Spreading The Disease – Mindcell EP

From their very first single a few months short of four years back, the sound of UK metallers Spreading The Disease has been a contagious eventful trespass which has evolved almost by the song let alone release.  It has been a growth driven by creative drama and rich imagination which is now unleashing its fullest, most striking roar within new EP, Mindcell; five tracks of ravening ferocity wrapped in bold enterprise which confirms and further establishes the Kent hailing outfit as one truly individual and compelling proposition.

As its predecessor, the Insurrection EP released late 2017, was borne from a bolder step in the character and enterprise of the band’s sound, so Mindcell openly reveals another thick step in its blooming. Into the EP’s fertile and atmospheric asylum Spreading The Disease weave their richest web of styles and flavours yet; uniting the familiar and the adventurously unique in a tempest of sound which just demands attention.

Obsession opens things up, an initial sonic stand swiftly pulling in a tempest of noise, aggression, and vocal ferity. As barbarous as it is there is also an instinctive virulence to the assault which only escalates as the track hits its savage groove. The throat of vocalist Connor Russell Snyder is a fury of emotion and threat but equally an incitement of feral melody as the song breaks from its wild incursion into a voraciously catchy chorus. From start to finish the track is superb, the rhythmic blitz of drummer Jack Apell and bassist Steve Saunders, the band’s founder, as manipulatively resourceful as it is hungrily barbarous and entangled in just as magnetic and enterprising exploits from guitarists James Falconer and Martin Osbourne with each broadening their imagination by twist and turn.

The mighty start continues as Voices rises from sonic mist, the disturbed edge of its intimation fuelling and springing the controlled but hellacious surge of intensity which follows. It too is just a vehicle for subsequent imagination to emerge, dark calm and insecure vocal reflection crooning before erupting in its own bedlamic fury. That too is just a moment breeding another individual moment, the song a fluid patchwork of schizophrenic twists spilling pure magnetism from start to finish; it all crafted with individual prowess and emotive intensity.

The following groove metal swing of The Anger Inside is just as potently captivating, the track equally a bruising and harassing slab of nu meets death metal  soaked rock ‘n’ roll easily and quickly getting under the skin. Apell and Saunders steer the track through ears with sheer power and riveting guile respectively with the sonic cunning and causticity of Falconer and Osbourne similarly stirring and imposing.

Just as forceful and rousing are the vocal exploits of Snyder, their adventure no more potent than gracing next up Waves. Its gentle melodic lapping of the senses borders hypnotic, guitars and bass colluding in an alluring kaleidoscope of temptation before being urged into more caustic endeavour by the scything swings of Apell. Again there is a feral a quality to sound and song even within its mellow serenading and a progressively lined enterprise which adds to its increasing irresistibility and inevitable persuasion.

Conflicted brings things to a just as rich and potent close; the track opening with a groove which is as familiar as it is tempting. Soon though it’s untamed heart infests every emerging aspect, Snyder masterful astride its contagious trespass. To this at times, there is a hue of bands such as American Head Charge and Mudvayne but great essences soon devoured and reimagined by the viral exploits of Spreading The Disease.

Quite simply Mindcell is the finest moment to escape the creative institution of Spreading The Disease, one which should draw the spotlight it loudly declares the band deserves.

Mindcell is out now through Surgery Records; available from all platforms.

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Pete RingMaster 16/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Spreading The Disease – Insurrection

Getting our claws into their outstanding debut EP at the beginning of last year, we suggested that UK metallers Spreading The Disease had “much bigger and bolder trespasses waiting to be nurtured and uncaged as the band evolves.” The release of their first album Insurrection has more than confirmed that thought and realised those hopes in uncompromising and rousing style. The album is a furnace of creative irritability and ravenous imagination, a rabid cauldron of metal bred flavours and angers which confirms Spreading The Disease as one of the most exciting propositions emerging on the British metal scene.

The creation of bassist Steve Saunders, formerly of another fine proposition in The Self Titled, Kent hailing Spreading The Disease emerged in 2014 and quickly lured keen attention through the single Bulldozer and their explosive live presence. Last year the Viral EP stamped the band as a new beast on the UK metal scene, its plaudits garnering release backed by a year scorching venues and ears to equal acclaim. Insurrection is the next step in the band’s evolution and rise; an encounter roaring with the new maturity and invention fuelling the band’s songwriting and sound and snarling with even greater ferocity and quarrel.

The band’s lined up has gone through major changes since Viral, Saunders and guitarist Martin Osbourne being joined by vocalist Connor Russell Snyder and drummer Jack Apella. Whether the spark or just coincidence, the new line-up has coincided with that new evolution and creative breath in an already striking sound. When starting up Spreading The Disease, Saunders wanted to “produce a sound and music that although draws from many bands and influences throws it all into a melting pot and comes out the other side with something that in this day and age is hard to achieve, a sound of their own; a distinctive style that cannot be pigeon holed to say the least.Insurrection announces the band has achieved that aim; yes there are plenty of recognisable flavours but woven into something compellingly individual to the quartet.

