IAmFire – From Ashes

With the self-titled debut Mary Beats Jane album one of our all-time favourite releases, we have kept a close eye on the exploits of vocalist Peter Dolving especially with his time in The Haunted. So there was certain anticipation when news of a first album from IAmFire emerged, a project originally seeing Dolving linking up with bassist/vocalist Mikael Ehlert, guitarist Peter Ahlers Olsen, and drummer Ulf Scott. Now completed by drummer Jakob Mygind with Rasmus Revsbech, the Copenhagen outfit swiftly and increasingly surprise, feed, and captivate with From Ashes and its feast of heavy psychedelic/stoner rock bred adventures.

From its first breath From Ashes imposes its presence and qualities upon ears and imagination, opener Magpies and crows forcibly prowling the senses with ominous riffs and hefty beats. It soon settles into a heavy footed magnetic stroll though as the contrasting but equally tempting warm tones of Dolving settle upon the trespass. Fusing essences akin to Electric Wizard, Black Sabbath, and Kyuss with the grungier spicing of a Gruntruck, the track submerges the listener in a weighty embrace of sound and hypnotic charm.

It is a compelling start carrying on into next up Did you find your name, the song sauntering in on a mellow melodic breeze driven by boisterous and instantly rousing rhythms. As its predecessor, its presence is immediately contagious, Dolving vocally and the band musically weaving a celestial tapestry of suggestion with a lurking lining of shadow bred implication. That dark inclination erupts with increasing intensity as the song twists and turns, its rapacious Palms spiced heart sharing its creativity with melodic stimulants and increasing imagination.

Burn your halo shares a more irritable nature in its grunge lined rock ‘n’ roll next with its successor, Eyes wide open, descending into psych rock foreboding and seduction, again with an ever present edge which keeps the senses wary and ears transfixed. Both songs infuse unpredictable and tantalising twists in their already riveting bodies, the second casting a sonic incantation with a raw Jane’s Addiction like air, and each leave ears and appetite just wanting more.

That need is potently fed by For what it´s worth, its tribal rhythmic predation and invasively dancing grooves as addictive as Dolving’s vocal incitement which carries as much portentousness as reassuring calm. Bordering ritualistic, the track is creative manipulation with increasing dexterity before a similar but individual persuasion is cast by Beamer. It too has a volatility which maybe threatens rather than erupts but adds to the song’s body and imagination involving mastery with the drums an addictive ringleader once again.

The album concludes with firstly My mistake, a ravenous cosmic infestation, and lastly through the caustic yet suave tenacious shuffle of Inside. As the album overall, both tracks simply get under the skin with the puppeteer qualities of the rhythms and irresistible trespass of the grooves, they just two aspects in their individual multi-layered and flavoured examinations.

From Ashes is psych/stoner manna with rabidity in its enterprise controlled by an imagination which barely recognises restraint itself, in its midst Dolving may be exploring his own finest moments yet. Simply it is striking irresistible stuff; so seems we have another to add to our persistent favourites.

From Ashes is out now via Elevation Denmark and available @ https://iamfirerocks.bandcamp.com/album/from-ashes

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Pete RingMaster 21/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Regulus – Quadralith

If you are looking to be ensnared in some new and fresh groove wired trespasses, checking out the latest album from UK blues stoners Regulus would be one wise move. Quadralith is ten tracks of eagerly infectious heavy assed enterprise; a multi-flavoured affair from a quartet of highly accomplished musicians.

The successor to their 2014 debut album Smoke and following a self-titled third EP released a year later, Quadralith sees Sheffield hailing Regulus venture into a new plateau of sound and imagination. There is new energy and maturity to its presence and songwriting compared to its predecessors which in turn breeds a bolder tapestry of flavour and enterprise as well as new potential for future success.

The album opens up with Dominion and instantly winds a dirty enticing groove around ears before the robustly swinging rhythms of drummer Joe Milburn and bassist Martyn Lucas-Bewick spring their bait. As the guitars of Thomas Osborne and Luke Jennings add their melodic enterprise and hungry riffs, the latter’s vocals backed by the former’s to complete the potent lure, the track has attention firmly held. With a touch of early Desert Storm to its body, the song grows and blossoms by the minute and listen, laying the scene for things to come with its expanding net of flavours.

The following Last Chance To Die Young makes a more instant impact as the virulent beats of Milburn stirs the instincts from within a sonic cry. There is no escaping the organic draw of the grooves swiftly dancing on the appetite, riffs and rhythms courting that temptation with their own catchy tenacity. Vocals come with a greater snarl than in the first song, a cantankerousness which suits as both guitarists combine the imagination of their electric strings. Quickly igniting ears, the song builds on the strong invitation of its predecessor to really get things firing before Seven Tales Told gets funky and sultry with Lucas-Bewick’s magnetic bass leading the way. Merging blues rock essences with heavy stoner and that keen funkiness, the song flirts and imposes from within a raw contagious stroll.

The band takes the listener into darker depths with Bones, its heavy textures almost stalking the senses but again with a natural catchiness which only entices. Even as it slips into a blues croon, there is a swing to the rhythms which demands involvement as much as that coaxed by melodies and vocals, the potent addition of contrasting female tones catching the imagination. Its heavy, lurking prowess is followed by the country rock twanged Heart of Stone and the resourceful tapestry of The Dream Reaper. The first of the two easily pleases though lacks the vital sparks of many companions within Quadralith and is quickly outshone by the grooves woven, stoner heated roar of its successor. Taking best track honours, the song spins a sonic weave of temptation and enterprise which fascinates as it manipulates ears and body.

Poor Man’s Grave is no slouch in grabbing eager attention either; its instinctive swagger, if ebbing and flowing too much at times, a constant draw on which guitars and bass skilfully and magnetically conjure while Dutch is a slab of instrumental stoner rock ‘n roll which twists and turns with persistent boisterousness and ideation to continue the new high the album has found. Milburn is especially dexterous and compelling and just as potently backed by his band mates as the song masterfully dances upon the senses.

With a scent of XII Boar to its grouchy romp, Overcome keeps the passions burning, its lure devilish and infectiousness unwavering as it nurtures another pinnacle to Quadralith, success backed by the album’s title track as it brings the release to a fine close.

Across the album you sense a tempestuousness, an intimate angst but one used to drive and colour the creative adventure and energy of all four members of Regulus individually and as one. There are times when the album does not bite and sear as it might or personal tastes wish but it has a persistent potential which draws keen attention as much as the undoubted prowess and imagination of the band with pleasure the continuing result.

Quadralith is available now through Off Yer Rocka Recordings @ https://regulusband.bandcamp.com/

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Pete RingMaster 07/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Widows – Oh Deer God

As kids on a rainy day there was nothing better than coming home caked in the dirt rich antics of the day; being mud splattered after playing and revelling in the organic filth on offer. The sound and new album, Oh Deer God, from UK stoner/heavy rock outfit Widows is the sonic equivalent; a dirty, scuzzy plaything which sticks to the senses whilst offering a tank full of just as instinctive pleasure.

Over seven tracks bulging with rabid grooves, ravenous riffs, and vocals that instinctively wear irritability with pride, Widows has unleashed their heaviest and dirtiest escapades yet but without losing the body inciting grooving which helped debut album Death Valley Duchess grab attention back in 2012. The five years between releases has seen the band in their words trade “the desert worship for some more sludgy/doomy elements and it’s definitely a much darker affair.” It has also seen new bassist Phil Emblin come in and link up with vocalist Adam Jolliffe, guitarist James Kidd, and drummer Ze Big; another move which seems to have given fresh depth and weight to a sound bred on the inspirations of artists such as Down, Kyuss, and Clutch. It has been a fair time since the band formed in 2008 and released debut EP Raise the Monolith two years later, a passage which on the evidence of Oh Deer God has seen them become one of Britain’s mightiest purveyors of infestation.

The Nottingham band swiftly has Oh Deer God eagerly fingering the senses with its title track. First the guitar strokes ears, the bass quickly joining in as beats add their imposing bite and Jolliffe growls with an almost toxic intent from the midst of it all. Strolling along with a controlled but feral gait, the song breaks its stride with moments of instinctive boisterousness but then slips back into its natural prowl. Melodic strains simply add to the raw temptation of the track, its stoner breeding complimenting the primal heart driving things. With a touch of Northern Ireland outfit Triggerman meets Clutch to it, the song brings things to the boil superbly before parting for the one minute plus fury of its successor.

Caffeine and Hatred is a short swift violation that just ignites the senses and passions, its punk tempest and web of sonic trespasses, accentuated by the lethal swings of Ze Big, irresistible pleasure. The song is as musically horny as it is quarrelsome, the kind of rabid assault greed flocks to before taking on the rhythmically big boned and sonically compelling Heresy and Venom. As with the first, the song has hips swerving to its grooves and the inner punk grabbing on to its senses puncturing stabs with glee whilst the rocker inside swings from its stoner nurtured tendrils of intoxication. There is a great element of discord in the mix too, an unpredictability which increases the slavery of the imagination.

More familiar essences and designs are woven for the tangy exploits of next up Blue Tuna but wrapping a rhythmically agitated skeleton dancing with more of that expectations squashing enterprise already shaping the album while Ride To The Realm Of Coitus gets to the grain of dirty rock ‘n’ roll with its crawling motion and grubby textures. With the bass a soiled flirtation, the song initially stalks the senses before flicking a switch into a feistily energetic and volatile canter with tart melodic seduction veining a rapacious character built on predacious grooves and riffs.

The blues infested grooving of Baron Greenback Blues across a spine of wonderfully dishevelled rock ‘n’ roll has things hungrily bouncing next, the track a wild and wily incitement of body and spirit with another seriously carnal and glorious bassline stealing the passions before making way for Germanium Buzz which brings things to a fine close. Almost clean cut in comparisons to things before it, the song is the one track the stoner rock tag fully fits though it too is soon uncaging muscular dexterity and body trespassing instincts seeded in other strains of sound, merging both sides with increasingly captivating tenacity.

You can call Oh Deer God and the Widows sound stoner rock, sludge, or heavy rock but quite simply it is just undiluted rock ‘n’ roll and the reason the band’s latest album is one essential slab of prize pleasure.

Oh Deer God is out now through UMC Recordings and available @ https://widows666.bandcamp.com/album/oh-deer-god

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Pete RingMaster 24/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Morass of Molasses – These Paths We Tread

The first album from UK trio Morass of Molasses has definitely been one encounter we have here been keenly anticipating, almost from the day the band first stepped forward with a couple of senses infesting, psyche twisting tracks. Their fusion of doom, sludge, and stoner bred textures served in a swamp of aural filth just fed all the instincts and continued to through their debut EP a few months after. Now we have These Paths We Tread to devour, an album which we will admit had us a touch unsure initially.

Instantly enjoyable, These Paths We Tread still had thoughts crowding to contemplate its new proposal of sound. Morass Of Molasses has lured their music from the filth infested depths of the swamp into a cleaner yet still aurally clinging landscape. That is not to say that it does not still come with a healthy coating of scuzz and doom lined dirt but it is a lumbering trespass of sound which is almost more celebratory than predatory. Quite simply their sound has matured, grown up even, and hindsight through listening back at certainly that last EP, So Flows Our Fate, shows it was an evolution on the cards even back then. To be honest we miss the filth but it has not stopped These Paths We Tread through time and listens blossoming into one seriously striking encounter loaded with the potential of even greater adventures ahead with the threesome of vocalist/baritone guitarist Bones ‘The Beard’ Huse, lead guitarist Phil ‘The Mountain’ Williams, and drummer Chris ‘The Beast’ West.

