A Blue Flame – What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remain

A Blue Flame_RingMasterReview

Three years after the release and success of a debut album, A Blue Flame has released successor What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remains, a collection of songs which musically tug at the imagination and lyrically at the emotions.

A Blue Flame is the solo project of British songwriter Richard Stone, a Leicester based artist who has been stirring attention these past months through a host of suggestively ripe and ear pleasing singles. What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remains follows his 2013 cast first album someone else’s dreams will fill our home; an offering released under the name of Woodman Stone. As suggested, it was a proposition which grabbed ears and plaudits alike, its lead song Does Madonna Dream of Ordinary People especially drawing strong support and airplay across the likes of BBC 6Music and BBC Leicester with Tom Robinson calling Stone’s music: “wonderful unashamed pop music that comes with an inbuilt English Pop sensibility running through to its very core“.

Featuring some of Leicester’s best musicians including co-producer Adam Ellis on guitar and Tony Robinson from The Beautiful South on keys and brass, What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remains is now whipping up even more loud attention. It needs little time to make a potent impression with When Time Slowed Down first up and readily caressing ears. Stone’s sound is a folk scented mix of British flavouring from pop and Brit Pop to a more rock hued proposal. The album’s opener is a gentle folk coloured slice of enterprise, a flavoursome coaxing gently drawing the listener into a release which just grows in strength and stature song by song. Keys and guitar cradle the dusty tones of Stone, a jazzy whisper coating every note and tone of the engaging start.

ablueflame_RingMasterReviewEveryday Yesterday similarly makes a low key entrance though there is a latent sturdiness from its start. With the firm beats of drummer Damon Claridge leading the way as guitar and keys amidst warm harmonies colour the track’s sky, a captivating catchiness descends on ears.  It is a quality ever present in Stone’s songs, making an increasingly vocal present here and in the following The Girl Inside of You. The new single, the track is a rousing slice of melody thick revelry embraced in Brit Pop meets folk rock flavouring. Increasingly addictive with every listen, the song has bodies bouncing and thoughts thickly involved as Stone’s lyrical and vocal prowess works on the imagination. A thumping proposition setting an early peak to the album it is also the spark to a new plateau within What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remain.

Next up is Our Memories Fade, a less energetic endeavour initially which grows in energy and emotion as sultry guitars glow across crisp beats. It too has an instinctive infectiousness, an organically appealing swing wrapped in Americana-esque charm while Stone grips attention with his words and inviting vocal style. Its highly pleasing endeavours make way for Be Kind To Yourself, a smouldering ballad which might not have the same spark as its predecessors but simply beguiles with its fifties hued cry.

Earthy punk infused rock ‘n’ roll treats ears next in the shape of the excellent I Don’t Know, another imposingly enjoyable sing-a-long canter with Skids like fuzzy guitar, while the equally compelling Out There Somewhere shares its own piece of rock where again a Stuart Adamson comparison arises as the song has a touch of Big Country to it. Both tracks increase an already eager appetite for the release, a satisfaction which From God on Down feeds with even greater strength. Flirting ears with a twist of reggae inspired devilry and slight dub effect within its formidable rock ‘n’ roll, the track takes top honours.

A Julian Cope feel shades the inescapable magnetism of Marlborough Park Avenue, a scent which only adds to its bewitching prowess and success whilst The Sun Refused To Shine dips into the fifties/early sixties again with its teasing melodies aligned to another potent Stone croon and alluring harmonies. The two songs alone reveal the diversity of sound and invention which frequents the album, a variety continued by the country twanged folk of Feeling The Same and finally Goodbye as What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remain goes out with the same poetic gentleness it began with, if with greater melancholy involved.

Enjoyable on the first couple of listens and near on essential thereon in, What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remain announces A Blue Flame and Richard Stone as one of Britain’s most compelling propositions and exciting songwriters.

What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remain is out now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/artist/a-blue-flame/id1078425623 and http://www.cdbaby.com/Artist/ABlueFlame across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/ablueflame/

Pete RingMaster 25/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Kirsten Adamson – New York Girl

Photograph by James Glossop.

Photograph by James Glossop.

Taken from and backing up a thoroughly captivating debut album, New York Girl is the new irresistible single from Scottish singer songwriter Kirsten Adamson. It is one of those songs which though thoroughly fresh you feel you already know and have an affinity with, a lively romp to raise the spirit and get those feet leaping around to. The summer might not quite be here yet but in sound Kirsten Adamson brings it to your doorstep with New York Girl.

If the name has a tinge of familiarity to it that is because Kirsten is the daughter of ex-Skids and Big Country songwriter/guitarist/vocalist Stuart Adamson. As hinted at by her self-titled album released last December and the new single, plenty of his talent has transferred in the genes. With influences from the likes of Kate Bush and indeed Big Country a major part of her formative years, the summers spent in Nashville where her father relocated to in 1998, have equally left a potent impression on her invention and quirky pop sound. Pinning her down with comparisons is a tough thing such the refreshing distinctiveness which flows through voice and music but imagine a mix of Rachel Sweet and Fay Fife with Lene Lovich for occasional company and you get closer.

New York Girl instantly leaps upon ears as throbbing rhythms collude with the energetic and spicy coaxing of keys and guitars. It is a lively entrance which only continues to invite participation as Kirsten’s voice dances amongst the jangly strands of guitar and the bold rhythms which still bound around within the melodic seducing of keys. There is a definite eighties alternative pop scenting to the magnetic encounter, so much so that if Kirsten was around back then you could easily see her being swooped up by Stiff Records.

Continuing to twist and swing with an inescapable pop contagion, New York Girl leaves a spring in the step and a satisfied smile on the spirit; much as the album it comes from which maybe is an even better way to get the song because then you get to bask in the feisty revelry of tracks like Robot Girlfriend, The Calling, and Valentine alongside the beauty of others such as Like This, Feel The Same, and Time To Be Afraid amongst many other impressing proposals.

New York Girl is released Match 18th whilst the Kirsten Adamson debut album is out now @ http://www.kirstenadamson.com/

Upcoming UK tour dates:

March

22nd The Hope and Ruin, Brighton

23rd The Fiddlers Elbow, Camden London

24th The Vic, Derby

26th Gullivers, Manchester

27th The Cluny. Newcastle

30th Stereo, Glasgow

31st Cafe Drummond, Aberdeen

April

2nd Mad Hatters, Inverness

3rd Voodoo Rooms, Edinburgh

https://www.facebook.com/kirstenadamsonmusic/     https://twitter.com/kadamsonmusic

Pete RingMaster 18/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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