King Hiss – Earthquaker

Having found ourselves more than caught up in the sound and adventure of King Hiss through their Snakeskin EP back in 2013, there is always a real leak of eager anticipation approaching every new encounter with the Belgium hailing rockers. So far it has been rewarded with a creatively roaring and rousing experiences especially with the band’s last album Mastosaurus but nowhere to the extent of lustfulness found for its successor, Earthquaker.

The band’s new album is a thunderous and explosive unleashing of a sound which has developed with the same hunger as we have found for its evolving exploits. To use our own words, Mastosaurus proved “exceptional and increasingly so with every listen” but is now simply left in the dramatic wake of Earthquaker.

King Hiss create a tempest of sound as infectious as it is invasive as they embrace the key essences of hard and stoner rock alongside the rich marrow of grunge and groove metal. Familiar and unique flavours continually entangle and flourish in the band’s increasingly distinct songwriting and music and fair to say over three full-lengths it has grown to be as irresistible and we suggest as essential as anything out there in the rock landscape.

Earthquaker is pure creative virulence from start to finish, even the introductory forty odd seconds of Critical Failure pure enticement as its intrigue flooded menace lined coaxing invades ears and imagination to draw the listener into the unscrupulous swing of the album’s title track. Grooves immediately infest and shape the song, Earthquaker infesting speakers and listener with relish before developing its darker and deeper web of textures and threat. The tones of vocalist Jan Coudron as ever enthral as they drip with drama and emotion whilst the melodic and voracious exploits of guitarist Joost Noyelle enthral as they invade. With rhythms pure manipulation, the track had album and us boisterously bouncing in no time.

Defiance urging incitement and spirit erupts in the following Revolt!, the track as feral as it is skilfully composed in its intent and craft. Whipping up a storm, drummer Jason Bernard drives the rebellion of song and word with glee whilst the bass of Dominiek Hoet is a snarling predator in the mix of temptation and riot, they together inciting the epidemic of untamed contagion unleashed. Even so, its virulence is eclipsed by that of Desertsurfer and with almost immediate effect. From the first second the track is an unapologetic weave of addictive hooks and grooves wrapped in melodic and harmonic temptation yet as all songs is wired with muscle and attitude bordering on the confrontational.

Through the Alice In Chains meets Twelve Boar predation that is Monolith and the dirt clad but melodically seductive GTWHR, the boldness and variety within Earthquaker is further accentuated. Unpredictability and evocative enterprise is as openly persuasive in both as across the whole release and further cemented within the grime laden, grooved rock ‘n’ roll joy of Kilmister and in turn Butcher and its gripping ruination. The track is as mesmeric as it is threatening, Coudron at the head of its haunting presence and instinctive blood lust with inescapable rhythms stalking and striking out within another compelling web of drama springing from Noyelle’s strings.

Drop Dead Leader may have not quite ignited the same lust as those before but with its southern tinged invention it still left imagination and pleasure united companions while Vomit had the former alone more than involved in its own adventurously fertile curiosity and craft; another major highlight added to the bulky amount already provided by Earthquaker.

The album is brought to an end through firstly Black Wolf, a track which weaves and swerves like a rattle snake before striking and unleashing its resourceful and venomous prowess, and lastly the sonic infection that is Sum of all Nightmares. Again grooves and hooks are as lethal and irresistible and the carnivorous riffs and barbarous rhythms escaping the band within both songs unbridled pleasure and rousing incitement.

In many ways it is no surprise that King Hiss had us over excited once again as they just get better and better but Earthquaker is a whole new ballgame for the band and their truly dextrous sound which no one should pass by without at least one concentrated listen.

Earthquaker is out now @ https://kinghiss.bandcamp.com/album/earthquaker

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Pete RingMaster 19/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Transport League – A Million Volt Scream

The fifteen years since first leaving Lucifer’s fires has not dampened the roar in the heart and throat of Transport League or the voracious swing in their feral enterprise, nor indeed the ravenous virulence of a sound which is always preying on new hellish flavours. The proof is all there in the viscera of their new album, A Million Volt Scream: a release which lures, embraces, and devours the senses with the greatest ravening intent yet from the Swedish outfit so that never has the well-established term upon the band’s music, Boogie From Hell, been more apt.

