Nine Dart Finish – The Misadventures of…

Nine Dart Finish is a British outfit drawing on the wide influences of the likes of Weezer, Supergrass, Queen, and Ian Dury for their pop fuelled rock ‘n’ roll; The Misadventures of… is their debut album which unapologetically has the body bouncing as fun floods every pour of its magnetic enterprise. The trio from Birmingham has already lured potent attention from fans and media alike with a handful of singles especially potent; appetites for their boisterous sound which their first album can only multiply.

Consisting of former Coffeeshop member in lead vocalist/bassist Daz Yardley, guitarist/vocalist Christopher Mobbs, and drummer Andy Proudman, Nine Dart Finish first drew ears with debut EP Fall To Pieces late 2015. Since then their hook loaded pop ‘n’ rock has grown and become more creatively mischievous by the song. The Misadventures of… brings all the enticing dynamics and lusty grooves of the band’s sound as well as those devilish hooks the threesome seems to instinctively conjure together in one rousing enjoyable place.

Bringing the lively antics of recent singles, highlights of that first EP and new tracks together in one captivating union, The Misadventures of… roars into view with the outstanding The Cut of Your Jib. The track is wild rock ‘n’ roll, almost feral in its energy as riffs and rhythms harry ears just as eager vocals blaze. As the album continues it is easy to see why certain tracks were chosen and potent as singles and teases for the full-length but for personal tastes it is tracks like the raucous rock bred opener which trapped the keenest attention and passions. With a touch of Queens of the Stone Age to its contagious tempest, the track is a garage rock lined clamour getting the album off to a magnificent start.

The following Fall to Pieces is a far calmer proposition as a melodic jangle colludes with vocal harmonies before the track settles into its warm catchy swing. There is no preventing the quick shuffle of feet to its stroll, keys adding to its summery scent as vocals and melodies entangle before In the City uncages its own rock ‘n’ roll flame. Within its slightly rawer attack, hooks tease and tempt as riffs nag, Proudman’s beats striking with relish as they drive the infectious escapade.

Recent single Kicking & Screaming is next, a song which blossomed by the listen as its organic rumble aligns to melodic enticement. The former gives the otherwise gentle seduction a volatility which imposes without truly erupting, a combination gripping ears within a grunge pop like proposal while Charlie Bonkers offers up a melody woven slice of Brit Pop nurtured enterprise. It is fair to say that the song did not impact as potently as those around it on our tastes yet as honest to admit it had the hips swinging and vocal chords playing without any trouble.

You Don’t Bother Me similarly did not quite grab as strongly as many of its companions with its sixties hued pop but again involvement in its enticement was unavoidable as with the blues kissed rock of Falling for You. Both tracks epitomises the band’s knack at weaving varied and seriously catchy adventures though each is swiftly overshadowed by the album’s finest moment consisting of its final three songs.

From its initial melodic caresses Fabio’s Overture blossoms into a truly mesmeric slice of pop rock, emotive strands in voice and sound entangling another lure of virulent catchiness as inescapable whether the song is ablaze or simply smouldering. Its thick enticement leads into the rousing devilry of You’re so Cool. As again pop floods its bold rock ‘n’ roll, the track nags and taunts attention with relish. With something of UK duo The Sea about it, the track is superb rivalling the opener for best song honours though they are equally matched by the tenacious stomp of album closer London. There is a certain mod like hue to the song which only adds to its outstanding character and roar.

Though as mentioned there are some tracks which undoubtedly eclipsed others for us, The Misadventures of… is one thoroughly enjoyable involvement from start to finish. Nine Dart Finish have a sound with open growth in every new song so expect many more lustily fun times ahead as well as right now with their new offering.

The Misadventures of… is out now through iTunes and other stores.

http://ninedartfinish.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/NDFmusic/   https://twitter.com/ndfmusic

Pete RingMaster 17/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Asylums – Killer Brain Waves

Photo by the Cool Thing Records sparkplug Kana Waiwaiku

Photo by the Cool Thing Records sparkplug Kana Waiwaiku

Amongst the most highly anticipated releases this year here in the office, maybe the most eagerly awaited was the debut album from UK sonic punksters Asylums. Having been hooked on the Southend-on-Sea hailing quartet’s frenetic and devilish jangle since being infested by Wet Dream Fanzine EP within the first throes of 2015, a more than keen and impatient appetite has been brewing and now we can say it has been well worth the hours pacing the floor waiting for Killer Brain Waves.

