Sewer Rats – Money Maker EP

_RingMaster Review

Dirty, energetically angry, and sonically visceral; that is Money Maker, the debut EP from British psych rockers Sewer Rats. The band has a sound which more than lives up to its name and a release which is bred from the filthiest recesses of their grungy psychedelic lit minds. The five track encounter, unleashed by London based label Fluffer Records, intimidates and tempts in equal insatiable fashion whilst providing the potent seeds for a very healthy and musically carnal future for the band.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Luke Morris, bassist Iain Morrison, and drummer Dean Robbins, the Immingham in Lincolnshire hailing Sewer Rats has been brewing up plenty of keen attention through their fiery live presence and abrasive sound. Money Maker is sure to inflame matching success, its recent release already luring rich acclaim and hungry new appetites their way.

cover_RingMaster Review   It all begins with Skint and a swift caustic wind of guitar which in no time is part of a sonic lacerating of the senses as gnarly bass, scything beats, and raw intensity joins the mix. It is a blend weaving a sludgy swamp of stoner bred grooves and heavy, almost animalistic, riffs led by the scowling, Lemmy-esque tones of Morris. As thick and aggressive as that is, the scuzzy roar accompanying the sounds expelled ensures there is viciousness to the swing of the song and an irked belligerence to its bracing air. It is a superb start to the release, addictive hooks and grooves vocal throughout the tempest before it all makes way for Devil Blues.

The second track has a slightly more laid back approach to its bluesy filtered cauldron but still stirs up a blaze of scarring sonic trespass and anthemic hostility bound in more scorching grooves. Again this is a title which perfectly sums up its content; rock ‘n’ roll to open up hell and enslave salacious souls, and indeed leave the listener exhaustingly wanting more.

The psychedelic instincts of the band take centre stage with the instrumental Black Label Serotonin. It is a sweltering climate of sultry melodies and surf rock twisted enterprise, providing rich evidence that Sewer Rats can be as emotionally and sonically gentle as they are aurally ferocious. It is a bewitching hex which is swiftly a memory as the EP’s corrosive title track surges with toxic radiance and caustic energy straight after. Once more grooves collude with searing hooks and ever grouchy vocals to create a swagger to the sonic blizzard, and again feet and senses are treated to a rebelliously contagious and enjoyably punishing stomp.

Money Maker is concluded by So Far Away, the brutish Motorhead meets Black Tusk corruption of its predecessor replaced by a wash of psych rock acidity aligned to a southern kissed morass of aggressive invasiveness and inhospitable noise. It is a mighty end to a gripping release, though you can easily sense that Sewer Rats is only at the start of its evolution and there will be plenty more attention grabbing and mightier proposals forged ahead, certainly just as uncompromising ones.

If the likes of Bad For Lazarus, Converge, Mastodon, Unsane…well you get the idea, are your temptation check Money Maker out for sure.

The Money Maker EP is out digitally and on vinyl now through Fluffer Records.

RingMaster 14/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Helligators – Road Roller Machine

Hell_RingMaster Review

It is fair to say that Road Roller Machine lives up to its name, the new album from Italian heavy rockers Helligators an unrelenting juggernaut of ravenous riff driven rock ‘n’ roll. Immersing strains of blues and stoner bred colour into a raw and uncompromising tempest of power and intensity, the release is a thumping treat of bruising and invigorating sound; not the most unique you are likely to come across this year but without doubt one of the most exhaustingly enjoyable.

Hailing from Rome, the 2009 formed Helligators self-released their debut album Against All Odds two years later, it and a video for the track Tattooed Killer, enticing keen attention the way of the band. The varied flavouring in their imposing sound sparked increasingly eager appetites from that point on, with the release of 2012 single Snake Oil Jesus only reinforcing their emerging presence and potent musical persuasion. The song was a strong teaser to things to come too, pleasures to be found and grown further in the 2014 recorded and recently released Road Roller Machine. Alongside all of this the band’s live presence has equally drawn acclaim, the sharing of stages with the likes of Orange Goblin, Nashville Pussy, Doomraiser, Strana Officina, Bad Bones and many more persistently impressing over time. Now it is with their second album released on Sliptrick Records, to whom the band signed this past spring, that Helligators are looking to stir up rock ‘n’ roll ‘trouble’, and such its rigorously persuasion it is hard to see them not becoming a loud household name.

