Coilguns – Watchwinders

Pic laure gilardhucci

Always seeking proposals that challenge and ignite the senses whilst forging new invasive temptation, Swiss quartet, Coilguns, has always been a rewarding refuge and evolving adventure come trespass of noise and imagination. Unpredictability and creative intensity has as much shaped and fuelled their tracks, EPs and albums as physical intimation and intimidation and new album, Watchwinders is no exception; in fact it is the band’s most compelling, ravenous, and rousing slab of incitement yet.

With both debut album Commuters and its successor of last year, Millennials, we have come away wondering and in regard to the latter maybe doubting whether Coilguns could emulate let alone eclipse their feral majesty. We will not be allow that fruitless thought to arise with Watchwinders despite its magnificence but simply bask in its irresistible provocation and intrusive craft.

Released as all the band’s encounters via Hummus Records, the label founded by guitarist Jona Nido, Watchwinders was written and recorded during one intense month-long session, and as always with the band recorded live, and there is no escaping the instinctiveness of its breath and assault. There are moments when it is as if the band itself does not know what is coming next yet each song is a skilfully woven tapestry of sound, texture, and dissonance as fluid and earnest as it is unscrupulous verging on psychotic.

The album immediately lured unbridled attention with opener Shortcuts. For a minute and a half, Luc Hess manipulates with his galvanic senses poking beats, the vociferously presented tones of vocalist Louis Jucker just as potent in enslaving ears and appetite. In swift time the swipe of noise punk proved enslaving and only enforced its hold and drama before Subculture encryptors forced its thick and also quickly gripping body through speakers. As rhythms fall over themselves to invade, the guitars of Nido and Jucker create a sonic scourge; one only further bracing once embracing the great raw pestering of the latter’s vocals. From the abrasive flurry a just as devious calm emerges, rhythms and sonic threads a virulent nagging matched in prowess and magnetism by the vocals with the synth of Donatien Théivent carrying the same composed yet volatile enterprise, as the track revolves in rapacious noise and intent.

Big writer’s block erupts with its own contagious spite and captivation next, rhythms again at the core of its bold and vigorous creative coercion where punk and hardcore essences entangle in noise and sonic voracity. A breath taking cauldron of untamed and tense captivation it is followed by the album’s title track which eagerly uncages an esurient flood of urgency and compulsive tempestuousness in sound and emotion. The track is superb, managing to eclipse its mighty predecessors even by the brief time it takes its cyclone to slip into a bewitching oasis of magnetic voice and synth. Even so a current of rhythmic badgering escapes the agility of Hess, niggling and inviting as Jucker’s throat provides a similarly rich coaxing.

The prowling doomy presence of The Growing block view follows, the track skirting and courting the senses with its dark, heavy and evocative bait before Manicheans shares it’s twisting and turning, threat carrying drama. It is another drenched in discord bred thought and sound, a track fraught and agitated physically and emotionally with both songs effortlessly adding to the persuasive weight of the release.

Prioress is next up, an encounter haunting and staining the senses with its respective calm intimacy and drama bred turbulence. Locked away in its gripping, slightly suffocating dark defiled rapture, ears and appetite again found themselves defenceless to the band’s invention with eventual escape from the song’s creative confinement only the doorway into insatiable carnal tenacity courtesy of The Morning shower. A rapacious noise punk trespass as psychically catchy as it is emotionally disharmonious it joined its companions in easily luring us to stomp to its tune.

The unpolished, blemish embracing reflection of A Mirror bias beguiled with its singular but potent tenebrous breath with Urban reserves straight after unleashing a hardcore winded cyclone animated tempest to equally enthral and incite. With the keys of Théivent alone a portrait of fateful and predictive suggestion within the track’s tumultuous and unstable expulsion, the second of the two is the kind of infernal uproar that makes Coilguns and indeed Watchwinders so unique and addictive.

The album closes out with firstly the devouring hounding of Broken records and lastly the hypnotic seduction of Periscope. The first simply engulfs and consumes all in its path without suffocating its organic infectiousness while its successor arises upon a sonic line to draw and open up every predatory shadow and caliginous depth of false utopia and together they provide a fearsomely glorious conclusion to an outstandingly impressive release.

Once more Coilguns has left us open mouthed and lustfully devouring an album which leaves the world a better if more soiled place.