Emerging in 1994 Transport League embraced the sound of early Clutch with as they say “some hints of Cathedral and Corrosion of Conformity.” Swiftly it established its own ever evolving character and by the 2013 release of fifth album, Boogie From Hell, was the fuel to that enduring moniker. Even as the band has continued to explore new shades and avenues it has remained fitting to that declaration as shown by A Million Volt Scream. It is an encounter bred from a ferocious cauldron of mutually heavy metal and rock with just as healthy and hungry essences of punk, sludge, and alternative trespasses; infernal rock ‘n’ roll if you would.

A Million Volt Scream wasted no time with subtle persuasion, warning sirens allowing a moment to run away before its title track opener stalks with eager rhythmic instincts. That alone proves gripping bait but once the band’s renowned rapacious grooves uncage their swing, entanglement is inescapable. The track hits its stride with a devilish swagger, the vocals of guitarist Tony Jelencovich a masterful scowl within the unappeasable contagion. Rich imagination only adds to the temptation, the track’s Pantera meets Rob Zombie like breath twisted and ignited with industrial lined apocalyptic proclamation.

1200 Goddamned follows, the rhythms of drummer Mattias Starander again a potent and insatiable coaxing before the song uncages its full belly of riffs and grooves, the exploits of Jelencovich  and lead guitarist Peter Hunyadi mercilessly infectious and invasive just as is the former’s great grungy tones. Even with its eager swing, there is a riveting predatory edge to the bass of Dennis Österdal, his lines threat and temptation together much as song and sound around them across the release.

Fair to say with ears and appetite already hooked both only found a lustier attention as next up Monster Human leered in and began stalking their ground. Its menacing bounce and mischievous sonic glints swiftly stole subservience, another Rob Zombie-esque swing this time merged with a Rammstein scented industrial intimidation only adding to the captivation before relief at the departure of its fiendishness is swiftly stolen by the dark deeds and drama of Dawn Of Lucifer. The band’s already multi-flavoured sound is stretched again as the track’s alternative metal breeding reveals the seed of bands similar to Faith No More, Dog Fashion Disco, and Mushroomhead though emerging as inimitable Transport League alchemy. Simply put though, as to be honest applying to all tracks within the album, it is inventively yet instinctively bred rabid rock ‘n’ roll and proved unapologetically irresistible.

Vultures is next up, the song immediately wrapping grooved sonic wires around the senses then manipulating them like a puppeteer to its own carnal swing. Carnivorous in every essence, viral with just as forceful a zeal, the track is another esurient stalking and a major contender for best track honours while Vanished Empire brings its own creative enmity to bear with dissonance carrying craft and again a strain of rabidity to offer its own imposing challenge.

Facedown Bondage might not quite have ignited the same heights of delirium but with its southern rock irritancy and contagion aligned to groove metal embroiled contention it too proved thick pleasure to breed greed for as too Slave In Orbit with its low slung stoner grooves and funk metal intimation. As with all tracks though, it is the perpetual current of imagination which adds the unpredictability and individuality that seals already done deals.

The final pair of Creature Grunts and Rabid Horizon leaves nothing to be desired as A Million Volt Scream departs as impressively as it began. The first is another song which sparks thoughts of Mike Patton and co at certain moments as it hungrily strolls, its severe catchiness spun with intoxicating grooves and rhythms which manage to simultaneously punish and seduce. The final track is basically a slab of untamed rock ‘n’ roll, a beast of intensity and motion which even the dearly departed could not prevent swinging their bones to.

Their sound is indeed boogie from the inferno below though such it’s and specifically the inescapable temptation of A Million Volt Scream it is hard to tell if Transport League work for the Devil or he dances to their tune.

