Nine Seconds – Nothing To Confess

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Nothing To Confess is the second electro stomp from the collaboration of vocalist Oliver Spring of Sleepwalk / tEaR!dOwN / Nerve Conflict ) with No Comment keyboardists René Ebner and Thomas Kowalzik which goes under the name Nine Seconds. The successor to their successful and well received debut Poladroids of 2013, the project’s new album is an insatiable march of synth pop driven EBM. It is bursting with electro anthems which simply declare defiance from feet and enjoyment as unacceptable. That is a strong weapon for any album to have and a potent essence to Nothing To Confess but to temper its success, it is not always backed up by songs which forge a lingering grip or leave expectations challenged. To be honest though with the infectious tenacity and magnetism the album holds it is a missed opportunity easy to forgive.

Flickering electro sounds open up first track Attractive Lies, their one dimensional coaxing leading to a more flavoursome web of synth spawned enterprise and harsher rock energy. Vocally Spring brings raw texture to the song too, his coarse melodic roar cradled in a tantalising blend of causticity kissed endeavour and hook lined virulence. In no time the song is a contagious antagonist dragging body and emotions into its aggressive devilry and setting up listener and album for the following adventures, starting with Antistar Machinery. The second song has an even darker character and ferocity to its hypnotic enticing which with a similar trait to the vocals, is swiftly dominating attention and imagination. Holding a nice strain of harsh industrial belligerence in its infection fuelled persuasion too, the song continues the strong and impressive start of the release.

To be fair no track ever lets that stature drop too far but some lack the same stirring spark, such as Borderland (2nd Attempt) with its pungent intimidating atmosphere over a rebellious smile of sound, though this lurks more than unleashes its inhibitions. It is intriguing and again easy bait for dance-floors with a healthy spice of bands like Depeche Mode and early Ultravox to its sinew sculpted provocation. The lack of that particular addictive essence which ignited its predecessors is the key to its inability to stay with the listener long term, especially once Pompeii energetically bubbles in ears next and quickly takes all thoughts and focus in its arms. Exhausting in its sonic persistence and vigorous movement, the track is an irresistible lure turning Nothing To Confess back into an epidemic of sound and temptation.

As Waiting For The Last Kiss plays next, the vocals reveal one of the limitations of the release. Though Spring is a potent presence and vocal agitator, there is at times no daring in the Nine Seconds - Nothing to confessdelivery and diversity of his attack. This admittedly is more a flavouring of the scene rather than something specific to the band itself but it is telling that the better moments on the album see him and the band stretching that aspect more. The song itself is an enjoyable if familiar design and another soon put aside as firstly the sinister instrumental Malfunction 09 encourages the imagination and The Forgotten Man provokes the appetite with its eighties post punk/electro punk spiced challenge.

   No Shut Eye (Fight Back mix) ferments nicely in the ears next; it’s fiery heart and similarly inflamed creativity an evocative proposal which suggests sonic anarchy more than it actually realises. The song makes for a tempestuous enticing though No Shuffle soon puts it in its place with a tapestry of robotic beats, android like vocals, and an engrossing weave of effervesce electro invention prone to psychotic eruptions. It is a thrilling and dynamic slice of electro revelry stealing top honours from those earlier successes.

The album’s last unique track is Planet On Fire, a journey through a sultry ambience by portentous vocals and a fiercely smouldering intensity. It is another excellent canvas for the imagination to play, though for once feet are left to amuse themselves by the thought provoking exploration. The track shows another side to the band’s exploration in songwriting and makes for an intriguing conclusion to the album.

Nothing To Confess actually ends with the obligatory genre remixes; here Waiting For The Last Kiss being given a Nine Seconds vs Cryo Club Mix and Attractive Lies a Nine Seconds vs Mind.In.A.Box reworking whilst Antistar Machinery is treated to a Nine Seconds vs Leaether Strip interpretation. It is the main body of the album which impresses though. Yes it feels like there is a classic lurking within the release which the band could not quite find but when it sounds this enjoyable and provides an hour of body inciting tempting it is hard to imagine too many worrying.

Nothing To Confess is available now via Space Race Records @ http://spaceracerecords.com/releases/nothing-to-confess/

https://www.facebook.com/nineseconds

RingMaster 09/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

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Zero-Eq – Fall EP

zero-eq

If you are looking for some easily accessible synth pop which is just as potently offering new intriguing promise then you can do a great deal worse than heading over to the Fall EP frim Italian trio Zero-Eq. Consisting of five virulently infectious and persistently enterprising songs with a quartet of highly pleasing remixes, the release is a sparkling electronic endeavour of emotive shadows and captivating melodies which you can easily envisage inviting an intensive spotlight upon the band.

