Pigeon Lake – Barriers Fall

Three years after the release of their striking and quickly acclaimed debut album, Tales of a Madman, Norwegian quartet Pigeon Lake return with its successor in Barriers Fall. The time between has seen changes within the band and a reassessment of the way forward; a shift sparking an evolution in sound too which is actually hard to pin down but openly inflaming the Oslo outfit’s new offering and release which like its predecessor at the time, will make a definite rival to those around it for one of the most essential investigations of the year.

Since emerging in the opening smiles of 2012, Pigeon Lake has grown to be one of the most compelling propositions on the melodic rock/metal landscape. Founded by vocalist/guitarist Christopher Schackt and completed by childhood friend and drummer Andreas Prestby and bassist Kenneth Stiansen, the band instantly sparked attention and praise with the I: Mindrape EP later in that first year. Its themes of domestic violence, sexual assault, and mental health were as striking as the raw sounds inciting ears. The three became four with the addition of lead guitarist Magnus Engemoen soon after while the following year saw Stiansen replaced by Anders Børresen. As their sound moved towards a flavouring more akin to the likes of Katatonia, Stone Sour, and The Ocean, the band’s live presence escalated before they got down to work creating Tales of a Madman, its release coming in the Autumn of 2014 and followed by the band heavily hitting the road again including taking their first steps touring Europe.

Linking up with Wormholedeath Records in recent times provided the spark for that previously mentioned re-assessment and the resulting highly amicable departure of Børresen and Prestby which was soon followed by the joining of bassist Håkon Bechholm and drummer Jonas Rønningen. Now the new line-up has unveiled Barriers Fall, an encounter feeling darker and rawer than that first album yet their most melodically seductive and inventively mature adventure yet.

The album opens with Ragnarok, grooves instantly wrapping ears with shadow lined radiance. There is a portentous edge to them though, nothing imposing but clearly there as rhythms jab and riffs collude around them. Magnetic straight away, the track settles down into a heavy prowl where all those imposing elements erupt for a few rapacious seconds before Schackt’s cleaner tones steer the tempest into kinder waters. Abrasive growls remain alongside him though as the song merges predatory and seductive sides, luring the imagination into a provocative squall of emotion and intensity.

It is a striking start soon eclipsed by the just as tempestuous roar of Lyra. Nagging riffs align with Schackt’s distinctive tones initially, the bass prowling around them before the incendiary heart of the track erupts with fiery melodies and antagonistic tendencies. Harmonies and melodic tempting bewitch as the song subsequently shares its evolving soundscape, contrasting textures blending their potencies in one beguiling encounter. There is definitely something of the aforementioned Katatonia to the song and indeed album but equally the likes of Opeth and Swallow The Sun come to mind though in all honesty Pigeon Lake here and across Barriers Fall only reveal their own character of sound and imagination.

The album’s title track is next, seducing with a mesmerising poetic melody and calm vocal reflection before Rønningen’s beats add increasing threat. In time, as things increasingly simmer with greater intensity, everything comes to a head, vocals spilling their psychosis as a sonic causticity descends. A relative relief in the storm comes with the closing breaths of the excellent track before the more mercurial presence of The Futility of You takes the listener into a controlled yet seemingly unstable emotional embrace. Again the music is a web of trespass and radiance, vocals matching the changeable mood with suggestive prowess as wiry hooks and almost toxic melodies tempt and trap the imagination. Epitomising the album as a whole, the track only reveals new layers and textures with every listen, each time within it seeing growing attraction and the blossoming of image painting thoughts.

Hide and Seek runs a fine line of control and lawlessness, its cauldron of corrosive energy restrained and held back by the harmonic and melodic beauty hugging the senses though it is never more than a breath from breaking free while within Sunder it shapes the predatory nature of a track which equally is as much an oasis of elegance and gentle repose as a turbulent tempest; a beauty and beast of inner and worldly turmoil.

Senses harrying riffs brings A Familiar Problem to bear on ears next, delicious bait opening up into a just as enticing fusion of roaming grooves and brooding rhythms around feral toned vocals. That previously mentioned raw element of the release has its head with the harsh throated presence of Schackt adding to the psychotic edge of the track with clean and melody woven radiancy just as powerful before Perfect Place casts its variable cyclone on the passions. Irresistible within its first moments and only stealing greater lust thereon in, the track breeds an addiction as rich as its unpredictability to provide if not the pinnacle, one of many.

