Turning on the LoveSick Radio

US rockers LoveSick Radio “bring a distinctive blend of unapologetic rock guitar coupled with pop melodies and a little hip-hop swagger, creating a fresh sound all their own. “ The words of their bio are swiftly backed up by a sound which infests body and spirit and a live presence which has had halls bouncing long before the likes of All-American Rejects, Bon Jovi, Dorothy, Bobaflex, Scott Weland of Stone Temple Pilots, Justin Bieber, Blue October, Kid Rock, Steel Panther, Three Days Grace, Hinder, Twenty One Pilots, Safety Suit, Paramore, Dead Sara and New Found Glory have followed the band on stage.

A short while back we had the pleasure thanks to the guys finding out more with the band, chatting about origins, their sound, songs, and much more…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

David (Guitar):  Thanks for having us! We are LoveSick Radio & we play honest rock & roll with a touch of blues/punk. This line-up started when I reached out to Troy, our singer. I asked him if he wanted to sing on a track I had & he was game. Oddly enough we have known each other forever but can’t remember how we met. That song snowballed into bringing in Glenn & the Matts. We’ve been writing & touring ever since.

Were you involved in other bands previously? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe style or direction?

Glenn (Bass): All of us have played in a bunch of bands prior to coming together and doing this one. We’ve all brought a lot of what we learned in the other bands, as far as what makes a band work and what doesn’t and what we want out of music, to this band. Everyone’s past musical experiences have really shaped the way this band operates. Being in a band is like a relationship: you have to go through some tough ones to discover what you want.

What inspired the band name?

Matt B. (guitar): Our previous drummer was going through a breakup. Whilst on his way to rehearsal he kept hearing all these songs about heartbreak on the radio & when he got to rehearsal he made a comment about how the radio seemed lovesick & everyone thought it sounded cool so we went with it.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Matt S. (Drummer): I wouldn’t say there were any specific ideas about forming the band.  We are just 5 guys who vibe well with each other musically, have an almost obsessive passion for music, and the drive to write and play day in and day out.  All of us have differing backgrounds musically, but at the heart of it, we love rock and roll.  The sound is a culmination of the individual influences of all of us, but more importantly, we just want to write good songs.  A good song is a good song, regardless of the genre.  Some might sound heavier, more twangy, or more soulful than others, but that’s all of our personalities coming out.

Do the same things still drive the band from those fresh faced days or have they evolved over time?

Matt B.: Essentially writing great songs that we get off on performing & connecting with an audience has always been the driving force within the band.

As the band evolves the drive to widen our reach & get our music out to the masses becomes stronger & stronger

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Troy (Singer): “Early days” kinda makes me laugh as I still feel like we are in our “early days”, but as far as evolution I think that honestly happens from song to song. Not just in our sound, but as a band overall…getting more comfortable with one another and for me as a vocalist pushing myself to new places. I think evolution has started since day one for us.

Are those things, that evolution, something organic or more the band deliberately setting out to try new things?

Matt S.: We aren’t afraid to try new things or experiment musically.  It just depends on the mood of the song and what makes sense.  We don’t just follow a music equation, but obviously we want our music to be accessible to everyone.  From the time that someone shares an idea, we build on it, we practice it, and we finally record it, the song could be almost completely different.  I’d like to think it happens organically.  When we get in the studio, that’s where the fun and experimentation begins.   On the current album we are working on, we have instruments which we do not have live on stage (strings, keys, horns), the band plays kazoos and sings gang vocals, we stomp, we clap, we play instruments that we have never played before, just to get the sound and vibe that we hear in our heads.. 

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

David: Yes everyone in the band love a million different things but I think the artist the inspire our approach are Aerosmith, AC/DC, The Stones, LED Zeppelin, Sex Pistols, The Rival Son & Stereophonics to name a few. These are all iconic bands & that’s what we strive to be one day. So we are constantly pushing ourselves to be the best we can be.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

Troy: There are always gonna be some variations, but music usually comes first…typically a killer riff. I’ll take a rough demo and live with it for a while…usually spend time driving around coming up with ideas and bring them to rehearsal where everyone chimes in. So in the beginning it’ a very “isolated” process but as we get things worked up, the band as a whole will bring in all the different influences.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Troy: Inspiration for me is always life…either something I lived or something I am watching someone go through. The only time it would vary is if I am asked to write for a specific TV or movie thing, but even then I have to draw from personal experiences…As an introvert I spend a lot of my time just watching people. I write what I see.