It is fair to say that there is nothing particularly ground-breaking in sound upon the seemingly eighties inspired encounter, if Depeche Mode was not an inspiration to the band we would be staggered, but it is just as valid to say that few synth pop bred releases in recent times have thrilled and sparked the imagination as rigorously as Fall does. It is a colourful and imperiously seductive proposition which makes feet and attention a submissive volunteer with great ease but it also leaves a lingering bait of invention and craft which has thoughts and appetite engaged well beyond its departure. It is a release which cannot be placed on the top table of the genre it is spawned from but for enjoyment and rich potential band and EP sit on the frontline of pleasure.

Hailing from Roma, Zero-Eq was originally a duo before the line-up of Phenix (guitar, synthesizers, vocals), IO (lead vocals, synth), and Zero-Eq - Fall E.P.Tyler (bass, synth bass) came together. A collection of early songs in the Greatest Hits 2003/2004 EP in 2005 was the band’s first venture though it seemingly has been kept under wraps whilst 2012 saw the release of their second EP Bugged Karma, a proposition which drew the band strong attention and acclaim home and beyond its borders. The year also saw the band emerge live to again pleasing reactions and appetites for their magnetic sounds. Fall is their next step and one which should bring another elevated twist in their ascent with its captivating qualities.

Erase starts things off, its opening sample and haunted noise a swift temptation for the imagination before emerging pulsating sounds further coaxes ears and senses. Synths pounce with a confident air and robust energy within the still subdued yet forceful gait, a keen canter which embraces the excellent dark vocal tones of IO. His voice even with an effect glazed production has a certain Dave Gahan tone whilst musically the song crowds shadows and subsequent melodic flames into a thick tapestry of seducing adventure and enthralling suasion. It is a song which does not explode into anything more than a keen invitation but does not need to as its infectious charm and imaginative hooks refuse to be ignored.

The following Never let you in is similar in many ways, its stance another emotive premise with darkened hues which permeates rather than seizes thoughts and emotions. Again a Depeche Mode essence is a vibrant spice to the song’s transfixing body, adding richer flavour to the evocative narrative simmering perfectly within a chilled but conducive ambience. Like its predecessor the track has a firm hold on a by now hungry appetite which the title track moves in next to reveal its presence to. The opening discord blessed twang of sound is soon pushed aside by a gloriously vivacious and urgent stomp of electro enticement, its pop bred smile and energy sparking thoughts of Blancmange and in some ways Modern English with its insatiable hooks and electro grooves. The track is a mesmeric instigator of feet and passions, a song you know dance floors will be greedy over.

Negative Changes provides an arguably larger emotive presence than previous songs, its melodies and expressive keys weaving a rich and expansive landscape within which vocals and melodies play with a festivity of spirit. The mix of vocals from IO and Phenix is a captivating move whilst the bass seduction of the track simply engrosses to the point of lustful recognition. Like so many of the songs on the EP it is certainly not out of its time but you just know that if it and others were released in the birthing days of synth pop they would be stealing the limelight from lesser talents.

Inside My Head emerges as another quite irresistible incitement, its rawer burn of rock guitar and throaty bass a masterful tempering and complement to the flaming chorus which it has to be said has a definite touch of early Duran Duran to it. Flexing muscles and oozing charm from start to finish the track is a scintillating and stimulating triumph showing yet another edge to the sound and creativity of the band.

As mentioned the release is completed by four remixes by Retrogramme, Public Domain Resource, Lost Reality, and Klonavenus, for the title track, Erase, Halloween Inside, and Enemy respectively. All make for an intriguing and pleasing extra to the main course but play second fiddle to the main protagonists.

The Fall EP as said is not bursting with anything strikingly new but you have to ask if that really matters when it sounds and feels this good.

The Fall EP is available digitally and on CD through Space Race Records from May 23rd.

https://zeroeqofficialpage.bandpage.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 16/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Public Domain Resource – Dead Surface

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     Until the arrival of their debut album it is probably not too far-fetched to assume a great many like us were not aware of Public Domain Resource and their magnetically crafted contagious sound. The recently release of Dead Surface has certainly addressed that lapse and such the potency of the synth pop bred waltz marking this fifteen track temptation the only recommendation is for you to go immerse yourself in this band. It is an album which ebbs and flows at times to both intrigue the imagination and occasionally leave the appetite wanting a little more from particular moments but taken as one radiant proposition the album is a riveting and vibrantly refreshing slice of electronic adventure.

     The Bergamo based project consists of Pietro Oliveri (music, synths, programming, vocals) and Ugo Crescini (vocals) though founded in 2012 it was initially a solo venture for Oliveri before Crescini linked up with him in March of last year. The band’s first year saw the appearance of Under The Ground, a track which reached 3rd place in the Industrial Music chart on Soundclick.com. Its successor Nemesis-The Third Day and the following The Hang were no less eagerly received either with the two songs riding high in IBM charts and all three now appearing upon the Space Race Records released Dead Surface. Combining a weave of sounds and flavours from eighties synth pop to EBM and varied electronic spicery, it is an encounter which warrants plenty of encounters to discover all its little nuances and seductive essences but one which constantly rewards with those unveilings. Whether the album will rival your all-time favourites time will tell but certainly it will earn and deserve a regular feature on your adrenaline cast playlists.

   The album starts with its best track, a title Ideals never relinquishes despite the strong challenges to come. Opening with a Dead Surface Coverdelicious bassline right out of early songbook of The Cure, the track immediately has interest hungry and eager to learn more. Tantalising electronic strokes soon join the persuasion alongside energetic rhythms and roving synth temptation but it is the excellent vocals of assumedly Crescini which seal the deal. It is hard to know who provides vocals actually each voice clearly distinguishable but only if you know which belongs to whom, something we could not find out in time. A more than healthy Depeche Mode feel evolves to wash through the song as it expands its lures and enterprise as well as a sturdy rock element to the vocals especially, it all adding to a masterful infection clad synth pop triumph.

    The following Red Lines has a more tempered energy to its candescent electro glow aligned to shimmering enticements and also has little difficulty in seducing ears and thoughts. There is a rich emotive breath to the track from its opening note and first lyrical syllable and though as it progresses and builds a rich intensity in its melodic colouring and emotional depth the pervading shadows within never waiver or lessen their evocative call. Its successor Under the Ground is a similarly crafted blaze of melodically hued imagination, different in sound and delivery but as provocatively expressive and built with dark edges to provoke the imagination. Both tracks continue the impressive start to the album before passing over to another pair of pinnacles on the release.

    The title track from an arguably predictable opening dips enthrallingly into a darker climate of voice and sound which brings thoughts of New Order to the fore. It is when the song takes a breath and puffs out its melodic chest and rhythmic muscles around a pulsating nagging electro core that it ignites a virulent fascination of sound and shadowed seduction. The melodic groove which laps at the heart of the song alongside impassioned piano strokes only go to accentuate a Heaven 17 like bait fuelling the outstanding track, its success straight away matched by Fiat Lux. Admittedly the song took a little linger to fully convince but evolved into a strong favourite. Like those before, it has a unique character seeded in familiar yet fresh seeds. Once more thoughts drift to the eighties, this time from the chilled atmosphere which reminds at times of post punk band The Passage and a discord kissed vocal delivery which persuades like the haunted expression of that band’s creator Dick Witts crossed with the wily tones of Fatima Mansion’s frontman Cathal Coughlan. It is a ravenously addictive slice of electronic tempting adding further depth to the album.

    After such a strong passage maybe it was inevitable that the release would wander a little in potency which it does with the slightly predictable Negative Fields and the unsurprising Nemesis – The Third Day, though both are undeniably enjoyable and conjured by accomplished craft as they sandwich the arresting electronic landscape of Always Prey for Them – The Reich’s Station. Their enjoyable presences are soon lost to thought as the minimalistic beauty of Mishima San and the impossibly addictive Your Blood Is Mine combine to ignite the passions all over again; the first an elegant stimulation of melodic mesmerism and sultry synth pop engagement which is as epidemically contagious as any full on virus and its successor a multi-spiced electronic web which hustles and imposes its grandeur on the senses whilst holding them in a warm atmospheric embrace. Both tracks are irresistibly memorable, something you can say about the majority of the album as proven by The Hang. Heavy in texture and similarly weighty in infectiousness the song is a slow burning rousing of the imagination which needs longer than some to fully convince but does so without reservation before The Second Day takes its swipe at winning over emotions, its inevitable success going on what has gone before soon confirmed by its resourceful and skilful electronic maze of adventure.

    Completed by two more than decent remixes by Tourdeforce (Red Lines) and Retrogramme (Under the Ground) as well as the Magnetic Fields edit of Mishima San, the thrilling Dead Surface is an exhilarating incitement of a united dancefloor and individual passions. Increasingly more impressive with each romp through its insatiably addictive and inventive body the album marks Public Domain Resource out as a new protagonist in exploratory synth pop, a band draped in shadows for not much longer you suspect.

http://www.publicdomainresource.net/

http://ekproduct.bandcamp.com/album/dead-surface

8.5/10

RingMaster 10/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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