Uniforms – Reasons To Breathe

Uniforms has a name which if not careful when searching out the band can lead you in the wrong direction, a single additional letter a spark to that deceit alone, but find the Scottish quartet and you will hear nothing  but an individual prospect not so easy to miss. The band has just released new 7” EP, Reasons To Breathe; three slices of earthy punk rock as infectious and rousing as they are emotionally raw and attitude laden.

Hailing from Dundee, Uniforms uncaged their presence and sound in 2011 and has since become one of Scotland’s most potent punk experts. Fresh from rousingly closing up the Manchester Punk Festival, Uniforms have now unleashed the successor to their acclaimed 2015 Pink Couch EP, to show they are still writing and banging out some stirring punk moments.

Though punk rock bred, their music and the new release also show a dab hand at bringing pop punk and additional raw hues to its sound. Opener Get Me Out Of Here immediately entices with guitar wires before rhythms bound in to escalate the song’s initial hook on attention. Swiftly the catchiness of the track aligns to its rawer instincts, an infusion of pop enterprise lining and breeding a chorus which soon has the body bouncing. In many ways it is akin to a collusion of Stiff little Fingers and Yorkshire Rats with a whiff of Top Buzzer pop rockiness but soon establishing its own individual roar and presence in highly magnetic proposal.

The following My Wise Friend is just as adept at getting the body bouncing, its own contagious exploits merging punk belligerence to organic infectiousness. Stabbing rhythms and sonic clashes of guitar magnetically align to a vocal incitement just as potent in rousing the senses. For two minutes, the track snarls and incites ears and imagination, a time of natural pleasure repeated in final song Searchlights. It too had limbs and hips flying in quick order, retaining their subservience as it revealed a revolving cycle of energy and enterprise, every twist, each turn, bringing fresh temptation to eagerly chew upon.

Inspiring an appetite from something larger from the band, Reasons To Breathe is Uniforms back better than ever and providing a trio of excuses why DIY punk is still one of music’s essentials.

Reasons To Breathe is available now via TNS Records digitally and on Ltd white vinyl (300) @ https://tnsrecords.bandcamp.com/album/reasons-to-breathe or https://uniforms.bandcamp.com/album/reasons-to-breathe-ep-2

 https://www.facebook.com/WEAREUNIFORMS/   https://twitter.com/weareuniforms

Pete RingMaster 31/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dead By Monday – Almost Punk

Having earned a strong reputation for their live shows and energy, Scottish outfit Dead By Monday are out to spark similar praise on a broader scale with the release of debut EP, Almost Punk. Offering four slices of ferocious punk rock with an almost deceitful character as they reveal a far richer breeding of flavours once immersed in their roars, it is a release which not only warrants attention but pretty much commands it.

Formed in 2016 within the Glasgow music scene, Dead By Monday has as mentioned drawn great plaudits for their live dynamic and aggressive presence which has been rewarded with gigs alongside the likes of The Living End, Daggermouth, Annewrage, and WRCKG. Initially coming together with the intent of creating politically charged punk rock, the foursome soon found a harder, harsher, and heavier sound emerging but one still embracing their punk rock hearts alongside inspirations from the likes of Rage Against The Machine and The Dillinger Escape Plan, NOFX, and Gallows. Almost Punk is their first nationwide trespass and a very potent introduction it proved to be.

Certainly the EP was a slow burner with us, making a good first impression but really blossoming over time and listens as its creative depths emerged. The release opens with The First, and instantly had attentive ears with its simple but efficient opening punk bred riff. Paddy Chapman’s guitar is the lure, the throbbing bassline of Declan Buist a waiting trap before the song explodes into its rapacious and irritable stroll. The gruff tones of vocalist Murray Taylor are soon sharing its grievances as the swinging beats of Ciaran Whyte spark the track’s contagious gait and energy. There is little particularly unique about the track at first but with its mellower detours and sharp hooks grows into an ear grabbing proposal, those animated rhythms of Whyte particularly magnetic.

The following Dead Souls soon overshadows its predecessor, the excellent track a bruising slab of punk ‘n’ roll with a tasty line in hard rock to its twists and turns. Again Taylor’s vocals almost bully the listener as surrounding sounds work on their rocker instincts while spiky hooks and gang vocals make for an additionally tenacious incitement. Firmly the song took best track honours, though it was swiftly challenged by next up Our Doomsday. Straight away Whyte’s rolling punches had attention gripped, Buist quickly backing up the rich coaxing with its own throbbing bait. It is a magnificent start which in some small ways is followed by an anti-climax as the track opens up into its grouchy punk holler but it is a mere quibble as the track soon seduced the appetite with its snarling attack. There is something of Stiff Little Fingers to the song at times which does it no harm at all, indeed helps make it another bright spark in the growing potential and ready-made enterprise of the EP.

The closing Choke brings a post hardcore tone with its opening strains, clean vocals from Taylor strongly enticing with an underlying emotive warble well backed by the harmonic tones of Whyte. Eventually its captivation leads to the ferocious heart of the song, its hardcore instincts expelled with force and dexterity for a caustic finale. The most inventive and unpredictable track on the release it also challenges for top song honours, holding it for a while with its outstanding start and engaging imagination.

Almost Punk is an ear grabbing introduction to its creators but it is the potential and instinctive invention it carries and of which it suggests there is much more to come, that makes it more than just a great first encounter.

Almost Punk is released July 27th.

https://www.facebook.com/DeadbyMonday/

Pete RingMaster 25/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Yorkshire Rats – Self Titled EP

It is fair to say that since returning from an extended hiatus, UK punks Yorkshire Rats have blossomed into one persistently rousing and creatively tenacious proposition. It is not as if their early years were barren from success and plaudits let alone ear exciting sounds but as their new self-titled EP shows, maturity and a new creative drive has seen them become one of the essential melodic punk encounters on the British if not global scene.

Formed in Pontefract by vocalist/guitarist Don Mercy (ex-Abrasive Wheels, ex-Billy No Mates) in 2004, Yorkshire Rats released a well received 7” and EP in their two years capped by supporting Rancid in 2006. Then the band took that hiatus before returning around a decade after first stepping forward and subsequently released their swiftly acclaimed debut album, Sea of Souls in 2015 via Indelirium Records. It was a release embracing the band’s earlier sound whilst welcoming a broader punk canvas and that new energy, all subsequently pushed again by the Trouble City EP last year and now their new four track offering.

Again the new release sees the band drawing on the seeds of punk rock across the decades and from both sides of the North Atlantic, infusing all into their own individual hook strapped, melody shaped songs. The EP opens up with the irresistible Alone Together, a track “all about the strains of relationships whether that be romantic or political.” It opens up with a delicious old school hook, raw bait surely nurtured from a Ramones/Stiff Little Fingers like inspiration. Soon rhythms are jabbing at the persistent lure, in turn the potent vocals of Mercy flirting with ears and matching the infectious strength of the sounds around him. The melodic boisterousness and craft of lead guitarist Matt Lee only adds richer colour to a song already gripping the imagination and body with its chopping riffs and rousing rhythms.

The following Where Do I Sign? brings a more US styled stroll to ears; its lively body and melodic enterprise akin to Green Day though soon developing its own unique character as the firm beats of drummer Chris Furness and the dark swing of Josh Clarke’s bass unite with the fiery veins infused by Lee. Though slightly more restrained in energy compared to its predecessor it is an equal in catchiness and uncaging lusty hooks as too next up No Way Out. There is more of a Social Distortion spicing to the third track, it again a bold and flirtatious proposal with an addictive chorus impossible to resist. With a bassline to drool over and an enslaving sing-a-long vocal temptation further in, the song hits the spot dead centre.

Final track, Better Days Will Come, is an energetic croon with a Joe Jackson like riff and Elvis Costello scented melodic suggestiveness, all wrapped up in Yorkshire Rats creative theatre. It is a fine end to an outstanding release with Mercy a vocal magnet even as hooks and melodies intensify their weight and  temptation.