Taking a snap at any and everything with a mischievous smile on their creative faces, band and release is the kind of sonic devilment ears and music were evolved for. Offering twelve tracks which flirt and bite, tease and seduce, with an imagination and eccentricity found in Bedlam, Killer Brain Waves announces Asylums as one of music’s most essential and even more so irresistibly thrilling propositions. It is a collection of songs within which sarcasm and discontent are frequent visitors as too a virulent dose of humour and fun driven imagination. Musically, Asylums recall in heart and enterprise the likes of Swell Maps, The Dickies, and Supergrass. At times essences also remind of bands such as Weezer and We Are The Physics but as shown a dozen times over, all are hues in a devilry uniquely Asylums.

art_RingMasterReviewMixing a handful of treats from their previous EPs/singles with new slices of angular revelry, the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Luke Branch, guitarist Jazz Miell, drummer Henry Tyler, and bassist Michael Webster open up Killer Brain Waves with the mighty Second Class Sex. Its first breath brings a senses swamping tide of meaty rhythms and nagging riffs engaged in a toxicity of sound which simply infests the psyche. Though its spreads its body into a more expansive tempting, that energy never diminishes. Webster’s bass groans and growls in ears; a great lure matched by the swinging intent of Tyler as the swirling sonic seduction of the guitars lay their trap. With vocals just as potent and a touch of White Noise era XTC to the mix, it is a stunning start to the release, and one not losing a beat as I’ve Seen Your Face In a Music Magazine steps up next.

The second track is just as eager to invade body and thoughts, using a lower gear energy wise as a spicy wiry groove entangles ears and rhythms cast in another rousing and pulsating enticement. Melody and discord court the outstanding tone and delivery of Branch, each adding to the glorious trespass with a tangy hook just icing on the cake. New wave meets pop punk to give some clue to its ingenuity, the song departs so Joy In a Small Wage can share its ‘mellower’ charms. The track almost floats over the listener, keys washing its path though equally there is a darker edge in tone and another beguiling bassline to keep song and ears on their toes. That Weezer reference is arguably at its most potent here but again the result is, within a near perfect pop song, something belonging only to one band.

Bad Influence rumbles as it croons next, plaintive vocals and dirty riffs aligning with a heavy bass enticing to create another epidemic of swinging enterprise before the even more magnificent Wet Dream Fanzine leaps in. It is impossible not to join in with every Asylums song, and especially with this gem. Hips and instincts are grabbed straight away by the opening hook and swinging rhythms, vocal chords soon after as Branch leads a jangle of rhythmic agitation and funk infested bouncing clad in another fiercely tantalising weave of Miell’s sonic invention. A favourite since its appearance on that same named EP last year, the song continues to ignite tingles; as too the following The Death of Television. A nest of sonic vipers and stabbing beats, all with rebellious intent in their hearts, the song is one minute and twenty six seconds of creative agitation demanding similarly off kilter movement and involvement in return for its rare incitement.

The heavy punk ‘n’ roll of Monosyllabic Saliva comes next, its body a prowling beast tempered perfectly by the harmonic quality of Branch’s voice. Fuzzy with a thick feel to its atmosphere, the track is a brooding slice of pop rock veined by the ever insistent grooves and sonic tendrils escaping the guitars. Its dark tone is contrasted by the pop punk saunter of Born To Not Belong, a song which feels like it’s an already known friend as it makes its first proposal but simultaneously adds another string to the albums creative harp.

Necessary Appliances soon has ears greedy, the song twisting and turning with a more conservative sound compared to its companions but still unveiling a tapestry of imagination fuelled endeavour before Sunday Commuters and Missing Persons keep the thrills going. The first of the pair is another more controlled slice of pop rock with great sixties inspired harmonies taking the listener on a stroll of excitable rhythms and fuzz lined tempting while the second seduces with its Weezer/Supergrass hued canter around another commanding bassline and crisply landed beats.

The album closes with the outstanding punk raw challenge of Slacker Shopper, a grouchy and thickly aired proposal which as so many just hits the spot. The band’s most aggressive and irritable offering yet, it is a brilliant end to Killer Brain Waves providing a final new shade to their sound and invention, one we hope to hear more of. There is also a hidden track which we will call Butterfly just because the word is repeated most often. It too shows a fresh side to the Asylums sound; imagine the Beach Boys or Walker Brothers doing shoegaze and you get a hint of the great extra gift within the album.

We expected good things from Asylums with Killer Brain Waves but the album simply out does any expectations with ease. For fans and newcomers, Asylums and their first full-length are simply a must.

Killer Brain Waves is our now via Cool Thing Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/killer-brain-waves/id1105949093 and other stores.

http://www.asylumsband.com   https://www.facebook.com/asylumsuk   https://twitter.com/Asylumsband

Pete RingMaster 24/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Paradigm – Realize EP

Paradigm Promo Shot _RingMasterReview

Offering four tracks which either hit the ground running with ears and imagination or simply blossom into just as potent propositions over subsequent listens, it is fair to say that the Realize EP is one attention commanding debut. The first EP from London trio Paradigm, it is a striking introduction to a UK rock band already stirring up strong words of acclaim.

