Monster Jaw – Losing All My Friends EP

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The end of 2013 brought forth Get A Tattoo, the debut EP from UK rockers Monster Jaw and a release which we found to be ‘Drenched in promise and an intriguing raw pleasure’. It was release which frequently lured our ears back into its potential fuelled grasp from thereon in and inspired a broader wave of national appetite for it with a reboot earlier this year through Cobra Kitten Records. Now the band returns with its successor and not only realises some of that brewing potency but has thickened it further, to again captivate, excite, and raise expectations that the Bradford/Leeds based trio will evolve into a pungent rock ‘n’ roll protagonist.

The Losing All My Friends EP bulges with a clutch of songs which manage to snarl whilst they seduce, each combining a mellow smouldering with heavy and hungry intensity. The tracks grip and spark full involvement from imagination and attention yet also they feel like a little bit of a missed opportunity in not going for the jugular creatively and aggressively. Nevertheless the release is a sizeable persuasion and a thoroughly enjoyable encounter which increases the stock and stature of one of Britain’s more fascinating emerging bands.

Formed in the earlier moments of last year by vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Mik Davis (ex-New York Alcoholic Anxiety Attack), bassist Neil Short (ex- Down the Machine), and drummer John Bradford (ex-Utopian Love Revival), Monster Jaw was soon sculpting striking songs bred from the inspiration of their surroundings and life experiences. Narratives of such baiting as love, sex, drugs, and dystopian futures swiftly gripped as the band’s sound and live presence brewed up a buzz , something Get A Tattoo soon fuelled further. Shows and support slots on tours for the likes of Stiff Little Fingers and New Model Army only accelerated their emergence and it is easy to see Losing All My Friends, produced as its predecessor by Wes Maybe (The Libertines, Roger Waters, Robert Plant), giving it all another healthy thrust.losingallmyfriendscover

The title track opens things up and takes little time in cupping ears with melodic enticing and rhythmic incitement. Once relaxing into its fiery stroll, with the strangely low key yet highly alluring vocals of Davis spicing up the growing sonic blaze, the track unleashes an infectiousness which is more a slow invasion than a virulent infestation but finds the same irresistible results. The shadowed basslines of Short temper and compliment the scorched temptation of guitar whilst Bradford jabs and probes ears with a reserved but punchy tempting, everything merging for a feisty and compelling mix of garage rock and punk with just a whiff of Jesus and Mary Chain tangy acidity.

The impressing start is followed by the catchy stomp of Low and the punkish psychedelic alluring of Lidocaine. The first of the two songs ebbs and flows in force, melodic caresses building to raw and energetic crescendos which hit the sweet spot. Though that changing of attack is emulated a little in success, the track is a bruising seduction which emerges as another potent slice of nostrils flaring alternative rock persuasion flavoured with a blend of Birdland and My Bloody Valentine essences twisted into something distinctly Monster Jaw. Its successor is a sultry furnace of hazy atmosphere and flaming sounds which again grip most addictively in its explosive eruptions which descend from slower suggestive build-ups. As its predecessor, the song is one where it walks a fine line between calm and aggression and maybe might have found a new gear choosing one over the other. It has to be said though but both, and especially Lidocaine linger and flirt with thoughts and emotions long after their departure so maybe the band has it right after all.

The release is completed by two bonus tracks, first up being a studio version of fan favourite Do It Gay, Do It Straight. It is a ridiculously compelling and anthemic slab of rock ‘n’ roll for feet, voice, and passions, and so easy to see why it ignites audiences. Completed by an extended version of the title track, Losing All My Friends is an increasingly impressing proposition. It gets bigger and better with every listen and though yes it does feel like the band missed a potent trick with it, the EP shows a more imaginative, creatively mature, and adventurous Monster Jaw, and that works for us.