Watchwinders is out now via Hummus Records on CD and vinyl; available as a name your price download @ https://coilguns.bandcamp.com/

Full Coilguns tour dates w/ Yautja

08.11 – Paris (F) @ Espace b

09.11 – Sheffield (UK) @ Record Junkee

10.11 – Leeds (UK) @ Temple of Boom

11.11 – London (UK) @ The Macbeth Of Hoxton

12.11 – Glasgow (UK) @ Broadcast

13.11 – Manchester (UK) @ Satan’s Hollow

14.11 – Northampton (UK) @ TBA

15.11 – Utrecht (NL) @ TBA

17.11 – Gdansk (PL) @ Ziemia

18.11 – Warsaw (PL) @ Poglos

19.11 – Krakow (PL) @ Warsztat

20.11 – Wroclaw (PL) @ DK Luksus

21.11 – Berlin (D) @ Zukunft am Ostkreuz

22.11 – Stuttgart (D) @ Ju-Ha West

23.11 – Fribourg (CH) @ Hummus Fest / Fri-Son

24.11 – Lyon (F) @ La Marquise

26.11 – Clermont-Ferrand (F) @ Raymond Bar

27.11 – Angers (F) @ Jokers Pub

28.11 – Oss (NL) @ Lollipop

29.11 – Fontaine l’Evêque (B) @ MCP Apache

30.11 – Liège (B) @ La Zone

https://www.facebook.com/coilguns    https://twitter.com/COILGUNS

Pete RingMaster 04/11/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Down To The Bunker – Misery

A growling, snarling beast of a release, Misery is the debut album from Swiss quintet Down To The Bunker and an encounter which marks them out as one richly promising, indeed already impressive proposition. Offering up nine tracks of alt metal predation merged with heavy rock contagion and hardcore dissonance it all delivered with potent technical prowess and an uncaged heart, the release is one wake-up call to and declaration of intent from one rather exciting outfit.

Formed in 2012, the Genève hailing band has worked through years of line-up instability as it searched for the right personnel. It is a time though the band equally used to explore and hone a sound which is as unpredictable as it is varied and adventurous. A self-titled EP in 2015 drew keen attention though its support live was a struggle with again a changing line-up trespassing the next steps for Down To The Bunker. Now though things seem to have settled and with the band’s strongest line-up to date, the stability relishing result being the striking Misery.

Embracing a sound which sees the likes of Tool, Korn, Rage Against The Machine, Meshuggah, Gojira, Promethee, and Code Orange amongst its inspirations, Misery is an album which arouses as it challenges. Almost every moment has attention glued to its lures, the thrill of the unexpected rearing its head throughout an encounter which twists the familiar into its own pattern of fresh imagination and invention. Certainly there are moments where it ebbs and flows in the intensity of its temptation but there are few if any moments where it allows the listener to impulsively drift off elsewhere.

From the opening bait of first track Mother, the album was burrowing under the skin; sonic lures straining against the speakers urgently wanting out. The guitars of Matt and Jerem continue to bait the senses as heavier and darker strands join them, the bass of Arnaud a predatory taunt alongside the considered but imposing swings of drummer Léo. Completed by the fine tones of vocalist Jo, the track swiftly grows into a formidable and compelling incitement, imagination and unpredictability increasingly fuelling its enterprise and inescapable persuasion.

The increasingly magnetic and impressive start is easily continued by the album’s title track. It too springs from a seductive sonic lure if one which lances the senses rather than caresses them. The emerging web of guitars ensnared ears with swiftly nagging and devious intent; a strength of coercion matched in voice and rhythm. There is a touch of Mudvayne to the track at times which does it no harm or indeed the atmospheric winds which bring haunting melodies amid seemingly calm but dark aural intimation.

With the twisted canvas of The Asylum a refreshing bedlam of sound and individual craft shaped into another tantalising captivation come threat and the, at times, even more creatively unhinged and similarly fascinating Chrysalis, there is no let up on attention and enjoyment. Each track lured and trapped both with a creative greed which alone marks Down To The Bunker out, a dexterity in thought, songwriting and adventure which equally infests next up Ethics. As with all songs, it is a writhing collusion of sonic vines and metallic dissonance matched in vocal and lyrical dispute, and like each a blend of the barbarous and seductive as a cast of styles and flavours join up to ignite the band’s imagination and sound. There are moments of deceptive and corrupted calm which maybe disrupt the flow and impact of the track but it is that unexpected ideation which also makes it as potent as anything within Misery.