These Paths We Tread gets off to a mighty start with My Leviathan, its gentle caresses of melody and atmospheric waves a deceptive coaxing into the waiting jaws of colossal riffs and flirtatiously tangy grooves. Settling into a predacious crawl entwining raw causticity with salacious seduction, the song roams ears and imagination like a primal siren. Bones’ raw throaty roars share pure toxicity at times, his hostile tones matched by the punchy rhythms of West but tempered by his own calmer vocal tempting and the sonic web cast by Williams. Continually twisting through an array of perpetual incitement on ears and appetite, the track is glorious, its emerging funkiness icing on the feral cake.

Recent times has seen MOM tear into stages alongside the likes of Orange Goblin, Ohhms, Vodun, Elephant Tree, Desert Storm, Space Witch, Sea Bastard, Gurt, and Limb among many others, and there are essences of a few of these within second track So They Walk. Its grooves seep Orange Goblin/Kyuss like taunting whilst its irritable side has a Sleep like causticity, all merged into a distinct MOM recipe and a track like its predecessor which hits the spot with relish.

Continuing themes of “mythic sin and ancient archetypes”, album and next up Serpentine lyrically and musically bind the listener in evocative textures. The third track winds around ears with a dexterity and sonic adeptness emulating its title, grooves almost slithering across the imagination as rhythms bite. Bones’ warm if emotionally deceitful vocals contrast the underlying volatility of the track superbly, also erupting at times to spark a sonic wave fuelling greater weight and intensity throughout. It is a bewitching affair, not as instantly gripping as the first pair of songs but blossoming with every listen into an instinctive temptation before the brief incantation of The Ritual lures and the haunting presence of Centralia descends. A weave of stoner bred enterprise lined with provocative shadows and ghostly whispers as infectious rhythms drive a rolling canter, the second of the two is a well of suggestion coloured by the skilful adventure of Williams on guitar strings.

Next up Maenads is a psychosis of drama and sound, simultaneously enthralling and threatening with seduction and primal toning. It is fair to say, as the album, the track grows and infests deeper into the psyche with every taking of its inflamed intoxication; its melodic anaesthetic fascinating and feral instincts tantalising before things end with Wrath Of Aphrodite, a song which maybe did not quite spark the passions as richly as its companions yet has body and appetite for more bouncing to its groove woven, heavily boned rock ‘n’ roll.

Certainly for fans of the band, These Paths We Tread  will maybe need time to grow and develop on ears and thoughts though newcomers will find Morass of Molasses a quick persuasion we are sure. Yes we still miss the filth but the album blossoms into something thickly compelling and increasingly pleasurable; how stupid of us to doubt with those first thoughts.

These Paths We Tread is out now through HeviSike Records in various formats @ https://morassofmolasses.bandcamp.com and http://www.hevisike.com/product/morass-of-molasseslp

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Pete RingMaster 24/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Desert Kingdom – Self Titled

desert-kingdom_RingMasterReview

Hailing from the suburbs of Melbourne, Desert Kingdom recently made their introduction to greater attention with their self-titled debut release offering seven slabs of fiercely muscular stoner bred rock ‘n’ roll relishing the band’s inspirations. Certainly uniqueness is not as forceful as the physical power and prowess of the band but there was no escaping a richly pleasing and rousing first glimpse of the potential loaded quartet.

Consisting of vocalist Ritch, guitarist Emmett Young, bassist Brett Wright, and drummer Paul Coste, Desert Kingdom swiftly get down to business as opener You’ll Burn descends on ears with sinew woven riffs and swinging beats. Instantly infectious, it is a commanding coaxing for ears only increasing its potency as choppy tenacity infects those initial chords and a heavy grumble escapes the bass. The raw scowling tones of Ritch are equally as persuasive, it all combining for a fiery slice of stoner heaviness clothed in the influences of bands such as Orange Goblin, Kyuss, and Down.