With its initial seeds sown when vocalist/guitarist Alex Blake met drummer Angel D at school where they exchanged a Nirvana album and instantly became best friends, Paradigm truly stepped forward with a line-up completed by bassist/pianist Giulio Granchelli. Honing their sound whilst earning swift and potent reputation for their live presence, the band eventually hit the studio where producers John Cornfield (Muse, Oasis, Robert Plant, New Model Army, Supergrass) and Paul Corkett (The Cure, Bjork, Placebo, Nick Cave), after recording the EP with the band, announced that “This is one of the most fresh and exciting modern rock bands we‘ve produced!”

Realize opens with the instantly impressing Desire, a track which has the listener’s physical and emotional involvement on broad with little time or effort. Riffs and rhythms create a united coaxing further enhanced by spicy grooves and the quickly compelling and throaty bassline cast by Granchelli. As melodies add sultry temptation, the dark tones of Blake steal their big portion of attention, his presence already being described as Nick Cave-esque, and understandably so listening to the opener.  It is an enthralling persuasion catching further alight with its rousing chorus and volatile emotive energy. Every twist brings a new spice to enjoy, keys pulsating with an enterprise as resourceful and magnetic as the drama fuelled hooks and collusion of vocals cast across the band.

Paradigm Cover Artwork _RingMasterReviewThe stunning start is closely matched by Your Darker Side. It is a less intensive affair but just as rich in melodic tempting and creative imagination. Many bands have been offered up as an attempt to describe Paradigm’s individual sound; Muse, 30 Seconds to Mars, U2 among them but we suspect everyone will find out their own unique comparisons, as here the song reminds these ears of The Fatima Mansions and Teardrop Explodes as much as anyone else, a Julian Cope air also seemingly lacing Blake’s again impressing tones and delivery. The thrilling and highly infectious song itself proceeds to build crescendos of energy and intensity, each erupting seamlessly into anthemic roars and gentler hugs of expressive sound.

To reveal another shade to their songwriting and sound, the sombre yet fiery Strangers has a Walker Brothers air to it at times, going on to unveil a grungier presence leading up to and for its tempestuous chorus. Pete Wylie also comes to mind across the song, but as suggested each will hear their own references such the thickness and depth of the Paradigm sound and invention. Fusing various strains of rock, past and present, the song fascinates as much as its catchy qualities seduce, and though it does not leap on the passion as swiftly as its predecessors, Strangers has them just as greedily hooked in time

The same with closing track The Miracle. Its theatre of sound and emotion sees the poetic hues of a piano aligning with almost orchestral like drama, an imaginative blend needing longer to explore and get into but emerging as another easy to embrace proposal if admittedly not quite to the same strength as the previous three on personal tastes. Nevertheless the band only impresses individually and as a single thick flirtation of the senses.

Paradigm have announced their presence in big, bold, and at times breath-taking style with Realize so expect to hear much more from and of this potential bulging band.

The Realize EP is released April 8th through Sumind Records across all stores.

http://www.paradigmofficial.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Paradigmcomprock    https://twitter.com/paradigmrealize

Pete RingMaster 06/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

deardarkhead – Strange Weather

DDH_RingMasterReview

Rousingly fascinating is probably the best way to describe Strange Weather, the new EP from New Jersey trio deardarkhead, that and gloriously suggestive. Across six tracks as cinematic as they are emotionally intimate upon the imagination, band and release immerses the listener in its and their own sculpted exploits. The release is an anthem to the conjuring of bold imaginative adventures and a tapestry of creative virulence for ears to bask in.

The beginnings of deardarkhead go way back to 1988 since when the band has released five recordings on their own Fertile Crescent Records label with a retrospective of their early work additionally released in 2012 by Captured Tracks. Their distinctive fusion of post punk, indie rock, shoe gaze, and dream pop has been greedily devoured by an increasing many whilst their live presence has seen the band play with the likes of Supergrass, The Psychedelic Furs, Everclear and The Lilys amongst numerous other. Despite numerous compilation appearances, and that 2011 retrospective  Oceanside: 1991-1993 since last album Unlock the Valves of Feeling was released in 1998, you might say that deardarkhead have been a ‘forgotten’ treat by many; if so that is set to inescapably change with the release of Strange Weather.

Always luring inquiring interest with each release, the band has probably ignited the strongest intrigue with the new EP as it is their first without long time singer/bassist Michael Amper who left the band in 2009. His departure only seemed to ignite a hunger to explore their instrumental side as remaining members, guitarist Kevin Harrington and drummer Robert Weiss proceeded to move in that direction and perform instrumental shows after linking up with bassist Kevin McCauley the following year. The suggestion is that the band is looking for the right vocalist to bring in but on the evidence of Strange Weather, and its empowering potency, you wonder if it will be any loss not finding the right man.

art_RingMasterReviewFrom its first track Strange Weather has ears and emotions enthralled, the imagination just as swiftly ignited as Falling Upward emerges from chilling winds within a dank atmosphere. It is pulled from the wasteland by a nagging guitar, its sonic lure soon colluding with the resonating bait of the bass and crispy textured beats. With them comes a tenacious catchy resourcefulness which infectiously lines the post punk hook and bass groove which subsequently entwine and enslave ears. All the tracks to the EP spark ideas and mental imagery, ones sure to differ person to person, but a cold war like landscape is ours adventure for the opener no doubt helped by having recently watched Deutschland 83. There feels a cinematic kinship between the band’s sound and those visuals with every leap into the sonic tapestry of the song pushing the story along.

With a touch of Leitmotiv to it, the track is a riveting start, leaving ears and pleasure lively and ready to embrace the warmer jangle of Sunshine Through The Rain which follows. There is a calmer air altogether to the song, a melodic radiance which wears the scent of eighties indie pop yet contrasts it with a steely proposal from bass and hypnotic beats. Again captivation is a given to its My Bloody Valentine aired persuasion though it is soon outshone by the thrills and dramas of both Juxta Mare and March Hares. The first of the pair unveils a sultry atmosphere around a delicious melodic hook and bassline which would not feel out of play of a sixties/seventies TV spy thriller. Its lean but thick lure is the spring for an evocative weave of sonic enterprise and suggestive melodies, all courted by the dark shadows of bass and the persistently jabbing swings of Weiss.

As outstanding as it is, it too gets eclipsed by its successor, March Hares stealing the whole show. From the pulsating rhythms of Weiss to the snarling tone of McCauley’s bass, the track has ears and an already lustful appetite enslaved. Their irresistible bait is then entangled in bewitching tendrils of sonic imagination from Harrington; the song subsequently swinging along in the web of their united craft and invention to entice body and spirit further. In full stride, the track has a great feel of The Monochrome Set to it, indeed Harrington’s stringed adventure carries a touch of the English band’s guitarist Lester Square to it as a House of Love shimmer and Birdland like rowdiness add to the slavery.

Ice Age immerses the listener into chillier post punk climes next; its nippy atmosphere and almost bleak ambience tempered by the sonic elegance seeping from the guitar within the anthemic tenacity of the drums. Again it is fair to say that the song lures physical and emotional involvement with ease before Thinking Back explores a maze of reflective melodies and evocative grooves within another addictive rhythmic frame. There is an essence of Echo & The Bunnymen and Bauhaus to the track as post punk and gothic lit shadows and depths spread through sound and thoughts.

The track is an imposingly mesmeric end to a spellbinding release. Strange Weather will have you breathless, excited, reflective, and going on a myriad of imagination bred adventures with its suggestive incitement. We are no experts on deardarkhead and their releases to date but the EP has to be up there as possibly their greatest moment yet.

The Strange Weather EP is released March 25th via Saint Marie Records on Ltd Edition vinyl (100 Black / 150 White with Red Blue and Black splatter) and as a download @ http://saintmarierecords.limitedrun.com/products/567260-deardarkhead-strange-weather and http://saintmarierecords.bandcamp.com/album/strange-weather

http://www.deardarkhead.com/   https://www.facebook.com/darkheads   http://twitter.com/deardarkhead

Pete RingMaster 23/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Fuzzy Vox – No Landing Plan

Fuzzy Vox in Space

Fuzzy Vox in Space

Wondering how to spend the weekend to its fullest enjoyment? How about filling your home with suitable alcohol, inviting a horde of friends over, and turning the speakers high as the new album from Fuzzy Vox provides a party to remember. I should warn that weak hips will be put under serious stress in this pursuit of fun because No Landing Plan is one of the most energetically feverish and tenaciously insatiable incitements to hit ears and bodies in quite a while. A collection of songs bred on garage rock and power pop, the French band’s second album is pure rock ‘n’ roll virulence with a character as varied and demanding as the medical bills received after it has seduced bodies to exhaustion.

Hailing from Joinville le Pont, Fuzzy Vox is the devilment of vocalist/guitarist Hugo Fabbri, bassist Greg Dessons, and drummer Nico Maïa. Emerging in 2011, the band quickly awoke national ears with the release of first EP, Technicolor in the October of 2012, breaching broader attention with debut album On Heat early 2014. The past couple of years have been especially lively and successful for the trio; tours all over Europe building on the success of their album with a recent adventure alongside Jim Jones Revue & Thee Vicars one particular highlight. Fuelled by the punk DIY ethic which again sees their latest encounter a self-released proposition, Fuzzy Vox is now ready to dive into major spotlights wherever they can be found, and with No Landing Plan as their key, betting against the band hitting new peaks of attention to match the plateau set by the album is pointless.

Recorded in Los Angeles last summer with Andy Brohard and Ryan Castle (Primal Scream, Black Angels), who also mixed the album, No Landing Plan gets straight to devilish work with opener Explosion Of Love. From the first slither of feedback a sense of mischief is a foot, and quickly playing with ears as jabbing beats join a web of temptation cast by guitar with the bass in swift seductive union. Hugo’s vocals alone show the energy and passion running eagerly through the song and sound, hooks and choppy riffs building on it with their own addictive dexterity.

art_RingMaster ReviewIt is a rousing start eclipsed by the following Distracted. The garage rock of its predecessor takes a more sixties scent in the second song, The Stones an easy clue which unites with a more Hives like tenacity as the track blossoms its anthemic adventure. Again feet and hips are as much a blur of involvement as ears and appetite are hungry recipients of the increasingly dynamic mesh of contagious sound and sonic bait.

With Told You Before taking little time to stir limbs into action with its punk rock/power pop shenanigans, the album has body and soul lock ‘n’ loaded in its high octane revelry. Wiry grooves and melodic flames only add to the imagination’s subservience and remember that mention of exhaustion? Already the signs are there barely three songs in.

That variety in sound is also pushing through by now too, the scintillating Grow Evil exploring a lively rock pop prowl with a touch of The Jam meets The Dirtbombs to its almost carnal temptation whilst I Got A Girl bounces around in a power pop stomp drawn from both the sixties and seventies take on the infectious flavour. Both tracks are superb but outshone by the jagged rock ‘n’ roll of Bo Diddley, a song living up to the sound its title suggests whilst creating a catchy incitement of viral proportions.

The Jam comes to mind again as Don’t Leave Me Behind steps up next with its melodic rock ‘n’ roll, equally though, so does an open Elvis Costello inspiration. It is a blend when woven into the band’s own invention simply sparks up further keen endeavour with and within the track, and indeed Charlie once it takes over with its R&B laced pop romp. As easy as it is to get entangled and absorbed by the carnival of sound, lyrically the songs within No Landing Plan are just as potent and impacting, Charlie especially striking. That diversity of sound is also in full swing within the song alone, a float through crystalline ambience following a thrilling surge of Oliver’s Army spiced devilment, leading to another anthemic whipping up of feet and emotions.

Easy Street frolics in ears next with a swinging festivity of sound and voice whilst teasing like something akin to a pop punk version of Supergrass whilst A Reason To Love leaves the listener in the throes of ardour for its surf rock coated, rockabilly bloomed slice of punk ‘n’ roll carrying flames of Living End/Tiger Army in its imagination. As an example applying across the whole album, for the references offered they are mere clues to the Fuzzy Vox uniqueness which fuels all tracks to gripping success.

So get those dancing shoes on and corks popped because Fussy Vox has one memorable weekend, indeed any moment in time you wish, ready and waiting courtesy of No Landing Plan.

No Landing Plan is available from February 26th  from most online stores.

http://fuzzyvox.com/    https://www.facebook.com/fuzzyvox   http://www.twitter.com/fuzzyvox

Pete RingMaster 26/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Token Joker – Just Part of the System

Photo courtesy of Meg Hope Photography

If you are looking for a tasty slab of rock ‘n’ roll to take around with you in the heat of summer this year, then lock in your mp3 players, grab the Just Part of the System EP from UK rockers Token Joker, and unite the two. The four track encounter is a magnetic and invigorating slice of sonic enterprise to while away the day with whilst revealing exactly why the Devon quintet is beginning to create a stir in the UK rock scene.

Not much more than a year since the band emerged, Token Joker has been on a determined course and potent rise reaching a first pinnacle with the forthcoming release of their debut EP. Before its creation though, the Dawlish hailing band has grabbed plenty of attention for the melody rich, hook loaded songs of lead vocalist Leon Welsh and rhythm guitarist/vocalist Matt Coleman. Within weeks of stepping from the shadows, the band found itself courted by a London promotion company which led to their playing the O2 Academy Islington. This was followed by shows with bands such as of The Tricks, The Others, and The Beaches as well as appearances at The Great Escape Festival in Brighton, Teignmouth Carnival, and the Oxjam Exeter Takeover. It was a busy and successful 2014 for the band, global radio play another emerging success, and it has continued into this year. Recorded with producer Paul Reeve (Muse, Razorlight, Supergrass) this past March and mastered by Simon Heyworth (Mike Oldfield – Tubular Bells), the eagerly anticipated Just Part of the System is now set to awaken a new spotlight on the band, a focus sure to be reinforced by the excellent song Ride the Train which is taken from the EP and firing up radio shows and stations through Token Joker linking up with renowned UK radio plugging company Pluggin’ Baby.

11096726_932257790127827_9070900460185589201_nThe EP opens with 10,000 Angels, a short atmospheric instrumental which sparks the imagination if not the ears to the same degree. It does lure in an attentive intrigue though, the piece like a dawning of bigger things, which turn out to be arriving in the shape of Green. The first track evolves seamlessly into its successor; tendrils of spicy coaxing from the guitar emerging from the previous sonic haze as thumping rhythms also add their invitation. That flavoursome enterprise turns into fiery grooves and hearty riffs from Chris Dearing and Matt Coleman respectively soon after, whilst the rhythmic side of the song gains greater weight and voice through the muscular swings of drummer Rupert Waldron and throaty basslines of Michael Jackson. It is an aggressive yet respectful enticing enhanced by the expressive vocals of Leon Welsh. Cross its length the song continues to endear itself to ears and thoughts, never quite exploding as it hints at, but feeding an awakening appetite to sparkling hooks and feisty textures.

Things kick up another gear with Rookie, a great busy stomp of dirt clad rock ‘n’ roll with an almost volatile character to its persuasion and a combative energy to its gait and persuasion. Within this formidable tempting, blues lined melodies colour the dramatic landscape, adding even more alluring hues to the gripping roar of the increasingly impressive song.

The EP is completed by the outstanding Ride the Train, a track swiftly taking ears and emotions on a feisty and heady course of provocative grooves and fiery melodies. Alongside this, hooks almost leap at ears as rhythms jab and flirt simultaneously with the senses whilst the voice of Welsh again creates an attention grabbing roar with range and diversity. An incendiary stomp to light up any mood, it is no wonder that the song alone is raising keen awareness upon the band and now supported by the rest of the EP, sure to be a leading lure across the year.

The band has already found the support of Matt Bellamy of Muse on their side, with many more soon to join the fold once Just Part of the System is unleashed on the nation. The bluesy, heat enriched summer of rock starts here.

The Just Part of the System EP will be released on April 27th digitally via iTunes and on CD.

http://www.tokenjoker.com   https://www.facebook.com/TokenJoker1

RingMaster 16/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Asylums – Wet Dream Fanzine EP

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What do you get if you take a pinch of Supergrass, add it to an ounce of We Are The Physics, and then spice the mixture with a further splattering of Manic Street Preachers, Devo, and We Are Scientists? Well there is a good chance it will be something like the irresistible sound of and debut release from UK psyche poppers Asylums. There have been some startling entrances and introductions over the past months alone, but it is hard to remember many getting ears and emotions as excitable as the Wet Dream Fanzine EP manages in its three short, sharp slices of angular pop rock. The release is pure contagion but with a deranged invention and devilish imagination which reminds of a few and stands thoroughly unique in its character and temptation.

Asylums hails from Southend and have already picked at rapidly growing attention through their home made videos for the tracks making up the new EP; though having the songs bound together in one addictive package seems to make them grow in greater in persuasion and flirtation again. Live too the quartet of Luke Branch, Jazz Miell, Henry Tyler, and Michael Webster have been stirring up a buzz, a tour with The Vaselines and their own headlining enterprises luring in more and more appetites from fans and media alike. Now the Wet Dream Fanzine EP steps forward, with its title track released on the same day for the band’s new single, and there is a certainty that it is poised to shake up the UK indie rock scene for the better.

That new single opens up the release, Wet Dream Fanzine instantly laying down sonic smog of guitar enterprise which with pungent rhythms, has feet and thoughts immediately engaged and enthralled. The swing of the vocal delivery matches the warm stride and swagger of the song, everything a bouncy dance of mischievous persuasion with melodies and vocal harmonies soaked in creative devilment. There is no escaping the infectiousness of the encounter or its insatiable torrent of quirky and highly flavoursome hooks, it all unrelenting for the whole of the two and a half 10868149_320437288151046_8986672175115969600_nminutes the track takes to leap all over and inflame the passions.

There is no let-up in the devilry and quality either as the punk infused tenacity and urgency of The Death of Television takes over. An initial sonic spearing is the trigger to rebellious percussion and beats aligning to vocals just as sharply edged in their delivery. The song is soon a masterful stomp of creative agitation courted by a rhythmic and riff clad proposal which leaps around like bare feet on hot coals; the type of brilliance which made Baddies so essential when around. There is also an old school punk DIY feel to the EP and songs individually, which simply energises the second song and listener during its brief but addictive stomp.

The release closes with I’ve Seen Your Face In A Music Magazine. The third song combines the spicy grooving which lit up the first song with the more caustic attitude of the last track, merging it into a melodic and discord spiced wine of sound and invention. As the other songs, attitude exudes from every pore and note of the outstanding incitement, guitars toying with the imagination as rhythms jab with their own refined tempo on the senses and pop punk sparked vocals croon and roar with perpetual captivation.

It may be only one release but it is easy to suggest Asylums is the next big thing not only in but for British rock ‘n’ roll. The last time we were this excited was when…well privacy prevents details.

The Wet Dream Fanzine EP and single are available from February 23rd via the band’s own Cool Thing Records.

http://www.asylumsband.com/ / https://www.facebook.com/asylumsuk

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

 

The Reverse – No, I Don’t Want to See Your Stupid F**king Band

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Hailing from London, UK band The Reverse showed themselves quite handy at crafting strongly persuasive and magnetic songs with the release of their Kind Words For Cruel Times album around a year ago. Merging the drama of folk with indie inventiveness, the band’s sound is a gentle and welcoming tempting which does not startle but certainly entices keen attention. Now the band returns with new single, No, I Don’t Want to See Your Stupid F**king Band, providing more of the same charming enterprise which lit their full-length but with even greater colour and potency to its creative flame.

