NoYz? – Tinnitus

Ever since being introduced to Noyz? years back through their ear grabbing track Happy Hour In A Junkyard, a song persistently played upon the internet shows we were involved with, The RR has been patiently waiting for the first album from the Serbian band. Finally it is here and there is no let down for hopes and anticipation by Tinnitus and its collection of multi-flavoured rock bred tracks.

Formed in 2004, the Belgrade outfit lacked a truly stable period line-up wise and went on a hiatus in 2012. Three years later founder and vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Stevan ‘Sharkey’ Radoičić brought the band back and set about creating that long promised first album. Their sound is a fusion of grunge, hard rock, metal, and punk; a mix embracing unpredictability and prone to ear grabbing hooks and bold enterprise. Inspirations to the band include the likes of Nirvana, Alice In Chains, Soundgarden, Metallica, Megadeth, System Of A Down, The Offspring, and Bad Religion; a list giving a good hint to that blend in their music.

Tinnitus opens with Introbytes, a slice of metal infused punk nurtured rock immediately presenting the type of ear catching hooks the band specialises in. Despite its title it is far more than an intro, the predominately instrumental encounter a stomping invitation into the weave of sound, design, and textures shaping the album ahead with the following Pure Fucking Metal Pwnage skilfully exploiting all. The second track’s first breath is thrash like, its second a thicker mix of metallic flavouring before the band’s rock ‘n’ roll instincts emerge in the blossoming song. Sharkey’s vocals are as keen as the sounds around them, the rhythms of drummer Milan Jejina Yeqy a swinging and rousing trespass while the bass of Anja Tvrtković is a heavy throaty lure with the song itself not holding back on the imaginative twists which again provide persistent temptation across the release.

Blow Joe is next up and straight away drums tease and tempt, their beats an infectious coaxing matched by the glorious lure of the bass. Swiftly the guitar casts melodic strokes across their irresistible dark bait before the track opens up a web of hooks and grooves, a hard rock infusion erupting upon the compelling landscape.

Similarly Cold Turkey enters on appetite pleasing bait, bass and guitar entangling around vocals before the track exposes its dirtier grunge nurtured side. Grooves soon expose greater lures in the track as vocals reflect with irritability and angst. Magnetic from start to finish, the track easily hit the spot before Ein Neues Leid steps forward with its classic punk breeding. That in turn gives birth to a broader punk ‘n’’ roll roar lined with grunge and melodic rock enterprise.

The senses became entwined by guitar wires as What You May Call It rises up straight after, infectious dexterity a rich wash in its imaginative tapestry of sound and invention. Again manipulative hooks are freely sprung and greedily devoured, Noyz? sharing their dextrous conjuring of such tempting with ears grabbing unpredictability and keenly echoed in Diarrhea and in turn Dream. The first of the pair is a catchy and swiftly satisfying offering if not quite matching up to those before it for personal tastes whilst its bolder successor bears its Nirvana inspirations proudly before immersing them in Noyz? individuality, one drawing on a palette of rock.

The melodic caresses of Cherished Leader easily seduced, the relatively calm yet fiery song casting its own uncomplicated but potent hooks within melodic metal scenery, while Happy Hour In A Junkyard once more simply hit the spot with greedy accuracy. Once its familiar opening hook leaps forward there was no denying its command, bass and guitar making a potent force within the lively swings of Milan, and once that effortlessly persuasive chorus erupted , old instincts flared. Every band has a moment or a few which is their calling card and this is still easily the one for the Serbian outfit.

With the final trio of the feral punk ‘n’ roll driven, diversely flavoured and sculpted Boy/Girl, the equally untamed hard rock reared Pissoff and another host of an inimitable Noyz? hook in The Gootch leaving ears bursting with satisfaction, Tinnitus is easy to fully recommend.

There are moments which simply stole the passions and others which had us boisterously bouncing so fair to say that from start to finish the long awaited Tinnitus hit the spot.

