Clone Age – Fuse

CA_RingMasterReview

Though inspirations are unknown, it feels a safe bet to suggest that Queens Of The Stone Age and especially Foo Fighters is among them going by Fuse, the highly enjoyable debut album from alternative rock band Clone Age. Ten tracks fuelled by energetically dynamic and melodically thick rock ‘n’ roll, the release is an impressive introduction to a Croatian quartet which, on this evidence, has the potential to break into much broader spotlights.

Formed in 2002, Clone Age has gone through line-up changes and creative breaks over the years whilst also earning a fine reputation across gigs and festivals for their live show, wining numerous regional awards into the bargain too. It was 2014 which saw the present union of vocalist/bassist Robert Kriković, guitarists Adrijano Valpatić and Nenad Rešetar, and drummer Marko Lajtman come together; a moment in time which seemed to spark a new creative energy and chemistry in the band leading to the writing and recording of a host of new songs which make up first album Fuse.

Recently released via Croatian label Dallas Records, Fuse gets straight to work on ears and imagination with opener Give Yourself To Me. A lure of guitar entices first, it quickly joined by the potent tones of Kriković, which in turn soon welcomes the beefy beats of Lajtman amidst a thicker sonic roar. That initial nagging hook enjoyably continues as the track breaks out big melodies and rousing vocals; it all courted by one tempestuously throbbing bassline. As quickly as the song’s sounds blossom so too does the Dave Grohl and co scent, a flavouring never dissipating in song and album yet at no point does Clone Age or Fuse become replicas without their own imaginative ideas and creative characters.

The feisty and quickly satisfying start moves aside for the following Should I Care and the continuation of the album’s attention grabbing prowess. Less imposing than the first, its melodies smouldering on the ear, the track still unveils a potent catchiness which colludes with a seductive landscape of imaginative and sultry textures aligned to stylish sounds. At times more hard rock than alternative rock sculpted and in latter moments a bluesy proposal, the song simply hits the spot with increasing ease before passing its triumph over to We’ll Make It to try and emulate. That it does with its rhythmic shuffle and vocal tempting within an anthemic bellow which again is as familiar as it is fresh and greedily devoured. In sound and voice, Clone Age has the knack of inviting and involving the listener in body and emotion, a continuing success across Fuse which maybe is at its height in this rip-roaring protagonist of the spirit.

art_RingMasterReviewAddition shares its own spicy hook and groove laced bait next, its swaggering body and reflective blues laced nature carrying a touch of Alter Bridge and Sick Puppies to it to great effect. The guitar craft and imagination of Valpatić and Rešetar enthrals and excites throughout, the former also providing some great backing vocals to reinforce the emotive potency of Kriković.

A calmer time comes with the southern laced and lively balladry of My Little Miracle, its gentler embracing coming with maybe the most tenacious and bold rhythmic proposal from Lajtman on the album whilst Wake Me Up whips up the body and passions with its bouncing gait and instant hook lined flirtation. There is a whiff of nineties indie rock to the song, but equally a disarming post grunge/alternative rock pop magnetism which has hips swaying and the imagination gripped with consummate ease.

From one pinnacle to another and the mightily addictive Never Enough. From its opening thick and grouchy bassline, the song is in command, writhing spice rich grooves quickly adding to the fascination. Relaxing a touch as it hits its mischievous stride, a pulsating spotting of fifties seeded keys start their seduction, popping in and out of the sinew spun and vivaciously hungry flames of heavy rock ‘n’ roll. Like Squeeze meets Bush meets QOTSA, the track is glorious; rock ‘n’ roll manna for the senses and passions which almost alone provides one of many imposing reasons for checking out album and band.

Save Me might have a less unpredictable and dramatic air and character to it next, but the song is an appealing tapestry of harmonic vocals and fiery guitar enterprise around a steelier rumble of bass and kinetic beats. It lets no one down in pleasure and anthemic potency before What’s My Name offers up its own restrained but infectious smoulder of melodic suggestiveness and emotive reflection. Hinting at further nineties grunge influences without being pinned down; the track is as intriguing as it is compelling.

Alone completes Fuse with a fusion of power pop and again grunge inspired alternative rock. Taking ears on a heady and contagious ride of sound and energy, it sums up the invention and recognisable but commandingly fresh sound and exploits of Clone Age perfectly; and tells you all you need to know about the band’s ability to write songs which almost demand physical and emotional involvement.

Clone Age will most likely be strangers in name and sound to you right now but it is something you should amend with Fuse. The reward is an adventure of rock ‘n’ roll to improve any day.

Fuse is out now via Dallas Records across many online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/cloneageck   https://cloneage.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 16/03/2016

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Hercules Morse – Edge Of Life

Hercules Morse_RingMaster Review

Creating a great blend of familiarity and predominantly fresh invention distinct to the band, UK alternative rockers Hercules Morse re-unleash their debut EP, Edge Of Life, a repackaged version of their 2014 three track encounter offering a trio of additional new tracks to get enthusiastically greedy over. The band has been compared to bands like the Foo Fighters and Queens Of The Stone Age, understandably so at times, but as Edge Of Life reveals, there is much more in adventurous sound and texture to the band rousing rock ‘n’ roll.

Rising from the demise of their previous guise, The Blue Screen Of Death, the Southampton hailing Hercules Morse emerged in 2014, quickly uncaging the original version of the Edge Of Life EP to potent reactions. In their earlier incarnation, the band had shared stages with bands such as Turbowolf, Band of Skulls, Brant Bjork, Zico Chain, Orange Goblin, and Dinosaur Pile Up; a success and live hunger just as rampant with Hercules Morse as the south of England can testify since the band stepped forward. Now national attention is getting a firm and impressive nudge with the bulkier invigorating return of Edge Of Life.

That creative poke begins with The Education, an incitement throwing thick riffs, biting rhythms, and spicy grooves at ears from its first breath. The equally potent vocal prowess of rhythm guitarist Steve George quickly joins the virulent tempting, his lead tones well supported by those of lead guitarist Harry Gardner. Already those earlier mentioned comparison make a tasty hue to the encounter but spices in a fiery and tenacious romp finding its own identity with every swinging rhythms and sonic hook.

Hercules Morse Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review   The great start is continued and eclipsed by the EP’s excellent title track, it too straight to the point with anthemic beats from drummer Guillaume Redonnet-Brown eagerly rolling in as the guitars cast a web of melodic enterprise around the again highly alluring vocals. There is a mellower air to the track even with its robust rhythmic boisterousness and the great carnivorous tone of Paul Shott’s bass, and a flavouring drawing on the melody rich essences of classic and alternative rock over past decades. For personal tastes it does ultimately lack the bite of its predecessor but more than makes up for it with a contagion of flowing melodies and harmonies tempered by an underlying tempestuousness.

Good Old Days steps up next, uncaging a bluesy groove from its first touch and an increasingly magnetic web of hooks and juicy sonic craft thereon in. Bouncing around with sinews as blatantly bold and insatiable as the melodic catchiness skilfully nurtured, the track offers a thrilling and inescapable Super Happy Fun Club meets Feud meets Squeeze proposal that has body and emotions on board within its first half minute.

That Difford and Tilbrook like essence is an on-going spicing, lighting up the previous pair of songs and again All About Me, if in a subtler way as a more Josh Homme inspired hug of sound wraps ears from within the wiry sonic and punchy rhythmic resourcefulness of the song. More reserved but no less potent in its persuasion and lingering seduction of the imagination and appetite, the song entangles its gentler incitement with fiery blues seeded guitar whilst its grunge heart simply becomes more vocal and engagingly volatile over time.

The EP comes to a close through firstly the pulsating and lively rock ‘n’ roll canter of Nowhere Left To Go and lastly the weighty energy and eventful landscape of How Do You Love Me. They are both songs which spring no major surprises in originality but defy solid comparisons to others as they sculpt more enjoyment to acclaim Hercules Morse for. The second of the two especially grips ears with its inventive twists and surging infectiousness, ensuring the EP ends on a high.

Edge of Life is one of those yet to be discovered friends that instinctively offers new fun crafted from somewhat recognisable exploits. It also reveals a brew of individuality though which comes with the potential of greater uniqueness ahead; reason enough to get involved with the band right now.

The Edge Of Life EP is available through all stores from 4th December and https://herculesmorseuk.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/herculesmorseuk   http://herculesmorse.co.uk/   https://twitter.com/herculesmorseuk

Pete RingMaster 04/12/215

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Los and the Deadlines – Perfect Holiday EP

Los and the Deadlines_RingMaster Review

With more distinctive hues to their creative tapestry of sound than colours in a drag queen’s make-up palette, UK based Los and the Deadlines unveil their new EP to cast a captivating enticing which is as dynamically refreshing as it is imaginatively inflamed. There is adventure on every corner and inventive devilry within each creative breath of the Perfect Holiday EP, exciting times coming with increasing persistence over each and every listen. The band has sparked intrigue and enjoyment with previous releases but those just pale against the vibrant and bewitching exploration of this new Los and the Deadlines encounter.

The seeds of the band began when Arizona bred lead vocalist/guitarist Alex LoSardo moved to London in 2010. After being introduced to guitarist Neils Bakx, common interest and already existing musical thoughts began to bear fruit between the pair as they began writing and composing together whilst studying for their undergraduate degrees. A few line-up changes ensued as the band established its sound and presence, the time offering up a pair of strong EPs in the shape of Metro Talk in 2012 and Part One: Bank last year. Italian drummer Alberto Voglino had joined the band before the release of their second EP whilst Israeli bassist Rotem Haguel linked up more recently after another change in personnel. Whether he was the missing link to the band’s full potency others can decide, but there is no doubting a new spark and maturity, not forgetting energy, to Perfect Holiday which declares a band coming of age.

cover_RingMaster Review    The band’s sound is often and understandably tagged as art-rock but as opener Feel At Ease quickly reveals that barely hints at the evolving brews of grunge, stoner, punk, noise, and many other rock ‘n’ roll spices woven together in the EP’s individual exploits. The first song is an immediate throaty groan of heavy bass, discord deranged guitar, and jabbing beats. It is an almost menacingly brewed lure which never flinches as the spoken delivery of LoSardo opens up a just as pungent narrative. Fresh predatory air hits all areas before the song opens out into a catchy and melodically tempting chorus, its appearance another trigger as the song returns to its stalking but with a hungrier and livelier nature. We would suggest as this and all songs play, each listener will find their own references and hints to compare songs with, and here, thoughts of early Squeeze, Split Enz, and just a touch of Pere Ubu nudge these thoughts.

The outstanding start is followed by It Could Be So Much Better, an instantly grittier and more classic rock toned saunter resonating to metallic swipes on drums and blossoming a bluesy tang to the winding grooves of the guitars. Melodic vocals only add to the sultriness whilst off kilter scythes of sonic invention ensures another song not here just to feed expectations, even if it is arguably less adventurous than surrounding proposals with its fiery Red Hot Chili Peppers like smoulder. That is not to suggest the track has an air of predictability, just that it is less creatively ‘psychotic’ compared to the likes of The Youth’s Opinion which follows it. Once again the band opens a track up with the richest bait, rhythms and riffs compelling enticement with a touch of grouchiness which soon expands into a maze of wiry grooves around a Queens Of The Stone Age melodic revelry. Addictively virulent and tenaciously imaginative, the song swings and dances on ears, treating them to further sonic and warped resourcefulness which it would not be too far from the mark to suggest plays with a Melvins spicing.

From one glorious incitement to another as Batshit Crazy steps forward, its entrance a merger of crispy beats and a heavy, dark funk bred bassline around more greatly alluring tones of LoSardo, the vocalist potent whether speaking or singing across songs. Though restrained in its energy and assault, its title sums up the song’s nature perfectly, a funky Jane’s Addiction like prowess colluding with Dog Fashion Disco like imagination. To be fair all references offered never weaken something original to Los and the Deadlines, and as mentioned everyone will hear someone different within the band’s unique waltzes.