Please give us some background to your latest release.

Glenn: Our latest release is a song called “Young Hurricane”. It’s written kind of like a poem in the way the vocals are structured. Basically it’s just about sticking’ to your guns and doing what you know is right (kind of a metaphor for playing rock n roll in 2019). A lot of the really cool elements of the song came together in the studio when we had a chance to really sit down and play with different ideas to build the song.

Give us some insight to the collective themes and premise behind songs.

Troy: I think it is fair to say we have some pretty universal themes with all our tracks…def some self-reflection and overcoming, some rebellious middle finger flipping and of course love and loss. I’d say our next release “Bloodshot Eyes” falls in the self-reflecting/ overcoming category but doing the reflecting in some smokey bar if those still exist…haha

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

David: It happens both ways in the studio. But a lot of time we will have the music done to a certain point & start tracking before the vocals are finished. The bed tracks might influence Troy to do something different then what we had for the rough demo. We are never married to an idea. We are always changing or rewriting trying to get the best out of the song.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

With the live show we want to sound like a freight train going a full speed. So we work on dynamics, power & energy. We want you to feel it when you come to a show.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

Matt S.: Like any other band, you have to put in the time.  We have played for empty rooms, we have played for packed houses, and we have played festivals where you can’t see the end of the crowd.  People seek out good music.  The hard part is introducing it to them (luckily the internet exists).  I feel that we have the sound and energy to lure people in, and to keep them coming back to shows.  It doesn’t matter if it is regionally or worldwide.  As long as you connect to the crowd, you will build a following.  Whether it is a home show or something across the country, we put on the same game face each night and try to win over every crowd we play for.  We have found that people like the resurgence of good old fashioned rock and roll everywhere we go, so everywhere feels comfortable and like our neck of the woods.

Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands and talking of the internet how has social media impacted on the band to date?

Glenn: Absolutely. It all comes down to a band’s desire and willingness to push themselves and go outside of their comfort zone to grow and do something cool and original. Social media and the internet are a great thing for bands because it allows us to reach people all over the world as independent artists. Without the internet, we might not have the opportunity to do this interview!

Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

Troy: I think there will always be both negative and positives whether being the “underdog” band on the come up, or at the top trying to stay there. I think the internet and social media will always have the ugliness and trolls looking to tear you down, no matter what your status….however, the positive of how many people can be reached is hard to argue. Honestly with this band being started in the “new world” of technology, it’s really all we’ve known so is kinda our new normal.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

David: Thank you again for having us!!

If you would like to check out us & the music you can go to these links. See you on the road!

AppleMusic: https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/lovesick-radio/203509719

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/feels-so-good-single/1436316245

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/7zca83vBdFEDg0119J8thJ?si=4bw6zx7-RL-fbpKajO1aHw

YouTube: Youtube.com/lovesickradio

Instagram: @lovesickradio

Twitter: @lovesickradio

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LoveSickRadioBand/

 & anywhere else you stream & download music

Pete RingMaster 03/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Starling Radicals – Promisedland Vol 1

It is probably fair to say that last year was a disruptive one in the emergence of Welsh band The Starling Radicals, the band having to deal with “several sequential departures of recently-joined members” though it did give their fans the well-received Wasteland EP. They have come through that turbulence though with a new stable line-up and now a new encounter in the shape of Promisedland Vol 1 which as good as demands keen attention.

Formed in 2012, The Starling Radicals has built a strong and loyal following with their alternative rock bred sound nurtured with the inspiration of bands such as Nirvana, Stereophonics, and the Manic Street Preachers. Two years after stepping forward, the band released debut album Saintland, the potent first step in their rise within the UK rock scene. Promisedland Vol 1 is another leap forward and with its quartet of hook rich and rousing slices of tenacious rock ‘n’ roll, quite easy to see pushing the band and reputation a few more rungs up the ladder.