A Million Volt Scream is out now via Mighty Music; available @ http://targetshop.dk/transport-league and https://targetgroup.bandcamp.com/album/a-million-volt-scream-2

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Pete RingMaster 090/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Morass Of Molasses – The Ties That Bind

Infestations come in many kinds and shapes but few if any are as fascinating and compelling as the sound of UK heavy rockers Morass Of Molasses. It is a proposition which devours the senses whilst ensnaring the imagination, a beast of sonic invasion and melodic seduction which has never been more vital than within the band’s new album, The Ties That Bind.

The Reading hailing trio’s second album is simply a feast of rousing sounds and beguiling imagination; an encounter which reeks of unpredictability and revels in the surprises that offers even as one having a close ear on all to escape the creative cavern of vocalist/ Baritone guitarist Bones Huse since his days as part of the also seriously magnetic Karn8. A whole different proposition though it was on record and before us as we stood grooving to that earlier outfit at a Guildford gig, the seeds to the heavy blues might and weight of the 2013 formed Morass Of Molasses could be heard in many ways being sown.

It is fair to say that the first two tracks unleashed by the band soon after it’s rising up from the thick southern swamps of the UK left the senses caked in dirt and rancor, a trespass so easy to devour and by so many. Soon the band was laying their tar thick sounds, lumbering riffs, and viscous grooves down alongside the likes of Crowbar, Orange Goblin, Ohhms, Vodun, Elephant Tree, Desert Storm, Mammoth Weed and many more, the sonically infesting of the Jaegermeister stage at Bloodstock Festival with their acclaim gathering sound another spark to opportunities for relentless touring and sharing stages with such bands. The release of the So Flows Our Fate EP in 2015 simply sealed the deal though it was soon seriously eclipsed by debut album, These Paths We Tread two years later as the evolution of their sound flourished.

Now that striking release has been simply outshone by its successor, The Ties That Bind a tantalising kaleidoscope of textures and imagination as heavy and ravenous as an avalanche, as melodically syrupy as the outcome of the event which inspired the band’s name, and simply imaginatively mesmeric and creatively unforeseeable. The album rises up through The Darkening, its initial quiet on the side of portentous even as an elegant melody lights its path. Its brief but alluring invitation springs into the following Woe Betide, predacious riffs and swinging rhythms colluding with beacon like grooves. The band’s sound embraces everything from blues, occult, and stoner rock to sludge and doom metal with much more in the flavouring as relished by the second track. With Bones’ distinctive tones roaring, the guitar of Phil Williams weaves, his melodic wires wrapping the track as the rhythms of drummer Raj Puni incite and impose. Continually lighting up fresh shadows and unveiling new levels of enterprise, the song just captivated, its calms sheer seduction and eruptions rousing invasions all crafted and delivered with inescapable almost devious enterprise.

Similarly Death of All invades every welcoming aspect of ears and appetite, its feral rock ‘n’ roll  pouncing on the listener straight away as blues bred enticement and fiery funk grooves leads to infectious alternative rock bordering detours. Like a salacious fusion of Red Hot Chili Peppers, Iggy Pop, and Black Tusk, the track is superb but mistake us not all uniquely Morass Of Molasses.

The fires within the song are white hot smouldering in next up Estranger, the song a seductress expressing intimate thoughts as the album continues to explore themes of human connection, delving “into the deep-rooted interactions we share with each other and ourselves” via the Dark Forest motif which shapes every spark of album and songs. Every groove within the track swerves around with voluptuous temptation, Huse’s vocals backed by those of Puni, carrying a gentle swing whilst entangled in the enthralling threads woven by Williams’ guitar. As its predecessors, the song just gripped ears and imagination, new depths and invention oozing from every passing minute.

The pastoral calms of Legend Of The Five Sons beguile just as readily next, the radiant serenade keenly bewitching across its melodic beauty. Featuring the graceful tones of Sian Greenaway of doom rockers Alunah and the flute prowess of Matt Ainsworth, the song caressed the senses like a lover before As Leaves Fall builds on its folkish hues with shamanic rhythms and melodic intimation; darker shadows brewing in its own particular enchantment and exploding in the ravenous jaws of Persona Non Grata. It is a pyre of roasted grooves and manipulative rhythms scalded further by caustic riffs and vocal scowling. Again it proved so easy to greedily devour and with increasing hunger, the almost crust punk whiff which occasionally arises and especially its cosmopolitan hues delicious spicing.

