keeps well within the walls of existing designs and when it does offer undoubted invention and mouthwatering ingenuity leaves it under a thick wash of almost uniformal surface rapaciousness. It means you have to work to discover the elements which set the band apart more than imagined but those rewards are full and impressive. So forget the image and gimmicks behind the sounds if new to the band just indulge in one very healthy and mischievous slab of bovine strong metal.

Morning Wood is available digitally and on CD now via Tenacity Music.

https://www.facebook.com/voiceofruin

http://voiceofruin.bandcamp.com

8/10

RingMaster 06/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Devoid – The Invasion

 

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     Formed in 2005, thrashers Devoid has emerged as one of the most noticeable and notable bands to emerge in recent years in Indian metal through their accomplished and commanding sound and their acclaimed debut album A God’s Lie. The Demonstealer Records released mix of thrash with a healthy shadow of death metal to its breath put the band in a brighter spotlight certainly at home if not quite as potently further afield. Now with the release of their impressive new EP, The Invasion, the Mumbai quartet has unleashed a darker, heavier, and more dramatically intensive declaration which could thrust the band into the widest awareness and recognition. Exploring more of their death metal brutality without diminishing the thrash endeavour and voracity which set the band’s rise in full flight, the release is an absorbing and ferocious encounter with a craft and imagination which intrigues and places Devoid onto a new lofty plateau.

    Starting out as a trio consisting of vocalist and rhythm guitarist Arun Iyer, drummer Shubham Kumar, and lead guitarist Keshav Kumar, with bassist Frank Pawar joining the following year, the band first made their mark by winning Campus Rock Idols, a big competition for rock and metal bands back then. Shows and tours with bands such as Demonic Resurrection, Bhayanak Maut, Myndsnare, Kryptos, Brute Force, and Infernal Wrath brought the band’s sound and presence into an eager and swiftly growing fanbase. 2010 saw the release of A God’s Lie as well as a tour across cities such as Bangalore, Mumbai and Pune with UAE death/thrashers Nervecell. Since then the sharing of stages with the likes of Cradle of Filth, Decapitated, and Sybreed has only cemented and accelerated Devoid’s stature in India and surrounding areas which The Invasion threatens to take to new climates. With line-up changes seeing guitarist Sanju Aguiar replacing Keshav Kumar in 2011 and Abhishek Kamdar coming in for the departing Pawar a year later, Devoid has evolved its sound and intensity into a stronger and darker yet just as contagious creative savagery; a powerful storm to thrill the full global presence of thrash metal.

     The release emerges with a provocative and atmosphere instrumental intro, a guitar shaped design filling intimidating and covertowering epically sculpted walls of sound. The acoustic caress which expands throughout the piece coaxes the imagination to dare a journey through the imposing and epic heights surrounding them, leaving thoughts exposed for the following ferocity which explodes in the shape of the title track. The opening narrative of the concept of the world under an invasive fury is expelled though a rasping vocal malevolence as punishing rhythms aligned to exhaustive riffery and sonic causticity lays welcome siege on the ear. It is a furious and compelling mix, the thrash heart and core of the song irresistible in its brutal consumption of the senses and the malevolent death bred breath of the track an insidious but potently alluring temptation. Opening up its melodic arms with a great solo and reducing the energy of the attack with an equally intensive yet more respectful thickly caressing ambience, the rage dissipates into a closing fade but leaves a lingering menace which is soon taken up by its predecessor.

    Pandemonium Is Over goes straight for the throat with even more dangerous and vicious rhythms in league with corrosive riffery whilst the excellent vocal squalls of Iyer are like lightly grained sandpaper and pleasingly abrasive and inciting. As the track impresses and steers a wide awake appetite for the EP into even greedier urges of hunger, it is fair to say that the band is not delving into new unexplored realms but still creates a proposition which is fresh and antagonistically eventful, a predacious chewing of the senses and imagination which stands aside of plenty of other bands uniting the two core essences of the band’s sound.

     To this point The Invasion is a tremendous adventure but soon given a new adrenaline shot of contagion and riveting hostility with Brahma Weapon and the hellacious closing track, The Grand Design. The first of the pair is an exhilarating and exhausting blistering of the ears, riffs insatiably hungry and acidic whilst the rhythms of Kumar are so accomplished and malicious in their bone splintering sculpting  that they hardly seem to break sweat, something the listener cannot say once drawn into the intensive tempest of addictive enterprise and sonic violence. The best track on the release it is almost matched by the EP closer, a song with a lumbering heavyweight presence and an almost Pantera like vehemence and ferocity to its stalking rabidity, musically and vocally. Crawling over the listener with an intrusive leering breath and potentially lethal sinews, the song never quite unleashes its full vitriolic energy but certainly increases its intensity and hunger allowing its fearsome rancor to soak every second of the outstanding quarrel.

      Expanding and exploring their previous more old school trash inventiveness, Devoid has moved into being an unpredictable and imposingly darker force. The Invasion suggests this evolution is still a work in progress making the band’s next proposition easy to highly anticipate whilst the EP declares itself an encounter all thrash metals fans should make.

https://www.facebook.com/devoidindia/

9/10

RingMaster 04/02/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Bog[~]Morok – Industrialypse

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    Industrialypse is a confrontation which grips the passions from its opening moments and proceeds to enslave their greedy hunger through twelve inventive and explosive slabs of industrial/nu metal. The album is more than that though, a wealth of styles and essences laying seeds within its insatiable sound conjured and sculpted with craft and enterprise by Russian band Bog[~]Morok. It is a refreshing and thrilling release, a sort of merger of the essences of Fear Factory, Korn, Sybreed, and Dir En Grey, a blend which ignites the imagination and sets the emotions ablaze.

The band started as a solo project for Rybinsk musician Morok in 1997, his intent to create a death/black metal exploration. Debut album Azoic in 2003 drew good attention as at the same time the project expanded to a full band. A death/doom presence emerged but one honed by the influence of modern and industrial metal, a sound which has continued to evolve across the band’s five albums, Stadiae II of 2005 and Syn.thesis two years later the stand out highlights before Industrialypse, though Decadence of 2010 potently continued the expansion of sound and stature of the quintet. The new album is another plateau cast, a riveting exploit which shows Bog[~]Morok as one of the very best industrial metal cored bands still to be discovered by the masses, something which Industrialypse with luck can amend.

The title track opens the encounter, cyber sounds and industry the entrance for thumping rhythms and voracious riffing to Frontcover 1corrupt ear and air. Soon into full stride the track expels a rigorous rapacious charge ridden by the excellent expressive vocals of Morok. Swinging between aggressive and respectful, carnivorous and seductive, the song is an intensive industrialised slab of extreme metal with electro temptations and melodic persuasion. A mix of demanding rhythms and scything cuts of guitar wrapped in a warm melodic synth lure, the song easily persuades especially with its unpredictable and ever shifting attack as it grows into the first towering hook of the album.

The following Gliese 581d and Не вижу зла (Stadiae III) continue the powerful start, the first a rampant stretch of melodic ambience and senses staggering metallic brute force created with skill and imagination as is the synth spawned warm textures and enticements aligned to the stringent intensity. Its successor opens with compelling almost sinister electro bait, its person cinematic soaked in atmospheric intrigue. That lure leads the imagination into an inciting dramatically melodic narrative with an additional teasing within its sinewy embrace, which plays like a mix of Biting Elbows and Limp Bizkit. It is an absorbing provocation building an industrial soaked landscape that is simply irresistible and transfixing.

After the bruising challenge of the pleasing Neizbezhnost, the album provides another major pinnacle to match the starter in the toxic shape of Hellstarter. An initial reasonably gentle coaxing only hints at the imminent hellacious ravaging of the senses to come, a rabidity increasing the urgency and aggression of the guitars and rhythms whilst there is an insidious temptation to the keys.  As ever with Bog[~]Morok  there is no resting on singular assaults and the song soon twists and launches blackened violations and industrial causticity around a melodic and nu metal taunting. It is an ingenious torrent of inventiveness and addiction causing enterprise, a triumph only matched, after the contagious Fear Factory like Shapeshifter, by the sadistically tantalising Bloodsucker. It is another track to chew and seduce the senses whilst bringing an ethnic curiosity to its sonic acidity and adrenaline fired predation; simply a masterful ferocity of corrosive and magnetic craft.

The mix of English and Russian sung songs adds to the frenetic allure of the album, especially with when the likes of Свет В Конце Тоннеля, another track which brings thoughts of Korn to mind this time in collusion with The Browning, and the melodically enticing Звездопад sound so good and convince a greater appetite to come play with their individual and unique gifts.

IDDQD unleashes another intensive metallic fury of rampaging riffing and equally pungent violent rhythms whilst Undream brings the album a melodic slowly burning treat, its smouldering and emotive beauty a delicious wrap for the imagination and heart. It is part of a great ending to Industrialypse , a finale completed by the blackened ruinous interpretation of the Fantomas’ song, Der Golem. Heavy, dark, and dirty, it is an extreme storm which maybe hints at the earlier days of Bog[~]Morok. Industrialypse is an outstanding release, one bringing metal and certainly industrial metal an invigorating excuse to get excited, and one all should take the time to search out and enjoy.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Bog-Morok/126796064065588

9/10

RingMaster 08/11/2013

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