With George Toulouse offering instinctively bold vocals and guitar, Gareth Bain the dark hues of magnetic bass, and Joe Steele the lively swings of his beats, The Starling Radicals quickly get down to business with EP opener I’m With Her. Straight away an enticing wiry hook escapes the strings of Toulouse, rapacious rhythms quickly adding to the almost carnival-esque initial prowl of the song carrying just a hint of The Shanklin Freak Show to it. It is a compelling and thrilling start which maybe loses its edge a touch as warm melodies and Toulouse’s instantly striking vocals step forward. Their presence though brings a new wave of Police meets Manic Street Preachers infectiousness which in turn entangles with that earlier temptation, the song revelling in its variety and creative dexterity as it firmly grabs ears and imagination.

The band quickly show that opening a song in fine style was no flash in the pan in the first as the following You Make A Mess Of Me uncages its own delicious hook built groove to get things underway; the guitar again the instigator soon aided by controlled but bold rhythms and Toulouse’s rich tones. Its swing never allows a moments rest even when the song simmers though it is always ready to bubble over again within its melodic rock ‘n’ roll. As with the first track there is something familiar at play but an essence only adding to the enjoyment of its infectious and enterprising proposal.

The Scottish Play has a dirtier air and snarl in its blues scented rock ‘n’ roll as well as a more classic rock scenting though ultimately it is their fellow Welsh men in the Manics which comes to mind as the track hits the spot just as potently as its predecessors.

The release ends with Heart This City, a song which did not make the same kind of impact as those before it at first but it is fair to say with Toulouse vocally as alluring as ever and rhythms an anthemic undercurrent, it grew in persuasion and temptation listen by listen. It makes a fine finale to a release which maybe is not as unique as it might be but pushes the sound, reputation, and stature of The Starling Radicals to new heights and indeed the pleasure of their company.

Promisedland Vol 1 is out now.

http://www.thestarlingradicals.com/    http://www.facebook.com/TheStarlingRadicals/    https://twitter.com/thestarlingrads    https://www.instagram.com/officialstarling/

Pete RingMaster 29/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

WEAK13 – They Live

photography-by-squishflash-images

photography-by-squishflash-images

WEAK13 is a band which demands attention; through their in your face DIY attitude and a creative attack driving a sound, which in the shape of their first album, is most likely to have you rocking like a dog before a bitch in heat. Three years in the making, They Live is a prime slab of the British band’s raw and rousing rock ‘n’ roll, a lyrical and physical confrontation which takes no prisoners while confirming the Kidderminster trio as one of the most striking and creatively honest outfits within the UK underground scene.

Founded in 1999 by vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Nick J. Townsend, WEAK13 has been a constant nagging of the establishment, world and musical, backed by a multi-flavoured brew of sound as aggressively punk as it is dirtily grungy and uncompromisingly rock ‘n’ roll. With the current line-up of bassist Wesley Smith, drummer Neel Parmar, and Townsend together from 2010, WEAK13 has constantly stirred things up and continue to with a first album which infests body and spirit.

Produced by John Stewart (Eight Great Fears) and mastered by Henry Smithson (Foo Fighters, 2 Unlimited, Stereophonics), They Live opens up with the irritable My Last Summer With You, a track which seems to have a distinct crabbiness running through its creative veins. As riffs and rhythms assault and pound as Townsend plaintively roars, the song makes for a potent and steady start to the album. Things swiftly kick up a gear though as Down On Me quickly begins the trend of inescapable hooks and anthemic rhythms which continue to blossom across the album. In no time Parmar’s beats and Smith’s cantankerous basslines grip ears and appetite, being more than matched by the rebellious air of riffs and Townsend’s magnetic vocal presence; a combination creating a gripping slice of punk ‘n’ roll.