Wrapped in the great artwork of Anja Tvrtković, Tinnitus is out now and available @ https://noyzband.bandcamp.com/album/tinnitus

https://www.facebook.com/noyzgrunge

Pete RingMaster 07/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Desert Clouds – Nothing Beyond The Cage

It is probably fair to say that we did not make an immediate connection with the new album from UK based rockers Desert Clouds yet there was a certain lure which took us back to its atmospheric embrace with intrigue and enthusiasm. It was an essence which grew richer as band and release, Nothing Beyond The Cage, blossomed by the listen into a fascinating and increasingly persuasive proposition.

Formed in 2008 in Naples, Italy, Desert Clouds relocated to London two years later. It was a time which saw instability in the band’s line-up though things were far more settled by the time 2017 EP, Time Distortions, was released; an encounter which drew strong attention the way of the band, praise carrying interest which was only built upon by subsequent singles in Speed of Light and Under Tons, both unveiled last year. It is easy to imagine that Nothing Beyond The Cage will only increase the reputation and stature of the quartet within the UK rock scene with its multi-flavoured and atmospherically provocative adventure.

Nurtured in a mix of grunge, stoner, doom, psych and alternative rock, the band’s sound is a seductive trespass as forceful and mercurial as it is plaintively intimate and brooding. Often it comes over within Nothing Beyond The Cage like a raw Doors meets a predacious Kyuss aligned to the emotive howls of early Coldplay amidst the soulful winds of Soundgarden but emerging if not boldly unique certainly clearly individual to Desert Clouds.

The album opens up with The Outcast Trail (See you Chris), a sullenly thoughtful ballad built on a web of melodic imagination and vocal emotion which roars like a funeral pyre in fiery crescendos. Unsurprisingly there are thick Soundgarden hues to the outstanding track, a tribute to Chris Cornell, with its sonic and emotive heat evocative and invasive, its enterprise seriously magnetic led by the inescapably compelling vocals.

The following Speed Of Light opens with a just as dark air, the bass of Julius Caesar a portentous throb within the wiry web and earthier riffs of guitarists/vocalists David Land and Val L. Wallace. With every passing note and vocal lure, the song’s intensity and drama increases, brewing up into a controlled yet feral blaze spiked by the predacious beats of Andrea Orabona. Though it lacked the spark of its outstanding predecessor for our appetite, the song enticed and lingered behind its wake before next up Take Off harassed the senses with its moody almost irritable melodic roar. Grooved tendrils vine the track with increasing captivation, their incandescent lures lava-esque within the song’s muggy climate.

The calmer but mercurial balladry of Under Tons tempts next, its tenacious croon as untamed as it is intimately restrained with every moment contrasted within another twist courtesy of craft and imagination before Overmore springs its desert/psych rock exploits on ears. A certain QOTSA lining adds to a swift appeal while its successor The Judgement carries a Coldplay/Muse like spicing which grew more flavoursome by the listen. All three tracks flourished over time whilst equally sharing the, at times understated but certainly not hidden, broad palette of sound the band creates with.

Final track is Whistling In The Rain, an almost bestial encounter in its prowling gait and ursine-esque growl but lava-like in its sonic climate and scorching winds. From vocals to guitar, rhythms to atmospheric conjuring, the song is another mighty highlight to Nothing Beyond The Cage, a release which we might have needed time to take to but have with real eagerness once we clicked.

Nothing Beyond The Cage is released January 18th.

https://www.desertclouds.net/   https://www.facebook.com/desertclouds/   https://twitter.com/TheDesertClouds

Pete RingMaster 17/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mammoth Temple – We’re Not Extinct

Having just been introduced to former Thirteen Shots frontman Johnny Rose’s new project in Blast Bomb we now have the new endeavour from its guitarist Lewis Manchip for you. That proposition is Mammoth Temple and they have just released their rather appetising debut EP, We’re Not Extinct. Echoing the band’s name in many ways, it is a lure of heavy boned rock ‘n’ roll worshipping the seduction of the groove and the growl of the riff, a fuzz rich proposal caked in the dirt of grunge and veined by stoner bred tendrils of melodic suggestion. It is also a potent introduction to the band and one which gets more compelling by the second.