The Losing All My Friends EP is available via Cobra Kitten Records now @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/Losing-All-Friends-Monster-Jaw/dp/B00N953ZK0/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1414436807&sr=1-1&keywords=monster+jaw

http://www.monsterjaw.co.uk

RingMaster 27/10/2014

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Bite The Shark – First Blood

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With a sound as snappy and hungry as their band name suggests, Bite The Shark have made one impressive and attention grabbing entrance with debut single First Blood. Consisting of three songs which roar and swagger with a muscular rock tenacity and punk ferocity, the release is an adrenaline charged juggernaut of rock ‘n’ roll. If you are looking for music unafraid to get dirty whilst spilling bodily fluids then letting Bite The Shark and its single clamp its jaws on you could be one of the wisest moves you make this year.

Hailing from Manchester, the UK band only formed in the early days of 2014 and has swiftly drawn a healthy attention and fan base their way. The recently released First Blood equally took no time in garnering acclaim and more, its success leading to an invitation to the trio of Rory O’Grady and brothers Adam and Edd Langmead, to record with Romesh Dodangoda (Motörhead, Bullet For My Valentine, Twin Atlantic) this September. Like the music within the single, it is fair to say that Bite The Shark is on a charge.

Gas & Air right away tells you all you need to know about its creators, rugged riffs immediately sizing up ears before welcoming imposing rhythms and spicy grooves. It is a striking entrance which is as bold in its presence as it is addictive Microsoft Word - bitesuarez.docxin its explosive enterprise. Elements of Turbonegro and Buckcherry whisper across the raucous adventure as well as spillages of old school punk rock, all resulting in a richly flavoursome and highly anthemic stomp. Hooks and increasingly infectious grooves continue to enslave ears and emotions whilst vocally the band provides a captivating call and brawl of passion drenched energy. The song seems to be the one the band’s fans has grasped to their hearts the most and it is easy to see why as it flirts and romps around the senses.

For us though it is Burn em to the ground (sometimes seemingly just called Burn) which ignites the biggest lust. The track is a beast of an encounter, its opening prowl of beats and bass grooving irresistible and only added to by the sonic squall from the almost belligerent invention of the guitar. Lyrically and musically the song has a snarl and attitude which finds its seeds in bands like The Clash and Stiff little Fingers, whilst its addictive grooves and rapier like swings of rhythms infuses a hard rock riot into its predation. Politically powered and lyrically accusing with a weight of sound and tenacity to back it up, the track is immense and the seal to believing Bite The Shark is definitely going places with the potential to make a lingering mark.

The single is completed by the acoustic track Ms. Ratshit, a song with a swing to it that is bordering on rockabilly and vocals which simply captivate. Based on One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, it is another contagious stomp to cast praise and ardour over.

Do expect to hear a lot about Bite the Shark ahead and if you are wise you will jump on board their ascent right away with First Blood.

First Blood is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/first-blood-single/id899365205

http://www.facebook.com/bitetheshark

9.5/10

RingMaster 27/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Violation Wound – Self-Titled

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The fact that Violation Wound is the brainchild of Chris Reifert, a musician who has been a major genre shaping instigator through Death, Abscess, and Autopsy alone, is enough to make his new proposition a must investigation. The fact that it and its self-titled debut album is a rigorously exciting and enjoyable fury is an extra unbridled bonus.

Violation Wound is Reifert creating a dirty uncompromising brawl of punk rock and metal with hardcore ferocity, a sound and release which finds its seeds in old school punk/HC whilst forging its own distinctive voice. It is not a sound which rips up templates but certainly one which makes Violation Wound a fresh and viciously attention grabbing prospect. Reifert formed the band in 2013, the response to an ‘itch’ to play traditional pissed off punk rock. Moving from his usual position behind the drums to guitar and vocals, he enlisted friend and ex- Fog of War bassist Joe Orterry and current Fog of War drummer Matt O’Connell into the idea and band. The trio set to work creating and uncaging their punk ferocity which is perfectly caged within the album. Also featuring guest appearances from Autopsy guitarists Danny Coralles and Eric Cutler, the release like its sound is as raw and honest as it comes. The production is minimal in many ways and also as raw as it comes, allowing the heart, passion, and hostility to songs to breathe without restraint. The album plays like a collection of tracks brought together from different times or recordings, acting with an almost ‘fly on the wall’ like presence over a torrent of live performances. You feel and smell the sweat and aggression in the songs; immerse in their primal essence and emotion as they roar at the world. It is not a release for those without an appetite for the origins of punk in its most vicious guises, but for those where fire in the belly burns with vicious causticity, it is a must.

The album starts with a ferocious bang, opener Don’t Believe It a fire of abrasive riffs and crunchy rhythms over which Reifert snarls and violation wound coverart growls out the lyrics. Sex Pistols like hooks also sears the oppressively raw encounter, adding to the instantly contagious lure of the song. It is a tremendous start, especially with a great expulsion of guitar enterprise towards its conclusion, which leaves the next up Eyes Red And White in its wake. To be fair the track flies at the jugular with jaws clenched ready to rip out the throat of the senses for another riveting and blistering thrill but it is unfortunate to be sandwiched between the strong starter and the excellent Seeing Scars. At even at this point assumptions are set for the feel and voice of the album which the third song pleasingly confirms with its caustic graze of sonic hostility, vocal maliciousness, and rhythmic predation.

It all makes for a formidable and compelling entrance by the band swiftly put into context by the brilliant Glue Trap. Again riffs and rhythms are just a crescendo of vitriolic energy and intent to lay down an appetising canvas. A base which is then dealt exhaustive exploits of heavily throated grooves, spiteful hooks, and a flame of harmonica toxicity. It is barely over one minute of classic punk mayhem, a mix of Circle Jerks and The Exploited with just a touch of Stiff Little Fingers and quite outstanding.

Band and album continue to excite and impress in varying degrees, the likes of the Dead Kennedys sounding Everywhere is Nowhere with its irresistible niggling barbed hook and anthemic chorus and the surely Motorhead inspired rock ‘n’ roller Brian In A Sling casting new infestations into thoughts and passions whilst tracks such as the emotionally grizzled metal fuelled In My Veins and The Ramones kissed Disposable Soul without reaching similar heights still inspire and ignite a greedy hunger with their sonic and muscular vehemence. To be honest there is not one track which does not leave an invigorating and lingering mark, the depth of the savage rancor and occasionally the raw production helping choose some tracks over others as favourites, as well as of course the richness of hooks and shapely riffs, but all songs easily spark new strains of greed towards the album.

Bigger highlights of the album come in the eye balling intense Disconnection and the ridiculously catchy Complaint Box, a song which in fifty two seconds simultaneously bewitches and ravages ears through to emotions like a dangerously peeved tornado. Their triumphs though as soon exceeded by the abrasing animus of Off The Rails and the even stronger alienation of Circle of Wounds, a track where discord and anthemic potency align for a mouthwatering slice of brutal invention.

Brought to a potently solid and enthralling close by the lethal punk croon of Learn and Burn and the heavier rock bruising of Nothing To Say, the album is an excellent bridge to old school punk and modern ferocity which sparks an anticipation of much more from the band, hopefully this not a one off project. Flaws on the album, if they can be classed as real issues, is the production which meanders too much across the songs and as evidenced by the last two tracks, at times there is a too close a similarity between some tracks. That though is more than anything just finding something to temper the enthusiastic recommendation we can only make to all wanting honest merciless punk rock.

Violation Wound is available via Vic Records @ http://www.vicrecords.com/ now!

www.facebook.com/Violationwound

9/10

RingMaster 27/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

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MONSTER JAW ‘Get A Tattoo’ on 30th June‏

Monster Jaw Online Promo Shot

NORTHERN ROCKSTERS MONSTER JAW UNLEASH COLOSSAL DEBUT RECORD!

 ‘Get A Tattoo’ is filled with solid guitar riffs and catchy choruses, making for a decent debut EP.’ 9/10 – Big Cheese Magazine

 

UK rock crew ‘Monster Jaw’ nationally release their debut EP ‘Get A Tattoo’ on Cobra Kitten Records / Code 7, Monday 30th June.

Spawned in early 2013 by charismatic front-man and chief songwriter Mik Davis, along with bassist Neil Short and tubthumper John Bradford, Monster Jaw hail from the gritty northern cities of Leeds and Newcastle. Drawing inspiration from their blue collar surroundings, the trio also pull influence from the songwriting wizardry of Neil Young and Kurt Cobain, through to the moody garage rock musings of The Jesus and Mary Chain and the post-grunge drive of Stone Sour.

Over the past year, the animated upstarts have toured throughout the UK serving up a resonant and atmospheric post-garage punk sound that is coupled with a tight, electrifying stage show. Successful supports with Stiff Little Fingers and New Model Army on their UK tours have only furthered the band, along with lauded acclaim from Big Cheese Magazine, heavy rotation from BBC introducing and widespread underground radio.

Monster Jaw also have a strong DIY ethos and decided to self release their debut EP ‘Get A Tattoo’ on their own record label ‘Cobra Kitten Records’. With national distribution set up for this and future releases, the band have the resources to take their music to the next level. The assiduous three-piece drafted in London-based Belgian producer Wes Maebe (The Libertines, Roger Waters and Robert Plant) to work on their debut EP and his expertise really shines on what is a formidable record. The EP’s namesake ‘Get A Tattoo’ gets things rolling, showcasing the trio’s deft ability to lay down an alluring slab of post-garage rock that packs a highly contagious refrain. The driving punk rock givings of ‘We Don’t Care About Anything’ is next up, highlighting the band’s raw sincerity and authenticity. Lastly, ‘Summer Girl’, with its atmospheric groove and soaring vocals, shifts gears and tips its hat to The Pixies in passing. Now armed with a killer record, Monster Jaw are set to raise the bar with further touring throughout the UK. Stay tuned for more.

++ MONSTER JAW RELEASE ‘GET A TATTOO’ ON MONDAY 30th JUNE THROUGH ALL STORES ++

Monster Jaw Cover

www.monsterjaw.co.uk       https://en-gb.facebook.com/MonsterJawOfficial

 

Foreign Legion – Light At The End Of The Tunnel

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    As shown by their new album Light At The End Of The Tunnel, Welsh punks Foreign Legion has never strayed too far away from their roots but continue to invigorate and push their core sound with a passion and energy which never becomes tiresome. The band’s latest riot bridges their old school punk/oi background with a modern punk ‘n’ roll confrontation resulting in twelve songs which make swift anthemic stabs with contagious endeavour aligned to antagonistic intent.

     Formed in 1984, Foreign Legion has built an attention grabbing presence which has endured and widened over the years. A trio of full-length releases continued to set the band apart from the pack, especially the acclaimed Mick Jones produced What Goes Around Comes Around of 2002, whilst split releases with Major Accident in 2000 and Sledgeback in 2010 amidst their own EPs and compilation gracing songs, have proved the band a potent encounter within the modern era of punk rock. On stage again the quartet has forged a formidable reputation, the band playing across over 15 countries and sharing stages with bands such as Cockney Rejects, Guitar Gangsters, Control, The Warriors, GBH, The Ruts, Stiff Little Fingers and many more. They are also the only Welsh band to play the legendary CBGB’s in New York which makes an additional potent mark on their career’s CV alongside their numerous festival appearances including the likes of Back On The Streets, Punk & Disorderly and the Rebellion Festival, where the band is set to ignite the crowd again in 2014. Released via Aggro Beat in Europe as a Green With Red Splatter vinyl and Rebel Sound in the US as an equivalent in Mint Green with both issues limited to 250, Light At The End Of The Tunnel provides another feisty and tasty morsel from Foreign Legion to enthuse over.

     Light At The End Of The Tunnel makes a strong and appealing start with opener Jenny and its successor What A Place To Be, if neither really inspires a greedy appetite in the emotions. Both tracks still grab attention easily to set things off promisingly, the opening song entangling ears with welcoming guitar strands of melody from Simon Bendon punctured by the firm beats of drummer Glyn Bendon. Soon into its stride with the track’s narrative unveiled by founding band member and vocalist Marcus Howells, the restrained and easy to access stroll makes a simple and catchy romp before the second song on the album similarly has feet and voice in tandem with its infectious if undemanding beckoning, the bass of Steve Zuki the most irresistible lure.

    The album catches fire from here on in with firstly the excellent Regenerations (Council list. Riffs and rhythms bring an instant entrapment of the imagination before soon being reinforced by the swiping vocals as the song looks g at local governments and the decline of British towns and all that inspires. The track is a contagious two minutes plus of uncomplicated but thoroughly inciting social commentary in the renowned Foreign Legion style, though again maybe there is a spark missing in comparison to the following tracks. There is an undeniable greater potency to the song which the band and album expands further through songs like My Radio. A great bass intro from Zuki sets the track off in compelling style, its swagger and groove matched by the hooks of the guitars and the effect rubbed vocals. Infection again wraps the song, its virulence at new heights for the release with riffs and rhythms an additional thrilling toxic bait.

   Both Hey Girl and George Best continue and elevate the new plateau of the album, the first a Peter and the Test Tube Babies meets The Clash like provocation which takes mere seconds to seduce senses and passions whilst the similarly bred second creates a terraces like anthemic quality for an Serious Drinking mixed with Angelic Upstarts eyeballing, both songs enlisting full physical and emotional participation to its recruitment drive. As probably recognised, Light At The End Of The Tunnel just gets stronger and more impressive the further into its body you delve, the likes of Stalker with its deviously addictive bass hook, another striking offering from Zuki who adds something extra to the album arguably lacking on earlier releases, and the excellent Market Trader adding to the weight and bait of the release. The second of the pair again deals with the decline of towns, this through the intervention of supermarket chains and the likes, whilst raging and infecting with resourceful invention. #

     The uncompromising Three Years, and its unbridled assault on child abuse and feeble punishments, scars and provokes with greater venom and passion within the album before Miners and Drunken Heroes uncages a raw, caustic sonic grazing and belligerent defiance respectively. All three songs stalk and coax with spite and energy before the closing song covers them with its shadow. Phoenix from the Flame is a pure punk rock anthem, a band banner which alone places Foreign Legion band amongst the highest echelons of British punk, its body holding all the cards and bait to ignite crowds and recruit new hearts.

   Closing on its finest moment Light At The End Of The Tunnel is an outstanding punk quarrel and maybe the best thing Foreign Legion has set loose to date, certainly the rival to past glories. Punk right now feels like it is moving to a new heyday and records like this only reinforce that notion.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Foreign-Legion/149893361856696

8.5/10

RingMaster 03/03/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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4 Past Midnight – Life On The Inside

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It has not been an easy ride for Scottish punks 4 Past Midnight over the couple of decades the band has been creating prime genre provocation but thankfully the determination of the Glasgow quartet, though severely tested at times, has emerged victorious meaning we get to be buffeted and thrilled by the likes of their new album Life On The Inside. A thumping riot of grouchy punk rock and bruising rock ‘n’ roll, the fifteen track release is an exciting onslaught of passion and aggression which clearly shows 4 Past Midnight as still one of the most respected as well as recognised inventive bands within British punk.

Formed in 1989, the band was soon under strong attention and responses with their first release, the ten track Start Of The Liberation demo of 1990. Well received it led to live performances around Scotland leading up to the 1992 released Smash The Front. Again the album was keenly received and responded to but gigs were becoming harder to come by for the band, a situation which continued in both aspects with Pain, Greed And Death the following year. Acclaim was again garnered by the release but shows were scarce to put it mildly, a problem which remained as the likes of the 15 track cassette Midnight Escapades, the Get A Life single and EP The Fears We Hide were unveiled to greater attention over the next couple of years but no one seemed to want to put the band on in venues. At this point the band called it a day but renewed interest in their music saw them return in 1998 under the name Trickshot. The name change was not received well and the band reverted to their original title with The Ruff Demo and The Best And The Worst Of 4pm following, and for a while more shows promisingly did materialise but debut CD Jesus Christ Its 4pm Again in 1999 followed the earlier pattern, eagerly received but gigs came to a crawl.

2002 saw the band link up with Stu of S.T.P for a last charge on the punk scene. The Mental Ward EP and Trials And Tribulations ‎continued to gain success as did the Punkology compilation of 2008 though the 2006 SOS Records British Invasion Fest and a tour of the East Coast of the US with The Angst led to less unhappy experiences with the latter seeing the band fall apart whilst the release of their Guilty As Charged album never happened as the label went bust. Slipping forward slightly to 2011 and again through fan pressures and wants, vocalist/drummer Peter linked up with fellow band original rhythm guitarist Fred to have another assault on the scene with new members in bassist Stevie and lead guitarist Tam joining the band. The first result is the excellent Life On The Inside via STP Records, an album which leaves you breathless and hungry for much more.

The release storms from the blocks with the outstanding Broken. The track is an instant call of riffs and rhythmic temptation which expands into a hook cored slice of essential punk rock. The caustic enticement of the gravelly vocals and the infectious lure of the song are irresistible whilst the riffs scrub out an enslavement to compliment what is a deceptively familiar feel to the song. A lyrically emotive track which is like a mix of UK Subs, Angelic Upstarts, and Stiff Little Fingers in many ways, it makes for an immense start soon matched by the following Nightmare and its successor Any Other Way. The first is virulently contagious; its seduction starting from the first spirals of sonic engagement  and elevating through the catchy barbed hooks and bass prowling before the anthemic chorus locks in the passions and throws away the key. Snarling and confronting from its first aggressive note and syllable right through to its fiery finish, the track is the first of many pinnacles on the album. It is equally matched by the second of the two, the song a less antagonistic roar in the ear but one which still embroils feet, voice, and emotions in a riotous slice of punk rapaciousness.

The abrasive Crisis like Riot brawls with the ear next to again pleasing contagion soaked effect, though it does not quite match what came before and certainly falls before the might of next up Justified. The track creates another major highlight upon the album, riffs and drums building walls of addiction whilst the vocals climb their heights and senses with angry intent. A song about domestic abuse, it is a commanding punk ‘n’ roll provocateur with a furious energy which reminds of UK rockers Dirt Box Disco.

The album continues to exploit the already awakened passions through the likes of the outstanding Punk Rock Noise (4pm crew pt3), a track opening with a hook that is the close relation to that cast on Pretty Vacant and evolving into a ridiculously catchy terrace like anthem, the ferociously bruising Story Of My Life, and the dark compelling Hollie. The song about sexual abuse hits home hard whilst recruiting energies and emotions into another unmistakable potent triumph to follow predecessor, the more than decent Nothing Has Changed. All tracks stand out with individual character and passionate craft, though every song to be fair can be wrapped in that descript, as shown by The Truth Is Out There, the song an insatiable riot springing from TV show The X-Files.

The tracks and quality keep coming thick and fast, the dirty rock seeded attack of Trapped and the old school punk bred The Fight plundering the emotions to ignite another dose of rapture whilst What You Gonna Do has an Sham 69 oi snarl to its thumping rock ‘n’ roll confrontation to continue the cementing of Life On The Inside deep into the heart.

Bringing the release to an incendiary finale, Who Takes The Blame and How Does It Feel ignite ears and emotions with their ferocious riff driven anthemic persuasions, the first through another heavy slice of punk brutality sculpted with precise craft, epidemic hooks and rhythmic tension, and the closing track with its straight forward stomp of infection clad dirty rock ‘n’ roll.

4 Past Midnight has set loose one of the punk triumphs of this year, the last and maybe as far back as their previous attack. Life On The Inside is a gem you cannot help missing away from its muscular incitement and a band you all should petition local venues for to get them tearing up your town.

http://4pastmidnight.co.uk/

9/10

RingMaster 18/10/2013

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Biting Elbows: Self Titled

With enthusiasm and thoughts racing faster than fingers can type in praise of the debut self titled album from Russian punk band Biting Elbows, the ending line to it all is that this is a release which quite simply is magnificently sensational. Consisting of twelve diverse and imaginative slices of melodic punk in its varied guises the album alone from first note to last revitalises and instils a fresh breath to punk music, as well as putting the majority of current melodic punk bands to shame.

Formed in 2008, the Moscow based quartet of Ilya Naishuller, Garik Buldenkov, Ilya Kondratiev, and Alexei Zamaraev, has already inspired strong attention with first EP Dope Fiend Massacre and videos of songs from the release. It is fair though to say to most they are still an unknown but with their debut album that must surely change as nothing this good can remain a secret for long. Recorded across five Moscow studios the album without be openly political challenges injustices of personal and global heights with an infectiousness and irrepressible mischievous energy which one can only eagerly jump on board with.

The wonderfully varied and unpredictable album opens with the ska punk flavoured excitement of Toothpick. The lead single and video from the release, it is a pulsating and mesmeric piece of joy. Like a mix of [Spunge], Face To Face and King Prawn, the song ignites inner fires with sharp riffs and a hypnotic bass sound as instinctive and primal as you could wish for, whilst the vocals of Naishuller are wonderfully expressive and direct without corrupting the ear. To be fair discovering a truly original ska tinted punk song is beyond rare but Biting Elbows bring the strongest challenge to be heard in a long time.

As the opener drifts away the thought of wow that was good is quickly over ridden by the excellence of City Of No Palms and its gnarly bass and attention grabbing beats opening. An emotive sunrise of slashing riffs and stirring vocals over an irresistible persistent grumbling bass, the song is spiced with great group harmonies and incendiary reggae strokes as it builds to a crescendo of greedy energy and melodic beauty. The song ignites the territory bands like Living End owned with Biting Elbows easily rivalling their likes.

Angleton is another Living End type song with more than a whisper of Arctic Monkeys to its air, it is also stunningly delicious. The track is a continually rotating piece of brilliance in songwriting and sound, its orbit bringing the finest individual enterprise and imagination whilst its journey seamlessly crosses indie, classic, and pop punk with more added flavouring. Tight and highly charged inventively the band just stands out from the rest with the progress of the album only bringing confirmation time and time again.

The likes of the police violence addressing Rabid Red, the ska(rred) Who Am I To Stand Still with great brass interjections and warm unexpected keys, alongside the raw old school punk fury of Scaffolds On The Babylon with its Stiff Little Fingers like itch, all fully thrill and incite the emotions as well as continue the great diversity through the album. As much as one tries to temper the adoration with suggested flaws of weaknesses within the album there really is nothing to pull it up on.

The departing half of the album keeps the glory coming through the outstanding Dustbus and Kill The Cooks, but it is the twin masterpieces of The Enjoyers and World’s Most Important Something which steal the honours in the second half. The first as much as one tried to avoid the obvious comparison is vintage Green Day like though as everywhere the songs when heard out of context are distinctively and unmistakeably Biting Elbows. The song plays with the heart through witty lyrics and potent melodic teasing whilst the harmonica even in its relatively brief presence is like that extra tasty flake on the top of your ice cream. World’s Most Important Something is a riot of vintage punk with guitars inciting pure addiction and the anthemic hook of the song leading voice and spirit in a total union. Again one has to use the word brilliant, a word which most accurately describes the album.

Released via Misertia Records on July 23rd, the album which ends on the best melodic sunset a release could have in One Night In ’99 is exceptional. From the packaging with its great material lyric sheet through the additional DVD containing the three videos spawn from their debut EP on to the music, it is pure quality and easily one of the best releases this year whilst Biting Elbows has emerged as our new favourite band.

http://bitingelbows.com

RingMaster 09/07/2012

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