The album is completed by In Our Sacred Skin and The Deepest Roots, the first an earthy assault of sound as unapologetically caustic as it is hungrily tempting which only evolves with every passing note before returning to its cycles but twisting them around with fresh adventure so expectations can never feed and the imagination can be greedy; traits the whole of The Ties That Bind embraces. The final track sees Huse and Greenaway dueting, a spellbinding union which just lights up the air as William’s guitar strolls beside them; a darker climate looming in all the while to add to the captivation and drama.

It is a glorious end to quite simply the finest moment of Morass Of Molasses by far even given the might of those before it. The band is one of the UK’s truly unique and striking propositions and through the sensational The Ties That Bind they should get the recognition, attention, and success they both deserve.

The Ties That Bind is out now via Wasted State Records; available @ https://morassofmolasses.bandcamp.com/

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Pete RingMaster 04/07/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Blacktones – The Day We Shut Down The Sun

If a band name was ever perfect for the music it represents, The Blacktones is at the head of the field. The Italian outfit create a fusion of alternative/melodic metal and sludge thick stoner rock awash with the heaviest darkest shadows and emotions. It is invasive yet inescapably infectious as it snarls and ruggedly seduces in equal measure and especially magnetic within the band’s latest album, The Day We Shut Down The Sun.

Though in some ways feeling like a concept album, the band says The Day We Shut Down The Sun is “not a true concept, but every song represents a step by step journey to the losing of all the qualities of a human being. Following the tarots (starting with the pope, the fifth card) we represent the losing of faith, wisdom, genius, knowledge and finally, trough the Mage, we become the Fool, embracing the primordial chaos.” It is an alluring feel across the release bound in a thick collusion of hungry riffs, muscular rhythms, and melodic and vocal dexterity. Not always boldly unique, it is perpetually a proposition with individual character and enterprise which grabbed keen attention.

The band itself hails from Cagliari, formed in 2011 as an instrumental encounter by guitarist Sergio Boi and bassist Gianni Farci. Subsequently the line-up and creative intent evolved with the addition of drummer Maurizio Mura and vocalist Simone Utzeri, debut EP Distorted Reality arriving in 2012 before Aaron Tolu replaced Utzeri as frontman two years later. Their well-received self-titled debut album with guitarist Paolo Mulas bringing the band to a quintet drew potent interest with its release, as now its successor, via Sliptrick Records in 2015.It sowed the seeds for the richer and more rounded proposition of The Day We Shut Down The Sun and its more individual escapades.

Throughout the album, there are experimental darkly atmospheric intros, each counting down to the end of existence; the first in V – The Pope drawing ears and imagination into the waiting jaws of The Upside Down. Immediately a tide of sonic and vocal ferocity launches at ears, an instincts sparking groove infesting body and appetite within as rhythms pounce. Tolu’s vocals are just as rousing as the sounds around him, riffs adding a swing to their rapacity to match the tenacious endeavour of the increasingly contagious groove. Adventure and unpredictability blossoms as the song continues, bold sound and voice shaping one striking incendiary slab of metal.

The following Ghosts unveils a less imposing introduction but just as compelling with its suggestive intrigue and musical temptation. Down like grooves spread their lures from within the growing incitement, more aggressive traits emerging in all aspects but equally a tantalising melodic suggestiveness in guitar and harmonics which lures the imagination deeper into the ever present shadows.

The album’s title track makes an equally ear grabbing entrance, a predacious one as it prowls the senses with doom loaded rhythms amidst a slow tenebrific groove. Deep in its clutches you feel the lack of light, its thick weave a suffocating enveloping of the senses yet everything about it is contagious starting with Tolu’s ever enticing vocals. There is something certainly familiar about the excellent track yet plenty more fresh aspects in its trespass to demand praise carrying attention before Not The End backs its power up with its own pleasure brewing tempest. With a tinge of One Minutes Silence to it at times, the song twists and turns with an irritability in tone and sound as much a threat as it is a tempestuous seduction with stoner bred grooves and carnivorous basslines entwining for an even bigger lure.