Formed by Lewis and vocalist/bassist Dave, Midlands hailing Mammoth Temple is completed by the thunderous swings of drummer Ben. Initially taking their time to hone their sound, the trio have emerged with a live presence which is swiftly luring keen attention and plaudits, and now with a first release which is as thick in potential as it is already flourishing prowess and enterprise.

It opens up with Meat Promotion and instantly entangles ears in a flavoursome groove. With robust rhythms and throbbing bass that beginning is a sign of things to come in song and release. The blend of mellow vocals adds to a Queens Of The Stone Age like hue to the grunge meets heavy rock stroll of the track, the guitar continuing to cast wiry grooves and melodically sharp bait for ears and appetite to get hooked up on. It is a seriously infectious and captivating start which is more than matched by next up Wiping Out. Its psych rock kissed entrance is pure temptation, the skirting shadows intrigue against the vocal prowess of Dave and Lewis’ expressive melodies. With fiery flames igniting across its catchy gait and imaginative body, the song continues to blossom in imagination and craft. It might not be boldly unique but the song as the EP has a freshness and adventure to it which hints of such success ahead.

The mellower caress of Reflections is courted by the great dark shadowed throb of bass and volatility in Ben’s beats which never erupts but magnetically stalks the melancholic beauty of the song’s heart and touch. A song which just grows over time and listens, it brings another enticing aspect to the Mammoth Temple sound which only grows when the track does uncage its muscle.

The EP is concluded by firstly Promises, a distant rumble increasingly consuming ears as it looms closer and incites the imagination as blues rock ivy clings to its tenacious body and scuzzy skin. Another grower, it does not quite match up to those before it yet lingers in the memory with ease through its Jesus and Mary Chain meets Alice In Chains glaze alone.

How We Are completes the pleasure, it needing mere seconds to hook the appetite with its initial Soundgarden-esque melodic coaxing. From there, its simmering fire grows and intensifies with psych and stoner rock winds blowing across its rhythmic kindling and harmonic haze. As ever, there is a darker hue to its depths and emotion contrasting superbly with its brighter easily invited trespasses. The song is superb, a big end to a fine first union with Mammoth Temple.

It is early days but the signs are already hinting at a potent future for the band and rich adventures for us all alongside.

We’re Not Extinct is out now and available@ https://mammothtemple.bandcamp.com/album/were-not-extinct

https://www.facebook.com/MammothTemple/    https://twitter.com/MammothTemple

Pete RingMaster 05/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Exploring the lures of The Lunar Effect

Hailing from London in the UK, The Lunar Effect is a band making a potent impression on the Capital’s live scene and through their debut EP, Strange Lands released last year. We caught up with the band to find out more exploring origins, inspirations, the muse of “demon seductress soul stealing women” and more….

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

We are Jon, Dan, Josh and Brett and we are The Lunar Effect. It all started with Jon messing around with some solo songs which then developed into a gigging band. Jon’s brother Dan joined, then after a few gigs with other musicians Brett came in on bass. Josh joined soon after that when he answered an advert we put out for a singer. Job done!

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Yeah, we have all been in different bands and played as solo artists. You learn from the mistakes you have made in previous bands and try to avoid doing the same thing. It is important finding band members you get along with on a personal level; being a good musician just isn’t enough if you’re also a prize bell-end. If you’re not getting along it can seep into the music you make, then you’ll find it influences the style and direction you take going forwards. That’s why when we put an advert out for a singer we specifically said no dickheads.

What inspired the band name?

A lot of people often think it is because Jon has a daughter named Luna, but the band came first and it’s spelt differently anyway so we can nip that one in the bud. It is actually inspired by the moon and all of the elements in life that its cycles and phases had been said to affect through time, whether true or not.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We all just wanted to be musicians and write music, so forming a band is obviously what you do. It has taken a while to find the right people, but now we hope we can offer something a bit different. Basically some really good songs as an alternative to a lot of the rubbish that’s out in the mainstream right now.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

The goal remains the same. It’s always been about making good music with good people and having a laugh along the way. If we can make money from doing this then that’s a bonus. As time goes on you learn to be more selective with things like which gigs to take and which to pass on. You also learn where the pitfalls and charlatans are and how to avoid dealing with them.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

When the band first started it was mainly songs that Jon had already written himself that we just tweaked. We had a more lo-fi, grungy sound. As we have settled and grown into the new line up we have pushed ourselves more and found a sound drawing on all our influences.

 Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

Originally it was more organic, with each of us bringing in new ideas and influences. It just started to flow over time until we felt we were happy with it. Now we try to build on our sound by trying new ideas and pushing the boundaries, experimenting with new styles and noise while still keeping that vintage sound that is our essence.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

We like all sorts, from 70’s bands like Black Sabbath and Pink Floyd to bands like Soundgarden and Silverchair. There are a load of great bands around at the moment that people may not necessarily have heard of, like The Heavy Eyes, Mars Red Sky, Kaleidobolt, etc. The list goes on.

Is there a process within the band which generally guides the writing of songs?

It varies from song to song, but our latest songs usually come out of refining a jam or a riff. Sometimes it takes us weeks to finish an idea, other times they’re finished quicker than it takes to play it through which is cool. We’re good at criticising each other too, bad ideas don’t last long.

 Where, more often than not, are inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs found?

As far as inspiration’s go we cover the classics; women, drugs, women on drugs, demon seductress soul stealing women, trivial existences, crippling pain and yeah, the classics.

Give us some background to your latest release.

Our last release was an EP called Strange Lands. It’s very much sci-fi themed, from the cover to the lyrics and everything in between. Our first full album should be out by the end of the year. It’s shaping up to be a bit of a belter. You can see us performing a song from it for Hunter Studios Live sessions here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFrGNrBJXrU

 Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Generally we like to have the bones of the songs all rehearsed and gig tested. Then we can experiment with different techniques and add more layers to the track if we find something that fits and improves the song as a whole. We make sure we record more than we need, that way we can try out new ideas, see what works and what doesn’t and then cherry pick the best stuff.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably a favourite aspect of the band?

Well I wouldn’t say it’s necessarily our favourite part but obviously we do enjoy it. We also enjoy writing and recording in the studio.  We always have fun at live shows though, as hopefully do the people who come out to watch us.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

No, it’s hard locally as most local venues keep closing and everyone just goes to Wetherspoons. In London it’s the complete opposite. There is an oversaturation of venues which makes it harder to promote, especially with all the high entry fees, though you do learn with experience as we said earlier on. Gigging in Europe is a good idea. The promotion and pay can be a lot better and it’s all generally better organised. They really look after you.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

The internet is good for self-promotion and getting stuff out there, though getting people to actually click and listen is still difficult. It would be interesting to know how many of the people that read this interview will then go on to actually check our stuff out. Again, it is a good thing if you have the money behind you to pay professionals to handle the social media side for you, but that goes against what it is meant to be in the first place.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Just thanks for taking the time to read this and we hope that you do check us out on Facebook and all the other sites. You never know, we could be your next favourite band.

Check The Lunar Effect out further @ https://www.facebook.com/TheLunarEffect/  and https://thelunareffect.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 06/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

SixTwoSeven – Some Other’s Day EP

You cannot just make up real rock ‘n’ roll; it is in the heart as evidenced by Seattle alternative rock outfit SixTwoSeven. You just know it is an instinct in the quartet as their debut EP, Some Other’s Day rumbles through ears to arouse the spirit across four riotous tracks.

Formed in 2016, SixTwoSeven consists of vocalist/lead guitarist Greg “illfunk” Bilderback, his brothers in drummer Matt aka “the Machine” and guitarist Jason aka “J Danger”, and longtime friend Mike “MK Ultra” Knapp. This line-up was actually completed during the recording of Some Other’s Day with producer Jack Endino (Nirvana, Mudhoney, Soundgarden) at Soundhouse Studios, Matt coming in for backing vocals and leaving as a fully-fledged member of SixTwoSeven.