Formed by vocalist/guitarist Nathan Loughran and drummer Jason Moran, The Reverse was eventually completed by guitarist/backing vocalist Sam Hartley and after a previous bassist, James McKeown (ex-lead singer of The Great Divide and The Colours). A triplet of well-received EPs from debut A Clean Incision in 2006 through to Shutterspeed the following year, and in 2008 My Lifelong Psychological Experiment, reinforced the band’s emerging live reputation. It was the Graham Dominy (The Rifles, Razorlight, Ray Davies, Supergrass) recorded and mixed Kind Words For Cruel Times which opened up a broader attention, its success matched by shows with the likes of Klaxons, The Wave Pictures, Lupen Crook, Sgt Buzfuz, and Carina Round. The new single shows another engaging step forward for the quartet and you suspect with a similarly blossoming reaction.fucking_band_front

No, I Don’t Want to See Your Stupid F**king Band opens on a coaxing acoustic strum, the guitar casting a welcoming melody as Loughran begins the narrative bred from experiences and obstacles all emerging bands come up against. With lively yet controlled beats courting magnetic keys and harmonies, the song shuffles and tempts with a radiant weave of melodic prowess as bass and guitar lay down their own highly persuasive bait, the whole mix a gentle and unassuming song musically, compared to the lyrical altercation, but textured with refined and resourceful enterprise to spark the senses.

No, I Don’t Want to See Your Stupid F**king Band is a soothing seduction with a snapping title and lyrical premise, a song which reconfirms The Reverse as a band to keep good attention upon. It is not going to set your world on fire but the track is certainly going to give it a satisfying glow.

No, I Don’t Want to See Your Stupid F**king Band is available now @ https://thereverse1.bandcamp.com/track/no-i-dont-want-to-see-your-stupid-f-king-band

www.thereverse.co.uk

RingMaster 09/12/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Teamsters – Play Along With…The Teamsters

Photo by Mark Shackleton ©

Photo by Mark Shackleton ©

    A blend of sixties pop, indie, beat rock, and punk rock sounds an intriguing concept just on paper alone but in the hands of a band like British rockers The Teamsters it emerges as a frighteningly compelling recipe. The proof comes with the North London hailing trio’s new EP Play Along With…The Teamsters, a four track riotous encounter which enslaves feet and emotions to do its devilish bidding. The release is a tremendous party of precise yet organically bred sounds driven by imagination and unbridled passion, a mix which transfers its energy and incitement easily into its recipient. Simply it is one of the most exciting introductions to come along over recent years.

    Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Tom H. Wing, drummer/vocalist Bret Bolton, and bassist David Peter Jorgensen for the EP, The Teamsters grabbed the attention of Hamburg based label Moody Monkey who leapt in to release their debut. Play Along With… needs only a few seconds to steal attention and maybe a minute to fully ignite imagination and passions. From start to finish it has a wealth of enterprise to satisfy and excite fans of punk, mod, R’n’B, garage rock and plenty more. It is an excitable and insatiable stomp but one with a control which ensures it has a simultaneously clean and raucous impact.

     Diggin´ An Early Grave starts things off with a hefty roll of drums triggering a stroll through dramatically jangling riffs, a 1607057_233699483469843_267368660_nswaggering bassline, and instantly enticing vocals. The track dances across the senses with an unrelenting spring to its keen gait and near on wanton adventure to its guitar sculpted persuasion. There is a familiarity to the song too bringing forward the catchiness of sixties pop but just as strongly the track holds a modern raw causticity which only intensifies the stirring prowess of the song.

   From the excellent start, the similarly impressive Girl (How Could Ya?) takes things up a notch, its initial stabbing rhythms and guitar scythes an immediate incendiary fire for body and emotions. Like its predecessor the song has a contagiousness which flirts with the senses like a brewing epidemic, stroking and imposing upon them through two minutes of sixties beat meets rock pop, in a way like the Kinks meets Supergrass.

    The second half of the EP is even more invigorating and emotionally inflammatory. Don´t Come Back Home leaps at the ears with beats and guitars creating a magnetic web of lustful endeavour ridden by the vocals and harmonies. It is a spicy ball of voracious energy and senses searing sonic rowdiness bound to a tempest of flailing rebellion and eye balling contention. As mighty as it is, the track is surpassed by the closing A Girl Named Linda, the best song on the release. Imagine the R&B revelry of Bo Diddley in league with the garage punk rascality of The Hives aligned to that of Thee Exciters. Add a little Rocket From The Crypt in there and you edge even closer to the unique romp but still leave plenty of ingenious adventure to be imagined and discovered in song and ultimately the EP.

     Ensuring feet never have a moment to relax or emotions to settle into mere appreciation for its scintillating celebration the track is an irresistible infection on psyche and passions, a final triumph of a sensational debut. Expect to hear a lot more of and from The Teamsters, as shown by Play Along With…The Teamsters, one of the most exciting and ridiculously addictive bands to emerge so far this decade.

https://www.facebook.com/TeamstersMusic

10/10

RingMaster 18/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Teamsters – Digging An Early Grave

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The Reverse – Kind Words For Cruel Times

The reverse pic

     Released in the closing weeks of 2013, Kind Words For Cruel Times is an album you may have missed but is deserving of some of your attention. Brought to life by UK indie band The Reverse, the release is a gentle and persuasive collection of songs bred with a merger of folk and alternative rock intent. A little undulating in its convincing at times and more a work in progress sound wise than the finished article, the album nevertheless provides an attractive way to spend your time.

     The Reverse began with vocalist/guitarist Nathan Loughran and drummer Jason Moran, its idea and seeds growing out of pub conversations between the two, through late night recording sessions, and rehearsals. Initially the band’s sound engineer, guitarist/backing vocalist Sam Hartley was added to the band before a bassist called Joe completed the line-up,  his departure leading the trio to linking up with bass/backing vocalist James McKeown (ex-lead singer of The Great Divide and The Colours). A trio of EPs also emerged to good reactions starting with the debut release A Clean Incision in 2006. The following year saw the release of the Shutterspeed and in 2008 the My Lifelong Psychological Experiment EP, all three as the album recorded with and mixed by Graham Dominy (The Rifles, Razorlight, Ray Davies, Supergrass). Onstage the band has built a reputation to match their records, performances alongside bands such as Klaxons, The Wave Pictures, Lupen Crook, Sgt Buzfuz, and Carina Round enhancing their stature. Kind Words For Cruel Times makes the next step forward for the North London quartet with its unveiling on Under The Influence Records, the label an offshoot of one of London’s premier music nights Under the Influence, a monthly showcase for new songwriters/bands at the Boogaloo in London. Whether it will make an indelible mark on the awareness of UK’s indie scene is hard to tell but certainly given the chance it is an album to wake up some eager attention for the band.

     The release opens with Encore a well-crafted slice of folk pop which makes a positive if underwhelming start to the album. 131125kindwords2With keen melodies and crisp rhythms around the mellow tones of Loughran, the song certainly provides a pleasing encounter but something feels missing, a spark to ignite the imagination. There is a Dire Straits lilt to the melodic design cast by the guitars whilst vocal harmonies embrace their lure with an appealing tempting of their own but there is a low key energy or maybe unoriginality to the track which prevents it taking as much attention as its design deserves.

    All the same the album makes a decent first touch which is immediately built upon by the provocative Atoms and the following Then They Came For Us. The first of the two from a smouldering start develops a swagger and energy to its stride which infects the imagination, guitars cradling the more urgent stance of the song in an engaging melodic web. Again the vocals work best when the trio of singers combine even with Loughran’s delivery a strong focal point; though as the album progresses you yearn for a snarl to his tone occasionally. With a great rhythmic dance in its latter surge, the track is a compelling suasion setting a high level for its successor to match. Evocative and melodically caressing the second of the pair is an absorbing ballad with potent sinews which grows and grows on the emotions over time to provide another sultry high point of the release.

    With a healthy resonance to the opening bassline, a rhythmic tantalising, and melodic enticement to its heart the title track makes a pleasant but slightly underwhelming offering before making way for a song which still offers doubts and irresistible bait. Myleene is a whimsical reflection of a maybe rocky relationship, a song with a creative tonic which simply infests the imagination but one with a poor lyrical presence which at times just niggles. Despite that the song never leaves thoughts and senses alone, the song an addictive sort it is impossible not to embrace and join in with.

     The highly emotive encounter, The Longest Day has thoughts working eagerly next whilst the heated breath and melodic radiance of Ghosts incites a warm appreciation, but it is the excellent revelry of The Third Party which has things blazing again mentally and emotionally. Another song to start with a slow and tender coaxing it soon washes the ears with a bluesy guitar enterprise alongside a stirring prompting from the drums and bass, both elements constantly impresses across the album. With a contagious charm and magnetism to its chorus and energetic heart, the song fights feistily for the best track award.

     Both Mary and Lucy make strong and captivating enticements, the first an especially bewitching treat with its punchy rhythms aligned to virulently addictive hooks and melodies giving the previous track a run for its money. Their lofty heights put next up Dynamite & Gunpowder a little in the shade but it is another to take its time in convincing before succeeding, even if the vocals flounder a few times along the way though redeemed by the backing harmonies and sixties folk pop air.

   Closing with No More Encores, the track completing a top and tail union with the opener on the album, Kind Words For Cruel Times gives a great deal to find strong satisfaction with. It is not without flaws but comes with a potent promise, its accomplished slice of indie folk/pop suggesting The Reverse is a proposition to watch out for.

www.thereverse.co.uk

7/10

RingMaster 28/01/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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