desert_kingdom_art_RingMasterReviewThe atmospheric, drama soaked entrance of Mafiaso Opera deceptively makes a gentler proposition but its sinister air is soon a tempestuous torrent of catchy beats and predacious riffs. As vocals rage spicy grooves wind around the rhythmic temptation, varied metallic strains linking arms in a familiar yet fresh incitement. Brawling with the senses through every passing second, the track quickly eclipses its impressive predecessor, stomping with raw aggression and captivating enterprise before Doghouse Blues prowls with an equally rapacious intent to that of the previous track while military seeded rhythms impose their agreeable authority. Like a blend of Gruntruck and Pantera with a whiff of Mary Beats Jane, the track irritably rumbles leaving satisfaction full if not quite matching the heights sparked by the pair before it.

If the last track prowls then 7 Years stalks the senses with its doom bred trespass, sonic flames erupting within the pressure as choice grooves entwine voice and the engaging ponderous gait of the rhythms. It too lacks the sparks of those early successes but again only and increasingly pleases as its waspish sound intensifies in tandem with the song’s boisterous aggression with subsequent blues toxicity adding to the fun.

Abstainer rocks like a lustful dog next, its hungry riffs and heftily swung rhythms alone a carnal incitement while Fuck You is sonic belligerence and muscular aggravation bred to raise the spirit as the release re-hits the early plateau it began upon. With spicy hooks and scorching grooves, the track has all the attributes and open potential to raise expectations that Desert Kingdom will come under the scrutiny of the broadest spotlights if not now in the time ahead.

Concluded by the boozy blaze of Whiskey, sawdust and spit rock ‘n’ roll with all the groove laced liquor you could wish for, the release is a very easy to return to stomp. Originality might be a touch on the scarce side but enjoyment is full, something never drawing complaints.

The Desert Kingdom album is out now via Black Bow Records across most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 01/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Valley Of The Sun – Volume Rock

VOTS_RingMasterReview:

If a title ever reflected its contents then it is Volume Rock, the new album from Cincinnati stompers Valley Of The Sun. The release is a mighty roar of rousing rock ‘n’ roll which never takes a breath and demands to be played with the dial locked on maximum. In many ways it carries on where their acclaimed debut album Electric Talons Of The Thunderhawk left off but with even more resourcefully honed and fiery exploits on board to fire up ears and rich enjoyment.

With the two well-received EPs, Two Thousand Ten and The Sayings of the Seers in 2010 and 2011 respectively, under their belt, Valley Of The Sun really caught attention and a new wealth of eager appetites with Electric Talons Of The Thunderhawk in 2014. It took their inflamed mix of stoner, hard, and desert rock to new heights with just rewards in responses and acclaim. It is easy to feel though that all of its success was just the appetiser to bigger things and reactions around the uncaging of Volume Rock and its step up in sound, songwriting, and the band’s ability to get all rocking like a bone starved hound.

The album opens on the instantly masterful and rousing swagger of Eternal Forever, ears clipped by sticks on rims as a bluesy invitation swings away alongside. In another handful of seconds, the song hits a rampant stroll with its riff loaded chest out and rhythmic hips swinging. The vocals of guitarist Ryan Ferrier quickly impress as they light ears and song whilst his riffs find quick unity with the catchy grooves of Adam Flaig, the contagious start becoming a full on anthemic enticement driven by the potent jabs of drummer Aaron Boyer and the brooding bassline of Ringo Jones.

It is an exhilarating start backed within moments by the following Wants and Needs. Slightly less urgent but no less commandingly infectious, the track has a spicy Queens Of The Stone Age feel to its melodic and vocal persuasion though equally, and not for the last time across the album, there is also a grungy essence which hints at Alice In Chains. A blaze of spirit raising rock ‘n’ roll, its success is matched and eclipse by the thick and sultry charms of The Hunt. Badgering the senses and body from start to finish, the track is an inflamed shuffle with imposing rhythms and citric grooves bound in the outstanding tones of Ferrier, his presence backed just as potently by the band in voice and enterprise.

Volumerock_FrontCover_RingMasterReviewNext up Land of Fools has enjoyment and limbs in full involvement too; it’s more reserved but seriously addictive entrance, with rhythms and riffs insatiable bait, the lead into a virulent epidemic of lean keen hooks and beats which continue the track’s initial magnetic work as sonic flames cast by the guitar of Flaig and Ferrier’s harmonic throat flare. There is no escaping a Josh Homme and co feel again to the outstanding encounter, a flavour only adding to its triumph before making way for I Breathe the Earth and its delicious bass grumble. That leading lure brings ears into t smouldering sighs of fiery guitar and in turn concussive beats and beguiling harmonies, all colluding in another aural swelter with psych and blues rock imagination.

The heavier and thicker textures of Speaketh the Shaman steps forward next, Ferrier crooning with purpose and heart within the smokier fire of the song’s sizzling climate and sound. As in a few other tracks, bands like The Sword and Torche come to mind a little, though generally a fleeting essence within Valley Of The Sun’s own creative flame. Certainly the band skilfully employs familiar hues in their own sonic designs, but as different colours in something maybe not boldly unique but undoubtedly distinct in style and character.

If previous tracks were fires, Beneath the Veil is a volcano of grooves and melodic lava, enveloping and treating ears to a white hot invasion of infectious blues rock ‘n’ roll. It roars and stomps in its groove woven waltz, springing the listener into an exhaustive dance and revelry for which no escape is possible or wanted until its last note blisters on the ears.

A chance to grab a breath is allowed momentarily by Solstice before it too is a thumping hard rock scented canter with a punkish snarl pulling tired bodies back to their soon revitalised feet. Its departure lets Empty Visions bring the album to memorable close, the track a hot bed of sonic fuzz and melodic tinder setting fire to ears and spirit under the catchy guidance and temptation of the ever impressing vocals.

It is a fine end to a thrilling encounter which just leaves you wanting more and with real greed. If Valley Of The Sun impressed before, they will blow a great many more away with Volume Rock and its incendiary rock ‘n’ roll.

Volume Rock is released April 29th via Fuzzorama Records @ http://www.fuzzoramastore.com/en/ and https://fuzzoramarecords1.bandcamp.com/album/volume-rock

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Pete RingMaster 28/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Black Space Riders – Refugeeum

Black Space Riders official 2015_RingMaster Review

With their previous album D:REI, it is fair to say that German space rockers Black Space Riders not only set a new benchmark for themselves but ignited a whole new host of appetites and acclaiming attention. Now the Muenster sextet return with its successor Refugeeum; an intensive and expansive exploration which may or may not quite surpass its exceptional predecessor, but is an equal as it reinforces the band’s stature as one of the most fascinating and gripping propositions in heavy rock.

This time around the band has dropped from spatial explorations and focused on earthbound issues and tempestuous times. Musically the band has found an earthier and more organically trespassing, as well as more intimate, depth and invention to their ever diverse, flavour embracing sound. Certainly there are moments which soar and take flight through rich and broad landscapes but always they lead to the turbulence and raw canvas of emotional and physical migrancy, to simplify the album’s theme. There is also a new and open maturity to the songwriting and its realisation in Refugeeum, a quality taking the already recognised and rewarding potency in all aspects of band and sound that had already powerfully blossomed within D:REI, to new pastures.

A spatial shimmer grows around ears initially as album opener Vortex Sun starts things off, its distant twinkle soon joined by a lone melody and vocal harmonies. Everything has a shadowy glaze to it but equally a magnetism which within seconds draws ears and imagination right into the brewing soundscape of the song. Once the drums begin rolling with increasing resonance and hunger, the track is on the lip of a thickly atmospheric and energetically contagious proposal, guitars casting a cascade of sonic enterprise around nagging riffs whilst the vocals add further descriptive drama and texture. The threat of a full explosion of sound and turbulence is constantly there but never really realised, the song moving through constantly shifting rock scenery with exotic mystique and sultry Eastern whispers a regular and inventive lining.

Frontcover Refugeeum Vinyl _RingMaster Review   The track is a glorious start to the album and swiftly matched by Universal Bloodlines, who wins its persuasive argument from the opening bait of throaty riffs and crispy beats alone. They come with an irresistible hook, one which only persists as the band develops and slips into a Life of Agony like emotive croon within rousing rhythmic and dirtily aggressive temptation. It is a fiery and intimidating fusion and ridiculously irresistible, even when the sonic craft of the guitarists SLI and JE add searing sonic flames to the raw alchemy.

Born a Lion (Homeless) comes next, opening with its own compelling coaxing. The scuzzy tone of bass from SAQ is a thick menacing hook all on its own whilst just as quickly, fuzzy guitars and slithers of keys align with its enthralling call to accentuate and colour the tribal call of the song. The vocals are shared around the album by Seb and JE, and here offer maybe their most rapacious and fiercely captivating delivery yet. The song itself continues to grow into a brute of a proposition, a treat lying somewhere between Killing Joke, Rammstein, and David Bowie.

There is a post punk edge to the following The Lure (Come with us), especially in its opening stalking of ears. Four songs in and each has provided the most individual and passion enslaving openings, entrances backed by ever evolving and twisting adventures, and here the fourth song goes on to explore a filth toned embrace of snarling vocals, evocative guitar caresses, and one hypnotically tenacious doomy prowl.

A mellower lure escapes Run to the Plains next, gentle vocal persuasion luring in attention as a darker groan of bass from SAQ or HEVO, who also features upon Refugeeum, courts its invitation. It is a tempting increasing as both vocalists unite with their unique and complementary tones. There is a touch of post rock to the track and a Palms like alternative rock smoulder to the stoner-esque ripeness colouring the mesmeric encounter. At over ten minutes the track is a maelstrom in waiting too, expelling thick tendrils of intensity and heavy grooves as well as tempestuous riffs across its constantly resonating sonic glow.

The pair of Curtains of Death, another with a start which just seems to know how to flick the switch of lust, and Melek’s Lament (Yazidi Tears) just seduce and engross with constant imagination. The outstanding first of the two follows up its tasty start with a spiral of tangy grooves, feisty riffs, and grouchy vocals, all honed into an intimidating and again wonderfully fuzzy yet boisterous shuffle before drifting off into reflective and haunting, almost cavernous exploration. It is a riot for the ears and feast for the imagination whilst its successor is a mist of worldly whispers, flirtatious textures, and emotional intensity, and in a completely different way just as fascinating and infectious, especially as it brews up its own seventies rock tinged roar of a climax which in turn descends into a sonic escape.

Such his skilled rhythmic jungle of beats and resourcefulness C.RIP has an easy time winning these ears over from start to finish within Refugeeum, and again ensures Walking Shades has its hooks into the psyche straight away with another almost meditatively inviting dance of beats. Subsequent melodies and vocals pursue another Life of Agony like toning in their catchy and provocative body, it all colluding for one tantalising offering before Ritual of Inner Strength brings the album to an epic close. The track in many ways is like a musical epilogue to Refugeeum, all the richest and most potent elements creating the hearts of the album’s songs converging together in a gentle but intensifying tempest. It is creative theatre, one igniting thoughts and emotions as strongly as its infectious lures grip the body, and though it does not take personal emotions quite to the heights sparked by other songs, its impacting croon is a fine end to a mighty release.

The band’s previous album had great ruggedness to it which has been rounded off for Refugeeum but in its place the band has honed a more intricate blend of slimmer tempests, thicker explorations, and a perpetual unpredictable invention. The album is Black Space Riders’ boldest and farthest reaching creative offering yet and after many more listens whilst composing this, decidedly their most thrilling exploit yet.

Refugeeum is available now digitally, on Cd, and on double vinyl (2x180G, incl. CD & lyric-insert) @ https://blackspaceriders.bandcamp.com/album/refugeeum

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RingMaster 24/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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