The shadowy flirtation of the track makes way for closer We Lust To Shop For Nothing, another with a Josh Homme like touch to its inventive colouring though in no time the song expels a blaze of rock ‘n’ roll which is more I Plead Irony like but constantly creating its own addiction sparking, ridiculously infectious emprise of sound and ingenuity. As all tracks, there is, for want of a better word, bedlam at the heart of the song, a ‘crazed’ weave which is as fluid and magnetic as it is relentlessly surprising.

As suggested earlier, Los and the Deadlines have suddenly blossomed from an enticing potential fuelled prospect into a beast of ravenous and mouth-watering rock ‘n’ roll, though again that really only hints at the thrills found within Perfect Holiday.

The Perfect Holiday EP is out from July 13th

https://www.facebook.com/losandthedeadlines   http://www.losandthedeadlines.com/

RingMaster 13/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Woody Woodgate – In Your Mind

Woody with Dan_RingMaster Review

It is a bit of a surprise that Madness drummer Woody Woodgate has only now unveiled a debut solo album, though given the busyness of the man over the years with various projects as well as of course with the Nutty Boys similarly it is not. Anyway the time has come and the enjoyably charming In Your Mind does not disappoint.

Taking the opportunity to hit the studio with fresh ideas whilst the Magic Brothers has been put on hold due to an on-going battle with mental health issues for his brother Nick, the other half of the acclaimed band, Woodgate has created a collection of melody rich pop songs which vivaciously dance on the senses and imagination. They also carry an openly personal and intimate aspect to them, playing like a kaleidoscope of reflections from the life of their creator whilst shimmering on and seducing the ears.

With vocalist Dan Shears aligning his unique and captivating tones to the sounds of Woodgate, contributions from guitarist/keyboardist Tim Maple, bassist Dan Drury, Madness’ brass section The Brass Monkeys, wife Siobhan Fitzpatrick, and brother Nick bringing their skills to the magnetic release also, In Your Mind swiftly has thoughts engaged as it opens with This Is It. The track is a brief scene setter, a glimpse of life breeding the spark to go on ‘romantic’ escapades, they starting with the following Magic Train. Instantly the song, through keys and a jazzy air, is an escape from the mundane into vibrant adventure, melodies and grooves flirting with the imagination whilst beats dance with ears and feet. The expressive tones of Shears bring their alluring colour to the ‘trip’ soon after, his voice courting songs like an enjoyable mix of Ian Broudie and Ste McCabe, and indeed here but more so across the album strong whispers to The Lightning Seeds kiss the music too. Becoming richer and thicker with every passing temptation, the song is an inescapable infection getting the album off to a strong and highly pleasing start.

woodywoodgate_inyourmind-_RingMaster Review     A spicy tang coats the following Something, guitar and keys bringing a smattering of country rock to their enterprise whilst vocals and harmonies swing with catchy revelry throughout. A bluesy tone also adds to the energetically creative waltz of the song whilst the brass seducing is simply the cream on the top of another captivating persuasion before the bewitching stroll of the album’s title track slips in. Bred in a sixties pop smile and melodies which quickly bring the sounds of Kirsty MacColl to mind, the song is a serenade for the summer, a warm kiss of pop which simply blossoms in strength and persuasion with every listen, in sound and the just as potent intimacy fuelling the lyrics.

Come To Me is just as irresistible straight after, though admittedly taking longer to find the same depth of reactions as other songs upon the album. There is a strong resemblance to UK indie pop band The Tonics in the song at times, but once the brass free their rich flames, the song soars into celestial climates. One of the numerously pleasing aspects of songs is the ‘simplicity’ of the lyrical side, a repetitious flare which just works, in choruses especially, but never defuses the thick emotive strength of words and intent as it graces the tenaciously spun web of catchy sounds.