Alone Together crawls over the senses, lumbering grooves and primal riffs enticing before dissipating for the melodic heart of the track to coax even closer attention. When they return with even greater weight and intensity as well as imagination, a lustful appetite was reeled in and only increased by the expressive and inventive journey taken while I.D.I.O.T.S. creates a web of stoner veins around metal antipathy to keep enjoyment just as intensive. Infectious and corrosive, the track is a great blend resembling Corrosion of Conformity meets Clutch and another highlight of the increasingly enjoyable album.

The Day We Shut Down The Sun is brought to a just as potent and mercurial conclusion by Nowhere Man and Broken Dove, the first a scorched and searing proposition as virulent in its calm predacious stroll as in its senses broiling blaze with its successor a more restrained but no less volatile collusion of sonic and emotional dissonance aligned to its own sonic furies. Both songs leave ears and pleasure entangled in their creative roars and each reinforces greater keenness in The Blacktones growth.

With a final pair of cards leaving the listener lost in the void, The Day We Shut Down The Sun is a release which should be checked out. It certainly grabbed attention first time around but really blossomed as an experience and pleasure thereon in.

The Day We Shut Down The Sun is available now through Sliptrick Records and @ https://theblacktonesband.bandcamp.com/album/the-day-we-shut-down-the-sun

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Pete RingMaster 14/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Atomic Bitchwax – Force Field

This is the time of year that the media generally gathers up their thoughts on Best Of lists and here to holler ‘hold up contemplate this first’ is the new album from New Jersey power trio The Atomic Bitchwax. A virulent tour-de-force of balls swinging rock ‘n’ roll, Force Field is a chest beating riot in the ears and ignition for the spirit which hits top gear in every aspect from its first breath and never takes its foot off the rock ‘n’ roll pedal until its very last.

Formed in 1993, The Atomic Bitchwax are on to their sixth album with Force Field and have never felt more energetically insatiable and creatively fevered or indeed irresistible.  The release sees bassist/vocalist Chris Kosnik and drummer Bob Pantella, both also of Monster Magnet, alongside guitarist Finn Ryan, formerly of Core, unleashing twelve slices of space rock infused stoner soaked proto-metal which assaults the senses like a rapacious virus. It ferociously careers through ears, gets into every pore to leaves a rich lingering taste which only inflames the appetite for more and more. Force Field might be one of the latecomers to the year’s party but immediately is the inescapable focus of attention.

It roars into action with Hippie Speedball, the kinetic thump of Pantella’s swings swiftly joined by the raw fuzz of Ryan’s riffs and the rebel rousing stroll of Kosnik’s bass groove. In no time the whole band is fingering an instinctive appetite for groove slung rock ‘n’ roll, the bassist’s vocals tones riding it all like a tenacious surfer as two and a half minutes are eagerly swallowed up the slab of sonic contagion.

Infestation one leads to number two in the shape of Earth Shaker (Which Doobie U Be). Instantly its muscle has bones shuddering, its sonic toxicity the imagination hooked as the listener is thrust into a whirl of melodic temptation and boisterous catchiness with a Rob Zombie-esque tinge. A robust rock ‘n’ roll waltz bound in stoner/psych dexterity, the mouth-watering escapade is soon outdone by the following Alaskan Thunder F*ck where a maze of melodic strands around rhythmic trespasses are thrust through ears with insatiable creative adrenaline. From vocals to grooves, hooks to rhythmic badgering, the song hits the spot dead centre yet is still in turn eclipsed by the outstanding Shocker. If the previous track was a hungry nagging its successor is an infernal itch with the most salacious row of hooks rich in aural bait. Neck muscles are worked out, limbs stretched from start to finish, the track so infectious and manipulative it is almost vindictive.

Next up, Crazy is an orgy of lecherous grooves and libertine rhythms, an electrified wash of temptation while Fried Dyed And Layin To The Side dances on the senses with the wantonness and devilry of a Wickerman worshipping cult with its instrumental a psyche twisting incitement. Each has body and imagination wrapped up in eager involvement, a feat even more vice like in the hands of Shell of a Man and its own randy antics. A song sure to have even a graveyard bouncing, it is sonic lasciviousness leading to unfettered addiction.

To be honest, that welcome dependence was installed from the first strains of Force Field, only gathering pace and hold track by track and continuing to accelerate as the likes of Houndstooth with its feral rock ‘n’ roll, the blues grooved stoner web of Tits and Bones, and the incessant rumble of Humble Brag lustfully seduce and hungrily incite.

Choosing favourite track within the album is a revolving whirl of indecision such its constant might but the glorious infection loaded charge of Super Highway is always to the fore, the song as virile a contagion as you will ever meet sonically or physically.

It all ends with Liv A Little, a mesh of seventies pop/ psych rock seduced by Hammond keys and entangled in blues lined stone grooves as fuzz soaked vocals flirt. Limbs and energies are defenceless to its merciless lures, the track a tapestry of decades courting flavours.

With every song rampaging pretty much in the time two minutes becomes three the album is a series of rousing bursts and arousing stomps. It draws on styles and inspirations past, weaving them into roars fresher and more adventurous than most heard this year and pretty much more vital than all.

Force Field is out now through Tee Pee Records.

http://www.theatomicbitchwax.com/    https://www.facebook.com/The-Atomic-Bitchwax-86002001659/

Pete RingMaster

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

IAmFire – From Ashes

With the self-titled debut Mary Beats Jane album one of our all-time favourite releases, we have kept a close eye on the exploits of vocalist Peter Dolving especially with his time in The Haunted. So there was certain anticipation when news of a first album from IAmFire emerged, a project originally seeing Dolving linking up with bassist/vocalist Mikael Ehlert, guitarist Peter Ahlers Olsen, and drummer Ulf Scott. Now completed by drummer Jakob Mygind with Rasmus Revsbech, the Copenhagen outfit swiftly and increasingly surprise, feed, and captivate with From Ashes and its feast of heavy psychedelic/stoner rock bred adventures.

From its first breath From Ashes imposes its presence and qualities upon ears and imagination, opener Magpies and crows forcibly prowling the senses with ominous riffs and hefty beats. It soon settles into a heavy footed magnetic stroll though as the contrasting but equally tempting warm tones of Dolving settle upon the trespass. Fusing essences akin to Electric Wizard, Black Sabbath, and Kyuss with the grungier spicing of a Gruntruck, the track submerges the listener in a weighty embrace of sound and hypnotic charm.

It is a compelling start carrying on into next up Did you find your name, the song sauntering in on a mellow melodic breeze driven by boisterous and instantly rousing rhythms. As its predecessor, its presence is immediately contagious, Dolving vocally and the band musically weaving a celestial tapestry of suggestion with a lurking lining of shadow bred implication. That dark inclination erupts with increasing intensity as the song twists and turns, its rapacious Palms spiced heart sharing its creativity with melodic stimulants and increasing imagination.

Burn your halo shares a more irritable nature in its grunge lined rock ‘n’ roll next with its successor, Eyes wide open, descending into psych rock foreboding and seduction, again with an ever present edge which keeps the senses wary and ears transfixed. Both songs infuse unpredictable and tantalising twists in their already riveting bodies, the second casting a sonic incantation with a raw Jane’s Addiction like air, and each leave ears and appetite just wanting more.

That need is potently fed by For what it´s worth, its tribal rhythmic predation and invasively dancing grooves as addictive as Dolving’s vocal incitement which carries as much portentousness as reassuring calm. Bordering ritualistic, the track is creative manipulation with increasing dexterity before a similar but individual persuasion is cast by Beamer. It too has a volatility which maybe threatens rather than erupts but adds to the song’s body and imagination involving mastery with the drums an addictive ringleader once again.

The album concludes with firstly My mistake, a ravenous cosmic infestation, and lastly through the caustic yet suave tenacious shuffle of Inside. As the album overall, both tracks simply get under the skin with the puppeteer qualities of the rhythms and irresistible trespass of the grooves, they just two aspects in their individual multi-layered and flavoured examinations.