Closing track Let’s Pretend takes the listener into one final embrace of emotional restlessness and creative anxiety, the song as the album whilst being intricately woven and layered is almost anarchic in its nature and heart. It is a fine end to another encounter with Pigeon Lake which simply blossoms and further impresses with every listen.  To be fussy, personal tastes would see Schackt’s throat scarring vocal side reduced to allow his excellent clean and emotionally suggestive tones to have an even larger say but it is a mere passing thought in a release which stirs every part of body and mind.

Barriers Fall is available now through Wormholedeath Records across most online stores.

http://www.pigeonlake.no/    https://www.facebook.com/PigeonLakeMusic/   https://twitter.com/PigeonLakeMusic

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Contemplating Leaving Eden

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It is quite simple. Leaving Eden is a band which demands attention with a sound and creative flair that persistently captures the imagination drawing an ever growing following simultaneously. Their ear catching and thought provoking music has help lead the band to sharing stages with hundreds of the biggest national bands in the world and tours across numerous countries. We managed to grab some time with Eric from the band to learn more about Leaving Eden and what makes them tick…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band?

Hi, great chatting with you also.

Eve: Lead Vocals

Ryan: Manning Drums

Johhny V: Bass

I’m Eric Gynan: Guitarist, vocals, Keys.

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now?

Yes we’ve all been in various bands along the way and learning from the past always gives you a jump on the future.

What inspired the band name?

Leaving Eden came to be simply that this planet is like the Garden of Eden right, with all of its corruption; wouldn’t it be nice to take off and go somewhere else to visit? Lol.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it to offer and does that intent still drive the band or has it evolved over time?

Definitely we have evolved. I think you have to in order to change with the times so long as it’s better. It’s important though to maintain your individuality. For us we set out to be different. Quick story here, we went to this huge studio once where bands like Seven Dust, The Rolling Stones and Boston recorded. The person there brought out a white board in the conference room and drew a box. They said you are here, pointing outside the box and you need to be here, pointing inside the box. I immediately said wait, are you telling us we need to be in that box?  They said well yes I guess I am. I said thank you very much and got up and walked out. I get it, if you wanna ride a wave and be like everyone else on that moment of time, they can easily slip you into a genre. For us though it’s hard to just slip us in to any particular genre. We won the best Hardcore act in New England and I thought that was funny because they couldn’t find the appropriate Genre for us. We stay true no matter what the times may change to our roots, Rock Music.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved and has that been an organic movement or you guys deliberately heading in certain directions?

I think being a recording artist, endlessly recording and working with some incredible recording engineers like Johnny K (Disturbed, Pop Evil) you learn what it really takes. When they say they will go through your music with a fine tooth comb, they mean that literally that down to the 64th beat your music will be scrutinized for perfection. Ya know good bad or indifferent, when you listen to the radio, you may not like the band you’re listening to but aside from that, you will NEVER hear something that’s not polished. It’s gotta be perfect or you’ll never make it to the radio. With this on mind, you take this knowledge of being tight to the live performance and it makes all the difference in the world. This is why some bands may record a great album but when you see them live, it’s just not the same. We try and stay true to our recordings.  We also evolve in that area after the recording we may change it up live where we may think we’ve built upon that foundation.

art_RingMasterReviewPresumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

I think all of us are inspired by what we like as far as taste in other bands music. For us what greatly inspires us is that organic sound that manifests itself in a way that is kind of like connecting the dots. We feel that Leaving Eden learns from the past, encompasses the present and forges the future. Any band that has been in the gutters not in the limelight, they’re the ones whom always forged the future. This is why we named our last album Pinnacle…Because it’s at that pinnacle where trends will be forged.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