copertina_road_roller_machine_RingMaster Review     Recorded with Luciano Chessa, Road Roller Machine bursts into rugged life with Nomad, a lone invigorating groove straight away gripping ears and appetite before rhythms and heavily robust riffs join the deliciously intensive early bait of the song. Thoughts of Motorhead quickly take hold, hints joining just as pungent ones of Danish band Grumpynators spicing up the deluge of spiky rhythms and ravenous riffery. It is a thrilling onslaught only accentuated by the growling tones of vocalist Hellvis, his bear like delivery a thick incitement within the increasingly tenacious enterprise surrounding him. Guitarists El Santo and Kamo bring stoner and blues lined hues to entwine with insatiable charge of riffs, both also providing good vocal backing to Hellvis, with everything involved adding up to the most hellacious and thrilling start to the album; maybe to any heavy rock album this year.

The Doomstroyer holds court next, its opening sonic coaxing over swiftly addictive enticing from drummer Alex, again an immediate grab of the listener. Heftily anthemic from the first instant, the track continues to incite imagination and body with the descriptive expression of Hellvis against slightly restrained rhythms and riffs but lures still pulling at the leash of intimidation. There is a Desert Storm like air to the track, a dirty and tempestuous climate which is as volatile as it is infectious, especially as guitar cast melodic tendrils wrap around rhythmic pistons and the song’s raw ferocity.

A ‘lighter’ air springs forth with Scream next; its blues rock breeding spicy veining to a landscape as rugged as that of its predecessor. The bass of Goblin stalks the song from its first second, a dark and predacious spine the guitars entwine with their constantly evolving and enthralling ideation. The individual craft and passion of each member is an equally roaring essence in each album track, and here uniting in a furnace of virulent adventure and instinctive tempting for a success more or less matched by both She Laughs and Snake Oil Jesus. The first of the two tempers its rabid aggressiveness with mellower melodic rock resourcefulness, both guitars and even the vocals infusing a relative calm to proceedings though the gripping snarl of the bass and the ever wickedly jabbing beats of Alex ensures there is no lack of the bands intimidating edge. Its successor is a groove machine all on its own, an incessant scorcher which spills adrenaline fuelled intensity and rebellious attitude with every caustic syllable and acidic chord. Once more the band twists in strong variety to the design and persuasion of the song; never going into the unknown but only leaving ears and appetite urgently wanting more.

More is what you get with Truckdriver, a track with little in the way of major surprises but a tank load of inventive enterprise in its southern honed rumble. There is no escape from the pure contagion of the song or that of the sultry and sinister dark majesty of Swamp Man Voodoo. Every groove and predatory hook oozes menace, backed by the rapacious nature of rhythms and the ever hungry riffs though each element also leaks rich seduction that never lets go. The outstanding song is pure theatre, a satanic dance and fiercely vociferous trespass for the soul.

No surprises for guessing the character of a song called Bad Ass from Helligators, its air instant belligerence and sound swift confrontation with of course plenty which just invites full involvement before Stone Crusher takes over with its Metallica meets AC/DC like blaze. There is no denying that the song did not find the same depth of appetite as those before it, or to be fairer as consistently as those as there are moments when the band again shows they can rival any one in unleashing a torrent of rock ‘n’ roll brilliance with thick rigorous invention.

Road Roller Machine is brought to an end by the acoustically crafted Black Sun and its blues kissed melodic smoulder. The song fuses stoner and southern rock hues with classic rock ingredients to sculpt another song which maybe does not quite match those earlier within the album but is impossible to tear one away from whilst providing a fine end to one mighty slab of heavy duty rock ‘n’ roll. Helligators have no interest in re-inventing rock music but certainly they want to give everyone a riotously good time and that they do big style with Road Roller Machine.

Road Roller Machine is out on Sliptrick Records now!