Its success is more than matched by that of Joke, the song sharing its own web of imaginative wiry hooks and grouchy riffs aligned to another great crotchety rhythmic incitement. Breeding further inventive enterprise and rousing twists, the track is pure addictive manna for a rock ‘n’ roll heart which like its predecessor lingers and returns in thought whenever it wishes.

weak13art_RingMasterReviewThe equally outstanding Sex Pest is more of the same temptation, casting its own individual creative baiting of ears and attention with a prowling stance and a character carrying a touch of Amen to itself. The predacious air of the song in word and music is as infectious as the instinctive twists and turns spun by Townsend’s songwriting and the threesome’s prowess at wringing every last tempting ill-tempered note and slap from their creative weapons. Closing with Nirvana-esque calm before a final rousing roar, the track makes way for the melodically spun Ashes In Autumn, a track just as much of a raw snarl as anything before it but showing the warmer if still invasive musical hues the band also has in its arsenal.

By now it is fair to say that band and album are in full compelling flow, the ‘poppier’ exploits of Closure coming next with its grunge spiced infectiousness to again engage and inflame an already eager appetite for the release while its successor Cameras Are Everywhere soon surrounds and trespasses the listener with its cyber toned touches and predatory manner within a more restrained stroll. Both tracks reveal more of the great variety shaping the album and the WEAK13 sound with the rhythmic imagination and virulence of Smith and Parmar as addictively riveting as the invention escaping Townsend’s throat and sonic endeavour.

The song is yet another highlight of They Live swiftly backed by the infectious quarrel of Here Come The Drones but subsequently eclipsed by the mighty persuasion of The Happiest Undertaker. The first of the pair swings and growls from the start, only increasing in potency with every passing magnetic minute while the second, strolls along with a knowing swagger which alone ensures increasingly eager ears. Fuller participation is drawn by another chorus which just lures vocal chords as rhythms take care of boisterous hips and neck muscles. Another track which seems to just become creatively broader, physically heavier, and more predatory through its bold body, it just whips up thicker pleasure in the album.

It is a pleasure which is only ignited again by the melodically bewitching, infection carrying Loyal Coward. With acoustic guitar and great harmonies arm in arm with tenacious rhythms and a bass tone bordering on bestial against the funk enterprise of the guitars, the track is sheer magnetism.

They Live closes with the fractious might and invention of Obey The Slave, the song as much of a brawl as a calling for ears and emotion, and a great end to one stirring and increasingly impressing encounter. The album shows that WEAK13 have no qualm about going for the jugular in attitude and sound yet breed something which is as catchy and galvanic as you could wish for; a release very easy to recommend.

They Live is out now and available only through http://weak13official.com/

https://www.facebook.com/weak13fanpage/

https://twitter.com/weak13

Pete RingMaster22/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Kolo – Do You Want To Rule The World

Kolo_RingMaster Review

It is hard to tell if Do You Want To Rule The World, the debut album from UK rockers Kolo, is getting its first outing this September as kind of implied by its press release or came out earlier this year and is now getting a national reboot come Sept 25th. What we can tell you though is if you have yet to get a taste of Kolo’s vibrant pop rock sound, the album is very deserving of a hefty moment of your time. It might not blow you away, though it could easily do that too, but as we found, band and album only provide a perpetual lure to return and party in its infectious melodic revelry.

The band emerged in 2006 when Exeter bred vocalist/guitarist Jon Burnell, equipped with a wad of songs inspired by “all the tramps and slightly weird people who come into the record shop” , moved to London and subsequently linked up with Spanish born bassist Dani Mourinho and Croydon drummer Steve Fuller. 200 or so shows down the line, the band found itself invited to support 3 Doors Down, this notable moment in their emergence followed by the band performing at a host of O2’s around the UK and the recording of their first EP. Recorded with producer Sean Genockey at the legendary Rockfield Studios in Wales, and mixed by Kirk Kelsey, it was a well-received introduction selling over 4000 copies and whilst providing a further spark to the band playing in the US and chances to share stages with the likes of Scouting for Girls, Mr Hudson, The Rifles, and Infadels.