Sure. For me I connect with the Universe in a way that opens my mind to listening. I use my fingers as kind of line antennas to pick up the frequencies, as strange as that sounds, if you listen, you can hear the music that lyrics, melodies and harmonies completely produced. Just gotta transfer that info to the recording. Then the rest of the band puts their stamp on it and presto, there’s a new song. I’ve even felt the influence of dead poets coming through. Sometimes I feel like I really can’t even take credit for the songs as they’ve come from somewhere else. It’s a deep meditative state of mind that brings these ideas into fruition.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Great question… Our songs speak from experience, life’s experiences…Sometimes good but mostly bad lol. Bad in the way of getting screwed, for instance our song Tied and Bound comes from the frustration of the music industry; “We’ve been screwed overcharged underpaid and abused, exploited avoided and falsely accused, we’ve been cut down let down fucked around tied and bound, but nothing can take the music away”

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Pinnacle released by Rock Avenue Records USA, was completely written before we got to the studio. We like to do pre-production first, be prepared so to speak, so that we aren’t wasting valuable time and money. Pinnacle is really an eclectic array of song themes and music. We tried to keep it again organic so you won’t hear all these extra vocal harmonies for instance that we could never do live. Yes there is harmony, but it can be done live.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

That is where one should shine right?  I feel it is our live sound which is one of our trade marks. It’s so hard in the studio to capture that live performance primarily because it’s a one sided energy exchange. When you have a crowd, that’s where the sharing of the energy happens, therefore it really helps to put you on top of your game. You can’t see the band for instance when listening to an album, so that performance is so necessary.  Can the band reproduce that sound live? With Eve in front, she is clearly universal and really takes control of the room or festival, really just connecting with the crowd.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?14195978_1274693589207580_3294288122701219788_o

Correct. We’ve been fortunate, lucky, graced, whatever you’d like to call it. Our motto has always been that we will play anywhere, anytime, any way we can so long as we can. This philosophy has led us to share the stage with some of the biggest bands in the world with;  Lacuna Coil, In This Moment, Black Sabbath (Heaven & Hell), Ronnie James Dio,  Rob Zombie, 5 Finger DeathPunch, Disturbed, Marylyn Manson, Alice Cooper, Lynyrd Skynyrd, ZZTop, Puddle of Mudd, Korn, Killswitch Engage, BuckCherry (Jefferson Starship, Big Brother and The Holding Company, Country Joe, 10 Years After, 40th Anniversary Woodstock) Shinedown, Dropkick Murphy’s,  Alice in Chains, Papa Roach, Bret Micheals, Halestorm, Theory of a Deadman, Avenged Sevenfold, Seether, Hell Yeah, Trapt, Dope, Soil, Fuel,  Queensryche, Saving Abel, Hinder, Damage Plan, 7Dust, Sebastian Bach, SoulFly, Days of the New, NonPoint, DrowningPool, The Misfits, The Butcher Babies, Collective Soul, MushroomHead, Mudvayne, Chevelle, Godsmack, Powerman 5000, 10Years, Taproot, Gin Blossoms, Michael Schenker (UFO, MSG & The Scorpions) Herman Rarebell (The Scorpions), Nicko McBrain (Iron Maiden), Kittie, One eyed doll, Uncle Kracker, Tremonti (Creed/Alterbridge) Lamb of god, Slayer, Stone Sour, Motorhead, Blackstone Cherry, HOOKERS & BLOW Featuring GUNS N’ ROSES, QUIET RIOT, W.A.S.P. Members, Steven Tyler, Ted Nugent, Lita Ford, LA Guns, Trixter, Warrant, Apocalyptic Review (featuring members of Godsmack) and many more..  This has led us to Winning The New England Music Awards & The Pulse Magazine Worcester MA Music Awards and Touring The USA, UK & Canada. If we didn’t get out there we would have never found these opportunities. There’s usually someone there that can help move you forward.

Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

Absolutely…In fact I believe bands who haven’t “made it” have more of an opportunity. Let’s take a band that has made it whether it was one song or many. As time passes, for whatever reason, they stopped making hits. It’s very rare for them to have another hit song or even get on the radio. It’s very strange but true. As a new artist you have more of a chance because again you’re at the pinnacle forging ahead.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

I find this very interesting. In a moment you can be heard all over the world. It’s absolutely amazing. Back in the day I feel bad for the artists before the internet that never had that chance. Shit, back then you couldn’t even stay connected with different states via phone. It was too expensive to make a phone call so you were quite limited as far as how far you could reach. Now, our music is flying through the airways, our unreleased song Out of the ashes says; digging deeper underground faster than the speed of sound

I can see the light of day, darkness fades away”. This just says as a band that’s not superstars, they are basically underground in the gutters spreading like swill in the harbor of slime lol. God some of the venues we’ve played have been the scum of the earth. Shit when we went to UK, there was a dirt floor. But in order to really appreciate where you may end up you’ve got to crawl through the slime in the gutters. If I for instance just started a band, had lots of money, related to someone big in the industry, getting signed immediately and becoming famous overnight, how then could I appreciate where I came from? When you come from the bottom of the barrel and make your way to the top, you never forget where you came from.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers

This was fun. Please excuse my unorthodox replies here and appreciate your time. Leaving Eden will be touring the USA, Canada and Europe. Hopefully South America as well, where our management/touring Co. Alpha Omega/Darkside Entertainment has offices in Europe, USA and South America we feel honored to be part of the family there. We hope to see all of you soon!! For all Leaving Eden Info go to http://www.leavingeden.com

And see us on Facebook Leaving Eden and Peace and Harmony to all!!  I say harmony because this planet, the universe, everything in it works in perfect harmony accept one species, Humans. WTF is that about right? Let’s make it happen.

https://www.facebook.com/bandleavingeden

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 01/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Outright Resistance – Me Vs I EP

Outright Resistance

Outright Resistance

There has been a following roar of impressed voices and recommendation to the ascent of UK metallers Outright Resistance within the UK metal scene and especially over recent weeks with the release of the band’s new EP Me Vs I. It is a defiant and aggressive growl of raw groove woven metal often openly suggesting inspirations from bands such as Lamb of God, Chimaira, Stone Sour, August Burns Red, The Agony Scene, and Pantera but unleashing its if not fully unique certainly own kind of irritable sound.

Formed in 2011, the Stevenage bred band soon had debut EP Don’t Eat My Organs stirring up awareness whilst hitting the local live scene with a raw passion. Shows with the likes of Hacktivist and TRC were including in a host of gigs across Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, and London, all adding to a growing reputation which was invigorated further by last year’s Poveglia EP and especially now through Me Vs I, with being one of six finalists in the 2015 London arm of the Bloodstock Metal to the Masses competition in between.

Me Vs I opens with its title track, a short piece of drama which finds more sense and potency once having journeyed through the whole EP and its honest no punches pulled look at prejudices and ignorance among other things. Maimed In Chelsea is the next proposal and boy does it start off with a wallop, riffs nagging the senses before being quickly joined by thumping rhythms and the grasping roars of vocalist Paige Lee. In no time it is into a grouchy stroll with Pantera-esque grooves entangling harsher rhythmic predation. Backed by the band, Lee continues to orchestrate the venomous nature of the track with her imposing vocal trespasses, the guitars of Michael Worsley and Joe Jacobs creating a contagious web of grooves and riffs for an outstanding full start to the EP which just becomes more addictive and viciously dynamic with each passing minute.

me-vs-i-artwork_RingMasterReviewProve Them Wrong steps forward next, displaying an even eager desire to consume the senses as riffs and the scything beats of Michael O’Neill descend. Soon displaying a more familiar heavy metal nature to its onslaught and melodic toxicity, the track is a hungrily enjoyable canter with the bass of Chris Everett a predatory incitement alongside the growling antagonism of Paige. Missing some of the extra sparks which ignited its predecessor, the song nevertheless leaves a heavily satisfied appetite behind before the outstanding Pain grabs attention next. From its first rhythmic coaxing there is a belligerence and defiance to the character of the song, a tempestuous attitude which fuels riffs and voice but still content to share its moments with spicy melodies and electronic intrigue across an increasingly rousing and enjoyable encounter.

An echo of Paige’s own personal journey having to deal with transphobia, Gee, Dysphoria challenges as it roars, rhythms a concussive assault and riffs a relentless incursion on the senses as vocals uncage an animosity toned but plaintive call for understanding. With melody spiced grooves and fiery enterprise straddling its intensive outpouring of the heart, the song demands attention being soon matched by successor Destiny Is All and in turn outshone by the closing ravaging of Take The Blame.

The first of the two stalks the senses; riffs again a niggling proposition as beats cantankerously swipe and vocals crawl with similar intent over song and listener while the second is a thrash/death metal spiced tempest as virulently catchy as it is violently imposing and bound in short but flavoursome grooves. Standing alongside Maimed In Chelsea as the EP’s best moment and showing the most adventurous nature of all, the song is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable release.

Me Vs I lives up to the promise and potential suggested by plaudits towards the band so far, suggesting greater things to come from Outright Resistance while leaving keen enjoyment.

The Me Vs I EP is out now @ https://outrightresistance.bandcamp.com/album/me-vs-i

https://www.facebook.com/OutrightResistanceBand/   https://twitter.com/OR_Band   http://www.orband.co.uk/

Pete RingMaster 20/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Spreading The Disease – Viral

Front art std ep_RingMaster Review

Having teased and indeed savaged ears with their first single Bulldozer recently, British metallers Spreading The Disease reveal more of their crushing sound and intensive potential with debut EP Viral. Consisting of four anthemically vicious and belligerently compelling slabs of raw rock ‘n’ roll, the release is a rousing protagonist. It comes littered with crucial grooves, predatory rhythms, and an enterprise which is as in the face hungry as the intensity fuelling each conflict within. It is early days for Spreading The Disease but the suggestion posed by Viral is that the UK has another ferocious and invigorating adventure brewing within its metal/heavy rock landscape.

Formed late 2014 by Steve Saunders, the former bassist of The Self Titled who approached his new endeavour with the intent to allow “a different approach to both band policy and creativeness”, the Kent based Spreading The Disease quickly expanded its line-up with drummer Edd Saunders. In relatively short time lead guitarist Julien Riquelme, rhythm guitarist Martin Osborne, and vocalist Adam May were completing the band’s personnel with a handful of songs soon emerging. Inspirations to their sound include the likes of Pantera, Kill or Be Killed, and Stone Sour through to Slipknot, Machine Head, and Breed 77, essences audible in the unbridled fury of first single Bulldozer. Now it is Viral poised to emulate its success with a potency which pretty much is what it says on the tin, offering an invasive and sweeping brutally with the potential to stir up the national metal scene.

POSTCARD_RingMaster ReviewF.U.C.K.U. roars through ears first, the EP opener emerging from a percussive ring of an invitation to intrude upon and stir up the senses. An initial riff is the coaxing prelude to a predatory stroll of irritable riffs and punchy rhythms swiftly bound in just as magnetic and tetchy grooves. The energy and attack of the track enjoyably ebbs and flows without ever leaving the listener void of an incentive to respond in kind to its anthemic provocation whilst the imagination gets entangled in the magnetic craft of Riquelme and Osborne. With the raw at times vitriolic squalls of May’s vocals loaded in unbridled rage and emotion, the track is a thunderous incitement and impressive start to the encounter.

Lost Generation is a matching exploit in songwriting and volatile invention, it too with a reserved entrance which soon builds into a formidable and cantankerously imposing canter. The song never quite reaches the viciousness of its predecessor but certainly emulates its success in sound and creative tenacity. More diversity to the vocals courts unpredictable and gripping twists and turns within the metal meets heavy rock ‘n’ roll powder keg whilst grooves spawned just infect the psyche with their virulent toxicity. With rhythms battering and provoking with similar potency the track is the kind of weighty rock ‘n’ roll instincts get greed over.

Bulldozer comes next and gets straight to the aggressive point as the bearish tones of May skirt the senses within a sinew driven onslaught of sound. It is an intrusion soon veined by classic metal enterprise though, that fiery sonic tempering to the brutality around it shaping the fluid fusion of calmer if still volatile moments within the bestial and contagious tempest. With a fierce climax to take on the world with, the track forcibly reminds why as that first introduction to the band, it impressed and sparked strong anticipation for Viral. Fair to say it still ensures thick satisfaction and the need to make a physical involvement with each and every listen but the fact that it is put in the shade a touch by the other tracks shows the strength and depth to the Spreading The Disease creative infection coursing through its companions on the EP.

Evolution brings the release to a storming close. From its first rigorous step, the track is a full-on infestation of riffs and hefty beats which is unafraid to build on its quick and bruising contagion by either spinning melodic meanders of peace or casting almost schizophrenic brawls of sonic imagination. The most exploratory song on the EP with an exotic hue to its melodic suggestiveness, the track does not neglect the band’s ability to create rancorous and debilitating ferocity neither, it all led by the great mix of throat scarring vocals and the ever primal and enticing bass of Saunders.