From Ashes is psych/stoner manna with rabidity in its enterprise controlled by an imagination which barely recognises restraint itself, in its midst Dolving may be exploring his own finest moments yet. Simply it is striking irresistible stuff; so seems we have another to add to our persistent favourites.

From Ashes is out now via Elevation Denmark and available @ https://iamfirerocks.bandcamp.com/album/from-ashes

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Pete RingMaster 21/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Regulus – Quadralith

If you are looking to be ensnared in some new and fresh groove wired trespasses, checking out the latest album from UK blues stoners Regulus would be one wise move. Quadralith is ten tracks of eagerly infectious heavy assed enterprise; a multi-flavoured affair from a quartet of highly accomplished musicians.

The successor to their 2014 debut album Smoke and following a self-titled third EP released a year later, Quadralith sees Sheffield hailing Regulus venture into a new plateau of sound and imagination. There is new energy and maturity to its presence and songwriting compared to its predecessors which in turn breeds a bolder tapestry of flavour and enterprise as well as new potential for future success.

The album opens up with Dominion and instantly winds a dirty enticing groove around ears before the robustly swinging rhythms of drummer Joe Milburn and bassist Martyn Lucas-Bewick spring their bait. As the guitars of Thomas Osborne and Luke Jennings add their melodic enterprise and hungry riffs, the latter’s vocals backed by the former’s to complete the potent lure, the track has attention firmly held. With a touch of early Desert Storm to its body, the song grows and blossoms by the minute and listen, laying the scene for things to come with its expanding net of flavours.

The following Last Chance To Die Young makes a more instant impact as the virulent beats of Milburn stirs the instincts from within a sonic cry. There is no escaping the organic draw of the grooves swiftly dancing on the appetite, riffs and rhythms courting that temptation with their own catchy tenacity. Vocals come with a greater snarl than in the first song, a cantankerousness which suits as both guitarists combine the imagination of their electric strings. Quickly igniting ears, the song builds on the strong invitation of its predecessor to really get things firing before Seven Tales Told gets funky and sultry with Lucas-Bewick’s magnetic bass leading the way. Merging blues rock essences with heavy stoner and that keen funkiness, the song flirts and imposes from within a raw contagious stroll.

The band takes the listener into darker depths with Bones, its heavy textures almost stalking the senses but again with a natural catchiness which only entices. Even as it slips into a blues croon, there is a swing to the rhythms which demands involvement as much as that coaxed by melodies and vocals, the potent addition of contrasting female tones catching the imagination. Its heavy, lurking prowess is followed by the country rock twanged Heart of Stone and the resourceful tapestry of The Dream Reaper. The first of the two easily pleases though lacks the vital sparks of many companions within Quadralith and is quickly outshone by the grooves woven, stoner heated roar of its successor. Taking best track honours, the song spins a sonic weave of temptation and enterprise which fascinates as it manipulates ears and body.

Poor Man’s Grave is no slouch in grabbing eager attention either; its instinctive swagger, if ebbing and flowing too much at times, a constant draw on which guitars and bass skilfully and magnetically conjure while Dutch is a slab of instrumental stoner rock ‘n roll which twists and turns with persistent boisterousness and ideation to continue the new high the album has found. Milburn is especially dexterous and compelling and just as potently backed by his band mates as the song masterfully dances upon the senses.

With a scent of XII Boar to its grouchy romp, Overcome keeps the passions burning, its lure devilish and infectiousness unwavering as it nurtures another pinnacle to Quadralith, success backed by the album’s title track as it brings the release to a fine close.

Across the album you sense a tempestuousness, an intimate angst but one used to drive and colour the creative adventure and energy of all four members of Regulus individually and as one. There are times when the album does not bite and sear as it might or personal tastes wish but it has a persistent potential which draws keen attention as much as the undoubted prowess and imagination of the band with pleasure the continuing result.

Quadralith is available now through Off Yer Rocka Recordings @ https://regulusband.bandcamp.com/

http://www.regulusband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/regulus.band    https://twitter.com/RegulusBand

Pete RingMaster 07/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright