Hellbound Hearts – The Proximity Effect

10731157_950532188321485_3327537509841984592_n

It was 2013 when UK rockers Hellbound Hearts caught our ears and imagination with their potential ridden and thoroughly thrilling Outside EP. It was one of those encounters which simply brought energetic and eager life to feet and emotions whilst impressively building on their already well-received self-titled EP of 2011, the year the band emerged. Now they have returned with their thumping new persuasion, The Proximity Effect, an EP which not only realises much of the promise of its predecessors but sets out a new recipe of inspiring adventure to be explored ahead.

The time between the last and new EP seems to have been a testing time for the York band; personnel changes, health issues, and recording issues thorns in building on their already potent presence and reputation. Now the trio of vocalist/guitarist Danny Lambert (ex-Terrorvision), bassist Craig McLaren, and drummer Billy James Mitchell (ex-Glitterati) have overcome all obstacles and unleashed their finest irresistible slab of rock ‘n’ roll yet. Already the band has unleashed their renowned live performances on the year, sure to continue in the vein which earned them success and high praise through performances with the likes of Black Spiders, JettBlack, The Treatment, Terrorvision, Sons of Icarus and Warrior Soul in the past. It is The Proximity Effect which will be the prime weapon in whipping up the broadest national attention though, something it has already begun sparking since its release.

Posters In The Sun descends on ears first, opening with a caress of raw but inviting guitar accompanied by a just as dirty riff, and soon finding heavy beats adding to the tempting. Once the dark tones of McLaren’s bass infuse their increasingly alluring enterprise, the track is stomping with punk attitude and rock ‘n’ roll voracity. Vocals bring their melodic roar to the web of hooks and captivating riffs soon after whilst Mitchell’s swinging sticks just seem to get more compelling and tenacious, much as the song. It is all coloured by a rock pop infectiousness which early on begins to blossom inside the encounter and ripen especially in its chorus. The song is the spice of addiction and makes one highly enjoyable and gripping start to the EP.

The following Ones And Zeros makes a just as imaginative entrance, a weave of melodic chords being accosted and complimented by a great resonance of throaty bass. Swiftly more aggressive than its predecessor but no less virulent, the song prowls and strolls across verse and chorus as a torrent of addictive hooks, musically and vocally, colour the first stage and a mellower catchiness lighting up the latter. Again there is a punk tenacity to the mix of metal and hard rock, resulting in a gripping blaze of sound around a host of creative and vocal temptations.

There is a grungier air to Bones next, a mellower essence which wraps around the alternative metal canvas. Equally though there is a raw aggressive edge to it all which lines the more voracious passages of the song. Riffs and hooks especially ignite thoughts and appetite whilst the punchy beats just keep it all caged in a slightly intimidating frame. Not as immediately infectious as the first two, the track is a growing and mighty persuasion revealing another new twist and flavouring to the band’s songwriting and sound.

Overall there feels a harsher nature, more volatile character to the EP than its predecessor. It never actually erupts in hostility but the danger is there and the songs all benefit from it, as shown by the closing Silence Falls. The last track has an open familiarity to it, bred from its pop punk and alternative rock collusion as much as anything, and is soon seducing with thick melodies and bracing riffs matched by addiction forging rhythms. Stirring up imagination and the pleasures alike with potent and magnetic enterprise, the song is a formidable and mouth-watering end to a similarly impacting release.

It may have been a turbulent 2014 for Hellbound Hearts but they are back, and on even more impressive form with a sound and creative adventure to match. If you are looking for feisty rock ‘n’ roll to invigorate your daily soundtrack then The Proximity Effect is a wise and thrilling choice.

The Proximity Effect EP is available now @ http://hellboundhearts.bandcamp.com/album/the-proximity-effect

http://www.hellboundhearts.com/   https://www.facebook.com/wearehellboundhearts

RingMaster 19/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

White Pigeon: Property Of White Pigeon

White Pigeon

    Take the classic metal essences of Whitesnake and Iron Maiden, infuse it into the melodic prowess of Europe, and then wrap it in the mischief of Tenacious D. as well as the glam rascality of Steel Panther and The Darkness…the result White Pigeon, a band who take all of the above as influences and create their own form of accomplished rioting. The UK band is just about to release their debut album, a record which hits the ear with relish to cause devilment whilst treating it to tightly crafted inventive sounds.

Hailing from Guildford, White Pigeon was formed in 2009 by Chris Nugent a drummer who in his own words said he spent his earlier musical exploits “trying to be uber cool for many years and playing music that was ‘fashionable’.” After ten years of this he decided to start his own project, moving forward to take on the role of vocalist and guitarist with the intent to play music which lit his own personal fires. Finding the best musicians his hometown had to offer Nugent recruited guitarist Jon Antony and drummer Joe Yoshida plus the twin melodic charms of Nathalia and Natascah Sohl. Soon completed by bassist Eoghan Logue, the band released their debut EP to strong responses as well as earning a great reputation for their insatiably energetic live shows locally and in notable London venues which included the sharing of stages with the likes of New Device, Sons of Icarus and The Treatment. The band also received acclaim for their festival performances at Weyfest and Guilfest where they shared a stage with 10cc and Mungo Jerry and have been by squash fans for song Don’t Get Too Close (Squash Song) which has led the band to being invited to and performing at the Squash Championships in Manchester earlier this year.

First album Property Of White Pigeon is the next step on the way to igniting national recognition for White Pigeon and a 300formidable persuasion it is.  Featuring revisited, re-mixed, and re-mastered tracks of their now rare first EP as well as five brand new tracks, the release seizes the ear from first note to last to provide an energetic brawl of fun and music, its first track Party the perfect title for the feisty and enjoyable encounter. The opener takes no time in feeding the ear hot guitar melodies and primes riffs driven by infectious vocals and warm inviting keys. The vocals from Nugent and the twins ignites hunger to join the revelry whilst the sounds control the feet and directs their responses to the anthemic lures eagerly at play with masterful efficiency. As the album, the song is a keen and rebellious slice of rock n roll with an honesty of trying not to be anything more than what it is, energetic and cheekily voracious.

The following Sea Devil is a stomp of fiery riffs and firm tidy rhythms which like its predecessor has a magnetic hold on the senses within the first pleasing moments of its stroll. The vocals again send harmonic flames through the track whilst the guitar solo and enterprise is burningly glorious and uncompromisingly mesmeric. Though a rock track, there is a rock pop breath to the song which makes its contagious and easy to climb on board its cruise of sea borne wantonness.

The likes of The Hunt which is more of the same as the first encounters and the following Southern rock seduction Kentucky Pie continue the strong allure of the album whilst Rock Me explores its intense sinews to bring a heavier and rampant taunt upon the passions. One of the biggest highlights of the album it again offers nothing new but has a freshness and persuasion which any refusal to join its thumping cause would be rude let alone impossible.

Occasionally the album slips below its already high levels though it is more personal taste not finding the connection than a problem with the album, but both Ladies and Get Me Outta Here are pale engagements against the richer and ebullient tracks elsewhere, the songs struggling to emerge from too recognisable and impotent ideas. It is just rare moments though as further tracks like the compelling Don’t Get Too Close (Squash Song) and the intoxicating Gladiator, its metallic muscular stance and varied gait inventive and exhilarating to earn strongest track on the release status, leave greater rewards and satisfaction.

The songs on Property of White Pigeon are all delivered with a tongue entrenched in cheeks which reminds often of US band The Tubes, but there is also no denying the quality of the musicianship with the guitars sculpting terrific fires and the bass prowling with hunger and resourcefulness, whilst the drums frame it all with skill and clear determination. Also featuring guest appearances from Markus Flaherty (Without Grace, Spotlight Cannibal), Erika Richardson (iMMa, Mika), Ed Forbes (Black Iris) and Ben Travers (Gypsy Fire), the album is a richly satisfying heavy metal binge from a band with a promise to head up British glam/metal in the future.

http://whitepigeonrocks.com/

8/10

RingMaster 13/03/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

www.audioburger.com