The EP itself opens up with One Single Night, instantly luring ears with a dirty riff soon joined by Greg’s grumbling tones. Bass and drums quickly add their moody touches as infectiousness infests all aspects of the emerging track. The song’s swagger is right there grabbing body and spirit, the creative flames of guitar luring the imagination deeper into its own increasingly magnetic prowess. Altogether it is a masterful persuasion and quickly matched by successor Wreckless Soul. It too has a certain confidence in its gait and swing, vocals a lighter invitation in the grungier nature of the song but loaded with the same catchiness as the hooks and riffs flirting boldly alongside.

Joshua’s Song has a calmer personality which its melodic imagination exploits with emotion and invention. The harmonic blend across the band brings extra light to the song and the SixTwoSeven sound, the band showing the variety in their creativity. Admittedly, the song did not quite light the excitement as its companions but it certainly left a strong air of satisfaction before the EP’s best track brings things to a mighty close.

An aggressive slice of punk fuelled rock ‘n’ roll, Top of the World is a virulently contagious incitement which has body and emotions bouncing in quick time. It snarls and entices, prowls and stomps with attitude and zeal ensuring listener involvement is hooked in no time. One of the reasons maybe that the band has been compared to the Weezer and Foo Fighters, the track alone makes SixTwoSeven a prospect to keep a close ear upon; a thought more than reinforced by Some Other’s Day as a whole.

Some Other’s Day is available now @ https://sixtwoseven.bandcamp.com/album/some-others-day

https://www.dubsevenrecords.com/    https://www.facebook.com/SixTwoSeven627

Pete RingMaster 17/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Andreas S Jensen – Disturbed

To this point in time, Danish born, London based Andreas S Jensen has made a notable name for himself for being a guitarist in Dub Pistols, as a writer/producer whose co-writes with the likes of Kevin Lyttle, Armand Van Helden, and Nate James have sold close to a million copies, and in collaborations as remixer, producer, session player, and engineer with artists such as Dido, Rizzle Kicks, Vybz Kartel, Sam And The Womp, Beenie Man, Nerina Pallot and more. This month though sees the singer songwriter/musician make his own individual impact, expectantly what will be his biggest one yet, with the release of a debut solo album. Disturbed is an ear pleasing, imagination stroking collection of songs combining lyrical intimacy with an alluringly broad brushstroke of sound. It is a release which makes the most seductive company note to ear and then haunts the memory once departed; that in anyone’s book the sign of something special.

Jensen has already enticed praise carrying attention with his first EP Disconnected which was released at the beginning of 2014. Embracing inspirations ranging from David Bowie, Tom Petty, and Elliot Smith to Soundgarden and The Zombies, the encounter was the first step towards the lofty heights now awaiting the senses within Disturbed. For the album Jensen drew on the talent of a group of London session players he has met through his producer and session work including drummer Adam Falkner (Babyshambles/Dido), guitarist Garo Nahoulakian (Nadine Shah), cellist Ben Trigg (Arctic Monkeys, Unkle, Jamie Collum), and Antonia Pagulatos (Gorillaz, Blur) on violin and viola as well as Jesper Lind (Jack Savoretti), Nikolai Bjerre (Lamb), Jack Cowens (Dub Pistols/Bondax) and many others. The result of this union of craft and invention is a record as rampantly catchy as it is emotionally open; each song like a big brother knowingly understanding those moments in life, love, and longing we have all hugged or endured.

Disturbed opens with its new single released a week before the album and fair to say Only Die Once instantly has attention gripped. Jensen’s voice is the first enticement, his warm slightly sandy tones soon joined by a theatre of rhythms and keys as a guitar weaves its own suggestive bait. There is drama in piano and bass too whilst instinctive infectiousness fuels vocals and the melodic coaxing hooking the senses whether in a controlled smoulder or a fiery blaze. As a sign of things to come across the album, the track simply blossoms and grows with every passing second; a crowd of instruments and sounds uniting in a fanfare of imagination and enterprise.