In March 2014 the band flew to Nashville to record Do You Want To Rule The World with 3 Doors Down guitarist Chris Henderson who had personally invited Kolo to record their album at his own studio. Seemingly released worldwide via LHM Records this past May, we are assuming September’s outing is another additional and welcome nudge on the world’s attention, a persuasion for more take notice of what really is one thoroughly enjoyable and increasingly compelling encounter with the almost exhaustingly energetic and creatively lively Kolo.

cover_RingMaster Review     Their album opens with the previously successful single Castro, its gentle emergence offering no hint to the anthemic roar to follow. With muscular beats and a meaty bassline joining early harmonies and melodically climbing guitar, the song slips into a controlled but feisty stroll which is never afraid to spring a flurry of fiery energy and catchy hookery the way of ears. It is a great invitation into the heart of Do You Want To Rule The World and quickly backed by the sturdier but no less infectious Be Someone. Again Mourinho provides a bass temptation to get hungry for whilst guitars and beats collude to cast a boisterous enticement catching ears as potently as the alluring tones of Burnell. The song is a kind of mix between Foo Fighters and Sick Puppies without sounding overly like either and the perfect set up to the stirring air and magnetic textures of Andrea which comes next.

The song is another melody driven warm tempest of enterprise for which the word rousing fits perfectly whilst its successor Mr Bigshot recruits ears and feet with a smiling swagger which you would swear came from an ELO seeding. With more bounce and swing than a bungee rope, the song leaps around inciting the same in others whilst entangling their vocal chords in its rich virulence of pop and rock at its united best. It is not particularly demanding or ground-breaking but all irresistible, heart-warming temptation.

Rule The World courts the alternative rock emotion of a 3 Days Grace in its pungent and energetic croon lit by the rolling bait uncaged by Fuller at choice moments whereas the outstanding Break Your Face dangles spicy slithers of grooving from its Stereophonics meets Fall Out Boy creative theatre to become more captivating and impressive with every passing minute. Both tracks hit the spot for body and soul, a success also pretty much found by High Heels and its harmonic mellowness over more of the rhythmic energy and prowess which as much as anything stands out across the album as a whole.

Variety is another strong feature to the songs within Do You Want To Rule The World, and maybe no more openly than through King Of The Street People which from opening with an enticing merger of voice and emotive strings twists into a breath-taking, urgency fuelled saunter sure to set dance-floors on fire and coax appetites into pure greed. It is pure pop and instinctive rock ‘n’ roll with a classical air and hungry rock breath, the provocative lure of strings a perfect companion to the grouchy voice of the bass and the contagion of the song an exhilarating soundtrack to the creative drama thrilling the imagination. As Break Your Face, the song is Kolo at its musically ingenious best and if there is anything to say ‘against’ the album, it is that the band does not take this boldness enough into other tracks.

The haunting start to Earthquake is a mesmeric lead for thoughts and the following adventure of changeable energies and similarly mercurial melodies and textures, its success making way for the pop infection that is closing track Dreams, another fiery serenade of vocals and guitars with a rhythmic skeleton equipped to be as tender as it is dramatic. The pair provides an enjoyable end to an album which maybe is not ground-breaking in any major way but reveals more as it only improves with age.

Kolo is a band to make you feel good and make your body move in ways you thought forgotten. Their songs are rock pop to lick your lips over but be warned once they infest there is no shaking them off… thankfully.

Do You Want To Rule The World is out now via LHM Records through most online stores.

Pete RingMaster 24/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Underground Ocean – I See Through You

Underground Ocean_RingMaster Review

Following a highly promising debut single, UK rockers Underground Ocean raise the ante with their second encounter, the explosively enticing I See Through You. In hindsight its enjoyable predecessor, Get Me Out, almost feels like the band was testing the water, building up to a bigger splash with its successor, and fair to say the new single is just that, a big nudge to greater attention.

Worcester bred Underground Ocean consists of vocalist/rhythm guitarist Stuart McDonnell, lead guitarist Matt Beddoes, bassist George Parker, and drummer Lee Evans and spices its music with inspirations ranging from Foo Fighters, The Police, and Manic Street Preachers to the Stereophonics and Fleetwood Mac. Formed early 2014, the quartet quickly set down a marker for their live presence, selling out home town gigs immediately with their debut staged in a 250 capacity venue. Since then they have played various shows across England to increasing success and acclaim with 2015 a rather busy year on that front. Now they look set and ready to stoke up more attention with I See Through You and its accompanying video.

The single instantly erupts in ears with force and energy, the swinging beats of Evans slicing through the just as rousing riffs cast by McDonnell and Beddoes. Things settle down a touch as the strong tones of McDonnell join the affair though there is still a raucous jangle from the guitars and the bass of Parker continues its eager dark stroll. The chorus is a rapid temptation too, its emotive and sonic roar coated with magnetic drama and anthemic urgency and with ease quickly involving the listener. The song continues to creatively bellow as new twists and scythes of fresh sound mingle in its angst lit heart right through to its final striking second.

Again the word rousing has to be used to describe the character and effect of the song, and its incendiary impact on satisfaction and appetite. Get Me Out was a potent introduction to Underground Ocean but I See Through You easily leaves it in its wake, and ahead of an EP the band is currently working towards, both songs ensure it is going to be one impatiently anticipated proposition.

I See Through You is available now

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Fuse – Alamein

the fuse_RingMaster Review

It is fair to say that the journey to the release of Alamein, and that of its creators The Fuse themselves, has been a platform of trials and issues to which many other bands would have probably thrown the towel in over long ago. Eight years on the UK rock scene has seen the band suffer member instability and changes, label collapses, and their manager struck down with cancer. The band’s new album in the thoughts of many was destined to never see the light of day, but with an attitude matching and title seemingly inspired by the Winston Churchill quote, ‘Before Alamein, we never had a victory. After Alamein, we never had a defeat’, the London band’s offering is ready to captivate grip ears.

Formed in 2006, The Fuse soon began enticing ears and interest for their alternative/indie rock sound, and within a year they was heading over to LA to record their debut album after Russ Regan, who discovered and signed Elton John, had heard their single Everybody Knows The Way and signed the band up. In the financial crisis of 2008 though, his Velocity Entertainment went bust leaving no release ready and the band returning to their home city. Back in England, The Fuse continued to lure attention and support with their shows, especially after playing one with Coldplay cover band Coldplace. This triggered more gigs around the UK and in 2010, a tour of Holland supporting Coldplace as well as the sharing of a stage with UB40 and numerous festival spots. More tours and shows in Europe were followed in 2012 by the band headlining the Pembrokeshire Fish Week Festival and Richmond World Music Festival, and the next year playing a couple of shows with Foreigner. Now the quartet of Alex Lato, Simon Bowker, Ed Thorne, and Simon James White have their first album on the launch pad, an fair to say, the Javier Weyler (ex-Stereophonics) produced album reveals a collection of songs which just grab the imagination.

CD_CBwallet_The Fuse_12_06_2015_RingMaster ReviewAlamein opens with the outstanding Black Lion, a song tantalising with almost tribal enticing from its first breath and a cascade of harmonic vocal roars, which in turn sparks a seductive stroll of meaty rhythms and tangy grooves. The song is soon strolling with a swagger and mischievous enterprise, drums and bass a prowling shadow against the bright temptation of the guitars and quickly alluring vocals. The full result is a contagious and increasingly compelling romp inventively setting the album off on a major high and setting a lofty bar for the following Misfit to match. It is a test quickly passed as an electro shimmer of an entrance evolves into a dark Stan Ridgway like pop canter, the track proceeding to flirt with spicy hooks and sparkling melodies over another tenaciously rhythmic adventure. Its colourful mix of sound is matched by a great variety of vocals across the band too, their unions a festival of creative revelry around a lively reflective narrative.

Oxygen steps up next, treating ears to a post punk bass line and matching ambience before the vocals, with melodies in tow, awaken a ray of energy and warmth. As in the first pair of songs, imagination is soon adding little twists of sound and character to the engaging and increasingly emotionally inflamed proposition. Feet and appetite are simply bewitched by the track and indeed Sleuth which shares its resourceful vivacity next. Inside once more contrasts unite, the snarl of the bass and punch of drums tempering but more so complimenting the bubbling keys and vocal vibrancy, it all bound in fiery guitar endeavour. It is a fresh breath of drama and aural heat which is continued through the mellower White Shark and the elegant croon of Rainbows. Neither song quite spark personals tastes as strikingly as their predecessors to be honest, but each, and especially the increasingly rousing latter, grows into a potent and provocative blossom of sound and persuasion.