The EP is the most rounded and relentlessly contagious offering from Yorkshire Rats yet, its songs relishing the inevitable increase in as suggested songwriting maturity and individual let alone united craft. A must have for melodic punk fans? We think so!

The Yorkshire Rats EP is out now on Northern Ruff Records @ http://yorkshirerats.com/store/ and other online stores.

http://yorkshirerats.com/    https://www.facebook.com/yorkshirerats    https://twitter.com/yorkshire_rats

Pete RingMaster 21/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dirt Box Disco – Poppycock

To date every Dirt Box Disco album has been a reason to romp and stomp, to unleash the instinctive punk and rocker inside with the British band’s own devilish intent. Of course their new proposal, Poppycock, is no different, a fifth album which turns body and spirit into a mischievously brawling blur of flying limbs, riotous fun, and lustful habits.

The Burton on Trent quintet has long established its own punk ‘n’ roll sound across four voracious albums and a host of EPs and singles. Fair to say that Poppycock brings more of that belligerent rock ‘n’ roll rascality but yet again the band manages to tap into something fresh. It is not necessarily a definable essence though the STP Records released album has a pop catchiness to its attitude loaded, middle finger raised rampage, but something which just gives the album its own character and the DBD sound a new twist.

In another year seeing the band relentlessly cause live havoc across the UK and Europe, DBD set it all up perfectly an album leaping upon ears with the same hunger as opener The Bullshit Kids bursts into life. Rambunctious rhythms and voracious riffs join group calls to get things started, a wiry vine of guitar temptation from Danny Fingers escaping the roar as the track spreads its bait. With lead vocalist Weab.I.Am standing antagonistically but invitingly astride the muscular stroll, band and track barge around with contagious revelry, DBD instantly showing they are still kings of the rebel rousing, listener involving chorus.

The following Finger Blast opens up with a Stiff Little Fingers like air, Deadbeatz Chris’ burly bassline and the swinging aggression of drummer Maff Fazzo courting the spicy hook and subsequent surge of caustic riffs set loose by Fingers and Spunk Volcano. Raw pop punk relishing its inbred rowdiness and sonic enterprise, the song has the body rocking and primed for the immediate incendiary incitement of Punk Rock Riot, a track as you would expect living up to its title with virulent aggression and anthemic contagion. With a slight whiff of The Adicts to it, the track is an inescapable persuasion to raise hell.

The excellent Little White Lie romances the senses with its multi-vocal union and warm textures next, all fuelled by the wilful and headstrong energy and sound expected of the band while its successor, Working For Wankers, has vocal chords at full volume in unity with its sentiment and defiance. Blending explosive and calm pastures, choppy riffs and melodic teasing leading to ferocious expulsions, the song has ears and appetite hooked within seconds, success equally found by the snarling Fat Kid with its carnal metallic riffs and toxic grooves.

DBD show their pure rock ‘n’ roll instincts with Snorting Crack From A Girls Top Rack, a virulent and raucous UK Subs/Sham 69 meets Showaddywaddy roistering providing an almost two minute spirit stirring yell. A pinnacle amongst only peaks, the track leaves body breathless and attitude inflamed ready for the lighter but still imposing incitement and swing of Lazy Bastard, its raw captivation subsequently eclipsed by the metal infused rock of Slapdash And Haphazard. Part pub rock, part hard rock, and all punk, the third of the three roars with creative zeal as sonic tendrils offer a scorching flame within the aggravated air of vocals and song.

The tenacious and uninhibited exploits of Geronimo are a bruising addictive charm to persistently knock around, as too the bolder poppy shenanigans of Imaginary Friend; both raffish sing-a-longs that vocals chords yearn for. The vociferously grouchy and rousing Somethings Are Better Left Unsaid is no different, its lures more metal nurtured but instantly involving rock ‘n’ roll to stride through the world with.

Poppycock closes with the tantalising swing and shuffle of I Hate This City, a ska/reggae kissed stroll with a touch of The Members and Ruts to its initial saunter. Boiling up with every passing second, the track hollers and thrills, and though it is not the best song on the album it leaves an irresistible and lingering imprint just impossible to shake off.

Upon the first listen or two of Poppycock, as impressive and highly enjoyable as it was, it seemingly did not make the same immediate impact as predecessors. That suggestion was soon dispelled as songs imposed their infectious claws in thoughts far away from their home in no time, returning as they pleased. Poppycock creeps up on you as well as creating a thrilling clamour in its presence while again Dirt Box Disco create musical havoc, emotional incitement, and the kind of rock ‘n’ roll that has body and heart stomping and howling with sheer pleasure.

Poppycock is out now through STP Records @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page3.htm and https://dirtboxdisco.bigcartel.com digitally and on CD with its vinyl release April 5th

Upcoming live shows:

 

http://www.dirtboxdisco.co.uk    http://www.facebook.com/pages/DIRT-BOX-DISCO/129060477115572    http://twitter.com/dirtboxdisco

Pete RingMaster 16/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Attack The Day – Felons EP

Pic Michal Spigiel

Pic Michal Spigiel

Attack The Day is another of those bands with a sound which defeats exact tagging due to its nature and eagerness to weave in a host of diverse flavours. The Northern Ireland hailing quintet, though it might be that they have lost a member since recording their new release,  are generally classed as alternative metal/rock but as Felons shows, they have the snarl of punk, the rousing tenacity of raw metal, the swing of funk, and the unpredictable character of post rock in their invention. The band’s second EP is an ear pleasing, imagination sparking encounter which captivates more and more with every listen.

Formed in Enniskillen in County Fermanagh in early 2012, Attack The Day soon developed a hunger to play live and soon had their local scene won over. Inspirations come from the likes of Sum 41, Mallory Knox, Maximum The Hormone, Slipknot, The Blackout, Gob, and Korn which alone gives you a hint to the variety in their sound. Last year saw debut EP This Is How It Ends released, its singles finding play and support on various radio stations such as IUR FM and RTE 2XM. 2015 also saw the band touring Ireland and play support to Suddenly Human. Now it is Felons poised to stir up further attention, a success easy to assume with its creative step on from its predecessor.

ATD - _RingMasterReviewFrom its opener, the EP shows a new expansion and invention in the Attack The Day sound as We Are The Change grabs ears with a sonic clamour and a tide of group roars. From there the lead vocal of Dáithí Murphy steps forward within a busy hustle of riffs and firmly jabbing rhythms which is part punk, part heavy rock, and quickly infectious. There is no mistaking the appetite sparking attitude soaking the song, but a challenge bound in spicy grooves from guitarist Mark Cadden as Ciaran Fitzpatrick’s bass throatily prowls the intimidating beats of Shane McGovern. Not for the last time, the punkish hue to a song within the EP, hints at a Stiff Little Fingers like growl to add further temptation for ears to embrace.

It is fair to say that the first song is a relatively and enjoyably straight forward slice of raw rock ‘n’ roll, something its successor Bridges I Burn certainly embraces while revealing the more off kilter imagination of the band. Its relatively mellow start is soon a lively funk fest of grooves and energetic rhythms, but a revelry which in turn sparks vocal animosity and imposing metal bred intensity. It is a passage of invention which repeats with increasing potency, every round revealing a fresh essence and spice within the adventurous exploits.

Epidemic follows that compelling proposal, bringing its own creative captivation with elegant melodies and suggestive beauty, the instrumental a warm yet melancholic caress of the imagination and senses before Part To Play springs its irritable metal and post hardcore causticity on ears. The slightly dour tones of Murphy work a treat against the fiery nature of sound and the band’s bullish harmonies, but the unpredictable character of the song soon has ears and thoughts buzzing in other ways. Slips into ska seeded swings and atmospheric caresses are great moments matched by the contrasting and corrosive winds of sound and intent which also wash across the senses, each providing a fascinating and successful piece in the inventive jigsaw of the track.

The EP is concluded by the boisterous rock stomp of Who We Are, a song emulating the first in providing an anthemic punk ‘n’ roll charge which just hits the spot. It is a great end to a thoroughly enjoyable second encounter with Attack The Day. Fiercely agreeable on the ear, the release also highlights the potential within the band, a promise and quality hard not to see making a bigger impact on the British rock scene ahead.

The Felons EP is released 20th May, available @ https://attacktheday.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/attackthedayband/   https://twitter.com/_AttackTheDay

Pete RingMaster 18/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Skurvi – Get ‘Em In

skurvi_RingMasterReview

Since emerging in 2008, booze and rebellion, belligerence and unbridled fun have been all potent elements to the punk rock roar of UK quartet Skurvi. Equally, inescapable hooks, voracious riffs, and a sing-a-long prowess second to none have shaped attitude loaded songs which nag and incite whilst lending themselves to insatiable partying. Nothing has changed in the Brighton band’s new album Get ‘Em In, though fair to say that every element has been turned up numerous notches for its thirteen tenaciously rousing punk anthems.

Creating contagious brawls of old school punk, oi!, and raw rock ‘n’ roll since day one, Skurvi has earned a potent reputation for their bracing anthemic confrontations and the 2014 released Pints Half Full EP. It has led to strong anticipation for the first album from the foursome of vocalist Jimmy Skurvi, guitarist Perry, bassist Liam, and drummer Craig; a wait quickly made very worthwhile with opener Till We Die. Straight away rhythms and riffs gang up on ears as a swinging hook lays down easy going but potent bait. Led by the rousing tones of Jimmy, the band is soon calling the shots with their gang shouts around as catchy a slice of punk rock as you are likely to hear this year.

It is a spirit inflaming start to the Pat Collier mixed and mastered album; not offering major surprises but commandingly fresh and virulent as it gets the listener to their feet with vocal involvement included and sets the appetite up for things to come starting with Skinhead. UK Subs like in many ways, the street punk toned track jabs and pokes with its jangling riffs and intrusive rhythms as Jimmy vocally challenges. There is no option but to get physically and vocally involved; a submission all tracks draw to be fair and majorly highlighted by the outstanding Snatch Squad with its rolling rhythms and deliciously throaty bassline entangled in more anthemic vocal incitement from across the band. With a ring The Adicts to it, the song as the first track upon Get ‘Em In, becomes a firm favourite with lingering persuasion.

art_RingMasterReviewDrunken Nights whips up attention with its harmonic vocal calls and niggling hook next whilst Alright follows with a great Stiff Little Fingers like character to its full throttle stomp. Both provide choruses which instantly spark eager participation; again a constant success which is just as inescapable in the likes of Isn’t Where It Ends, a seventies scented oi! bred track which might lack the final spark of previous tracks but still whips up nothing less than thick enjoyment.

Skum Rises brings a Spunk Volcano and the Eruptions to it which is no surprise as the track was written by Spunk himself, the only non Skurvi written provocation on the album. With its middle finger forcibly erect, band and song quarrel with ears whilst leaving them greedily satisfied before Better Way bounds in with sinew swung beats and a feisty attitude in sound and word to the fore. Again whether there is anything new in the song can be debated but with its refreshing urgency and cantankerous imagination, there is little care as it continues the album’s unstoppable infection of ears and the passions.

She’s Coming is a straightforward and seriously enjoyable stirring of punk instincts whilst Wanting More has a Crashed Out meets Royal Oi! scent to it; both tracks again only feeding an increasing greed for more though the pair do get outshone by the blistering assault of Geezer. Bruising and imposingly catchy, the song shows that punk comes best raw and without any graces before the closing pair of Work and Her leave release and listener on a breathless high with their own individual punk riots. Hooks and anthemic vocals are as keen and weighty as ever in both, their pairing providing a mighty end to a relentlessly enjoyable rock ‘n’ roll scrap.

Skurvi do not try to reinvent the punk scene with their sound and indeed Get ‘Em In but instead focus on having and giving bruising fun whilst creating invigorating spirit rousing proposals. It is punk rock to the core, boisterous rock ‘n’ roll as it should be, and boy is it fun.

