Art Of Burning Water – Between Life And Nowhere

cover_RingMasterReview

It is fair to say that any proposition from Art Of Burning Water is not for the faint hearted or anyone looking for melodic refuge. The trio’s sound though, and indeed new album Between Life And Nowhere, is something that a passion for ruthless noise with a penchant for violent infectiousness should and will eagerly embrace.

The London based threesome of drummer Mike, guitarist/vocalist Grief, and bassist Kunal create hardcore sandstorms of sonic intolerance and rhythmic barbarity; twisted punk ravages which are as pestilential as any plague but built on grievous grooves and piercing hooks ridden by the rawest of throat ripping vocal squalls. It is a trespass which has fuelled a host of releases from the band since 2003 and provided one half of an impressive split 7” with Nervous Mothers earlier this year. True to say, the band’s sound may have alienated as many as it has befriended but those hooked on their creative hostility come with zeal many bands would pay for.

A fury of ten songs over twenty minutes, Between Life And Nowhere has no times for niceties and flies at the senses from its first breath. A sonic lance and sample triggers Rambo Survival Techniques into life, the guitar an intrusive wave of sound backed by the thumping beats of Mike and Kunal’s grievous bassline. With Grief’s flesh wilting vocal spite soon infesting all, the track grumbles and rumbles like a bear with toothache, searing the senses whilst teasing them with an underlying catchiness which in turn lines the even more hellacious heart of Prime Example Of A Lonely Child. The track ebbs and flows in its intensity, never releasing ears from a sonic abuse but taunting the imagination with its primal instincts and another sampled incursion as spicy grooves and hungry riffs join in cantankerous intent.

The excellent Barbara O’Reilly comes in on the final sonic twine of its predecessor; swiftly uncorking its caustic toxicity with a punishing persuasion before the twenty odd seconds of You simply erupts in primal cancer upon the listener which in turn is followed by the less nasty but just as intrusive adventure of To Be Brave. With swinging beats linking up with a growling brooding bassline, the song makes a calmer entrance, the guitar teasing and inviting before the full tempest of emotion and rage at the track’s heart ruptures into its virulent sound. Twisting from raucous hostility to predacious stalking across its irritable body, the song quickly hits the sweet spot.

The acerbic melodic nature of Voivodian Solutions To Die Kreuzian Problems just as rapidly ignites ear though any kinder essences are lined with their own venom and soon involved with unbridled rancor as shown again within the infectiously woven drama of Alesha and the scathing rapacity of Prone To Bouts Of Hopelessness. The first of the two entices and brutalises with every harsh rhythm and heavy metal infused grooves, its punk ‘n’ roll almost welcoming but only to an awaiting destruction while its successor crawls over the senses with its poison on full show before savaging with full malevolent energy.

A handful of seconds is all that Baby Without Your Love has and needs to share its distorted enmity, leaving the quarrelsome and increasingly violent punk ‘n’ roll of Kindness Is Strength to bring the album to a fine and feverish close.

As suggested earlier, Between Life And Nowhere is not going to find a home in everyone’s ears, something it and the underrated Art Of Burning Water seem to revel in. Both offer punk/hardcore which leaves the kind of scars which sorts the men from the boys and both deserve a portion of your flesh and attention.

Between Life And Nowhere is out now via Bigout (France), Sleeping Giant Glossolalia (USA), and SuperFi (UK) and available @ https://artofburningwater.bandcamp.com/album/between-life-and-nowhere

https://www.facebook.com/aobwmusic   http://www.superfirecords.co.uk/aobw/

Pete RingMaster 21/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Humans The Size Of Microphones – Human Crop Circles

cover_RingMasterReview

Human Crop Circles is an album which just highlights how difficult it is to be noticed in the music scene. Released by SuperFire Records in conjunction with De Graanrepubliek, the album comes from Humans The Size Of Microphones, a British hardcore/noise rock band around in the first years of this new century. Their reputation and presence did not carry too far outside of the South coast area of the UK it is fair to say and maybe without any expectations of success at some point called it a day, a disbandment we are assuming as no search came up with anything active from the band or, to be honest, about them at all. As Human Crop Circles quickly reveals, this is a crying shame as its songs simply provide one furiously thrilling and rousing incitement of ears and imagination.

At one point slated to do a split with Electric Wizard, it is hard to imagine that HTSOM did not make some major impressions on someone somewhere. An early self-released five-track demo did appear in 2002, though it too probably got lost in the mists of criminal neglect. Recorded by the band’s drummer John T Baptist in his own studio, where the likes of Electric Wizard, No, Facel Vega, Hunting Lodge, and Field Boss have also recorded, Human Crop Circles has thankfully been uncaged to right some wrongs and introduce a new wealth of ears to the rather wonderful and mercurial tempest of sound that is Humans The Size Of Microphones.

The album bursts into life with Pissing Like A Racehorse where climactic guitars and tenacious rhythms crowd ears for an incendiary start which is soon an even more enjoyably volatile affair as vocals cries and a bedlamic character expose themselves in the mix. The early urgency settles a touch without defusing the now psychotic maelstrom and air of the song, but rises again as seriously addictive bass and guitar enterprise casts a web of sonic psychosis which in turn breeds greater ferocity in the noise punk tempest. It is glorious stuff, like a mix of Melvins, Neurosis, Halfling’s Leaf, and Dope Body; the kind of comparisons which occur often across the release.

The brilliant start is as potently backed up by No One Gets Out Of Here Alive, another magnetic slice of noise imagination and punk attitude as raw and seductive as it is magnetically and antagonistically inflamed. From the first pair of sonically intricate yet bullishly demanding songs alone it is hard to know how the band escaped attention but equally just an example of so many other stories of now lost to the world special bands.

The post-hardcore textured Middle England (Eats it’s Young) steps up next, its initial emotive wash the prelude to a tantalising weave of mystique soaked grooves and bolshie yet anthemic group vocal tempting amidst muscularly tenacious rhythms and mesmeric sonic devilment. It is more than a match for the already established pinnacles of the album and almost equalled by the following flirtatious seducing shared by The Smell of Wet Leaves. Sludgy and predatory but also alive with veins of sultry melodic grooving, the track shares an early dark and catchy lure which subsequently gets turned on its head by caustic energy and creative ferocity before re-establishing itself in another smouldering passage within the eventful encounter. Without quite having the final spark to turn personal tastes lusty, the track still leaves pleasure full in its presence before being over shadowed by the outstanding Fucking Tsunami.

The fifth track just grips and thrills ears from its first bestial bassline and swiping rumble of beats; bass and drums becoming puppeteer of body and passions whilst leading both into the concussive and hellacious exploits of the song’s full body and heart. The sonic and emotive turbulence is exhausting and breath-taking, as too the twisted melodic resourcefulness which lines every twist in the track’s dervish like shuffle. As in all songs, drama comes with every moment and unpredictable turn too; here devilishly enhancing the punk meets post punk meets noise rock triumph of the song. The bass and rhythmic unity of James Hasbeen and Baptist respectively ensures the track has instincts involved, the almost corrosive sonic endeavour of guitarist Pete Sake (all names as fun as the sounds fair to say) just reinforcing the persuasion.

The final quintet of tracks come from that aforementioned demo, each a harsher and more abrasive proposal but all carrying the inventive and multi-flavoured traits that give character to all tracks. Not Exactly Rocket Science is a rousing affair of aurally poisonous punk rock whilst Limitless Stupidity is an insatiable deluge of barbarous rhythms aligned to hostility flamed riffs and vocals further blessed with spicy hooks. The pair ensures ears and appetite continue to be well fed though maybe not as dramatically as the outstanding sonic invasion of I See The World Through Rose Coloured Testicles, an uncompromising and bewitching instrumental that just gets the tongue licking lips.

The pair of Dying For An Audience and Not In Our Name bring the album to a close; the first a fibrous net of riffs and acidic grooves which wraps ears before closing ranks for another bruising and inhospitable storm of hardcore whilst its successor with matching sonic antipathy, spews a tangle of punk hooks and spiky grooves around a battlefield of rhythms. With vocals just as agreeably rancorous, the duo provides a fine end to a great and welcome surprise introduction to a band we had no idea existed.

Maybe they will again as Human Crop Circles invades more and more ears but even if that optimistic hope is not realised, punk and noise rock enthusiasts need to have Humans The Size Of Microphones somewhere in their historical landscapes.

Human Crop Circles is out now via SuperFi / De Graanrepubliek and available @ http://superfirecords.bandcamp.com/album/human-crop-circles-lp or https://graanrepubliekrecords.bandcamp.com/album/human-crop-circles

Pete RingMaster 08/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Nervous Mothers /Art Of Burning Water – Split 7”

cover_RingMasterReview

Creating a union of ferocity sure to see walls tumble and bodies scarred, SuperFire and Vleesklak Records are joint unleashing a Split 7” featuring the raw hardcore animosity of Nervous Mothers and Art Of Burning Water. It is a four track fury taking no prisoners as it rages and abrases the senses. It is also a thoroughly agreeable slab of carnal punk from two bands not too hard to fancy hear plenty more from.

The first three tracks upon the split come from Belgian quartet Nervous Mothers. More about the Antwerp hailing quartet of Bart, Hans, Jim, and Rik we cannot find but opener Op Nul reveals all needed to keenly welcome the band to ears. A sonic wash with intimidating hues opens the track, a vocal sample soon wrapped in steely tendrils of guitar as beats prowl within the brewing animus. There is also a great resonance within the stalking of ears, a dulled yet throbbing essence from the bass which sparks the appetite even more before spiteful voice and song descend with raw animosity on ears.

Following track, Born is similarly set up but swifter into its sludgy punk infestation of the senses with vocals and vicious rhythms to the demanding fore. Though the opener remains the band’s pinnacle, its successor is a rapacious and invigorating trespass as it leads into the thirty second tempest of Waves. The grizzly growl of the bass steals the show but with a frenzy of rapier beats, flesh scorching riffs, and sheer vocal spite, the song is a short, blunt, incitement of punishment and pleasure.

The final song is provided by UK based Art Of Burning Water, a trio described in its bio as “a steroided immigrant noise punk outfit that does not need to be loved to live.” Being musically liked is probably not on the agenda either but as Oppressor soon prompts, embracing their sound is not too hard as Geith, Kunal, and Mike craft it to worm under the skin and venomously blister the senses. Rhythms are hypnotic, the guitars toxic, whilst vocals spill rancor with every syllable; a blend which just hits the spot as it nags, intimidates, and stirs up another twang of hunger in the appetite.

Both bands are new to our ears and now the source of plenty of retrospective attention via their bandcamp profiles. As for their Split, that is another infestation of punk violence to heartily recommend.

The Nervous Mothers /Art Of Burning Water – Split 7” is out now via SuperFi / Vleesklak @ https://superfirecords.bandcamp.com/album/split-7-11

https://www.facebook.com/nervousmothers   http://nervousmothers.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/aobwmusic   http://artofburningwater.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 08/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/