The Beach marks our arrival at the seaside, its joyful lure the lead into the warm embrace and festivity of We’re All Going To Brighton. Everything about the track from the smouldering brass caresses and swaying vocals to the energetic but relaxed rhythms says escape, relief from the pressures and boredom of life’s normal days whether as a child or adult we have all felt, its charm and presence sublimely relating those emotions and excitements.

The ska seeded Friday Night To Sunday Morning saunters through ears with a dreamy glaze to its poetic pop hug. The song almost glistens as guitars, harmonies, and brass venture into their imaginative exploits, rhythms in turn bringing their own pulsating shadow, wrapped bait to the sultriness of the song. There is no escaping a feel of Madness to the rich atmosphere and happy-go-lucky sway of the song either, or another potent slice of distinct variety within the album as also on offer in Everything Is Sunshine and its tantalising croon awash with an eighties pop lure which occasionally whispers Squeeze and The Bluebells. The track quickly has the listener involved though it is soon outshine by the excellent Flower and its psyche pop beauty. ELO has reportedly been an inspiration to the songs within In Your Mind, and for sure the legendary Birmingham rock pop band is a delicious hue to the siren-esque majesty of the album’s best track, though that choice does vary from listen to listen if we are honest.

The funky psychedelic tango of Mother comes next, the song a sweltering breath of seventies inspired blues/pop rock which at times feistily simmers and in other moments enflames with tenacious ingenuity. Its success is followed by the electro rock exploration of Shaman where within its relatively gentle hug on the senses drama bubbles away, creative and emotive shadows colluding with emotive energies for a fascinating and invigorating theatre of sound.

The album is brought to a close through Thank You and its melancholic yet vibrant balladry of emotional textures and words. You can feel the heart of Woodgate fuelling its presence and sentiment, portrayed potently by Shears and only accentuated by the expanding and evocative sounds around him.

It is a fine end to an increasingly enthralling and enjoyable proposition. It is easy to assume something similar to Madness from the encounter but In Your Mind swiftly sets that thought straight and just grows with every listen. At its height it is majestic and throughout is one nonstop summer of nostalgic incitement and warm enjoyment, an encounter you firmly resolve to hurry back to time and time again even before it runs its first course.

In Your Mind is available now via DW Records

http://www.woodywoodgate.co.uk/

RingMaster 07/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Bobgoblin – Sinistar

Bob Goblin

Music can be so frustrating at times especially when you cannot understand how a band with a song as dynamically addictive as Sinistar can escape attention for so long. Such is the case with US power pop/new wave band Bobgoblin. Formed in 1994, it has taken two decades for us to catch up and on to what their fans have known for so long, that this is one rigorously infectious and exciting band.

Of course one song does not paint a history but a swift backward search confirms the suggestion of the band’s brand new single, though now the band is on a new and even more exhilarating plateau. Formed as mentioned over twenty years ago by vocalist/keyboardist Hop Litzwire and drummer Rob Avsharian, who met whilst at University of North Texas, Bobgoblin was soon in full swing with its initial line-up completed by bassist Hech MaHech and guitarist Lech Vogner, before they were replaced by Tony Jannotta who took on both roles. Line-up additions and departures followed but the trio remained the stable heart of the band as their live stature grew and releases like Jet and The 12 Point Master Plan increasingly impressed and recruited fans. Also creating another project called AOJ (or Adventures of Jet in reference to the group’s first independent release) which took up a fair chunk of the time between their start and now, the trio has kept the years and ears busy, though yet to make that break through beyond their homeland it might be fair to say.

The band’s sound is seeded in the likes of punk, post-punk, and new wave, but equally has an adventure which embraces everything from 70s glam-rock, prog rock, orchestral music, and anything which catches the band’s imagination, as proven by their AOJ releases and their return as Bobgoblin and acclaimed album Love Lost For Blood Lust. Leaping back to the now and new single Sinistar, Bobgoblin are ready to nudge the broadest spotlight on their sound yet, an aim which if the track seduces the rest like us, cannot fail.

From the first strains of the bulging bassline, Sinistar has ears and attention licking lips; even more rigorously as riffs and vocals add their vivacious energies to the proposal. Hooks and grooves bound up as the song progresses, each adding their dose of infectiousness and irresistible pop toxicity. The best way to describe the song is early XTC meets We Are The Physics, though at any time there is additional flirtation which can spark a hint of bands like Devo, Baddies, Department S, Oingo Boingo, Tonight… Do not mistake this as assuming the song is predictable though, as it romps with a freshness and adventure which sets it firmly in its own spotlight.

The bass of Jannotta especially seduces; it’s grizzled throaty tones a delicious lure within the contagious revelry romping around it. Just as magnetic though are the devilish keys and flavoursome vocals of Litzwire whilst Avsharian simply slaps the skins of the drums and senses into eager submission.

Accompanying the track is Robotron, a similarly catchy and energetic slice of pop devilment which embeds an early Squeeze like mischief in its vibrant body of energy and inescapably infectious sound.

If like us Bobgoblin is only now infecting ears and the passions then just remember better late than never as you lose your lust to Sinistar.

Sinistar is available now @ http://www.bobgoblin.com/music

RingMaster 03/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Latimer House – Birdcage Walk

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The make-up of Latimer House is a diverse mix which makes their new single and its sound a bit of a surprise as our introduction to the band. Made up of guitarist Joe Cook from London and drummer/ percussionist Jiří Kominek from Toronto, who set the seeds for the band in 2010 when linking up and playing together, alongside bassist Michael Jetton from Virginia and Baku hailing keyboardist Anar Yusufov, the Prague based band have a sound as English as it comes. New single Birdcage Walk has an eccentric and quaint air which plays like a mix of Ian Dury meets Cockney Rebel with a rich spice of The Kinks and Tankus The Henge in its creative toxin. From the varied globe covering line-up it is an unexpected proposition but one which engages with an irrepressible charm.

Birdcage Walk is an edited version of a track from the recently released Latimer House album All The Rage. Following and along with first single This Is Pop, the new release makes a potent and intriguing temptation for their debut album, one easy to expect a whole new wave of appetite for the band’s sound to be woken up by. Consisting of a collection of tracks recorded in 2012 with engineer Derek Saxenmeyer, the February unveiled All The Rage brought an eager spotlight upon the band with others, one set to one increased by the new pop folk tempting of Birdcage Walk.

Guitars and rhythms immediately enchant ears as the song opens up its melodic caress. It is right away a gentle and endearing stroll which sways with enterprise and quaintly jangling suasion. The vocals of Cook go much towards bringing that British feel but musically there are elements of XTC with whispers of The Divine Comedy to the song which only add to the distinct caress. Cook’s voice has a dulled yet vibrant monotony which increases the charm offensive of the song whilst matching the earthier lyrical narrative, writing which itself brings a Squeeze like essence to the whole persuasion. With keys colouring the more singular stroll of the track and its shuffling dance, Birdcage Walk makes for a captivating encounter. It does not ignite a fire in the belly it is fair to say but as a summer breeze certainly hits the sweet spot.

The song is accompanied by Until Then, an openly rawer and dirtier stomp with blazes of horns and melodic tantalising which themselves have a rough edge and fiery touch. Within that appealing almost teasing scenery a jazzy air and indie rock intrigue plays with thoughts whilst the guitars cast a sonic flaming which brings its own distinctive hue to the spicily varied landscape. Longer to convince but eventually just as persuasive and enjoyable as its companion, it along with Birdcage Walk just infests the imagination and makes an exploration of All The Rage a must and attention on Latimer House ahead inevitable.

Birdcage Walk is out on Honk Records now digitally, CD, and on ltd Ed vinyl @ http://latimerhouse.bandcamp.com/track/birdcage-walk

http://latimerhouse.com/

8/10

RingMaster 07/07/2014

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parker BOMBSHELL – The Hours Down EP

parker BOMBSHELL The Hours Down

Ahead of a new EP due towards the end of June, we catch up with its predecessor The Hours Down EP which came out just three or so weeks ago. Consisting of five magnetic encounters from the individual imagination of Canadian band parker BOMBSHELL, the release is a captivating eighties bred dance which leaves feet eagerly agitated and thoughts thoroughly engaged. The band has evolved dramatically since its early days as just Parker, but has always reaped the richest essences of original synth pop and modern indie pop for a contagious enticement, which easily sums up The Hours Down EP.

The adventure of Toronto duo singer/songwriter Tom McNeil (also renowned for his podcast Addictions & Other Vices at Audioburger.com) and songwriter/singer/producer Thomas Ryder Payne, parker BOMBSHELL bring inspirations of the likes of Peter Gabriel, Elvis Costello, R.E.M., Billy Bragg, The Cure, The Smiths, Squeeze, Blondie and many more into their own elegant offerings. The latest release is the first in a series of four EPs which will make up debut album The Hours Down, each examining the five steps of recovery from depression and trauma. On the evidence of The Hours Down EP its full-length namesake promises to be an intriguing and absorbing experience.

Latest single Dust opens up the EP, and immediately casts a celestial sparkling of key spawned notes. The enchanted air is soon thickened with coaxing melodies and welcoming harmonies as a brewing energy builds behind the temptation. The track is soon settles into a slow but purposeful stroll, McNeil laying down his rich baritone yet mellow tones upon the musicianship of Payne to great effect and success but it is when the mesmeric voice of guest Rebekah Higgs comes into view that the song truly catches the imagination. With echoing harmonies and robust pulsating beats accompanying her entrance, tingles are sent down the spine as a seductive tempting spreads its bait before being embraced by the full weight and enterprise of the encounter again. The song as potent as it is initially is also a slow burner which just gets stronger and more welcomingly intrusive over each taking of its riveting creative emprise.

The following Long Drawn Out Goodbyes has a task indeed to follow the impressive start and it does itself no harm with an initial jangle of China Crisis like guitar amidst expressive breath of keys. The song moves into a potent stride soon after led by again punchy beats under an umbrella of evocative melodic expression sculpted by keys and synths. As expected that eighties spice is a prevalent enticement, elements of OMD and again eighties synth pop seeping into the colour of the song. Like a few of the tracks on the EP it does not explode or erupt as expected, and at times hoped, but gently smoulders with a melancholic like allure until reaching its more pungently enriched climax, a finale soaked in an enthralling drama and intensity.

Another Great Depression sweeps in next, a dark resonance the breeding ground for shadowed keys and great niggling guitar to beckon over which synths tantalise and tempt. Through the heart of it the vocals of McNeill smoothly unveil the narrative and emotive shadows of the song, his voice holding sway against the evolving textures and enterprise of Payne, whose darker throated tones add a menacing depth to the emerging landscape of the song. Like the first track it is a proposition which only grows and impresses more over time, and even though its initial encounter is not as impacting as that of Dust, it eventually puts that right to add another rich aspect to the release.

The brief but decent ballad Stuck Here comes next; voice and keys primarily casting emotive hues for thoughts to run with. It does not spark the same appetite as other songs, feeling like it is either unfinished or an intro to a song, though not its successor on the EP I would suggest. It is strong and appealing but out of place where it is, neither working as an interlude nor as mentioned as a lead into the last track Sucking Retail. The closer is a mixed bag of irresistible magnetism and towering temptation, but an offering which ebbs and flows in potency and success at times. Its crescendos are magnificent, contagious enticements which enslave the passions with nostalgic but fresh enterprise and vivacity but the moments in between, whilst laying out engaging bait, lack the dynamics and sheer drama of its better moments.

Nevertheless it is a fine end to a very appetising release which fans of organic synth pop will find plenty to enjoy in. It is a strong start to the emerging debut album from parker BOMBSHELL; time will tell if it is sustained but right now it is easy to be confident about that.

The Hours Down EP is available now @ http://parkerbombshell.com

7.5/10

RingMaster 18/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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