Get ‘Em In is out now via STP Records @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page4.htm

https://www.facebook.com/skurvi   https://twitter.com/skurviband

Pete RingMaster 22/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Juno – Speed Won’t Cut It

Juno_RingMasterReview

Speed Won’t Cut It is a mighty roar to get you to your feet, incite a closed fisted punch of the air, and arouse the spirit to stand defiant and proud. It is also the new irresistible punk incitement from UK punks Juno, a band just bubbling under finding major attention for a while now but now giving it an almighty nudge with their latest four-track EP.

Formed in 2008, the Leeds band sparked keen interest with their debut release We are Juno. A trio initially, they expanded attention and their line-up by the time of second EP Set Sail in 2009. A short break followed before a new head of stream saw the band return with the acclaimed Counting Backwards Causes Explosions EP. It was six tracks of boisterous rock ‘n’ roll which with its 2012 unleashing, drew a host of new fans and led to the band signing with The Animal Farm and the release of its successor Answers a year later, a proposition which eclipsed its predecessor in sound, persuasion, and success. Aligned to a potent live presence and craft which has seen Juno share stages with the likes of Summerlin, ACiD DROP, The Roughneck Riot, Twenty Twenty, Blitz Kids, Forgotten Roots, Adelaide, The Afterparty, Page 44, Failsafe, The Headstart and many more, the foursome of lead vocalist/guitarist Rob Kirk, lead guitarist/vocalist James Duncan, bassist/vocalist Ben Rowe, and drummer Matt Grum are now ready to pounce on full nationwide recognition without stopping at those boundaries and it all starts with the highly tempting Speed Won’t Cut It.

speed_wont_cut_it_RingMasterReviewMerciless hooks and swinging melodies have always been a part of the band’s punk ‘n’ roll offerings but alongside the band’s energy, all have gone up the gears within the new EP. It opens up with new single/video Last Dance, a track which ensures its invitation is quickly taken by feet. It is pure contagious punk rock with a flavoursome touch of AFI to it, though it quickly enforces its own lively character upon ears and imagination. With busy rhythmic bait and fiery guitar enterprise backing up Rob’s anthemically leading vocals, it is gripping stuff and just the start of the voracious revelry to follow.

Will I Be Free steps up next, immediately offering attitude in its riffs and jabbing beats. That continues into the quickly established canvas of jagged guitar tempting and band harmonies, Rob’s voice the ringleader as Ben’s bass prowls deceptive calms before one incendiary chorus. As with the first track, you cannot claim that Juno are re-inventing punk rock but few songs and indeed bands have set ears and emotions alight as effortlessly and rousingly recently as Juno in their first two songs on the EP alone.

Across the tracks the luring of physical participation from voice and body is inevitable and continues with the swinging stroll of Sirens. An arguably less imposing encounter but no weak link in stirring up spirit and thick enjoyment, the song bounds along throwing hooks into a gripping sonic resourcefulness to, like the Pied Piper, tantalise and seduce ears and spirit.

Speed Won’t Cut It ends on its biggest high and the mighty call to arms of Face Our Demons. Like a melodic punk version of Stiff Little Fingers, the track makes thick nudges on thoughts and emotions as its web of guitar tenacity and rhythmic pugnacity aids the song’s inescapable rebel rousing. The track is glorious; an inflammatory slice of intense punk ‘n’ roll which by its unstoppable and virulent finale, is sure to have the listener standing tall and yelling enough is enough to those and things which have taken advantage and more. It certainly did here.

Juno songs have a social and emotionally political aspect to their words which seems to further fire up the sounds around them and in turn the listener. It is a balanced weave though, which makes Juno easily stand out from similarly intense propositions whilst providing a hell of a great time, as proven by the must have Speed Won’t Cut It.

The Speed Won’t Cut It EP is out now across most online stores

http://www.wearejuno.com/   https://www.facebook.com/junoleeds   https://twitter.com/wearejuno

Pete RingMaster 10/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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