The track is a hellacious treat to end an excellent fuller glimpse at Spreading The Disease and their developing sound. As impressive as it is, Viral also suggests it is early days with much bigger bolder trespasses waiting to be nurtured and uncaged as the band evolves. With more of the same equally as palatable to anticipation, Spreading The Disease is looking like being another British brute equipped to breach the broadest spotlights ahead.

The Viral EP is out now at http://www.stdband.com/store.html

http://www.stdband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/spreadingthedisease.official

Pete RingMaster 12/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Order Of 315 – Antipi

 

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Three years ago French metallers Order of 315 awoke ears and attention with their debut album Near-Birth Experience, a fierce and tenacious offering which only grew in persuasion and stature over time. Now the Paris quartet have returned with its successor Antipi, raising the heat of the qualities and potential found in the first album whilst creating an even more compelling and varied confrontation. Antipi is a rousing incitement and cantankerous roar bred across eleven individual stirring aggravations of sound and imagination. Fair to say the band’s music still wears open inspirations at times but is now really showing its own character whilst unleashing tapestries of varied and aggressively delivered flavours.

Formed in 2010, Order of 315 draw on a host of styles from metalcore and hard-rock to progressive, djent, and alternative-metal; flavours bred in the experiences and tastes of its members with bands such as Black Label Society, Pantera, Machine Head, Slipknot, Stone Sour, Five Finger Death Punch, and Korn amongst individual sparks to their sound and imagination. The 2012 released Near-Birth Experience earned strong attention and acclaim from certainly the metal underground and media with its striking tempest, its seeds now blossoming into the creative voracity that is Antipi. The new album is more brutal yet equally richer in melodic tempting and certainly a more atmospherically volatile confrontation around a heart feverish in its resourcefulness.

Cover_RingMaster ReviewAntipi opens with A Slap On The Wrist and an initial sample stroked by an innocence drenched, single strand melody. It caresses the imagination, awakening ears ready for the swift assault on the senses of jagged riffs, beefy rhythms, and the instantly recognisable and welcome grizzly tones of Edgar Jabberwocky. His voice and delivery is a mighty lure alone easily igniting a pleased reaction in ears to match that being sparked by the growing rabid swing and antagonistic rumble of the sounds around him. The song is bullish rock ‘n’ roll, an easy anthem to get eager teeth into and a hungry appetite from, both fed with every passing swell of bruising enticement.

It is an outstanding start to the album quickly continued by Telescope. From its first groaning breath the track is a more imposing and intrusive proposition with the rhythms of drummer Pablo Civil unruly in their skilled design. Aligned to the predacious air of Grm Lecouflet’s bass, they make for a hostile yet gripping frame entwined by the thick winy grooves of Klaus Kersey, his guitar just as magnetic in primal riffery and sonic enterprise too. As with its predecessor, the track has hips violently gripped with its swinging challenge and ears hooked by its rapacious sound, Jabberwocky leading the incitement as masterfully as ever before The Feather Factor takes over with its industrial metal breeding and groove meets heavy/alternative metal tempestuousness. Subsequent switches into melodic flames bring a relatively undefined familiarity to things but only adds to the thick and captivating drama unfolding within ears.

Without quite finding the same dynamic impact as the first tracks, Abelian still keeps satisfaction fully whetted with its spidery melodic enterprise around a fierce tempest of a heart whilst the following Meiosis almost beats pleasure from the senses with the brutal rapier swings of Civil, though the atmospheric melodies, scything sonic trespasses, and unpredictable landscape of the assault are just as thickly tempting and alluring. Once more there is something recognisable in the spicing of the song but warped perfectly by its great bedlamic nature.

A creative composure lines Rumble Fish, the bass of Lecouflet a prowling protagonist leading the listener into the awaiting animus of the song. It never breaks its pleasing chains though, hinting and provoking with subtlety and atmospheric imagination whilst showing more of the growth in songwriting and maturity of the Order Of 315 sound, something clear across the whole of the album and indeed next up Data Warfare with its Korn meets Bloodsimple like turbulence with just a touch of Fear Factory adventure to it all.

Both the magnetically wiry Greyscale and the senses enveloping Densen keep things mean and keen; the first an inflamed mix of heavy metal and alternative rock as flirtatious as it is menacing whilst its successor crawls through ears with a slight but definite salacious sway to its evocative and intensive rock ‘n’ roll design. Both carry an attitude and hearty intimidation which, with the sonic imagination, sparks a want for more, a success just as easily drawn by the spiralling textures of Unperfect Circles. The track perpetually winds around the senses, the guitars especially influential in tempting out lusty enjoyment.

Drone brings Antipi to an end, the track a tangle of sonic craft and expression ridden by the brawly tones of Jabberwocky amidst a rhythmic tempest. Though in some ways the song takes longer to get to grips with, it is a fine end to another thrilling offering from Order Of 315. To be picky, there is a slight diminishing of unpredictability towards the rear of the release, until the final encounter anyway, but each track only ignites body and imagination to declare Order Of 315 one of the potent fresh roars within the metal scene.

Antipi is available now through numerous online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/OrderOf315

Pete RingMaster 21/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Spreading The Disease – Bulldozer

STD_RingMaster Review

Spreading The Disease is a new ravaging roar on the UK metal scene, certainly if their new single Bulldozer is the sign of things to come. The Kent based quintet is the creation Steve Saunders, the former bassist of The Self Titled for five years, and a project formed late 2014 to allow “for a different approach to both band policy and creativeness.” Swiftly it began to grow with Steve’s almost instant link up with drummer Edd Saunders and over following months the addition of lead guitarist Julien Riquelme, rhythm guitarist Martin Osborne and vocalist Adam May to the line-up, a creative union more than voraciously resourceful and inventively impassioned as shown by Bulldozer.

big_logo_RingMaster Review     That period also saw the writing of a host of songs, inspirations ranging from Pantera, Kill or Be Killed and Stone Sour to Slipknot, Machine Head, and Breed 77 amongst many adding to the evolving fury and adventure fuelling their sound. Now ahead of the recording of the band’s debut album early next year, Bulldozer has been uncaged to make the first heavyweight introduction to the Spreading The Disease infection.

Instantly the song offers an imposing and tenacious smothering of the senses, riffs and rhythms colluding to create a proposition living up in intensity and weight to its title. Almost as quickly though sonic tendrils draped in melodic fire are entwining the incitement too, their appearance aligned to the raw bear like confrontation of May’s vocals. All together it is a formidable and increasingly magnetic onslaught with only the more classically honed clean eruptions of backing vocals not quite working for personal tastes, though a minor thing in the ear in their slight conflict with the bestial and contagious predation of the track.

Continuing to brew and breed new twists and elements that grip attention, there is something for all one metal/heavy rock fans within the song, whether one with an appetite for a Mastodon or Slipknot to pluck two names from the air, or with a taste for extreme metal or more classically bred melodic metal, the song is a perpetual and enjoyably unpredictable unveiling of varied styles and rousing twists.

Bulldozer is a potent and striking first listen to Spreading The Disease, not enough being a single song to sing the band’s praises from lofty rooftops and claim them as a new major force, but as mentioned definitely a proposal offering plenty inciting a want to know more.

Bulldozer is being streamed @ https://soundcloud.com/spreading-the-disease/spreading-the-disease-bulldozer

http://www.stdband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/spreadingthedisease.official

Pete RingMaster 17/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Enemo J – Miley Virus

promo picture - enemo j_RingMaster Review

Listening to Enemo J is like being submerged in a swarm of African honeybees running amok, their sound a nagging and ferocious irritant that never desists in aggression and rage once provoked into creation by the band’s inspirations and imagination. As proven by new album Miley Virus, it also produces raw sonic nectar that ignites the appetite and through an unpredictable tempest, leaves the senses wrung out but with a real greed for more. The UK metaller’s fifth album is arguably their most adventurous and diverse yet, as again the band weaves an agitated expanse of styles and flavours into their storms, equally though it is possibly their most testing, but as that only results in being amongst their most fiercely enjoyable, it is a definite asset.

Hailing from Burton On Trent and emerging at the beginning of the new millennium, Enemo J has gone on to unleash a quartet of successful and increasingly acclaimed full-lengths and earned a potent stature for a live presence which has seen the band play with the likes of Napalm Death, (Hed) PE, Sylosis, Black Light Burns, and Korn, create a stir with performances at Download in 2010 and more recently 2014, and play with similar reactions fests such as Bloodstock. Now the core line-up of vocalist Craig Hartwell, guitarist Haydn Edwards, and bassist Mikey Wyke are ready to nudge and punch the broadest spotlights with Miley Virus, expectations after many listens to the beast leaning towards a highly positive outcome in that intent.

Miley Virus Artwork_RingMaster Review     After the vocal led Intro, band and album explode into tempestuous life with This Is Not A Toy, immediately spinning web of steely grooves and predatory rhythms led by the distinctive and as always swiftly engaging roars of Hartwell. His attack though comes with great variety from his throat and within the band, an adventure matching the winding lures of guitar and more controlled but no less imposing prowl of bass. Aligning ferocious metalcore influences with a groove metal tantalising, and subsequently cleaner textures in sound and voice, the track is a gripping and dynamic incitement to set things off and highly addictive, especially the more it evolves its rapacious body.

The album’s title track steps forward next, Miley Virus from an electronic coaxing flexing rhythmic muscles and cantankerous grooves from the already impressing prowess of Edwards. Spilling rap metal tenacity and enterprise in vocals and thick initial temptation, the track creates a kaleidoscope of uncompromising intensity and melodic tempting which at different times hints at the like of Skindred, Stone Sour, and American Head Charge across a thoroughly magnetic persuasion. Unfortunately our promo did not come with any details of guests and full personnel on the album but amongst many things, female vocals add a great siren-esque lure to the track’s robust adventure.

Five Percent slips in next, Hartwell’s voice offering its hip hop prowess as the track begins its growth into a fiery protagonist stalking ears and inciting with lyrical and physical confrontation. As bestial as it is harmoniously alluring within a volatile and climactic ambience, the outstanding track is a gripping proposal matched by This Stops Today. Carnivorous riffs court a sonic imagination straight away, vocals leaning towards a rancorous toning as they provoke and excite with the track perpetually twisting and embracing a wealth of attacks and formidable flavouring. As its predecessor, it too marks another lofty peak within the album with its Slipknot meets Stuck Mojo like voracity, a pinnacle almost emulated by the death/metalcore lined savaging of Ides Of March. The song is a predator of ears and emotions, virtually everything about it an insidious prowl led by the great malevolence fuelling Wyke’s bass but then tempered by the acidic strands spewed by Edward’s guitar and again impressive vocals.

The boldest adventure within Miley Virus starts emerging from Majora, the song a roar of rap lined metalcore which suddenly turns, with more impressive female vocals at its centre, into a melodically honed gothic proposal. This is Enemo J, so things never stay in one direction for long though; a swarming tenacity of riffs blossomed from the savaging fury and in turn swinging back into the gothic coated seducing. To be honest the track caught our ears by surprise and took a while to totally convince but overtime it wins out, as too Throughout which takes a similarly longer route in succeeding with its convincing. A thick tapestry of flavours extreme and melodic which at times flirts with post hardcore tendencies too, the song casts more great female vocals alongside the caustic squalls of Hartwell as melodies from keys and guitar provide an evocative drama. Admittedly, it fails to spark the same richest of reactions as earlier tracks but in fascination and invention, the song is absorbing and easy to repeatedly explore.

Both the volcanically intensive Sufferance and the drama fuelled radiance of Time sear the senses and light the imagination respectively, the first with its blackened wind over a swirling sonic canvas of endeavour. Its successor spins a low-key but potent acidic hook repetition within a sonically and emotionally turbulent post hardcore landscape, vocals as expected as strong as the music in revealing the depth of diversity and invention within their grasp.

Miley Virus is concluded by Drunk Lions At The Wolf Party, a ravenous ferocity of sound and presence veined by melodic and harmonic ingenuity. The song truly comes alive once all the extreme contrasts within it collude to create an engrossing flight of ire and emotive elegance, in turn providing a fine and big close to a riveting and thoroughly enjoyable encounter. Enemo J just goes from strength to strength with each release, and though for personal tastes it is a little bit a proposition of two halves, each song thrills and enthrals in their own inventive way to make Miley Virus an easy recommendation to make.

Miley Virus is out from November 1st through Digital Media Records across most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 31/10/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/