RingMaster 12/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Closet Disco Queen – Self Titled

photograph by Monni

photograph by Monni

There must be very few musicians who have bewitched and ignited our ears and senses more than Jona Nido and Luc Hess, and across as many projects. Seeing their names with a band or release stirs up an instant appetite to learn more, all thanks to previous triumphs and dramatic incitements from the likes of Coilguns, KUNZ, The Ocean, The Fawn, Schwarz and…well the list gets longer by the month it seems. Now the Swiss pair has unveiled another fascinating and virulent tempting under the guise of Closet Disco Queen and with a self-titled debut album. Consisting of seven instrumental progressive/psych explorations bred from a fusion of seventies blues rock, stoner and psychedelic rock, kraut and groove rock, to suggest some of the rich hues woven together, the album is an adventure which at times plays like a bedlamic dance party and in others a journey into the darkest, most haunted corners of the soul. Predominantly though it is rock ‘n’ roll to lose yourself within and another inspiring proposal from the sonic and rhythmic imagination of Nido and Hess.

The La Chaux-de-Fonds based pair open up their album with Hey Sunshine! and immediately have ears entangled in a web of melodic and sonic enterprise pierced by sinew swung rhythms. Grooves just spring from the fingers of Nido, instantly pushing away any inhibitions in the listener’s body left from trying to resist the anthemic and intensive shuffle cast by Hess. The music’s unbridled contagion is matched in impact by its smouldering seduction, both ignited further by the spatial warmth and mystery soaking the enthralling start.

The piece flows straight into the dark, haunted embrace of What’s Your 20? next, where compelling yet intimidating shadows ride a raw sonic mist. It immerses ears in a stark yet strangely alluring ambience for a flight into the hidden; a spellbinding slip into the darkest corners of the imagination preying on emotions and the psyche with every provocative breath. It is also the gateway into the instantly dramatic and rousing Caposhi, another heavy duty incitement to send the body squirming and writhing to its virulent drone and hypnotic tapestry of sultrily persuasive noise. The track is pure addiction, a consummate violation and puppeteer of flesh and greed through searing temptations around a robust spine.

    A brief sigh of frustration in its leaving escapes as the track twists into the warped rock ‘n’ roll feast Catch You On The Flip Sid, but that is soon forgotten as the new proposition reveals its own rhythmic jungle and sonic trespass sculpted by the psychotic invention of either geniuses or mad men; you will surely choose as the song creates its own asylum of sound and creative mayhem. It is jazzy and funky, avant-garde and psychedelic, all on another seriously enslaving rhythmic tango from Hess, and at nine minutes there is no complaint it has not given the fullest thrilling work-out for ears and soul.

Closet Queen Disco_RingMaster Review     The Shag Wag is soon brewing up its rich and ravenous blues rock blaze, from gentle flames bursting into a furnace of old school and modern rock ‘n’ roll. It is just as potent when slipping into gentler sighs of sound and energy too but at its best when sizzling on the senses and sparking the listener to get fully involved physically and emotionally. Rock music does not get much more incendiary and gripping than this, or frenzies as mouth-watering.

The duo stay with a blues bloomed tone and texture with next up IYD (In Your Dreams), the melancholic caress of the track spun on a sonic breeze of blistering sound and emotive theatre. Though the piece does not ignite the same intensive reactions and endeavour as other encounters within the release, it is an absorbing sea of invention to wallow in and set up the similarly but more imposing soundscape of Black Saber. The closing song expands and blossoms to greater intensity and emotion the essence of its predecessor, and fair to say that blues kiss is another highly emotive shimmer on the surf and psychedelic coloured investigation employed by the track. Across over eleven minutes, the constantly hinting and generally restrained volatile heart of the track does eventually erupt and steer the track into fresh and exhilarating tempests. Every moment sparks a new hunger in ears and appetite, and making its long length a swift passing of dramatic time.

It is probably fair to say that the first half of the Closet Disco Queen album had the biggest and fiercely lasting impact but even its latter trio of creative alchemy and dark fiery emotion alone only ensures the parting thought with every listen is give me more please. Together all tracks just confirm Nido and Hess an adventure which never stops evolving or getting bolder and more impressive.

Closet Disco Queen is available now on ltd 12” clear orange vinyl through This Charming Man Records, Division Records, and Hummus Records and as a name your price download @ https://hummusrecords.bandcamp.com/album/s-t-5

https://www.facebook.com/closetdiscoqueen

RingMaster 18/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Los and the Deadlines – Perfect Holiday EP

Los and the Deadlines_RingMaster Review

With more distinctive hues to their creative tapestry of sound than colours in a drag queen’s make-up palette, UK based Los and the Deadlines unveil their new EP to cast a captivating enticing which is as dynamically refreshing as it is imaginatively inflamed. There is adventure on every corner and inventive devilry within each creative breath of the Perfect Holiday EP, exciting times coming with increasing persistence over each and every listen. The band has sparked intrigue and enjoyment with previous releases but those just pale against the vibrant and bewitching exploration of this new Los and the Deadlines encounter.

The seeds of the band began when Arizona bred lead vocalist/guitarist Alex LoSardo moved to London in 2010. After being introduced to guitarist Neils Bakx, common interest and already existing musical thoughts began to bear fruit between the pair as they began writing and composing together whilst studying for their undergraduate degrees. A few line-up changes ensued as the band established its sound and presence, the time offering up a pair of strong EPs in the shape of Metro Talk in 2012 and Part One: Bank last year. Italian drummer Alberto Voglino had joined the band before the release of their second EP whilst Israeli bassist Rotem Haguel linked up more recently after another change in personnel. Whether he was the missing link to the band’s full potency others can decide, but there is no doubting a new spark and maturity, not forgetting energy, to Perfect Holiday which declares a band coming of age.

cover_RingMaster Review    The band’s sound is often and understandably tagged as art-rock but as opener Feel At Ease quickly reveals that barely hints at the evolving brews of grunge, stoner, punk, noise, and many other rock ‘n’ roll spices woven together in the EP’s individual exploits. The first song is an immediate throaty groan of heavy bass, discord deranged guitar, and jabbing beats. It is an almost menacingly brewed lure which never flinches as the spoken delivery of LoSardo opens up a just as pungent narrative. Fresh predatory air hits all areas before the song opens out into a catchy and melodically tempting chorus, its appearance another trigger as the song returns to its stalking but with a hungrier and livelier nature. We would suggest as this and all songs play, each listener will find their own references and hints to compare songs with, and here, thoughts of early Squeeze, Split Enz, and just a touch of Pere Ubu nudge these thoughts.

The outstanding start is followed by It Could Be So Much Better, an instantly grittier and more classic rock toned saunter resonating to metallic swipes on drums and blossoming a bluesy tang to the winding grooves of the guitars. Melodic vocals only add to the sultriness whilst off kilter scythes of sonic invention ensures another song not here just to feed expectations, even if it is arguably less adventurous than surrounding proposals with its fiery Red Hot Chili Peppers like smoulder. That is not to suggest the track has an air of predictability, just that it is less creatively ‘psychotic’ compared to the likes of The Youth’s Opinion which follows it. Once again the band opens a track up with the richest bait, rhythms and riffs compelling enticement with a touch of grouchiness which soon expands into a maze of wiry grooves around a Queens Of The Stone Age melodic revelry. Addictively virulent and tenaciously imaginative, the song swings and dances on ears, treating them to further sonic and warped resourcefulness which it would not be too far from the mark to suggest plays with a Melvins spicing.

From one glorious incitement to another as Batshit Crazy steps forward, its entrance a merger of crispy beats and a heavy, dark funk bred bassline around more greatly alluring tones of LoSardo, the vocalist potent whether speaking or singing across songs. Though restrained in its energy and assault, its title sums up the song’s nature perfectly, a funky Jane’s Addiction like prowess colluding with Dog Fashion Disco like imagination. To be fair all references offered never weaken something original to Los and the Deadlines, and as mentioned everyone will hear someone different within the band’s unique waltzes.

The shadowy flirtation of the track makes way for closer We Lust To Shop For Nothing, another with a Josh Homme like touch to its inventive colouring though in no time the song expels a blaze of rock ‘n’ roll which is more I Plead Irony like but constantly creating its own addiction sparking, ridiculously infectious emprise of sound and ingenuity. As all tracks, there is, for want of a better word, bedlam at the heart of the song, a ‘crazed’ weave which is as fluid and magnetic as it is relentlessly surprising.

As suggested earlier, Los and the Deadlines have suddenly blossomed from an enticing potential fuelled prospect into a beast of ravenous and mouth-watering rock ‘n’ roll, though again that really only hints at the thrills found within Perfect Holiday.

The Perfect Holiday EP is out from July 13th

https://www.facebook.com/losandthedeadlines   http://www.losandthedeadlines.com/

RingMaster 13/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Silent Divide – Master Of Disguise EP

SD Promo Photo_RingMaster Review

Let us introduce you to Silent Divide, a UK quintet who has just released one stonking beast of a debut unleashing some of the best heavy, voracious rock ‘n roll heard in an introduction in a long time. It is a highly anticipated proposition from a band having already ignited their local scene and now with a national submission to their roaring sounds in their sights, and it is hard to imagine the Master Of Disguise EP failing to achieve that success.

Essex bred Silent Divide, since forming in 2014, have gigged nationwide igniting crowds at venues such as O2 Academy Islington, Barfly, and The Waterfront Norwich along the way. Even before the EP’s release, the band had been approached to have its sounds played on numerous radio stations across England, Europe, and America; that enthusiasm adding to the eagerness of the band’s fans in wanting to devour the now revealed seriously impressive collection of songs.

Silent Divide’s sound is a fiery mix of metal, heavy rock, and plenty more; every song within Master Of Disguise bringing its own individual character and flavour to the diverse yet flowing landscape of the EP. There is also a snarl and dynamism to their music which can savage and seduce or roar and caress simultaneously, and it all begins with Pieces That Bleed. The track is an attention grabbing, adrenaline igniting slab of punk metal which along with a sonic trespass opens with the gnarly barracuda bass tempting of Jonny Darko. His strings growl with bestial seduction, gripping ears and imagination as the guitars of Joe Wright and Anthony Berry score the air as they uncage their own predacious set of riffs and grooves. In full swing, the song has ears and appetite truly alive, especially once it settles into a stalking stroll of a gait around the quickly impressing tones of Marianne Harrington. Things are soon tenaciously grouchy and lively again though, the song like a mix of US band Mongrel and Britain’s dragSTER with Harrington’s superb delivery reminding of the former’s front lady Jessica Sierra.

SD EP Cover 2_RingMaster Review   It is a rousing and exhilarating start backed as forcibly and enjoyably by the EP’s title track next, followed after by the thoroughly pleasing Silhouette. The release swiftly reveals a broader canvas to its adventure, guitars casting a spicy stoner-esque toning to the steadily brewing and eventually erupting grooves. With the dramatic and skilled swipes of drummer Luke McCormick guiding and puncturing its body, the song sculpts a web of antagonistic rhythms and creative contagion, every hook, twist, and vocal incitement unpredictable and inventively virulent. Again it is a track as much punk and metal as it is intensive rock ‘n’ roll, and again quite irresistible before it makes way for its successor. The third song stalks the senses with riffs and beats before slipping into not so much mellower essences but more expansive scenery of warm melodic rock and emotional resourcefulness.

As we suggested earlier, each song is an individual in sound and ideation, proven again by Crimson Crier. A southern drawl lines the opening coaxing of acoustic guitar, a sultry twang which is emulated in the country-esque/folkish delivery of Harrington. The tantalising balladry ebbs and flows in intensity as emotional and musical crescendos blaze away within the reflective and seductive croon of the song. Fair to say the track was not as immediate on these ears as others around it but has grown to be one of the major highlights with its Heart like hues and simply mesmeric presence.

The EP ends as it began, with a thunderous incitement bringing body and emotions a feverish offering to get involved with. Broken Name is more alternative metal than its predecessors, more proof to the depth of the band’s songwriting, but again has a raw and aggressive edge which is metal bred and driven by punk attitude. Arguably the most anthemic song on the release, it leaves EP and listener on a major high.

You may have heard good things about Silent Divide previously or they may be new to you, but all the rich things said have been proven and more by Master Of Disguise, one of the most thrilling and potential thick proposals this year.

The Master Of Disguise EP is out now digitally and on CD @ https://silentdivide.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/silentdivide.uk  https://twitter.com/silentdivide

RingMaster 03/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Watertank – Destination Unknown

SLF019 - hi-res cover_RingMaster Review

After ten years of existence, French rockers Watertank released debut album Sleepwalk in 2013 to heavy and deserved acclaim. Like for so many, it took our ears and appetites to hungry heights; in the words of our review the release was “an instigator of the purest temptation.” Now the band unleashes its successor Destination Unknown and lures even lustier responses with its irresistible concoction of sludge, stoner, and various other compelling styles. Taking the essential essences with made the first album so potent; Destination Unknown emerges as a fuller, more gripping proposal of sound and invention which in turn shows that its predecessor was just the appetiser to greater Watertank alchemy.

The Nantes band began in 2013, swiftly forging a strong fan base and reputation for their sound and stage presence with increasing success over the years. A couple of well-received EPs earned strong attention and praise before the release of Sleepwalk, whilst on stage the band proceeded to play with the likes of Torche, Kylesa, Baroness, Capricorns, Lair Of The Minotaur, and The Ocean amongst a great many. The band’s first album certainly sparked new spotlights upon Watertank though not to the level now expected to be aroused by Destination Unknown.

The album opens with Automatic Reset and straight away transfixes ears with its opening mist of guitar; the sonic shimmer quickly followed by a bulging blast of heavy riffs and rhythms. With them a groove also joins the tempting, its lure relaxing as the song settles into its stroll and welcomes the dusty tones of vocalist Thomas Boutet before returning with even spicier toning to its sultry tendril. Just as quickly a contagious air floods the encounter, a persuasion which never loses its potency as the song shuffles up its gait and intensity across the rest of the magnetic offering. The guitars of Rémy Bellin and Bojan Anicic continue to wrap ears and song in resourceful and gripping enterprise, greater colour added to the excellent start to the album all the time.

Straight away it and the following Fever reveal a more rounded and deeper depth to the band’s music, a less raw and caustic sound which still retains the growl and intensive weighty hues which fuelled the previous release. The second song is a far more aggressive offering than the first, punkish in its attitude and energy with wiry hooks to match. The bass of Maxime Coste is a grumbling potency whilst drummer Jocelyn Liorzou lashes skin and senses with adventurous and antagonistic scythes. It is a glorious riot bringing a mix of Torche, eighties band Skyscraper, and a touch of Motorgrator to entice before making way for the gentler smouldering charm of Contrails. It is still a heavyweight proposal though which seems to grow and loom over the senses with every passing second. Once more hooks and grooves grace a dynamic web of imagination and primal temptation, the latter at times as intimidating as the swings of Liorzou and the predatory riffs.

The song closes with similar reflection soaked calm to how it started, drifting away so the heavy resonance of Coste’s bass can lure attention ready for an intensive crawl of riffs and grooves. DCVR is another swift inescapable persuasion equipped with a sonic tang and commanding stature, not forgetting an addictive swagger even with it is on the prowl. It is also another track showing the greater expanse and imagination in the band’s songwriting and sound, and their ability to perfectly entangle rugged terrains with highly provocative ambiences of sound and emotion.

   The bubbling electronic start to Last/Lost Hope instantly catches expectations unawares and by surprise, though they are barely given a nibble to feast on within Destination Unknown anyway. Its enslaving coaxing soon evolves into a thrilling and lively shuffle of sonic and melodic festivity guided by the ever appealing tones of Boutet. At times elements of post punk and new wave, as well as noise rock, seem to add their spice to the infectious tapestry of the rock popper, a strong catchiness emulated again in the dirtier but just as contagious Surrender. As much as you can find hints in varying degrees of bands such as Torche and Queens Of The Stone Age to the song, there is an older hue to the outstanding stomp, elements across its kinetic two minutes recalling eighties and nineties seeded ingenuity.

Doomed Drifters explores the darkest shadows and corners of the band’s sound but again tempers it with a sonic and melodic resourcefulness which energetically and brightly smoulders as it masterfully fuse contrasts and flavours. Seducing with greater and more experimental suggestiveness for an emotionally provocative and atmospheric climax, the song leaves ears enthralled and primed for the bewitchment of the similarly expansive landscape of Scheme. Growing bigger and bolder with every passing harmonious whisper and melodic enticement, the song dances and flirts with ears and imagination, recalling a strong if coincidental feel of Comsat Angels to its exceptional and thrilling adventure.

The album ends with its just and adventurous title track, Destination Unknown a thick provocative embrace which evolves and then revolves through a soundscape of sonic and emotional intensity. It is a fine finish to an exhilarating proposition. Watertank certainly thrilled with their first album but leave it looking a touch pale against the creative vivacity and explosive drama of Destination Unknown, one of the most exciting encounters this year so far.

Destination Unknown is out now via Solar Flare Records @ http://shop.solarflarerds.com/categories/pre-orders and http://music.solarflarerds.com/album/destination-unknown

https://www.facebook.com/wtrtnk

Ringmaster 30/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

 

Hellrad – Things Never Change

FRONT COVER_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

The sound of US sludge metallers Hellrad is like toxic lava. It crawls over and consumes ears, blisters the senses, and devours all before it in an atmosphere of unbridled hostility. It also, with weighty persuasion and hellacious intensity, leaves the listener basking in a network of scorching, seductive grooves and intimidating rhythmic slavery, it all colluding for one fierce volcanic treat.

Hellrad began in the August of 2014; the Philadelphia quartet formed by guitarist Mike Hook (Eat The Turnbuckle, Bad Luck 13) and drummer Robert Lepor (Brian Candle). The pair swiftly enlisted bassist Herb Jowett (Javelina, Lick Golden Sky), and with an album’s worth of tracks emerging from their songwriting, completed the line-up with vocalist Dirty Dave Repenning (Off Duty Death, Warsaw). Their sound is as dirty as it is ugly, as angry as it is uncompromising, but aspects aligned to a violent creativity which emerges as wholly contagious. Recording Things Never Change at Permanent Hearing Damage Studios with Steve Roche, Hellrad have unleashed a proposal which is not quite a game changer but it is certainly an uncomfortable and uncompromising fresh breath to the sludge/stoner scene.

From the uncaging of its opener Street Zombies, the album reveals depths of sound and a cast of textures which are as much ravenously doomy as they are voraciously noise rock inspired, a blend perpetually brewing in a cauldron of sludge predation. The first track comes in as a warning siren, its portentous air sparking ears and imagination though their expectancy is soon engulfed in a lumbering and slowly brewing tempest of binding grooves and scything rhythms. It is a stalking rather than an onslaught, yet it has the intensity of a sonic tsunami smothering and stirring up everything in its path. The vocals of Repenning are just as rapaciously delivered, a squall of ire and emotion and as addictive as the roar growing around him. Lyrically little is given away by his raw delivery across the release but his psyche ripping presence is all about texture and emotion, and in that he, as the webbing of enterprise around him, is primal magnetism.

The following My Jihad’s Against My Mind keeps the impressive and intrusive start going, its rage and intent a much more urgent and volatile persecution of body and thoughts. Riffs and rhythms again create an unforgivingly caustic canvas for grooves and vocals to spread their almost rancorous bait, and once more the victim is blissfully immersed in echoes of a cancerous world and destruction. The closing tonic of stoner bred lures of guitar, rather than a respite to the torturous adventure seeding them, is the flowing link into another merciless ravaging. Dope Fiend Jesus manages to be even more raw and filth clad than its predecessor but also more seductive with its flirtatious melodic enticing and passages of mellow aggression. It is deliciously fearsome stuff carrying the whiffs of classic stoner and sludge bands but quickly corrupting and twisting them into something rabidly distinct to Hellrad.

Homegrown Terrorist is one of those sonic and social statements you do not ignore. Everything from its opening sample to the insidious sprawl of Repenning’s tones and the barbarous presence of the bass to the violent swings of Lepor, create an unshakeable trespass physically and emotionally. Its brutish incitement is only enhanced by the venomous sonic vines unleashed by Hook, their virulent enticement, rather than a temper to the existing savagery, an incitement to more threat. It is a template just as addictive in the hard-line predatory saunter of Fucked Up, another unrushed violation which waits until it is ready before unleashing a scourge of sizzling sonic enterprise and poisonous intent bred in an exacting embrace of intense rock ‘n’ roll.

The rhythmic nature of 15 Years and Counting is at times almost meditative, certainly hypnotic though there is no peace or calm to be found in the ruinous landscape of the song. The infectious and anthemic bait of Lepor is only reinforced by the carnivorous tones of Jowett’s strings, both forging the irresistible dark spine within the tightly entwined mix of melodic enticing and inhospitable noise pollution. The track enthrals and thrills before making way for the groove fest of Smoke More Crack. The salacious slab of rabid, dirt spawned rock ‘n’ roll is the final confirmation of the immense and addiction forging properties of band, album, and their severe concoction of sound.

Things Never Change is a punishing treat and Hellrad the nastiest, most vicious exponents of aural castigation, and we for one cannot get enough.

Things Never Change is available now digitally and on CD @ http://hellrad1.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/Hellradphiladelphia666 

RingMaster 24/06/2015

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