A twangy tone of guitar quickly makes 3AM an inviting proposal, the song growing with every passing chord into a magnetic blaze, still cored by that great initial bait and increasingly breeding a catchiness which lingers long after its boisterous departure. There are many tracks which wear single on their temptation, this certainly amongst them as too Paint This Town which actually has already had that position and unsurprisingly drawn a great many newcomers to The Fuse. Bounding in on a Blondie-esque dance of melodic flirting, the song swiftly builds its own distinct, infection soaked incitement for body and emotions. Its body of hooks and pop leaded tenacity has the musical shine of bands like Super Happy Fun Club and at times The Killers, whilst providing another pinnacle for Alamein.

The album closes with firstly the emotive and melodic smouldering of Phantom, a song which suggests that Coldplay is certainly amongst the band’s inspirations, and lastly In This World. The final song opens with a Lennon-esque tone to vocals and piano, subsequently growing into another of the slow burning persuasions on the release which builds into a richly satisfying theatre of sound and emotion which finds a potent resemblance to Queen like adventure.

Both songs offer an enjoyable end to a highly pleasing album and long last, proper introduction for the world to The Fuse. There is no doubting their journey to now has been worthwhile and creatively well spent, Alamein emerging as a very rosy addition to the melodic/indie rock discography of 2015.

http://www.thefuse.london/    https://www.facebook.com/thefusemusic/

RingMaster 05/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Underground Ocean – Get Me Out

Underground Ocean_RingMaster Review

Get Me Out is the debut single from UK rock band Underground Ocean and it is fair to say that the strong and seriously agreeable encounter sets a very potent base from which the band can spring forward from. It is an attention sparking introduction, not a song to set a fanfare ringing in the head, but one easily suggesting Underground Ocean are moving in the right direction to becoming a very viable rock success.

The Worcester quartet began early 2014, breeding their sound from inspirations ranging from Foo Fighters, The Police, and Manic Street Preachers to Stereophonics and Fleetwood Mac. The foursome of vocalist/rhythm guitarist Stuart McDonnell, lead guitarist Matt Beddoes, bassist George Parker, and drummer Lee Evans all come into the band with experiences of playing across the UK with various bands, Evans alone a part of outfits supporting the likes of L.A. Guns (Both), Ratt, Twisted Sister, Poison, Vince Neil, Bang Tango, Skid Row, Faster Pussycat, and Dirty Penny over the years. Experience is always a plus factor and you can feel that kind of knowledge and prowess soaking the new single, its creator’s learning of craft in the field so to speak, bringing as much to the maturity and rich songwriting fuelling the band’s sound and indeed Get Me Out, as the undoubted individual skill and invention of its members.

cover_RingMaster Review    Get Me Out emerges on a sonic lure, quickly unveiling a weave of melodic and rhythmic enterprise ready for the warm tones of McDonnell. With everything in place as the song hits a vibrant and punchy stride, a familiar air washes over the track yet it brings no distinct comparisons, just a general glaze of melody rich rock and quickly enjoyable endeavour. There is also real catchiness to the song which has feet tapping and voices involved in its easy going chorus, that infectiousness enhanced by the great shadowed feel of the bass which bring an opposing and a similarly rounded depth to the song as the vocals.

Recorded with Gavin Monaghan at Magic Garden studios and originally released last December, the re-release of Get Me Out feels like it is in the right place at the right time to awaken greater awareness of Underground Ocean and their persistently engaging sound. The song does not have you sparking into rigorous declarations about the band just yet but ahead of their new single I See Through You in September and their first EP later this year, it inspires definite intrigue to hear more.

Get Me Out is out now on iTunes and most other major platforms.

Upcoming Underground Ocean live dates…

7th August, Worcester Beer, Cider and PERRY FESTIVAL – Pitchcroft, Worcester

22nd August, Boars Head – Kidderminster

http://undergroundocean.com/  https://www.facebook.com/undergroundocean

RingMaster 13/07/2015

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