The Filthy Tongues – Back to Hell

Two years ago Scottish band, The Filthy Tongues released a debut album which quite simply blew us away. It was a striking and increasingly haunting incitement of “caliginous flavours and textures.” Such its gothic beauty and immersive intimation we wondered if the trio had already laid down their finest moment and would struggle to match let alone eclipse its majesty again. Oh fool us! The band has just unveiled its successor in Back To Hell, a web of instinctive drama and invasive magnetism which puts its predecessor and pretty much most things this year to date in the shade.

Edinburgh hailing, The Filthy Tongues consists of vocalist/guitarist Martin Metcalfe, bassist Fin Wilson, and drummer Derek Kelly; the three previously members of Goodbye Mr Mackenzie and Angelfish alongside Shirley Manson. After the demise of those bands, all ventured into different projects, musical and not, before Wilson and Metcalfe came together as acoustic duo The Filthy Tongues, named from a phrase from a Goodbye Mr. Mackenzie song. This project subsequently evolved, the three gents back creating together and vocalist Stacey Chavis joining what would become Isobel Gowdie & the Filthy Tongues (to become Isa & the Filthy Tongues). Moving on, the band became three again and The Filthy Tongues with the startling Jacob’s Ladder the irresistible wake-up call to their presence and dark world. That first album was a tapestry of sound and styles; everything from dark rock, garage punk, surf, dark folk and post punk aligned to plenty other rich flavours as the band created almost salacious realms of seductive craft and gothically shadowed deeds. Back To Hell is more of the same yet a whole new landscape of manipulative imagination, riveting sound, and lyrical weaving.

As its predecessor, Back To Hell ventures through the dark claustrophobic underbelly of the Old Town in Edinburgh yet equally it incites the imagination to broaden its landscape and conjuring. It opens up with the addiction sparking Come on Home, a track instantly sharing an electric mist of intrigue and dark suggestion before springing an infection fuelled stroll stalked by the vocal prowess of Metcalfe. Like the sounds, his voice has a dirt clad texture, a gravelly tone which just draws you into the narrative and atmosphere of the developing aural theatre. Keys similarly bring a teasing suggestion to the mix as rhythms and guitars openly simmer. Swiftly hips were swaying to its call, head rocking to its swing and voice aiding the wonderfully tainted harmonies. The band’s new single, it is just superb, that haunting quality in their music already seducing via keys and voice as guitars weave and rhythms coax.

It is an outstanding start reinforced by the senses transfixing tale of The Ghost of Rab McVie. Strings and their electronic counterparts quickly infest the imagination, the first from the suggestive touch and craft of Susannah Clark. Metcalfe is soon within their descriptive midst, voice similarly nurturing thoughts as the song leads the listener into its melancholic heart. There is a beauty to it though which just seduces ears and imagination but with an earthiness keeping the dark surroundings fully in view before the album’s title track provides the gateway into a nefarious journey. Feeling like being trapped in a Celtic Wickerman driven nightmare, the song simultaneously overwhelms, indeed suffocates, and seduces all with increasing intensity. It is quite superb with the craft of Clark simply irresistible.

Mother’s got a Knife follows, its animated shuffle also getting under the skin within the first dance of enterprise before slipping into a smouldering glide; repeating the captivating cycle in swift time. Like a mercurial fusion of Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers, The Bad Seeds, and Wall Of Voodoo with a Josef K lining, the track was another which seduced and enslaved with ridiculous ease such its masterful imagination and virulent breath.

Next up Leper Town was just as persuasive, its pop infested rock ‘n’ roll reminding of a few  in some small ways but as ever, so unique to The Filthy Tongues as it had body and thoughts bouncing and appetite for their invention greedy. That individuality is never absent from a song as proven once more by Carlos the Jackal, menace and tenebrific elegance soaking its predacious yet infectious prowl while Who are you? is the band’s creative theatre at its most compelling and beguiling. It too has a threat in its air and beauty in its dark drawl; addiction for its creative alchemy once more inescapable.

The album goes out on the mesmeric croon of Take it, a song with a whisper of U2 meets Helldorado about it and a dirty laced grace which just fascinates as layers of sound seduce. It oozes beauty, loneliness, and temptation; a crepuscular radiance of sound and emotion which steals attention from the real world.

It is a glorious end to another extraordinary encounter with The Filthy Tongues. Their Jacob’s Ladder was one of the essential releases two years ago, Back to Hell is THE most vital release of this so far and hard to see being eclipsed too often over the months ahead.

Back to Hell is released May 25th through Neon Tetra / Blokshok Records.

http://www.filthytongues.com/   https://www.facebook.com/The-Filthy-Tongues-144934250476/   https://twitter.com/filthytongues

Pete RingMaster 21/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Senton Bombs – Mass Vendetta

SB_RingMasterReview

There is nothing better than watching a band which catches the ear build on previous successes whilst pushing themselves and sound. UK rockers The Senton Bombs is a band which consistently manages that impressing trait and has so again with new album Mass Vendetta. The band’s most diverse and boldly adventurous offering yet, the eleven track stomp sees the band pushing into feverishly imaginative and variety spun territories whilst still rocking like a bitch in season incited hound.

Formed in 2004, the Blackpool quartet seemed to hit the ground running in sound and attention, become a greedily devoured live proposition matched in support for their early releases including a pair of well-received albums. Fair to say though as successful as they were, the band really hit the spot on with Chapter Zero in 2013. In many ways it was a landmark in the band’s growth, The Senton Bombs honing their persistent embracing of varied flavours and styles into something which really set the band apart from the crowd. Various singles and the excellent Phantom High EP of 2014 saw the band pushing their fusion of hard and blues rock fired punk ‘n’ roll on again; their rousing and inventive stomps heavily nudging on worldwide awareness which this fourth album will surely only ignite.

Such its bold step forward from its predecessors in imagination and character, though hindsight shows the seeds were already openly audible in past releases, it took ears a first listen to get to grips with the Ronnie Bomb produced encounter. From there though, it was full steam ahead as body and imagination got eagerly involved with the album’s dramatic roar which starts with recent single Trailblazer. From its initial percussive coaxing, spicy grooves spiral out, wrapping eager ears as rhythms add their thick thump. The potent start is soon stirred up further by the recognisable grainy vocal tones of bassist Joey Class and his bass’ similarly familiar throaty sound. Equally, the imaginative twists and turns which emerge as melodic calms and clean vocals collude with fiery expulsions and energetic tenacity only increase the song’s potency. Further encasing ears in a blues lined sonic web cast by guitarists Damien Kage and Johnny Gibbons, the great track is a pungent hint of things to come with its entwining of unpredictable and dynamically varied textures.

art_RingMasterReviewMainstream comes next, a track already soaked in acclaim as a single last year. It opens on similar blues laced grooves to its predecessor, they entangling the rampant swings of drummer Scott Mason before things relax a touch as bass grooves join those of the guitars and Class’ always alluring and anthemic vocal delivery. Rising strands of creative theatre and rousing energy adds to the brewing drama and contagion of the track, the album itself increasingly gripping an already eager appetite as it heads towards an even headier plateau through the following pair of Train Wreck and Out West. The first of the two grips ears straight away through Mason’s rolling beats alone; only increasing its persuasion as flirtatious riffs and grooves joins the rapacious energy fuelling a rockabilly courting slice of bracing rock ‘n’ roll. Like Turbonegro meets The Pirates, the track has the body bouncing and appetite greedy before its successor explores a melodic and emotively enticing landscape. The song is as virulently catchy as anything on the album but takes the band into new creative scenery with its melody evocative and emotively inspired alternative rock balladry with a definite Midnight Oil feel to it.

The album’s title track strolls boldly in next, its feisty punk ‘n’ roll a rebel rousing exploit for body and spirit led by the scything beats of Mason and Class’s attitude soaked tones. The track is simply rock ‘n’ roll to lose control to, a mosh pit inciter and rebellion instigator which just needs to be the next single. Then again that can apply to numerous tracks within Mass Vendetta, as the contagion bulked 13 Days instantly proves. Riffs and hooks dig deep, anthemic vocal and energy infests, and rhythmic predation only excites as the track throws itself around like a creative dervish.

Allowing a breath to be taken, Avalanche saunters in next, sharing surf rock flames across its sultrily ambient skies and gravelly smouldering vocals. Unsurprisingly, the song also has an edge to its heart and creative nature which magnetically contrasts with the almost exotic hues and bracing emotion sharing their tempting.

Back to next single choices and the blazing romp that is Pretty Tricky makes a loud shout. Hard and punk rock meets classic and glam spiced rock ‘n’ roll, the track has feet involved by the end of its first torrent of chords and burst of rhythmic rampancy, the voice on board within the first round of the seriously addictive chorus.

Wedlock Horns brings another irresistible twist to the album, its reserved but eager entrance providing eighties rock/new wave flirtation from which Class and band swing with a southern blues infused revelry which again has restraint but stronger zeal in its lively heart. If without leading the body into bad habits, the song enthrals just like the folk punk lined Red Shield. With Class’ cleans tones as compelling as the lyrical drama and incitement, the track sublimely grips ears and imagination whilst sharing its emotive snarl.

Mass Vendetta closes with the highly enjoyable Apex, another imposing and predacious slab of infectious hard/punk rock brawling giving the album a rousing finale and the listener one last reason to hit the play button again. As in some ways expected, the band has moved on again in sound and invention but this time with their biggest leap in creative diversity and bravery yet. If it did not already, the world is about to know all about The Senton Bombs.

Mass Vendetta is released April 15th via 7Hard @ http://sentonbombs.com/store

http://www.sentonbombs.com/   https://www.facebook.com/thesentonbombs

Pete RingMaster 05/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Faintest Idea – Increasing The Minimum Rage

FI_RingMasterReview

Though understandably often tagged as a ska punk band, Faintest Idea definitely shows themselves to be a true punk band with a penchant for ska bred hip swinging revelry loaded with oi! inspired snarls upon new album Increasing The Minimum Rage. The eleven track stomp is an irresistible roar of politically charged songs that have no qualms in getting feet and bodies feverishly bouncing whilst thoughts and emotions are inspired by its lyrical bite. Most of all though, the British band’s new offering is simply one of the most rousing slabs of contagious rock ‘n’ roll heard in many belligerent moons and deserving of everyone’s energy and time.

Formed in 2008, the Kings Lynn hailing Faintest Idea initially was a jugular ripping punk band venting their political unrest and distrust. That attitude and defiance has never lessened even as the band began weaving in inspirations taken from two-tone, ska and reggae influences. 2013 saw the release of debut album The Voice of Treason on Manchester’s TNS Records to swift acclaim, soon potently backed by the videos for tracks such as Bull In A China Shop and Youth. Live the band has equally become an essential great time for many, the “rudeboy street punks” taking their rousing presence to shows and festivals across Europe and the UK, including in 2014, a 10 date tour of Russia.

Now the band is ready to uncage a new infectious call to arms in the shape of the Hieronymous Melchers (Capdown, Citizen Fish, King Prawn and Snuff) recorded and Massimiliano Giorgini (Anti Flag, Rise Against, Alkaline Trio, Common Rider) mastered Increasing The Minimum Rage. Featuring guest contributions from Vic Ruggiero (The Slackers) and Sean Howe (Random Hand), the album quickly reveals Faintest Idea to have a grouchier fire in their creative belly and a sound at its heaviest and angriest, musically and lyrically, yet with no detriment to their instincts to swing and inflame the listener’s body. The first track, Circling The Drain opens on a theme setting sample as horns meander in the background. From there as a guitar adds its vague musing, the song grabs a breath and leaps into a captivating stroll with Jack’s choppy riffs colluding with the flirtation of mischievous melodies amidst organ shared smiles. The brass flames of trumpeter Sara, trombonist Bobble, and tenor saxophonist Lil dan add to the infection quickly grabbing ears and imagination, creating a rich platform for the snarling vocals of bassist Dani and his dark throated bassline. There is a snarl to Jack’s guitar enterprise too and a firm hand to the beats of the other Jack but as the song’s climate gets feistier and more agitated, a rampant swing stills drives it and the listener before it slipping straight into the equally irresistible Cocktails.

Faintest-Idea-Front-Cover_RingMasterReviewThe second track similarly bounds through ears with rhythms and riffs as inescapable bait and a virulent catchiness to its energy and attitude equally matched by the band’s vocals. Throughout hooks grip and again flirt with the imagination as the song’s skittish gait takes care of the body, vocals in turn challenging thoughts at the same time as brass unveils a rich seducing in something akin to Rancid meets Random Hand meets The Members. Its mellowing departure simply simmers into the sultry embrace of Down Pressure, a funk infested and ska fuelled romp as light on its feet as it is antagonistic in voice. As its predecessors, the song defies the listener not to become fully involved, dares them not to offer their hips and support; a challenge impossible to win as the song leaps around with kinetic persuasion.

The power pop/ska punk exploits of Echo Chambre steals attention next, working its addictive charm on every aspect of a willing disciple as guitar jangles and pop punk rhythms act as ringleaders to another thrilling proposal embracing smouldering brass and lively shadows furthered nurtured by Dani’s vocal attitude. Its tenacious exploits lead to the thick energy and aggression of The Well Has Run Dry which, from its first breath, is a confrontational proposition equipped with spiky hooks and a flaming melodic coaxing courtesy of guitar and some emotive lip prowess. United it stirs up air and emotions before the outstanding Stick Em Up (Lords of War) takes a stand with its punk ‘n’ roll contagion. As jazzy and funky as it is ska and old school punk spun, the track tantalises and badgers in sound and tone. Female vocals bring a B52s spice to certain parts whilst other times the song rumbles along like a mix of early Specials and The Adicts, revealing itself as another enjoyably multi-textured adventure.

Through the Clash/ Serious Drinking like chest beating of the beguiling Throw Away The Key and the ballsy rock ‘n’ roll of No Consequences, greed and thick enjoyment for the album is only confirmed before being given another big shot in the arm by the brilliant pairing of Ouroboros and Corporation. The first of the two is a web of flavours and styles as surf rock spiced guitars entangle with ska spawned riffs and intrigue loaded progressive punk grooves whilst Dani and co take potent shots at political and social injustices. The track is glorious and swiftly matched by the dramatic theatre of its successor. With vaudevillian prowess to a sinister soaked sound, the band bring the exploits of the song’s villainous title protagonist into panto-esque but certainly not trivialised view before descending upon them with oi! fuelled animosity and anthemic incitement. The track is ingenious; pure creative theatre and heading numerous memorable moments within the album.

Closing on Tightrope with its strongly brooding persuasion of sound and imagination, Increasing The Minimum Rage makes it so easy to say it is destined to be one of the year’s highlights. From start to finish it has every aspect of the listener enthralled and involved; only increasing that hold with subsequent plays whilst showing that to stand up and be counted does not have to see an absence of unbridled fun.

Increasing The Minimum Rage is released via TNS Records on 1st April @ http://tnsrecords.bandcamp.com/album/increasing-the-minimum-rage

http://www.facebook.com/faintestidea   http://www.twitter.com/faintestidea   http://faintestidea.bigcartel.com/

Pete RingMaster 31/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Orielles – Jobin EP

orielles_RingMasterReview

Following an especially successful 2015, British surf pop trio, The Orielles, are ready to bring the same romancing of ears and imagination to this year with the seriously tantalising Jobin EP. Consisting of three slices of the band’s increasingly acclaimed blend of sultry melodies, bewitching harmonies, and feverish flavours bound in lo-fi beauty, the EP beguiles and inflames the senses whilst hinting that 2016 can be just as big if not greater in the band’s emerging history as its predecessor.

The Orielles began early 2013, the result of a house party and the creative uniting of sisters Esme and Sid Hand-Halford and friend Henry Wade. It was not to be an immediate launch into active duty as the girls only began learning their instruments from that point but with inspirations coming from riot grrrl and California surf bands, the Halifax trio were soon working on songs and honing their creative exploration. Since then, well-received tracks and releases has reinforced their rising reputation as a live proposition with 2015 especially potent as The Orielles drew big doses of acclaim at festivals such as Dot To Dot, Live At Leeds, and Liverpool Sound City as well as their individual shows.

orielles art_RingMasterReviewWith a UK tour in motion and a host of other events lined up, the band is set to be as busy as ever with the strong potential of greater success and praise heading their way just taking Jobin as a cue. It opens with its title track grabbing ears with an instant bait of crisp beats from Sid and the siren-esque lure of Henry’s seductive grooves. Their winding tendrils continue to entice and vein the rhythmic potency of the song, Esme’s bassline as captivating and alluring as her magnetic vocals and the surrounding celestial harmonies. The melodic character of the song has a House Of Love hue to its tempting with a psych rock flavouring only adding to the overall richness and raw yet elegant climate of the spellbinding track.

Twin Freaks is equally as compelling as it settles into a sweltering landscape with thick shadows to its evocative tone and inventive depth. Led by the almost flirtatious stroll of bass, there is an immediate infectiousness which is keenly shared by the vines of surf rock enterprise cast by Henry and the siren-esque quality of the vocals; both resonating in ears and memory as potently as the virulent charm and touch of the song.

The EP closing Sliders is the most feisty and energetic of the three tracks with tenacious beats and a vivacious energy stoking its melodic fire and anthemic gait. There is a punk rock scent to its revelry too, a touch of eighties band the Mo-dettes joining hues reminding of bands like The Raveonettes and Throwing Muses though being organically cultured in surf rock, the song emerges as something openly distinct to The Orielles.

Robed in discord tinged melodies, equipped with vociferous guitar, and basking in soaring harmonies, Jobin is a release which truly lingers in the memory. It is the persistent bringer of great pleasure and a strong nudge to pay close attention to the continuing and enthralling emergence of The Orielles.

The Jobin EP is released April 1st via DIY label Art is Hard. It will be available @ http://artishardrecords.bandcamp.com/album/jobin-ep as a 7″ flexi-disc featuring lead track Jobin, a 20 page colouring book zine illustrated by Alex Gamsu Jenkins and a download code for the full 3 track EP.

https://www.facebook.com/theorielles   https://soundcloud.com/theorielles

The Orielles – Upcoming UK dates:

APRIL

2nd READING Oakford Social Club

3rd BRISTOL Lousiana

9th LONDON Flying Vinyl Festival

MAY

1st LIVERPOOL Festevol

AUGUST

5th TUNBRIDGE WELLS Forgotten Fields Festival

Pete RingMaster 31/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Combomatix – Chinese Songs For Bad Boys

Combomatix_RingMasterReview

We have it on good authority that there is a very healthy and thriving garage rock scene in Rennes; the city already the hottest place in France right now for the genre’s raw rock ‘n’ roll. If Chinese Songs For Bad Boys is anything to go by, we can only take such claims as a potent and truthful description of things there right now. The new album from Combomatix, it is an exhilarating and galvanic ten track roar of rousing incitement which is deliciously raw, at times primal, and persistently a volcanic consumption of the senses. It leaves exhaustion and ripe pleasure in its wake with a body littered with inescapable imagination sculpted hooks and fuelled by an impassioned energy which soaks every bold note and snarling syllable.

Formed in 2008, Combomatix is the creative union of Charmes Samson and Ian Carnage. Since exploding forward, the pair has become one of France’s very best garage punk propositions. A clutch of EPs and a self-titled debut album have made potent marks on attention and appetites as too a live presence which is used to eager plaudits. Now with the keyboard devilry of Laure adding to the spicy, volatile fun of Chinese Songs For Bad Boys, Combomatix and their voracious sound is ready to stir up a far bigger landscape with their ravenously devilish rock ‘n’ roll.

The album opens on the electronic horn of Intro, a dark herald for the devilment to follow starting with Another Shakin. Instantly beats and riffs unite in a feisty shuffle; an uninhibited flinging of sound quickly joined by just as grainy and attitude loaded vocals. The great Hammond-esque tone of the keys emerges from within the persistent blues scented rock ‘n’ roll nagging with a touch of Stones like suggestiveness, their invitation simply adding to the rest of the lures expelled by song and band.

ChineseSongForBadBoys_RingMasterReviewA great full start is quickly eclipsed by the sultry surf rock spiced throes of Chinese Thought. It has a slightly eccentric character which blossoms under the imaginative enterprise of keys and guitar before throwing a surprise and twisting into a dirty garage rock bred stomp. Hazy and very agreeably grimy in its tone and textures, the track is a bracing contagion immediately surpassed by the glorious devilry of Wet Bones. Just as raw and insatiable, the track is a tempest of rhythms and irritable vocals amidst another fiercely enticing sonic web bringing a In The Whale/ Love Buzzard like infestation of ears and spirit. There is something about rock ‘n’ roll duos (at times trios in this case) which without fuss get to the core of their sound and the instincts of the listener; they just strap on and swing from the passions, and it is no better epitomised than by this rousing incitement.

If there is a prize for most addictive and virulent hook on the album, it gets given to the irrepressible asset of I’m On It. At the track’s heart, it is a delicious badgering of the senses by the guitar, its controlled but undeterred picking at ears and appetite matched by less vocal but just as flavoursome bass bait. The accompanying swagger is just as irresistible whilst sonic detours only add greater fuel, along with the raspy vocals, to one fiercely flirtatious temptation.

Never Cut The Wire has feet and hips moving with eager energy next, courtesy of its rapacious garage punk endeavours as the surf seeded coaxing of keys gets to grips with the imagination before Take A Ride offers a voraciously catchy slice of blues lined garage rock pop with frenetic beats and rebellious riffs. The magnetic tendril of melodic acidity is the icing on its slight Mobbs like romp and a kinetic persuasion more than matched by the incendiary Guinea Pig. Rhythms need barely seconds to have energetic involvement on board whilst riffs and hooks collude to enslave hips and limbs as forcibly as it has emotions and a greedy lust in tow.

The song is manna for physical and emotional lust; a quality pushed further by the tenacious sonic niggling and fevered resourcefulness of I Got Pills. You will need meds to recover from its psych rock meets noise/garage punk sorcery, either to relax after it commands your body like a puppeteer or to overcome its sinister psychosis that, admittedly very welcomingly, gets right under the skin.

The album closes with the psychedelically off-kilter and salacious shenanigans of I’ll Make You Mad; a track born of a kaleidoscope of funk tainted garage and rock ‘n roll seeded flavours with an expressive sixties/seventies flavoured dressing. Arguably the most involved and adventurous song on the album, it is a mighty conclusion and another major highlight within only lofty thrills across Chinese Songs For Bad Boys.

It took little time for Combomatix to become firm favourites and in turn provide a truly refreshing and galvanic moment for 2016. Fun and exhaustion, what could be better!

Chinese Songs For Bad Boys is out digitally and on Limited edition 12”vinyl now through Howlin Banana Records and Retard Records and also @ https://howlinbananarecords.bandcamp.com/album/chinese-songs-for-bad-boys

https://www.facebook.com/Combomatix-119016974834926

Pete RingMaster 16/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Witching Waves – Crystal Café

Photo by David Garcia

Photo by David Garcia

Of the albums most anticipated by our particular ears was one from UK duo Witching Waves. They had us on line with their ltd edition cassette Concrete/Chain Of Command in 2014 and inescapably hooked with debut album Fear Of Falling Down later that same year but things have just got contagiously fiercer and even more sonically fascinating courtesy of their second full-length Crystal Café. It is a stunning roar of sonic and emotional dissonance fuelled by cutting hooks and feverish melodies, and that is not to forget the ever darkly mesmeric and often challenging lure of the vocals.

A mix of corrupted psych and surf rock fever with punk and post punk attitude, the Witching Waves’ sound mighty be better suggested by casting it as a union of the punk antagonism of The Raincoats and the garage punk ‘n’ roll devilry of The Creeping Ivies in collusion with the raw and virulent off-kilter pop of The Adult Net , Morningwood, and Delta 5. To be truthful, the London band has a sound which has always been its own individual but now forcibly so on Crystal Café. Intrigue for what the band will reveal next is always company to eager anticipation and indeed expectations, and it was no exception this time around, especially with the duo of founding members, vocalist/guitarist Mark Jaspar and vocalist Emma Wigham, having grown by one with the addition of bassist Ed Shellard since that previous impressive album.

Crystal Café opens up with Twister, a song shedding drama with its first surge of guitar. As it hits a heady stride with scything beats lining the brooding bassline of Shellard, the track has ears and imagination onside with ease, even more so as the siren like tones of Wigham collude with Jaspar’s sonic tendrils, all hot spice and raw flirtation. Not for the last time, a scent of The Cure certainly hits the rhythmic side of a song, adding appealing hues which engagingly merge with the fiery enterprise of guitar and voice.

art_RingMaster ReviewThe outstanding start continues in the concussively seductive Seeing Double, a roar of scuzzy guitar and alluring vocals with a sniff of almost Xmal Deutschland like post punk coldness. It is a grouchy encounter, epitomised by Jaspar’s aggressive vocal outbursts, but simultaneously also a raw melodic enticement which simply grips the imagination.

The following Pitiless uncages an anthemic rumble of rhythms as Wigham’s captivating vocals get entangled in the citric lines of just as compelling guitar spawned imagination. Juicy hooks are as frequent as searing sonic endeavour, being caught up in a bracing infectiousness which has the body jerking and senses wilting, though they do get respite from the alluring repetition sculpted instrumental Red Light Loop that follows. It is the first of a few imagination sparking interludes, a break before the raw trespass of contagion continues, in this case with Make It Up. There is a Wire like quality to the song which only adds to the pop catchy theatre that evolves to seriously excite and involve the listener. The track is as irresistible as a fondle in the shadows; offering a warm moment of pop slavery in the senses whilst they get intruded upon by the dissonance soaked soundscape of the album.

Anemone spreads a portentously melancholic instrumental breeze next, its starkly lit prowl a rising smog of discord as invasive as it is intimidatingly bewitching. The track sets up ears and imagination for The Threat, it a melodically cultured temper to the previous trespass with its boisterous surges of muscular beats and flowing vocal warmth over less kind but as riveting grooves. It too brews into a swarming sonic assault but without losing any of the pungent temptation it began coaxing ears with before the brazen temptress that is the excellent Red Light wraps its raw hunger and salacious beauty all over the listener.

The scathing sonic air and vocal angst of Receiver then takes over, its Jaspar voiced tempest bold exploration of the senses with underlying seduction added by the harmonies of Wigham, whilst after its pleasing encroachment and the evocative caress of instrumental Inoa, the album comes to a mighty close with new single Flowers. Wrapping around a glorious bassline echoing early Cure as crisp beats descend with resonating effect, strings of melodies and atmospheric suggestiveness come together, in turn swiftly joined by a dual smooch of vocals to captivate and entrance to which Wigham further adds her spellbinding lures. As seductive and inviting as it is, the track equally offers a host of descriptive shadows and sonic discordance that fester in thoughts and emotions to fine effect.

The track is an enthralling end to a simply superb release; another from Witching Waves and easily their finest moment yet. Hopefully this time around, the band gets the attention and surge of fresh appetites for their unique sound which previous releases warranted but Crystal Café demands and deserves.

Crystal Café is available on vinyl, cassette, and digital download from released February 26th via Soft Power in the UK and HHBTM Records in the USA.

https://www.facebook.com/witchingwaves   http://witchingwaves.tumblr.com/

Pete RingMaster 26/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Dick Venom & the Terrortones – SnakeOil for Snakes

Dick Venom_RingMaster Review

Eagerly awaited and as rascally salacious and creatively lecherous as hoped, SnakeOil for Snakes shows exactly why for a great many, Dick Venom & the Terrortones is THE essential British rock ‘n’ roll band. The band’s debut album is a web of flirtation and riot of rhythmic agitation bound up in vats of garage punk contagion posing as songs. It is manna for the insane and inspiration for the lascivious, but most of all, the album is punk ‘n’ roll to get a nation and continent romping.

Formed in 2010 by the inimitable Dick Venom, the Nottingham hailing band has left a fevered trail and reputation behind their live presence, an acclaim infected assault matched in plaudits by their increasingly impressive releases. Aside their own sweaty live stomps, the band has shared stages with the likes of The Meteors, The Rezillos, Bad For Lazarus, Demented Are Go, Lawnmower Deth, The Radiacs, Vince Ray & The Boneshakers, and Savage Messiah amongst a great many whilst first EP RockinRollin VampireMan set the trend for luring strong reactions and praise. Invasion Of The Spider Queen in 2013 only increased awareness and the band’s fan base, with last year’s EP The MonsterPussy Sessions nudging broader spotlights to match the band’s new step forward in sound. Yet another plateau of trash punk invention and pleasure has been breached by SnakeOil for Snakes, its crowd of dirty rock ‘n’ roll bred tracks the kind of thing addiction was invented for.

cover_RingMaster Review     With Wrex St.Clair, Dusty Vegas, and Stevie Vee alongside, Dick Venom is soon infesting ears with his distinctive and zealous tones, leaping forward from the choppy riff toothed entrance of Gun of a Tongue. The opener is soon into an eager stride, interrupting its jagged scenery with glam rock enterprise and sonic mischief. The Rezillos were mentioned earlier and there is an air of the Scottish band as the song bounds into the passions with its garage punk/rockabilly revelry.

I Can’t Find my BrainCell swiftly keeps attention and appetite engrossed and increasingly wanton for more straight after. As a thickly enticing bassline from St.Clair leads the virulence of the song, guitars spring tendrils of sonic temptation whilst beats roll along with a promiscuous tenacity. Venom as ever is a schizophrenic bundle of vocal imagination and rebelliousness, lauding over but only adding to the theatre of the track with his rousing energy, a success only repeated time and time again across SnakeOil for Snakes as shown quickly by TightPants (DoubleHeaded). Surf kissed strands of guitar spin their own irresistible weave as female vocals add a great snarl alongside Venom’s. The song despite its edge is more restrained than the previous pair of songs but just as fiercely catchy and impressive in its fifties rock hooks and tangy melodic imagination.

Three tracks in and it is fair to say that building from the potent inventive base of The MonsterPussy Sessions, the band has honed hooks to be more barbed and gripping with roars even more anthemic and rousing as ideas…well they are shaped by even greater ferocious imagination. Taken from that last EP, Dead Deadbeat Delinquent first time around was proof of a greater adventure being forged and even now, as an old well known friend, it holds the same rich enticement amongst just as devilishly imperious tracks. With bass and guitar bouncing around with slim yet inescapable addictive post/garage punk lures as the beats of Vegas rumble with the senses, the song is primal seduction; everything from toes to emotions quickly recruited and eagerly involved in its fresh psychosis of sound and maniacal enterprise.

Shimmering grooves from Vee welcome ears in next up FFFunny Kinda Luvin, the song’s winy nectar of temptation framed by more inciting rhythms and the measured vocal rowdiness of Venom. Bass and drums subsequently create a tribal enticing as sonic hues smoulder and grow into bedlamic invention around them, it all strung together by a prime hook which even in its absence within the proposal seems to weave rich magic on lustful emotions.

Dirty rock ‘n’ roll colours the walls of Last DumbDregs of Dragsvile after that, essences of The Stooges merging with something akin to The Spits feistily pleasing ears, whilst Go Fuck on the Sidewalk gets garage punk funky with its Cramps meets The Ghastly Ones tango. Both tracks thrill and lead to forceful hip swinging, especially the second of the pair before things get scuzzy with Do The Mash. Though not quite living up to its predecessors, certainly in swift convincing, the track soon boils with its fire of spicy guitar and robust rhythms courted by Venom at his most grouchy and gruff yet.

Taunting with an initial coaxing which surely is a distant relation to something the Knack might have conjured, No Good to get Up To thrills as it spills its intoxicating devilment next. Bluesy to the air, punk rock to the growl, the track prowls and stomps around with attitude and intimidation, igniting another wave of greed from the appetite along the way. It is success emulated by the gloriously lustful seduction of Planet of the HoneyFuzz. Imagine Sweet as Turbonegro and then bound in The Phenomenauts contagion and you have a hint of this unique Dick Venom & The Terrortones treat of an infestation.

   MyWay or the DryWay saunters in next, rhythmic taps a lead into a gorgeous creeping of noir woven creative theatre, whereas Crypt Tonight is a throbbing of garage rock ‘n’ roll which throughout its surf embraced rhythmic meander and melodic shimmering, is like a tongue led insatiable kiss on the senses and passions.

A final trespass of deeply biting and lingering hooks amidst compelling vocal and sonic imagination brings the album to a riveting close, Get Fucked Up Good a brilliant libidinal enticing and entrapment of ears and equally lusty reactions and a sensational end to an album exciting in all departments. Hopes were high and demanding because of The MonsterPussy Sessions, but now left looking lightweight by SnakeOil for Snakes. Dick Venom & the Terrortones are ready to be spoken in the same breath of the garage punk greats yet it is still easy to feel we have still only tapped into the first layer or two of their devious majesty.

SnakeOil for Snakes is out now via Jailhouse Morgue digitally and on 12” vinyl @ http://terrortones.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/DickVenomandtheTerrortones  

http://www.dickvenom.com

Pete RingMaster 09/11/2015

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