The outstanding start is matched by next up Trust Is My Anchor, a single released earlier this year which had us on board with real anticipation right then for what Disturbed would subsequently bring. Like the first, the song makes a gentle start, acoustic guitar aligning with Jensen’s ever appealing voice and like its predecessor a proposal which just opens up its sound and invention with every breath. Soon it roars with a robust rock pop temptation which sublimely ebbs and flows in intensity whilst increasing its hold on ears and appetite second by second. There is something of Billy Momo to the subdued moments of the track and a hint of R.E.M. in its bolder expulsions; both deliveries as compelling as the other as another pinnacle within the album is exposed.

Take My Heart and Go needs barely a breath to seize ears as a glorious gnarly tendril of sound winds around the senses, a flirtatious bassline and the caress of acoustic magnetism swiftly stepping up alongside. Mixing country flavoured rock and eagerly strolling indie pop, the track has the body bouncing and hips swaying in no time with the imagination employed by word and another rich tapestry of textures and invention. For personal tastes it is probably fair to say that the track just misses the heights of the pair before it but the pleasure loaded grin our faces during its presence each and every time reveals all and alone why with every listen Disturbed  becomes more essential.

Through the electric shimmer of Another Way Of Leaving, a proposition merging sixties psych and eighties pop in its tantalising soulful croon, and the Baroque kissed Unchanged captivation is intense and greedy. The second of the two especially bewitches with its shadowy reflection and perpetually rising crescendo of sound and endeavour, the strings which magnetically colour most tracks voraciously manipulative and rousing before And She’s There calms things a touch with its vibrant canter. It too is a tenaciously catchy enticement all the same though which imagining The Everlys and Walker Brothers born as one and breaking out today gives a sense of this superb slice of contagious pop.

Thought gets the focus over body with the balladry of next up Looking Back For Something New, though it is hard not to sway to its melancholy lined tone and melodically intimate presence, while Run with at first a similar gait brews a contagion which has body and spirit rocking as again eighties funk/pop collude with electronic and creative drama. Both of the songs have a firm hand on ears and lustful attention though each is eclipsed by the bold exploits of Dangerzone, a theatre of rock pop which surely has to be the next single. Some tracks make you greedy for more, this is one for Jensen though one among quite a few to be honest but the show stealer of Disturbed for these ears.

The album concludes with I Carry My Cross, a beguiling dark folk/ country spectacle weaving in strands of gypsy, carnival and Latin rock which with its hypnotic funereal march is reason alone to take a chance on exploring one rousing release.

To be honest as much as we loved the single Trust Is My Anchor a few months back we were maybe expecting Disturbed to just back up its striking presence rather than take things to a whole new level. Boy, were we off the mark, the album a BIG must for all rock, pop, indie fans well everyone who loves boisterously catchy and emotionally honest music.

Disturbed is released September 15th with the single Only Die Once out September 8th.

http://www.andreassjensen.com/    https://www.facebook.com/AndreasJensenMusic    https://twitter.com/andreassjensen

Pete RingMaster 04/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Antigone Project – Stellar Machine

Last year French outfit Antigone Project not only took their sound to a more accomplished plateau with the From Its Room EP but hinted it was just the beginning of a whole new soundscape to their already easily engaging sound. It was a clue now realised by the band’s debut album, Stellar Machine a journey through spatial clouds of invention and diversity but as universes lead into new universes, equally feels like an adventure leading to many more bold journeys.

The creation of Frédéric Benmussa, a multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, producer and no doubt much more, Antigone Project has grown from a solo project in 2002 to be one of France’s most engaging electronic rock/metal proposals. With the talented prowess of bassist Manu Ventre and drummer Fred Monaco alongside Benmussa, the band had its hands on attention with the release of a self-titled first EP in 2015. It was the debut clue to the expansive and expanding sound growing within the outfit, a suggestion taken further by From Its Room a year later and now truly unfurled within Stellar Machine.