The album opens up with Find My Path and a lure of melodic metal with a darker bass resonance which increasingly looms in on the senses before igniting in a blaze of emotive ire and sonic intensity. Even so it holds its tempest in check, teasing and coaxing attention whilst intriguing the imagination with its unpredictable bait. As it slips into the ethers, the following Words Unspoken is boiling up to launch its sonic lava on the senses. Within seconds a great groove has body and spirit inflamed; its open Pantera inspirations extra pleasure as it burns away. There is a disorder to the song, a tempestuousness which threatens as it pleasures with the band’s vocal backing to the magnetic growls of Snyder excellent, an anthemic call in the heat of the song’s furnace.

There is a ‘calmer’ air to the following Dischord, well a less corrosive tone though it too is a bear of a proposal which is as caustic as it is imaginative. Osbourne paints the trespass with magnetic enterprise, his melodic tendrils and searing grooves as potent as the cantankerous riffs which escape his strings whilst the bass of Saunders springs its own invasive grooving to thrill. Though living up to its title in tone and presence, the track is a web of raw adventure though soon outshone in that department and might by the song Spreading The Disease. Already the album is the source of great variety in sound and style, pushed further by the fourth track and its fusion of nu and groove metal with far darker metal bred textures courting hardcore nurtured antagonism. The song is outstanding, a brawl in the waiting and raw seduction in the making.

Through the Stone Sour/ Sick Of It All spiced Greed, a striking and virulent invasion of punk infused groove metal which just gets more addictive listen by listen, and the similarly textured but far more savage Save Me, the album hits another plateau. Song by song to this point it has just grown in stature and impressiveness, a peak which Whores Of War nurtures to another high with its melodic suggestion and feral antipathy. Its attitude born rancor and sonic annoyance swiftly grabs ears and appetite; the rhythmic vindictiveness of Saunders and Apella as rousing as it is carnivorous and superbly bound in the captivating enterprise of Osbourne. Snyder skilfully bawls from the midst, his power and emotion undoubtedly giving Spreading The Disease a new weapon in their arsenal.

Even darker depths are tapped into by Method To My Madness, Saunders leading the way with his malevolence spewing bass with the band soon uniting in open crankiness and imposing dexterity. The track does not quite match up to those around it yet it grips attention and enjoyment from start to finish with moments where its creative psychosis just hits the spot before Can’t Let Go offers its plaintive reflection, again Stone Sour hinted at within its increasingly volcanic cry. Female vocals add to its magnetism, again the band pushing their imagination and the landscape of the album.

The Rage Against The Machine natured Brexit Wounds snarls and hollers next, Spreading The Disease once again twisting open inspirations into an aural rage of their own design. Plenty of other spices blossom as the song grows and spills its aggravated heart, whiffs of Red Hot Chili Peppers and Slayer arising in the excellent attack before the album closes up with Last Goodbye. It too embraces a Zack de la Rocha and co flavouring, melding it to a hardcore/groove metal furor as skilfully sculpted as it is ferociously delivered.

It is a storming end to an album which sears the senses and ignites the spirit. Insurrection is a brutal imagination bound treat from a band which we will not say has come of age as you still feel there is much more for they and pleasure to plunder ahead but has certainly established a new plateau for their sound and their position within the UK metal scene.

Insurrection is out now across most online stores.

 

 

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Pete RingMaster 01/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Spreading The Disease – Viral

Front art std ep_RingMaster Review

Having teased and indeed savaged ears with their first single Bulldozer recently, British metallers Spreading The Disease reveal more of their crushing sound and intensive potential with debut EP Viral. Consisting of four anthemically vicious and belligerently compelling slabs of raw rock ‘n’ roll, the release is a rousing protagonist. It comes littered with crucial grooves, predatory rhythms, and an enterprise which is as in the face hungry as the intensity fuelling each conflict within. It is early days for Spreading The Disease but the suggestion posed by Viral is that the UK has another ferocious and invigorating adventure brewing within its metal/heavy rock landscape.

Formed late 2014 by Steve Saunders, the former bassist of The Self Titled who approached his new endeavour with the intent to allow “a different approach to both band policy and creativeness”, the Kent based Spreading The Disease quickly expanded its line-up with drummer Edd Saunders. In relatively short time lead guitarist Julien Riquelme, rhythm guitarist Martin Osborne, and vocalist Adam May were completing the band’s personnel with a handful of songs soon emerging. Inspirations to their sound include the likes of Pantera, Kill or Be Killed, and Stone Sour through to Slipknot, Machine Head, and Breed 77, essences audible in the unbridled fury of first single Bulldozer. Now it is Viral poised to emulate its success with a potency which pretty much is what it says on the tin, offering an invasive and sweeping brutally with the potential to stir up the national metal scene.

POSTCARD_RingMaster ReviewF.U.C.K.U. roars through ears first, the EP opener emerging from a percussive ring of an invitation to intrude upon and stir up the senses. An initial riff is the coaxing prelude to a predatory stroll of irritable riffs and punchy rhythms swiftly bound in just as magnetic and tetchy grooves. The energy and attack of the track enjoyably ebbs and flows without ever leaving the listener void of an incentive to respond in kind to its anthemic provocation whilst the imagination gets entangled in the magnetic craft of Riquelme and Osborne. With the raw at times vitriolic squalls of May’s vocals loaded in unbridled rage and emotion, the track is a thunderous incitement and impressive start to the encounter.

Lost Generation is a matching exploit in songwriting and volatile invention, it too with a reserved entrance which soon builds into a formidable and cantankerously imposing canter. The song never quite reaches the viciousness of its predecessor but certainly emulates its success in sound and creative tenacity. More diversity to the vocals courts unpredictable and gripping twists and turns within the metal meets heavy rock ‘n’ roll powder keg whilst grooves spawned just infect the psyche with their virulent toxicity. With rhythms battering and provoking with similar potency the track is the kind of weighty rock ‘n’ roll instincts get greed over.

Bulldozer comes next and gets straight to the aggressive point as the bearish tones of May skirt the senses within a sinew driven onslaught of sound. It is an intrusion soon veined by classic metal enterprise though, that fiery sonic tempering to the brutality around it shaping the fluid fusion of calmer if still volatile moments within the bestial and contagious tempest. With a fierce climax to take on the world with, the track forcibly reminds why as that first introduction to the band, it impressed and sparked strong anticipation for Viral. Fair to say it still ensures thick satisfaction and the need to make a physical involvement with each and every listen but the fact that it is put in the shade a touch by the other tracks shows the strength and depth to the Spreading The Disease creative infection coursing through its companions on the EP.

Evolution brings the release to a storming close. From its first rigorous step, the track is a full-on infestation of riffs and hefty beats which is unafraid to build on its quick and bruising contagion by either spinning melodic meanders of peace or casting almost schizophrenic brawls of sonic imagination. The most exploratory song on the EP with an exotic hue to its melodic suggestiveness, the track does not neglect the band’s ability to create rancorous and debilitating ferocity neither, it all led by the great mix of throat scarring vocals and the ever primal and enticing bass of Saunders.

The track is a hellacious treat to end an excellent fuller glimpse at Spreading The Disease and their developing sound. As impressive as it is, Viral also suggests it is early days with much bigger bolder trespasses waiting to be nurtured and uncaged as the band evolves. With more of the same equally as palatable to anticipation, Spreading The Disease is looking like being another British brute equipped to breach the broadest spotlights ahead.

The Viral EP is out now at http://www.stdband.com/store.html

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Pete RingMaster 12/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Spreading The Disease – Bulldozer

STD_RingMaster Review

Spreading The Disease is a new ravaging roar on the UK metal scene, certainly if their new single Bulldozer is the sign of things to come. The Kent based quintet is the creation Steve Saunders, the former bassist of The Self Titled for five years, and a project formed late 2014 to allow “for a different approach to both band policy and creativeness.” Swiftly it began to grow with Steve’s almost instant link up with drummer Edd Saunders and over following months the addition of lead guitarist Julien Riquelme, rhythm guitarist Martin Osborne and vocalist Adam May to the line-up, a creative union more than voraciously resourceful and inventively impassioned as shown by Bulldozer.

big_logo_RingMaster Review     That period also saw the writing of a host of songs, inspirations ranging from Pantera, Kill or Be Killed and Stone Sour to Slipknot, Machine Head, and Breed 77 amongst many adding to the evolving fury and adventure fuelling their sound. Now ahead of the recording of the band’s debut album early next year, Bulldozer has been uncaged to make the first heavyweight introduction to the Spreading The Disease infection.

Instantly the song offers an imposing and tenacious smothering of the senses, riffs and rhythms colluding to create a proposition living up in intensity and weight to its title. Almost as quickly though sonic tendrils draped in melodic fire are entwining the incitement too, their appearance aligned to the raw bear like confrontation of May’s vocals. All together it is a formidable and increasingly magnetic onslaught with only the more classically honed clean eruptions of backing vocals not quite working for personal tastes, though a minor thing in the ear in their slight conflict with the bestial and contagious predation of the track.

Continuing to brew and breed new twists and elements that grip attention, there is something for all one metal/heavy rock fans within the song, whether one with an appetite for a Mastodon or Slipknot to pluck two names from the air, or with a taste for extreme metal or more classically bred melodic metal, the song is a perpetual and enjoyably unpredictable unveiling of varied styles and rousing twists.

Bulldozer is a potent and striking first listen to Spreading The Disease, not enough being a single song to sing the band’s praises from lofty rooftops and claim them as a new major force, but as mentioned definitely a proposal offering plenty inciting a want to know more.

Bulldozer is being streamed @ https://soundcloud.com/spreading-the-disease/spreading-the-disease-bulldozer

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Pete RingMaster 17/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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