Through the intimately reflective and melodically evocative Waves, a quest with its own underlying snarl, and the sonically invasive and haunting Lost In The Desert, there was no let up on bold enterprise and striking intimation. The latter is like a senses suffocating limbo which slowly but surely reveals it’s waiting demons and distortions resulting in an experience which gloriously tests and provokes.

a final pair of bonus tracks in Machine and Alive brings the album to a dramatic and imposing close. The first and another major highlight of the release openly wears familiarity in its holler yet it would be hard to say it is anything other than a Down To The Bunker creative clamour while its successor prowls, pretty much crawls through ears with a great mix of heavy grunge and rapacious metal bound in melodic volatility.

It is a great end to an album which just pleasures and grows more impressive over time. In their seventh year Down To The Bunker will be making their first introduction to a great many with Misery but it is easy to believe they will be no strangers to them and major spotlights hereon in.

Misery is released February 22nd via Tenacity Music; available @ https://tenacity-music.bandcamp.com/album/misery

https://www.facebook.com/DownToTheBunker

Pete RingMaster 20/02/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mnemocide – Debris

Debris is the title of the new EP from Swiss death metallers Mnemocide and also what will be left of the senses after facing their seriously appetising debut release. Four instinctively and invasively ravenous tracks skilfully woven through deliberate enterprise, the EP is a striking introduction to a band already suggesting very big things could be ahead for and from them.

From Basel, Mnemocide began in 2017 but emerged into the open earlier this year after honing their death metal bred adventurous sound. Joining producer Christoph Brandes in Iguana Studios near Freiburg, Germany, the quintet recorded Debris a few months back, a debut which quite simply makes us what to hear so much more.

EP opener, Only Shades, comes into view on cold winds, a portentous pulsation accompanying its emergence before guitars entangle the growing intimation. It all veers into a groove driven stalking of the senses, a powerful and sinister stroll loaded with restrained but invasive rhythms and potent throat raw vocals. Those grooves continue to lure keen attention within the similarly inviting if threatening consumption of sound where melodic enterprise and tempestuous intimation only adds to the track’s imposingly stirring presence, the EP off to a highly persuasive and stirring start.

The following Pawns swiftly manipulates the imagination with its initial samples, accentuating its persuasive lure with the subsequent tide of advancing riffs and heftily swung rhythms. Stride by creative stride, the track is persuasive warfare, every note a magnetic statement of intent as barbarous as it is captivating. If its predecessor impressed, the second song had us lustily hooked, success pretty much matched by next up Collapse, another track which got further under the skin carnivorous riff by barbarous rhythm. As suggested, the classic heart of death metal beats within the Mnemocide sound but again this is a song which embraces its seeds with imaginative adventure and violently flirtatious catchiness.

The same template breeds EP closer Soul Collector, a track chipping away at defences from its first breath as beats lustily land on and riffs gnaw away at the senses with almost viral contagion. Even darker, ravenous hues gather as the track prowls, all accentuating its grooved temptation and mercurial veering towards inhospitable countenance.

It is a fine end to a release which has become more stirring and irresistible by the listen. There are also big hints of a brewing uniqueness within the EP which only adds to an anticipation of what is to follow from a band ready demanding eager attention.

The Debris EP is about now; available@ https://mnemocide.bandcamp.com/releases

https://mnemocide.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Mnemocide/

Pete RingMaster 02/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Slimboy – Sail On Sailor

Returning from a seven year or so long hiatus n 2017 re-energised and with an even keener touch in writing and sound, Swiss punks rockers Slimboy quickly released their album Sail On Sailor. Now their fifth full-length gets a deserved re-release through Niro Music; a new push sure to draw host of new eager attention the way of the Basel-based trio.

Formed at the start of the millennium, Slimboy has released four praise luring albums, been signed to a major label, toured the world, and strongly hit the charts in their homeland. The band’s break between 2009 and 2016 saw its members busy with other projects but at the same time it seemed to fully refresh and give new energy to their Slimboy heart. Off of a recent tour with The Ataris, the threesome of vocalist/bassist Joel Bader, guitarist Sven Wallwork, and drummer Silvio Spadino has now re-thrust their latest album at ears and the Mike Herrera (MXPX) recorded offering more than warrants the new impetus with its eclectic body and intimately emotive heart; its new outing coinciding with the outfit’s European tour with US pop-punkers, MEST.

Album opener Falling Apart instantly and firmly coaxes ears with the solo lure of Bader’s vocals. In no time though the whole band jumps in with scything rhythms and boisterously enticing hooks and riffs. A cutting response to being wronged, the song continues to attack and roar, every passing half minute bringing new twists and imagination. It is a great start with an air of familiarity which does it no harm and is swiftly backed up and matched by the just as potent Heart’s All Gone. With something of US outfit The Cooters about it, the track immediately hits its prime roar, adrenaline and affirmation of feelings fuelling its thick and bold enterprise.

Inspired by a fan at their first show after returning, Let It Go is an infectious stroll with a web of hooks which just relentlessly hit the spot. Bass and drums create a tasty nagging as persistent as it is mercurial in its attack whilst guitar and vocals colour the heart of the emotion bred encounter. Embracing a weave of rock bred flavours the song makes it easy for ears and personal thoughts to be involved with its presence before the melancholic but uplifting Sorrows fully grabbed attention and fresh plaudits.

With pop nurtured virulence to its lively bounce Whatever had keen reactions animated next while Believe In You shares its own individual pop and rock collage as its acoustic beginnings evolve into a rich holler. The first of the two is a re-recorded track from one of their earlier albums and relishes the new creative colour given to its pop punk. Its successor was inspired by the Beach Boys song Sail On Sailor which also influenced the album’s title and just hooks ears and appetite with its imaginative body and mix of flavours.

Downfall is another simply contagious track which got under the skin to take favourite track status, it too holding a shade of familiarity to its inescapable and memorable persuasion. It was an album highlight easily matched by the more feral blaze of Freak; the song involving metal and hard rock hues in its riveting punk drama.

Concluded by the ferocious Hagfish-esque stomp of So-Called Unity and the personal emotion fuelled Life/Death (Ghost Of You), the album ends on a lofty high. For us it is at its very best across the last quartet of songs but from start to finish the album thoroughly engages and pleasures. If an album was deserving of a second chance at enticing a far bigger audience, this is it.    

Sail on Sailor is available now via Niro Music.

Upcoming Tour Dates with MEST:

August 14 – UK, London, Underworld; 15 – UK, Glasgow, Broadcast; 16 – UK, Scunthorpe, The Lincoln Imp; 17 – UK, Bridgewater, Cobblestones; 18 – UK, Bolton, Alma Inn, 19 – UK Stafford, Redrum; 20 – UK, Sheffield, Corporation.

http://slimboy.ch/   https://www.facebook.com/slimboyband/

Pete RingMaster 13/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cancel – Dark Reveries

Dark Reveries is the new album from Swiss hardcore fury Cancel; a release which echoes its titles with tracks which savagely grab you from reality to immerse in rousingly, often carnally raucous dissonance. It makes no compromises in its assault and attitude loaded irritability but tempers the compelling causticity with flirtatious imagination whilst declaring the Luzern quintet ready to seize global attention.

Founded in 2011, Cancel has released a host of ear grabbing proposals around a richly received debut album in Circle of 2015. Their sound has evolved across each encounter and ventures a whole new plateau of enterprise and devilry within second full-length Dark Reveries. It is tagged as hardcore but freely ventures across the landscapes of noise, punk, metalcore, and post hardcore with each individual song.

It opens up with Mind Burial, instantly expressing raw vocals and sound upon the senses as rhythms closely prowl. Stalking the listener, the track soon hits a more urgent stride without losing all its restraints; captivating attention with every passing second of its Coilguns meets Red Tape like assault. An instinctive groove seizes its moment to enslave as rhythms continue to prey, all the while the band’s imagination brewing and taking a thicker hold on the album’s thrilling start.

The following Hysteria surges through ears with punk ‘n’ roll rancor, beats thumping with flirtatious violence as group shouts and urges accompany individual temptation. It is a seriously enjoyable and insatiable trespass emulated in its own way by successor Golden Rats but given a whole new web of twists and turns to become scorched by and addicted too. Both tracks reveal more of the bolder hunger and adventure in the band’s sound; exploration further stretched and exploited within the invasively mercurial Death Cab. As its punk heart bellows and ensnares like a malicious Shevils, the band’s rock ‘n’ roll instincts gains momentum, the great blend of vocals following the imaginative endeavour. Wiry grooves and the brooding growl of the bass only add to the unbridled magnetism brewed and devoured.

Poor Man’s Sermon is pure seduction from its first breath, the song slowly unwinding its unpredictable body note by note, clean syllable by alluring word until strolling through post punk/rock terrain courted by throat raw vocal toxicity. It is a fascinating affair and mix which only intensified its ire and hold by the second before the punk hostility of Chased Feelings ripped through ears. It too though embraced a mix of flavours and urgencies within its brief tenure, making way for the anthemic roar and challenging antipathy of Freedom On A Cross. As its predecessor, the track swiftly got under the skin with its predacious swing and inescapable curse of hooks and grooves.

The following minute and a half sees You`re Everything I`m Not ravage the senses, its Converge-esque punk feud colluding with rock ‘n’ roll arousal to manipulate and enslave while Human Machinery straight after sees Cancel spark the imagination more forcibly in its minute of instrumental darkness than many bands do in a ten minute plus flight of suggestion.

Dark Reveries finishes off with its title track, another song which is on the hunt from its opening seconds of sound and invention but with an eagerness which refuses a negative response. It is a swing and purpose which shuffles its attack but cores it with an infectious lure which never deviates from its intent and success.

It is a fine end to an album which just impresses further by the listen. Cancel might not grow to be one of Switzerland’s greatest exports but already they are definitely one of its most pleasurable and captivating.

Dark Reveries is available now @ https://cancel.bandcamp.com/

 http://cancelband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/CancelBandOfficial

Pete RingMaster 03/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Insanity – Toss a Coin

If there is brawl you really want to be at the heart of, it is Toss a Coin the new album from Swiss hardcore outfit Insanity. It brings eleven insatiable confrontations to the ear; a clutch of spirit raising, defiance driven roars which refuse to take not today sir for an answer.

With a sound bred in the New York hardcore scene at its height, Insanity has sonically bullied and physically roared their way to a potent reputation and presence within the European punk scene over the past five years, one now sure to be re-ignited again by Toss a Coin. Since emerging, the Lucerne quintet has surged from their homeland across Europe into international waters, sharing stages with the likes of Hatebreed, Agnostic Front, Madball, Sick Of It All, Terror and many more along the way as well as headlining their own successful tours. Their debut album, No Limit, set down a certain marker in their ascent, its well-received presence matched by that in success by the Ready To Row EP. Released through Bastardized Recordings is a new powerful statement from the band, in sound and political/social quarrel as well as simply rousing punk ‘n’ roll.

With gang shouts, body manipulating grooves, and addiction forging hooks as prevalent as raw antagonism and instinctive antipathy to the world’s ills, Toss a Coin snarls and harasses from its initial second and opening breath of first up No Tolerance For Intolerance. The gnarly tone of Pery Zemp’s bass instantly has ears lured, riffs a great dirty backing before both collude with the rapier like swings of drummer Raphael Renggli and the first of involvement enticing band shouts. Vocalist Tobias Küng is soon to the fore directing middle finger reply to prejudice, the guitars of Yannick Balmer and Michael Portmann casting a mesh of grouchy riffs and animated grooves. There is no escaping the swift influence of its attitude and body, a submission subsequently given to song after song in varying but certain degrees thereon in.

The excellent start is matched by the caustic stomp of Find A Way, its intensive assault a furious charge compared to the swagger of the previous protagonist but veined with melodic tendrils and scythes and twisting spirals of noise. For all the rage, already an inbred infectiousness is as powerfully commandeering reactions, Insanity entangling both with imagination and zeal. It is a quality as rich within the album’s title track and indeed What I See after that. The first of the pair points and challenges with every syllable and note, band cries and neck muscle testing catchiness a particular trespassing incitement within nothing but while the second flows from its predecessor upon another deliciously grouchy bassline into a web of seriously grooved and rapacious punk rock with the instincts to rock ‘n’ roll.

Four tracks down and we would have forgiven any upcoming slip-ups such the potency of the quartet but no second is wasted in allowing ears and attitude a moment to relax, With My Friends an immediate air punching, hip guiding announcement of kinship stoking the fires. Again pleasure is ignited by Zemp’s bass, its metallic grievance manna for personal taste more than matched by the rest of the band within the inflammatory holler.

Down consumes ears in a cantankerous bawl next but one delivered with deliberate restraint carrying a perfect level of volatility; a blend lifting the body to its feet and vocal chords to their highest decibel throughout. Such success is an easy finding for All I Need too; its badgering riffs and probing rhythms herded into greater feistiness by Küng and listener by the ever persuasive and addictive gang clamours.

Through the mercurial but persistently wilful and stormy climate of One Day and the surly belligerence of $laves, there is no let-up in disdain and disobedience or imagination lit invention which may at times take a while to reveal it’s surprises within the tempests but hungrily makes each track distinct and riveting incitement; What’s Hardcore just as eager to prove the point with its punk ‘n’ roll revelry. Like a vipers nest, the song writhes with grooves, their snaky lures even flirting away when the song is running headlong with punk predation.

The final ignition of defiance and unbridled pleasure is provided by Die For, a body stomping charge riding thrash nurtured riffs like a surfer as melodies flare and rhythms prowl. Musically, the senses feel like they are being stalked by the track, vocally being willingly drawn with the spirit into mobilisation, both whilst rocking like a hound in heat to their combined militancy.

It is a glorious end to an outstanding encounter entwining the familiar with instinctive contumacy and enterprise resulting in one of, if not, the most enjoyable and manipulative treats heard so far this year.

Toss a Coin is out now through Bastardized Recordings @ https://bastardizedrecordings.bandcamp.com/album/toss-a-coin  or http://insanity.ch/store/

http://insanity.ch/    https://www.facebook.com/insanity.metal

Pete RingMaster 26/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Life’s December – Colder

Lifes-December_RingMasterReview

It is probably apt with it being called Colder, that ears feel like they are amidst an unstoppable sonic avalanche listening to the new album from Swiss metallers Life’s December. It is a proposal which devours and obliterates the senses, leaving them bare to the emotional trespass and creative enmity which fuels the band’s raw deathcore tempest. It is a punishing proposal even more intimidating with the band’s embracing of djent bred animosity within their sonic savaging but equally a release which given time makes an increasingly compelling persuasion on the imagination.

Hailing from St. Gallen, Life’s December consists of vocalist Rico Bamert, guitarists Dave Mühlethaler and Valens Wullschleger, drummer Jérémie Gonzalez, and bassist Simon Mäder, a quintet which quickly has the imagination involved with album opener Final Speech. It is a scene setting, sonic landscape laying introduction with a portentous narrative being embraced by sonic mist before breeding a moment of predatory ferocity in vocal and sound. Instantly showing the band’s penchant for djent and down-tempo trespasses within a deathcore shaped animus, the track leads the listener into the initially subdued but soon ravenous jaws of Lest I Forget. Quickly in full venomous prowl, the track entwines corrosive riffs and toxic grooves, immersing them in a death charged tempest of sound and emotion driven by guttural vocals and a web of guitar and bass hostility. All the while though, an underlying sonic intrigue and adventure lurks, never quite breaking from the storm but persistently flirting and coaxing closer attention to match the lure of the vocal variety which also emerges.

Lifes-December-Colder_RingMasterReviewIt is hard to say that Life’s December is yet offering anything boldly new in sound but from this song alone there is plenty of fresh resourcefulness to get the teeth and appetite seriously into; a potent and dynamic persuasion which continues with Memories and World Of Blame. The first gets right under the skin in no time with its steely grooves and grouchy riffs. Once in control it then uncages a rapacious torrent of melodic intrusions and rhythmic rancor which in turn is soon involved in a net of more welcoming and emotively lively exploits. Across the song, the band seamlessly slips into mellower or more cancerous endeavours, contrasts and extremes skilfully woven together to create one of the more dramatically unique and memorable passages within the album. In comparison, its successor is a carnal tempest of noise and spite; a fall into sonic causticity and vocal ire which without matching up to its predecessors still has ears fully engaged especially as it expands its stark and increasingly cancerous landscape of sound and emotion.

The brief melodic seducing of Interludium allows a moment to reflect and engage with calmer essences within the band’s imagination before Snow Falls Silently envelops the listener in sonic and emotional confrontation. Once more, there is no major moment of uniqueness involved with the track but its virulent tide of riffs and invasive grooves grip attention, success whipped up further by the throat shredding vocals and their pungent intent and variety.

The austere yet intimately melancholic landscape of My Existence is revealed next, a passage of sound and emotion littered with melodic lures and primal eruptions within a chilled and ravaged ambience. From there, the album’s title track explores similarly evocative scenery of thought and tone but within a far more grievous soul sucking doom soaked climate equipped with rabid assaults of raw guitar and biting rhythms perpetually accentuated by the bone shuddering resonance of the bass. With mouth-watering spirals of sonic toxicity veining its body too, the song hits the spot whilst numbing the senses before the instrumental Hero Missing brings the album to a sombre close with, in many ways, its most disturbing emotional moment, certainly its most haunting.

There are moments within Colder that truly ignite a greedy appetite and other times where fascination takes over; successes which together ensures Life’s December, a band with striking potential, is worthy of proper attention as equally its re-release through Dark Wings.

Colder is out now via Dark Wings across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/LifesDecember

Pete RingMaster 11/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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