Inspirations to the band’s sound and certainly new album range from Soundgarden to Deftones and Nine Inch Nails on to the likes of Depeche Mode, Jean Michelle Jarre, and Devin Townsend. That is enough to suggest the kaleidoscope of flavours making up the band’s album; they all involved with an even richer vein of Muse meets Radiohead like drama. Do not think you have a handle on Stellar Machine just yet though as ears will soon find a far thicker and greater carousel of the band’s own individual invention across its unpredictable body, one placing the listener into “the skin and shoes of a futuristic cosmonaut following the adventures of outer space travellers on a “stellar machine”.”

Climbing on board, ears are fastened into their seats by the powerful creative straps of opener Poison, its electronic/industrial lift off instantly swarming around the imagination. In turn, it leads to the virulent rock ‘n’ roll heart of the starter where riffs and rhythms are swiftly harrying and enslaving body and instincts, the calmer almost floating tones of Benmussa glazing the infectious exploits with a plaintive Matt Bellamy scented delivery. A compelling groove reinforces the song’s hold, the lively beats of Monaco dancing tenacious across the senses as keys bring cosmic scenery to bear on the imagination. Even in its calmer drifts, the song is forcibly infectious, the trio painting their creative canvas with an array of textures within skilfully woven enterprise.

The following Schizopolis needs mere seconds to have the body moving with its heated funk lures and enveloping synth pop enticement. A few seconds more brings a steelier tone and intensive edge to things, Ventre’s bass a darker brooding incitement which continues to lure and court the twisting infectious exploits of the song. Imagine The The meets Nine Inch Nails and the second track feeds expectations before taking them into deeper richer realms, leaving ears and appetite on a high ready for the moodier, crepuscular skies of III. The song’s air is as enticing as its predecessors, but within its emotional and atmospheric twilight a smouldering seduction matched in energy by the similarly calm vocals and keys.

Another fresh climate is brought by Mantra Nebulae, a dirtier rugged rock/metal contemplation over which vocals and melodies glide while Raphe Nuclei surrounds ears with an almost glacially reflective electronic embrace. Neither track quite lit up ears here as those before them but with the snarling dexterity of the first and the emotionally intensive vocals of Benmussa crawling the second, both tracks enthral and increasingly ignite the imagination over time.

In contrast The Black Widow instantly ensnared instincts and the passions, its intrigue ridden, noir coated web of dramatic coaxing as threatening as alluring. Hooks and grooves collude in seduction, vocals prowling with infectious devilry as bass and beats just flirt; a mix addiction was intended for. There is a touch of Fad Gadget to the song, eighties electronic/new wave essences as readily embraced as other more rapacious textures by the band and the increasingly volatile moments of the outstanding proposition.  The song is superb, a major highlight of Stellar Machine which Pretty Pain straight after easily backs up with its Mike Oldfield/ Devin Townsend nurtured symphony. As all tracks, every passing minute is unique to the last yet a continuation of their revealing cosmic travelogue and emotional revelation.

Cardio Machine is simply raw temptation, a fusion of predatory rock ‘n’ roll and synth pop virulence which has a firm restraint on both yet employs their attributes along another highly addictive body of enterprise. There is something enjoyably familiar about the song but nothing which can be pinned down, just simply and greedily enjoyed with every listen.

The album’s title track is eleven minutes of sample built introduction within senses stroking atmospherics, moving into electronic painting and progressive weaving where every minute adds to a flight feeling far shorter than its actual length such the beauty and captivation on offer. The song alone captures the mood and adventure of the theme; playing like a recap but of another past or future heroic planetary flight.

The album concludes with the atmospheric grace and beauty of Sun’n’rain; a rhythmically bold, melodically heated serenade beneath earthly pleasures. Drawing on the strongest Muse like flavours yet, the track with its almost Bond like theatrical lining brings the album to a powerful and more importantly thrilling close.

Stellar Machine confirms that Antigone Project just go from strength to strength, from bolder adventure to adventure yet still you get the feeling we have not come close to their most monumental exploit yet. Another must investigation for you all.

 Stellar Machine is out now through Lazy Freddy Records via most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/antigoneproject    https://twitter.com/projectantigone

Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright